printable banner

U.S. Department of State - Great Seal

U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

U.S. Government Assistance


Share

USG ASSISTANCE DoS (INL) Budget by Region
FY 1999 - FY 2001
($000)

 

FY 1999 Actual

FY 1999 Em. Supp.1

FY 2000 Estimate

FY 2001 Request

Narcotics Programs

       

Country Programs

 

 

 

 

Latin America

 

 

 

 

Bahamas

1,000

 

1,000

1,200

Bolivia

40,000

14,000

48,000

52,000

Brazil

1,200

 

1,500

2,000

Colombia

32,700

173,160

50,000

35,000

Ecuador

1,200

 

1,200

2,200

Guatemala

3,000

 

3,000

3,000

Jamaica

800

 

800

1,200

Mexico

8,000

 

10,000

10,000

Peru

42,600

31,940

48,000

48,000

Venezuela

700

 

700

1,200

Latin America Regional

11,000

13,500

9,000

9,500

Subtotal for Latin America

142,200

232,600

173,200

165,300

Asia/Africa/Middle East

 

 

 

 

Laos

3,700

 

4,000

4,200

Pakistan

2,200

 

2,500

3,500

Thailand

2,700

 

3,000

3,000

Turkey

500

 

500

500

Asia/Africa/ME Regional

2,800

 

5,341

3,000

Subtotal for Asia/Africa/ME

11,900

 

15,341

14,200

Interregional Aviation Support

51,000

 

50,000

50,000

Total Country Programs

205,100

232,600

238,541

229,500

Herbicide Research

-

23,000

-

-

International Organizations

9,200

 

12,000

12,000

Law Enforcement Training and Demand Reduction

8,000

 

9,000

10,000

Systems Support/Upgrades

2,500

 

5,000

4,000

PD&S

8,800

 

9,300

11,500

Total Narcotics Programs

233,600

255,600

273,841

267,000

1 The Congress provided $255.6 million in Emergency Supplemental funding in FY 1999.

DoS (INL) Budget by Function
FY 1999 - FY 2001
($000)

 

FY 1999 Actual

% of Total

FY 2000 Estimate

% of Total

FY 2001 Request

% of Total

Narcotics Programs

           

Law Enforcement Assistance and Institution Development

297,036

60.7

96,031

35.1

93,215

34.9

Alternative Develop/ Eradication

149,815

30.6

126,535

46.2

118,280

44.3

International Organizations

9,200

1.9

12,000

4.4

12,000

4.5

Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction

6,075

1.2

10,105

3.7

9,605

3.6

Law Enforcement Training

6,200

1.3

6,500

2.4

7,850

2.9

Program Development and Support

20,874

4.3

22,670

8.3

26,050

9.8

Total Narcotics Programs1

489,200

 

273,841

 

267,000

 

1 FY 1999 regular INC appropriation was $233.6 million. Congress added an Emergency Supplemental amount of $255.6 to make a total of $489.2.

International Training

International counternarcotics training is managed/funded by INL and carried out by the DEA, U.S. Customs Service, and U.S. Coast Guard. Major objectives are:

  • Contributing to the basic infrastructure for carrying out counternarcotics law enforcement activities in countries which cooperate with and are considered significant to U.S. narcotics control efforts;
  • Improving technical skills of drug law enforcement personnel in these countries; and
  • Increasing cooperation between U.S. and foreign law enforcement officials.
Over 4,341 persons participated in the United States Government's international narcotics control training program in FY 1999.

INL training continues to focus on encouraging foreign law enforcement agency self-sufficiency through infrastructure development. The effectiveness of our counternarcotics efforts overseas should be viewed in terms of what has been done to bring about the establishment of effective host country enforcement institutions, thereby taking drugs out of circulation before they begin their journey toward the United States. U.S. law enforcement personnel stationed overseas are increasingly coming to see their prime responsibility as promoting the creation of host government systems that are compatible with and serve the same broad goals as ours.

During FY 1999, law enforcement training continued to devote increased attention to the development and support of infrastructure building in those countries which posed the greatest threat to the U.S. as a result of their role as source or transit countries for narcotics destined for the United States. INL received positive feedback both from U.S. Embassies and foreign governments on the direct benefits gained from this training, including the discovery of illegal narcotics as a result of techniques learned during a program.

INL funding has also been provided for the establishment and operation of International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEA's) in Budapest and Bangkok. The regional training provided at the ILEA's consists of both general law enforcement training as well as specialized training for mid-level managers in police and other law enforcement agencies. Over 2500 officials from 25 countries have received training in Budapest and over 600 officials from 10 countries have received training in Bangkok. It is anticipated that additional ILEA's will be established in the Western Hemisphere and Africa.

INL-funded training will continue to support the major U.S. and international strategies for combating narcotics trafficking worldwide. Emphasis will be placed on contributing to the activities of international organizations, such as the UNDCP and the OAS. Through the meetings of major donors, the Dublin Group, UNDCP and other international fora, we will coordinate with other providers of training, and urge them to shoulder greater responsibility in providing training, which serves their particular strategic interests.

INL will maintain its role of coordinating the activities of U.S. law enforcement agencies in response to requests for assistance from U.S. Embassies. This will avoid duplication of effort and ensure that presentations represent the full range of USG policies and procedures.

Training Statistics

 

Number of Participants

Number of Programs

Drug Enforcement Administration

   

Training in U.S.

 

 

"Vetted" Training

157

5

Training in Host Countries

 

 

In-Country Drug Enforcement Seminar

204

5

Advanced Drug Enforcement Seminar

74

2

Int'l Asset Forfeiture Seminar

126

4

Airport Operations

35

1

Specialized

185

6

Joint Secret Service

72

1

ILEA

365

8

Financial

80

2

Subtotal

1,298

34

U.S. Customs Service

   

Training in U.S.

 

 

International Visitors Program

368

101

Training in Host Countries

 

 

Carrier Initiative Program/Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition

630

10

Overseas Enforcement Training

168

6

Train-the-Trainer Workshop

29

2

Regional Overseas Enforcement Training

96

3

Regional Train-the-Trainer

12

1

Short Term Advisories

110

11

Contraband Enforcement Team

78

3

Integrity/Anti-corruption

83

3

Intelligence Training

70

2

Seized Property Handling

24

1

Subtotal

1668

143

U.S. Coast Guard

   

Training in Host Countries

 

 

Maritime Law Enforcement

772

45

Port Security and Safety Course

168

12

Search and Rescue

35

2

Long Term Training

400

20

Subtotal

1,375

79

Total INL-Funded Training FY 1999

4,341

256

Drug Enforcement Administration

The preeminent responsibility of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is to reduce and ultimately minimize the impact posed to our nation by illicit drugs. All cocaine and heroin, as well as some marijuana and other dangerous drugs, are produced outside the U.S. These illicit drugs are smuggled from countries of their source, usually through other countries, into the U.S. Therefore, the reduction of illicit drug availability in the U.S. requires a strong international counternarcotics strategy. In cooperation and coordination with other nations, as well as with other U.S. agencies, DEA strives to concurrently suppress illicit drug production; disrupt the availability of these drugs in the distribution chain; arrest and prosecute those involved in any aspect of illegal drug trafficking; and seize their profits and assets. The primary contribution of DEA in implementing our international counter narcotics strategy is accomplished through the 77 offices that DEA maintains in 56 countries worldwide. The DEA overseas mission is fivefold:

(1) Conduct bilateral investigative activities,
(2) Coordinate intelligence gathering,
(3) Engage in foreign liaison,
(4) Coordinate training programs for host country police agencies, and
(5) Assist in the development of host country counternarcotics law enforcement institutions.

In most countries where DEA maintains offices, DEA carries out all of the above functions. The emphasis on each function is determined by the conditions existing in the host nation. For example, in some countries where the drug enforcement system is advanced, a DEA Country Office may limit its role to selected activities instead of the full range of programs. The following sections provide a few examples of the assistance DEA provided during 1999 to host nation counterparts in support of the five function areas.

(1) Bilateral Investigations

DEA Country Offices work with elements of the host nation law enforcement agencies to investigate activities of drug traffickers that lead to indictments and prosecutions in either the host country, the U.S., or a third country. Whenever appropriate and feasible, DEA shares intelligence information on major traffickers operating in host countries with foreign counterparts to enhance their investigative knowledge. The examples that follow illustrate DEA's?role in bilateral investigations.

The Bogota, Colombia Country Office, in conjunction with the Colombian National Police (CNP) and the Colombian Office of the Prosecutor General (Fiscalia) cooperated in Operation Millennium, a long term, complex investigation targeting the inner workings of a consortium of several of the largest drug trafficking organizations operating in Colombia today. The combined effort focused on the drug trafficking activities of major Linear Approach target Alejandro Bernal-Madrigal and his closest associates, including such notable traffickers as Fabio Ocho-Vasquez, Diego Montoya-Sanchez (Linear Approach Target), Alfredo Tascon, Bernardo Sanchez, and Orlando Sanchez-Cristancho. Bernal-Madrigal and his drug trafficking associates were identified in the course of this investigation as being responsible for coordinating and transporting between 20 and 30 metric tons of cocaine per month from Colombia to the U.S. via Mexico, primarily in maritime containerized cargo. In exchange, this criminal association generated upwards of $60-$100 million dollars in illicit proceeds, frequently bulk shipped via Mexico back to Colombia. This investigation has already resulted in the arrest of 47 suspects, the seizure of 13.7 metric tons of cocaine, over $500,000 in U.S. currency, and the identification of an additional 40 to 50 suspects operating in Colombia and elsewhere.

In September 1999, the DEA announced the conclusion of "Operation Impunity," which targeted a large scale Reynosa, Mexico, based polydrug trafficking/smuggling group with numerous cells throughout the U.S. and associates linked to the Carrillo-Fuentes Organization. This operation resulted in the arrest of Gilberto Salinas-Doria, one of the principal Mexico-based importation command and control targets of this organization. Also arrested was Jaime Aguilar-Gastellum, a principal supervisory member of this organization and a known coordinator of drug shipments for both the Juarez Cartel and the Jorge Caro-Quintero Organization. Both Salinas-Doria and Agular-Gastellum remain in the custody of the Government of Mexico, and U.S. officials are awaiting their formal extradition from Mexico.

The Hague, Netherlands Country Office, in conjunction with the New York Field Division, assisted Dutch and Israeli authorities in dismantling a major international MDMA trafficking organization with direct links to the U.S. This two-year, worldwide investigation culminated in the arrest of forty-nine individuals in the Netherlands, Israel, and other countries, and the seizure of approximately one million MDMA tablets. An estimated one million dollars in various foreign currencies and approximately five kilograms of semtex (a powerful explosive) were seized, and a clandestine laboratory utilized by this organization was dismantled. Intelligence information indicates that this laboratory, run by Dutch nationals, produced over 5,000,000 tablets of MDMA distributed in Europe and the U.S. This investigation included close coordination of information between DEA foreign and domestic offices and foreign law enforcement agencies in Belgium, Germany, France, Canada, and Australia.

DEA offices in Thailand worked closely with the Royal Thai Police, Narcotics Suppression Bureau, and members of Thailand's Sensitive Investigative Units to disrupt and dismantle heroin and methamphetamine trafficking activities orchestrated by a well documented heroin trafficker. The primary source of supply for this organization is the United Wa State Army (UWSA) in Burma. This organization smuggles narcotics shipments from Burma into Thailand, after which they are transported to distributors in Canada and the U.S. Noteworthy investigations mounted by Thai authorities and DEA-trained Sensitive Investigative Units in northern Thailand included seizures of millions of methamphetamine tablets, hundreds of kilograms of heroin and precursor chemicals, various amounts and types of assets, and two surface-to-air missiles.

DEA in Ottawa, Canada worked with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in Vancouver on a joint investigation that involved an organization responsible for the transportation of multi-hundred kilogram units of South East Asian heroin into Canada and, ultimately, into the U.S. Seizures from the investigation included three units of heroin captured on an ocean-going vessel off the coast of Puerto Rico, seven units seized at Toronto Pearson International Airport, 61 units in Vancouver, and five units in New York. The 76 units convert to 53.2 kilograms of heroin.

The Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic Country Office assisted host country counterparts in the investigation of Jesus Pascual Cabrera-Ruiz, the head of a Dominican organization responsible for transporting multi-ton quantities of cocaine to Puerto Rico and New York. As a result of this investigation, Cabrera-Ruiz was arrested and approximately 1,000 kilograms of cocaine and 1.4 million dollars were seized.

In March 1999, the Vientiane, Laos Country Office shared information with their counterparts about a major increase in the amount of opium being seized in the U.S. from mail parcels originating from Laos. Upon determining the internal procedures used by Lao postal authorities for mailing international parcels, a mail interdiction program was subsequently developed. This is the first active bilateral investigation conducted by the Vientiane Country Office since opening in August 1998.

During 1999, the Panama Country Office (PCO) worked closely with the Policia Tecnica (PTJ), leading to seizures of 385 kilograms of cocaine, 600 liters of Acetic Anhydride, and a number of heroin seizures. PCO personnel assigned to the Tocumen Airport successfully seized in excess of 2 million dollars in U.S. currency concealed within airfreight arriving from Mexico and other countries.

Based on information provided by the Madrid, Spain Country Office and the Long Island Field Division, the Spanish National Police (SNP) arrested four Peruvian citizens who were part of a drug trafficking organization based in Peru. The four defendants were involved in the delivery of approximately 60 kilograms of cocaine to a SNP undercover agent. This was Spain's first legally authorized undercover investigation. As a result of the investigation, two individuals were also arrested in Long Island.

The Caracas, Venezuela Country Office and Venezuelan law enforcement authorities initiated an aggressive program to address the increasing diversion of essential and precursor chemicals transiting Venezuela en-route to cocaine processing laboratories in Colombia. This investigation led to the seizure of over 112 metric tons of Potassium Permanganate and the arrest of four active police/military officials who previously had regulatory and/or enforcement authority of chemicals.

The Istanbul, Turkey Resident Office, in coordination with local authorities, ascertained that 1,500 grams of heroin seized in Turkmenistan was destined for Dallas, Texas. A controlled delivery to Dallas was arranged and the subject was arrested and detained without bond in Texas. Although the amount of narcotics seized was not particularly large, this case illustrates the growing role that the Newly Independent States (NIS) play in the global trafficking of drugs and also the cooperation of NIS law enforcement authorities with DEA.

The Curacao, Netherlands Antilles Country Office assisted counterparts in Suriname in an investigation that involved the exchange of weapons for drugs between Colombia and Suriname drug traffickers. The investigation resulted in the seizure of 67 kilograms of cocaine and the arrests of two Colombians and three Surinamese.

The Port-Au-Prince, Haiti Country Office and the Haitian National Police's Special Narcotics Unit participated in a regional counter drug operation that resulted in the seizure of 275 kilograms of cocaine, a two million dollar house, and $41,910 in U.S. currency.

DEA in Santiago, Chile, in cooperation with Chilean police officials, dismantled a Nigerian trafficking organization operating from a recently established base of operations in Chile. The organization was known to ship cocaine impregnated within clothing through the use of express postal services and maritime shipping containers. Two Nigerian nationals, principal members of the organization, were arrested, and 10 kilograms of cocaine were seized.

A coordinated effort between DEA in Honduras and Nicaragua and host country counterparts resulted in the arrest of Honduran Army Lieutenant Colonel Wilfredo Leyva-Cabrera and four others, as Leyva-Cabrera crossed into Nicaragua from El Salvador. Leyba-Cabrera and the other Honduran defendants were deported to Honduras, where they remain in custody. Leyva-Cabrera had been charged with complicity in kidnapping and murder to retrieve $240,000 (U.S. currency) in drug proceeds

(2) Coordinate Intelligence Gathering

DEA coordinates intelligence worldwide on the cultivation and manufacture of illicit substances, the sale of precursor chemicals for making illicit drugs, and the transportation routes of these drugs into the U.S. The following activities demonstrate the breadth of DEA involvement worldwide.

The Athens, Greece Country Office spearheaded a multi-agency, multi-national investigation of a cocaine transportation organization operating worldwide. Intelligence gathering led to the seizure of approximately 14.2 million dollars, the largest amount of drug money Greek authorities have ever confiscated. It is estimated that this organization delivered at least 50 metric tons of cocaine to ports along the Southern United States, Portugal, Spain, Greece, and Italy. To date there have been five Colombians arrested, with extradition to the U.S. requested. There have also been 36 defendants in Greece, Colombia, Miami, and Galveston arrested. Moreover, in excess of 5.6 million dollars in cash, 13 tons of cocaine, and three cargo vessels have been seized. This was Greek law enforcement's first major asset seizure utilizing their new money laundering statute and was also the first time that Greek authorities were able to obtain a legal Title III intercept. DEA and the Greek police were assisted by numerous U.S. and foreign law enforcement agencies in this investigation, known as Operation Atlantico.

During 1999, the Guatemala City Country Office (GCCO) received intelligence that led to a 1,225-kilogram cocaine seizure from a boat on the western Guatemalan coast. In addition, the GCCO received intelligence that three tractor-trailers had recently departed Guatemala for Nicaragua, where they would be loaded with a significant amount of cocaine before returning to Guatemala. Extensive vehicle searches and subsequent surveillance and arrests resulted in a total seizure of 2,556 kilograms of cocaine-the largest cocaine seizure in Guatemalan law enforcement history.

The San Jose, Costa Rica Country Office and host country counterparts conducted a joint wiretap investigation targeting Cuban-American cocaine traffickers and money launderers operating in Costa Rica. The intelligence gathering led to the arrest of seven suspects and a Costa Rican seizure of $1.5 million in U.S. currency and $1.8 million in assets, as well as a U.S. seizure of $150,000 in assets. Additionally, the wiretap revealed that the organization had recently sent a cargo container from Costa Rica, to Gulfport, Mississippi. A search of this container in Gulfport resulted in the seizure of 79 kilograms of cocaine.

A joint wire/cellular intercept investigation by DEA Brazil and the Brazilian Federal Police (DPF) resulted in the arrest of Leonardo Mendonca, one of Brazil's major narcotics violators, and six of his associates. Intelligence gathered indicated that the organization was responsible for smuggling multi-kilogram quantities of cocaine through Brazil and Suriname to the Continental U.S. and Europe. DEA also provided intelligence to the DPF that led to the seizure of cocaine conversion laboratories, one of which had a production capacity of 15 tons of cocaine per month.

Intelligence information provided to Croatian law enforcement personnel by the DEA Guayaquil Resident Office and the Vienna, Austria Country Office resulted in 625 kilograms of cocaine seized in Rijeka, Croatia. A container of supposed tuna was shipped from Guayaquil, then transferred to a different vessel and shipped to Belgium. The container was then loaded on a train destined for Rijeka, Croatia. Croatian police continued monitoring the container until the receiving shipping company received instructions to ship the container to Slovenia. The Croatian police then made a search of the container, discovering approximately 625 kilograms of cocaine.

Intelligence from the San Jose, Costa Rica Country Office about a vehicle transporting cocaine across the Costa Rican/ Nicaraguan border was passed to the Managua, Nicaragua Country Office, which in turn notified the Nicaraguan National Police. This intelligence led to the seizure of approximately 300 kilograms of cocaine and the arrest of the driver, a Costa Rican national.

As a result of information obtained by DEA in El Salvador and passed to the Anti-Narcotics Division (DAN), a Salvadoran cocaine distribution organization responsible for transporting multi-ton quantities of cocaine from Panama through Central America to the U.S. was disrupted. Several Salvadorans were arrested and 202 kilograms of cocaine were seized.

The Brasilia, Brazil Country Office spearheaded Operation Gaining Control, a chemical diversion project aimed at the control and documentation of fluvial traffic transiting the Amazon River destined to Colombia and Peru and the obstruction of entrance of precursor chemicals to those areas that produce cocaine HCL. The operational headquarters for Gaining Control is located in the port city of Manaus, State of Amazonas, and is maintained by a multi-nation task force comprised of law enforcement officials from Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Venezuela, Ecuador, and the DEA. All chemical intelligence collected in Operation Gaining Control is maintained in a database that is shared by all the country representatives participating in the project.

The Manila, Philippines Country Office (MCO) has been instrumental in enhancing the intelligence gathering capabilities of Philippine counterparts. To that end, the MCO has provided model legislation and expertise in the areas of technical collection and information management programs. Indicative of success, enhanced intelligence gathering and the exchange of information by DEA and Philippine counterparts resulted in the seizure of approximately 420 kilograms of crystal methamphetamine along the coast of Northern Luzon, Philippines, in November, 1999.

The Brussels, Belgium Country Office received information from a confidential source indicating that a DEA fugitive wanted in Philadelphia was in Quito, Ecuador. This information was passed on to the DEA Quito Country Office, which in turn informed the Ecuador National Police. An International Arrest Warrant Request was submitted to Interpol. The fugitive was arrested, and is awaiting extradition.

(3) Engage in Foreign Liaison

DEA Agents establish close relationships and networks with their counterparts that foster cooperation in international drug law enforcement. The following examples illustrate the impact of DEA's foreign liaison activities.

In April 1999, DEA sponsored the 17th annual International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC). At the conference, senior drug law enforcement officials from 29 member countries throughout the Western Hemisphere and observers from Europe, Asia, and Australia met to discuss and exchange insights on counter narcotics enforcement activities. Presenters described their counter narcotics law enforcement strategies and shared lessons learned from multilateral investigations and operations. Members adopted initiatives pertaining to the development of regional multinational enforcement investigations and operations targeting major drug traffickers in the hemisphere. The conference, hosted by the U.S., provided a forum for the delegates to exchange information and build personal relationships that are key to enhancing closer coordination among law enforcement agencies.

On October 18, 1999, Attorney General Janet Reno, on behalf of the DEA, signed a Memorandum of Cooperation between the DEA and the Federal Security Service of the Russia Federation to combat illegal activities in drug and psychotropic substances. The signing occurred at the American Ambassador's residence in conjunction with the Attorney General's visit to Moscow for the G-8 Ministerial Conference on Transnational Crime. The Moscow Country Office envisions enhanced cooperation between the two agencies as a result of this signing.

DEA Islamabad, Pakistan Country Office coordinated with host counterparts the arrest of seven U.S. fugitives; four have already been extradited to the U.S. This is a significant turnaround in the U.S.-Pakistani law enforcement relationship.

The DEA Bangkok, Thailand Country Attach� and the U.S. Ambassador to Cambodia met with the Cambodian Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister in Phnom Penh to discuss current and future cooperative counter narcotics efforts. Both the U.S. and Cambodian representatives expressed interest in the future establishment of a DEA office in Phnom Penh. A good example of the current relationship DEA enjoys with Cambodian counterparts is the unprecedented testimony of two Cambodian police officers in a U.S. Federal Court late in 1999.

DEA in Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras have coordinated the involvement of their host country counterparts in sharing tactical intelligence used in interception of drug loads and diversion of essential chemicals. Cross-border cooperation and a regional counter narcotics strategy were discussed at a meeting in Belize of IDEC Central America and Mexico Working Group members.

Annually, the South Korea Supreme Prosecutor's Office hosts the Anti-Drug Liaison Officials Meeting of International Cooperation (ADLOMICO) Conference. The 1999 ADLOMICO Conference, which was co-chaired by the DEA Seoul Country Attach�, was attended by 120 representatives from 16 different countries. Representatives from DEA Headquarters gave presentations on international drug trafficking.

In July 1999, after years of diplomatic negotiations between the U.S. and the People's Republic of China, DEA officially opened its office in Beijing. Throughout 1999, DEA hosted several Chinese law enforcement delegations sponsored by the People's Republic of China. While visiting DEA, these delegations received briefings at DEA Headquarters, Justice Training Center, and various Field Divisions.

4) Coordinate Training Programs for Host Country Police Agencies

DEA's international training activities are conducted in coordination with DEA's foreign offices, U.S. Missions, and the Department of State, International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs. The full range of the international anti-narcotics training program is addressed in the International Training Section.

The following table provides a summary of training courses provided by DEA to foreign law enforcement officials.

DEA Summary of International Asset Forfeiture Sharing

(FY99)

Name of Case or Investigation

Total Amount Forfeited in the U.S.

Recipient Country

Amount of Transfer

Transfer Date

Ives Charest

DEA Admin. Forfeiture Case No. C7970084

$45,250.00

Canada

$24,887.60

12/03/98

U.S. V. JULIO

Nasser Davis, et al. Case No. 94-131-CR (SD Fla)

$178,032,044.00

$9,108,712.00

Switzerland

$89,016,022.00

$4,554,086.00

12/18/98

12/23/99

Daniel Berger

DEA Admin. Forfeiture Case No. GH960118 (CD.Cal)

$214,322.00

Switzerland

$107,161.13

02/05/99

Walter Furst

Admin. Forfeiture Case No. R1960625 (CD.Cal)

$22,055.00

Switzerland

$10,630.43

02/05/99

Farina (D. Col.)

U.S v. $1,814,807.93 Case No. 97-S -1928

$1,814,807.93

United Kingdom

$181,466.89

06/03/99

Operation Dinero

(N.D. Ga) U.S. v. $295,375.28 No. 1:94-CV-3340-AC U.S. v. $3,531,149.00 No. 1:95-CV-0153-AC

$3,825,524.28

United Kingdom

Anguilla

$229,517.39

$328,528.99

06/03/99,

08/24/99

Luz Mary Durango

DEA Admin. Forfeiture Case No. C1960051

$28,665.00

Ecuador

$14,327.50

05/18/99

United States Coast Guard

Combined Operations

Coast Guard counternarcotics law enforcement in the Caribbean and maritime borders of Latin America is largely dependent on international combined operations. Partnering with law enforcement officials of other nations helps develop indigenous interdiction forces and enhances the cumulative impact of interdiction against drug traffickers in the region. Combined operations with other nations' maritime forces provide practical training for foreign, as well as Coast Guard personnel.

CARIBE VENTURE is a recurrent series of multinational operations in the Eastern Caribbean. Participants extend legal authority to law enforcement officials of other nations that permit entry and pursuit of suspects through sovereign sea and air space. International partners presently include: United Kingdom and dependent territories, the Netherlands and Netherlands Antilles, France and the French West Indies, Dominican Republic, Antigua & Barbuda, St. Kitts & Nevis, Anguilla & Montserrat, Dominica, Grenada, Barbados, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, St. Lucia, and Trinidad & Tobago. In addition, all RSS member nations participate in ad hoc combined operations conducted in the vicinity of their territorial sea and airspace.

OPERATION GENESISwas a cooperative effort between the Government of Haiti and the Government of the Dominican Republic to improve cross border police relations, cooperative investigations, and to integrate Haitian and Dominican Republic police entities responsible for counter drug operations.

OPERATION CREOLE STORM was an operation conducted with the Dominica Coast Guard and was the first time that the bilateral agreements were exercised with Dominica and the first time the USCG was involved in an operation conducted by an RSS nation.

FRONTIER LANCE was a surge operation south of the island of Hispaniola involving U.S. Coast Guard surface and air assets as well as Haitian and Dominican Republic interdiction assets. This operation used shipriders from both countries and helped foster a better working relationship between Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

OPBAT is an ongoing interdiction program involving forward staged Coast Guard and Army air assets, DEA agents, along with Bahamian Police and Turks & Caicos Islands Police forces. During FY99OPBAT forces seized 4,857 pounds of cocaine, 3,564 pounds of marijuana, 8 vessels and made 13 arrests. There are three primary staging sites for Coast Guard and Army helicopters, which may respond to targets throughout the Bahamas and Florida Straits. OPBAT style techniques were exported to other regions of the transit zone (Operation FRONTIER LANCE).

HALCON is a recurrent series of counternarcotics and alien migrant operations conducted between the Coast Guard and Dominican Republic (DOMREP). Training is conducted and includes Damage Control, Basic Seamanship and Maritime Law Enforcement. Shipriders extend legal authority that permits entry and pursuit of suspects through sovereign sea and air space. One operation in the series was conducted in December 1998. During Underway portion, the Coast Guard Cutter HARRIET LANE embarked 2 Dominican shipriders coordinated joint response to an airdrop 80nm South of Puerto Rico, which resulted in the recovery of 1,760 pounds of cocaine.

The Coast Guard also conducted the maritime professional exchange and training components of TRADEWINDS 99, a longstanding annual exercise sponsored by the Department of Defense. Crewmembers from a Coast Guard medium endurance cutter and patrol boat accomplished a broad spectrum of maritime training for personnel from CARICOM nations at two different sites in the Dominican Republic and Trinidad and Tobago.

OP CONJUNTOS is a continuing series of counternarcotics operations that exercise the existing bilateral agreement with Panama. Four OP CONJUNTOS were conducted in FY99 and plans are to continue the series in FY00.

Conducted four phases of OP RIP TIDE in FY99. Both Coast Guard and Jamaican assets were used during the four phases. Cayman Island assets also participated in both past and present operations, and increased participation is expected in the future. These operations were very successful and provided significant training to the JDFCG. During Phase One CGC RESOLUTE in conjunction with Jamaican forces interdicted a Jamaican canoe in vicinity of Grand Cayman, 1,600 pounds of marijuana was seized and 2 suspects were arrested.

Operations with Belize, OP ALLIED STRENGTH was conducted with Belize in November of FY99. This operation started as a Central Skies operation however, Hurricane Mitch changed it into an operation that exercised the U.S./Belize bilateral agreement. Two tons of hurricane relief supplies and $4K were delivered for Hurricane relief efforts. OPERATION IDES OF MARCH was conducted March 99, a total of 21 boardings were conducted. Belize National Police considered the operation a success with the exception of poor communications with Belize Forces small boats.

The Coast Guard also conducts coincidental operations with the Mexican Navy in the Gulf of Mexico and the Eastern Pacific. During these operations, Coast Guard and Mexican Naval units operate simultaneously, and exchange on-scene information, which may assist in the interdiction of drug traffickers. The Coast Guard assisted the Mexican Navy with the boarding of and subsequent seizure of 15,515 pounds of cocaine on board F/V MAZATLAN IV and 21,036 pounds of cocaine on board the F/V XOLOSCUINTLE in FY99.

Law Enforcement Detachments (LEDETs) are largely responsible for the success of combined operations with foreign countries. Coast Guard currently deploys LEDETs on British and Dutch warships which extends the Coast Guard's maritime law enforcement authority. LEDETs provide technical support to foreign countries conducting dockside boardings when requested by the foreign government, usually by operating drug detection devices, and providing guidance on detecting hidden compartments.

Beginning in April 1996, the USCG International Training and Technical Assistance Division (ITD), in conjunction with the Canadian Coast Guard, has been conducting a full time training and advisory program in Haiti, under the direction of the Chief, U.S. Military Liaison Officer, a USCG Commander. The team has been developing the Haitian Coast Guard (HCG), a unit of the Haitian National Police. The HCG now consists of 96 personnel and eight operational boats. They are very enthusiastic in all of their mission areas, especially drug law enforcement. Unfortunately, they are severely restricted in manpower despite a recent doubling of their force. They do not have a reserve force, so every operation impacts their training and qualification program. The HCG is not yet capable of protecting Haiti's 1500kms of coastline and numerous ports from the drug trafficking threat due to a lack of assets, minimal infrastructure, and a shortage of personnel. In addition to the team of trainer/advisors on the ground in Haiti, there has been significant involvement with Haitian students in USCG resident schools. Haitian students attended residential training at Coast Guard training centers in the United States. These students attended a variety of courses, but the majority of courses attended provided the basic skills needed by the growing Coast Guard. Additionally, several HCG members have attended professional officer training including the International Maritime Officers Course and Officer Candidate School. The HCG has also had two graduates of the USCG Chief Petty Officer Academy.

Maritime Counternarcotics Agreements

Coast Guard officers are key members of interagency USG delegations traveling to Caribbean countries to negotiate bilateral maritime counternarcotics agreements. The "Six Part" model agreements include shipboarding, shiprider, pursuit, entry-to-investigate, overflight, and order to land provisions. Coast Guard officials are also assisting the State Department in negotiating agreements to improve maritime migrant interdiction operations.

Coast Guard officers are posted in key embassies of source and transit zone countries. Current billets include Bahamas, Barbados, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. These officers coordinate a significant amount of informal training and assistance to host nation forces delivered by visiting Coast Guard cutter and aircraft crewmembers, as well as coordination of counternarcotics operations.

Training

The U.S. Coast Guard provides basic and advanced training in its four core mission areas of Maritime Law Enforcement, Maritime Safety, Marine Environmental Protection and Defense Readiness. Specific skill sets include enforcement of laws and treaties (counternarcotics, fisheries, smuggling, alien interdiction); search and rescue; marine environmental response and protection; safety and security of marine transportation, ports, waterways and shore facilities; contingency and response planning; legal authority and jurisdiction; resource management to include budget formulation and workforce planning, training and retention; and national defense preparedness. The training program development process begins by first assessing the state of the partner nation's maritime program, resources and the organization designated as the lead for this responsibility. A tailored, and possibly joint, training plan is then developed to meet the partner nation's program goals. Ultimately, in-country teams help the partner organization carry out the developed training plan to the point of established self-sufficiency. The team can assist a country in achieving national maritime goals in non-defense areas within the U.S. Coast Guard's area of expertise. Should the partner nation have a mission or issue that is covered by multiple U.S. agencies, which includes the U.S. Coast Guard, the team leader will assist in acquisition of personnel from other U.S. agencies. Mission areas that have been addressed by previous Coast Guard and joint training teams include: evaluation of maritime law enforcement programs, development of model ports relative to narcotics intervention, creation of an implementation plan for a multi-mission, multi-agency maritime service management model, and development of training plans and institutions for multi-agency marine safety and maritime law enforcement programs.

The following charts show actual and projected training and assistance events for FY99 and FY00.

USCG Technical AssistanceFY99 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Albania

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training team

30 Aug 99

10 Sep 99

IMET

Antigua (RSSTU)

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 98

30 Sep 99

INL

Aruba

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

01 May 99

08 May 99

Direct

Belize

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

15 Feb 99

19 Feb 99

INL

Bolivia

Port Security/Administration Legislation

11 Jul 99

15 Jul 99

DOD

Chile

Carrier Initiative Program

16 Nov 98

21 Nov 98

USCS

Colombia

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

26 Jul 99

26 Jul 99

IMET

Colombia

Riverine Operations Seminar Training

20 Oct 98

24 Oct 98

DOD

Colombia

Riverine Operations Seminar Training

01 Feb 99

05 Feb 99

DOD

Colombia

USCS Seaport Security Program

09 Sep 99

23 Sep 99

USCS

Costa Rica

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

09 Feb 99

19 Feb 99

INL

Curacao

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

23 Apr 99

30 Apr 99

Direct

Curacao

Maritime Law Enforcement Pre-Training Survey (E-IMET)

18 Jan 99

24 Jan 99

Direct

Curacao

Search Coordination and Planning

08 Jan 99

15 Jan 99

Direct

Dominican Republic

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

06 Dec 98

10 Dec 98

INL

Dominican Republic

Curriculum Infusion Program, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

06 Feb 99

20 Feb 99

 

Ecuador

Counter-Drug Training Support

22 Jun 99

06 Jul 99

DOD

Ecuador

Marine Safety and Environmental Security Seminar

23 Aug 99

28 Aug 99

IMET

Ecuador

Miscellaneous Mobile Training Team Out-CONUS

12 Oct 98

16 Oct 98

DOD

Eritrea

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

11 Jan 99

15 Jan 99

IMET

Estonia

Miscellaneous Mobile Training Team Out-CONUS

30 Nov 98

04 Dec 98

DOD

Georgia

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

14 Jun 99

19 Jun 99

USCS

Georgia

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

24 Nov 98

10 Dec 98

USCS

Georgia

Engineering/Logistics Administration Mobile Training Team

09 Aug 99

15 Aug 99

USCS

Georgia

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

21 Jun 99

26 Jun 99

USCS

Georgia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

16 Aug 99

11 Feb 00

USCS

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)
FY99 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Georgia

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

16 Aug 99

21 Aug 99

USCS

Georgia

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

22 Feb 99

04 Mar 99

USCS

Georgia

Program overview/oversight

07 Dec 98

12 Dec 198

USCS

Greece

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

20 Sep 99

25 Sep 99

DOD

Haiti

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 98

30 Sep 99

IMET

Indonesia

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

08 Feb 99

12 Feb 99

INL

Jordan

Pre-Training Survey Team (NON-EIMET)

26 Apr 99

30 Apr 99

DOD

Kazakhstan

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

31 May 99

07 Jun 99

INL

Kenya

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

09 Nov 98

13 Nov 98

IMET

Kenya

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

03 May 99

14 May 99

IMET

Lithuania

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2

30 Nov 98

05 Dec 98

INL

Macedonia

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

23 Aug 99

30 Aug 99

IMET

Malaysia

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

22 Feb 99

26 Feb 99

INL

Malaysia

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

01 Mar 99

05 Mar 99

INL

Mexico

Curriculum Infusion Program, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

01 Mar 99

15 Mar 99

INL

Mexico

Curriculum Infusion Program, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

05 Jun 99

20 Jun 99

INL

Mexico

Pre-Training Survey Team (NON-EIMET)

24 Jan 99

28 Jan 99

INL

Morocco

Joint Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

14 Feb 99

20 Feb 99

IMET

Mozambique

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

17 May 99

22 May 99

IMET

Nicaragua

Maritime Law Enforcement Pre-Training Survey (E-IMET)

07 Sep 99

11 Sep 99

IMET

Nicaragua

Small Boat Maintenance

15 Mar 99

26 Mar 99

INL

Nicaragua

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

01 Mar 99

12 Mar 99

INL

Panama

Container Inspection Program

06 Sep 99

11 Sep 99

DIRECT

Panama

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

21 Jun 99

26 Jun 99

IMET

Papua-New Guinea

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

20 Sep 99

24 Sep 99

IMET

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.) FY99 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Papua-New Guinea

Maritime Law Enforcement Pre-Training Survey (E-IMET)

22 Mar 99

26 Mar 99

EIMET

Papua-New Guinea

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1 - Assessment

26 Mar 99

06 Apr 99

IMET

Peru

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 98

30 Sep 99

NAS

Philippines

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

24 May 99

04 Jun 99

USAID

Philippines

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

23 Aug 99

08 Sep 99

USAID

Philippines

Miscellaneous Mobile Training Team Out-CONUS

16 Aug 99

20 Aug 99

USAID

Portugal

Instructor Course, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

22 Mar 99

28 Mar 99

IMET

Portugal

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

29 Mar 99

04 Apr 99

IMET

Romania

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3 - Development

20 Aug 99

24 Aug 99

IMET

Seychelles

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

26 Apr 99

30 Apr 99

IMET

Seychelles

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

28 Jan 99

28 Apr 99

DOD

Seychelles

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

14 Jun 99

18 Jun 99

IMET

Solomon Islands

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1 - Assessment

26 Mar 99

06 Apr 99

IMET

Solomon Islands

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

01 Feb 99

04 Feb 99

IMET

St. Maarten

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

09 Jul 99

16 Jul 99

Direct

Tanzania

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

15 Nov 98

23 Nov 98

FMS

Tonga

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

19 Jul 99

19 Jul 99

IMET

Trinidad & Tobago

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

25 Jan 99

30 Jan 99

INL

Trinidad & Tobago

Maritime Law Enforcement Pre-Training Survey (E-IMET)

23 Jan 99

30 Jan 99

USCS

Tunisia

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

13 Sep 99

18 Sep 99

IMET

Tunisia

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

26 Apr 99

02 May 99

IMET

Tunisia

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

06 Sep 99

11 Sep 99

IMET

Turkmenistan

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

13 Jun 99

18 Jun 99

INL

United Arab Emirates

Incident Command System

25 Aug 99

26 Aug 99

DOD

United Arab Emirates

Pollution Response/Incident Command System

11 Sep 99

17 Sep 99

DOD

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)
FY99 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Venezuela

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

11 Jan 99

15 Jan 99

DOD

Venezuela

Pre-Training Survey Team (NON-EIMET)

18 Jan 99

22 Jan 99

DOD

Venezuela

Riverine Operations Seminar Training

14 Feb 99

20 Feb 99

DOD

Venezuela

Riverine Training Program

25 Jan 99

28 May 99

DOD

Vietnam

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

16 Aug 99

20 Aug 99

INL

USCG Technical Assistance
FY00 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Albania

Instructor Course, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Albania

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Antigua (RSSTU)

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Azerbaijan

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Azerbaijan

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

Azerbaijan

International Partnering For Maritime Excellence

Azerbaijan

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

Bahamas

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Bahamas

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Belize

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

Benin

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

Bolivia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Colombia

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Colombia

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

Colombia

Riverine Training Program

Costa Rica

Engineering/Logistics Administration Mobile Training Team

Croatia

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

Croatia

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3 - Development

Curacao

Search Coordination and Execution Mobile Training Team

Dominican Republic

Marine Safety and Environmental Security Seminar

Ecuador

Marine Inspection Mobile Training Team

Ecuador

Marine Safety Pre-training Survey

Egypt

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

Fiji

Maritime Law Enforcement Pre-Training Survey (E-IMET)

Fiji

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1 - Assessment

Fiji

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

Georgia

Engineering/Logistics Administration Mobile Training Team

Georgia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Greece

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Greece

Instructor Course, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Guyana

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1 - Assessment

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)
FY00 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Guyana

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

Haiti

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Haiti

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Haiti

Small Boat Electronics/Electrical Course

Honduras

Marine Safety and Environmental Security - Post Hurricane Mitch

Iceland

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

Iceland

Search Coordination and Execution Mobile Training Team

Jamaica

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

Jamaica

Marine Safety and Environmental Security Seminar

Japan

Container Inspection Training Team

Jordan

Marine Safety and Environmental Security Seminar

Kenya

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Kenya

Instructor Course, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Lebanon

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

Madagascar

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Mauritius

Marine Safety and Environmental Security Seminar

Mauritius

Search Coordination and Execution Mobile Training Team

Morocco

Search Coordination and Execution Mobile Training Team

Mozambique

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Nicaragua

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Nicaragua

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

Nicaragua

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Nicaragua

Marine Safety and Environmental Security - Post Hurricane Mitch

Oman

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

Pakistan

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Panama

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Papua New Guinea

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

Papua New Guinea

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

Peru

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Philippines

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

Philippines

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)
FY00 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Philippines

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

Philippines

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

Philippines

Marine Safety and Environmental Security Seminar

Philippines

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Advanced Mobile Training Team

Poland

Search Coordination and Execution Mobile Training Team

Romania

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

Russia

Marine Safety and Environmental Security Seminar

Samoa

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

Seychelles

Engineering/Logistics Administration Mobile Training Team

Seychelles

Marine Safety/Oil Spill Contingency Plan

Seychelles

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

Solomon Islands

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

Solomon Islands

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3 - Development

Solomon Islands

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 4 - Implementation

Solomon Islands

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

Suriname

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Suriname

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

Suriname

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Suriname

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

Suriname

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3 - Development

Suriname

Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

Thailand

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Trinidad & Tobago

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Trinidad & Tobago

Port Physical Security/Port Vulnerability Assessment Mobile Training Team

Tunisia

Fisheries Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

Tunisia

Instructor Course, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

United Arab Emirates

Marine Safety/Oil Spill Contingency Plan

Uzbekistan

Coast Guard Development/Needs Assessment Team

Vanuatu

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 1 - Assessment

Vanuatu

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 2 - Planning

Venezuela

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)
FY00 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Vietnam

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Vietnam

Instructor Course, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Yemen

Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Yemen

Maritime Law Enforcement Pre-training Survey (E-IMET)

USCG Vessel Transfer Excess Defense Articles Program

Vessel Description

FY99

FY00 (Planned/Proposed)

82-Foot Patrol Boat

Trinidad & Tobago (2)

Jamaica (1)

 

Panama (2)

Costa Rica (1)

 

Argentina (1)

Turkmenistan (1)

 

Dominican Republic (2)

Georgia (1)

   

Colombia (1)

   

Romania (2)

180-Foot Buoy Tender

 

Dominican Republic (1)

   

Ghana (2)

157-Foot Buoy Tender

Argentina (2)

 

133-Foot Buoy Tender

Dominican Republic (1)

 

44-Foot Motor Life Boat

 

Seychelles (6)

   

Chile (6)

   

Australia (4)

   

Honduras (4)

   

Tunisia (8)

USCG Vessel Transfer
Excess Defense Articles Program

Vessel Description

FY99

FY00 (Planned/Proposed)

82-Foot Patrol Boat

Trinidad & Tobago (2)

Jamaica (1)

 

Panama (2)

Costa Rica (1)

 

Argentina (1)

Turkmenistan (1)

 

Dominican Republic (2)

Georgia (1)

   

Colombia (1)

   

Romania (2)

180-Foot Buoy Tender

 

Dominican Republic (1)

   

Ghana (2)

157-Foot Buoy Tender

Argentina (2)

 

133-Foot Buoy Tender

Dominican Republic (1)

 

44-Foot Motor Life Boat

 

Seychelles (6)

   

Chile (6)

   

Australia (4)

   

Honduras (4)

   

Tunisia (8)

United States Customs Service

Since 1973, the U.S. Customs Service has provided a comprehensive program of international counter narcotics training and assistance to foreign customs and other border control agencies. Individual training and assistance programs are tailored to meet the needs of the recipient country but usually focus on one or more of the following subject areas: narcotics interdiction at air/sea/land ports of entry; financial investigations; training development; and management of special enforcement teams.

Counter Narcotics Training and Assistance

In 1999, U.S. Customs conducted a total of 143 international counternarcotics programs involving 1,668 participants from over 40 countries. Programs conducted outside the U.S. included six Overseas Enforcement Training (OET) Programs for individual countries; three Regional Overseas Enforcement Training (ROET) Programs for two or more countries; two Train-the-Trainer Workshops (T3W) for an individual country; one Regional Train-the-Trainer Workshop (RT3W) for two or more countries; 11 Short Term Advisory (STA) programs; three Contraband Enforcement Team (CET) programs; three Integrity/Anti-Corruption Programs; two Intelligence programs; one Seized Property Handling Program; and 10 Industry Partnership Program (IPP) seminars.

In addition to the normal schedule of international counternarcotics training and assistance conducted under the auspices of INL, U.S. Customs carried out a number of counternarcotics projects in response to high priority concerns during 1999. Among these are the following:

  • U.S. Customs provided technical training and assistance in support of the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) programs currently operating in Budapest and Bangkok. U.S. Customs has developed and conducted specialized training at ILEA Bangkok; on topics which include: International Controlled Deliveries and Drug Investigation, conducted jointly with DEA; Complex Financial Investigations, conducted jointly with IRS; and Intellectual Property Rights, conducted with the FBI.

  • U.S. Customs developed and implemented a Colombian training and assistance initiative, focusing on narcotics interdiction efforts, combating the Black Market Peso Exchange, gathering of intelligence, and bilateral cooperative efforts between the government of the U.S. and Colombia. Based on the successes of this initiative, an FY 2000 Andean Plan is currently being developed to provide regional training and assistance focusing on integrity, border interdiction, trade fraud, intelligence collection, industry partnership programs, and financial crimes issues throughout the Andean Region.

  • U.S. Customs provided expert instructors for two OAS-funded Regional Port Security Seminars conducted in Ecuador and Peru during 1999, and included a total of 80 participants from 8 countries.

  • The Nigeria Inter-Agency Working Group was established to provide support and assistance to the democratic process, infrastructure improvements, and economic development in Nigeria. Over the past two years, U.S. Customs has participated in several multi-agency assessments, including an October 1998 airport security assessment at the Murtala Mohammed International Airport (MMIA) in Lagos which identified persistent deficiencies. In September 1999, U.S. Customs conducted an INL-funded Air Carrier Initiative Seminar and Site Survey in Lagos, and found that many of the previous security concerns had been addressed and corrected. In January 2000, U.S. Customs will conduct an INL-funded Special Airport Narcotics Interdiction Course in Lagos, which will focus on the targeting and search of passengers, cargo and aircraft, and smuggling investigations.

  • The Administration's Safe Skies for Africa Initiative is intended to promote sustainable improvements in aviation safety and security in Africa and to create the environment necessary to foster the growth of aviation services between Africa and the United States. The initiative recognizes that Safe Skies are a prerequisite for increased trade and investment and long-term economic development in Africa. In support of this initiative, the U.S. Government periodically sends multi-agency teams to conduct surveys of the aviation needs of the selected countries and will assist them in developing work plans to improve and enhance their aviation infrastructure. These countries are then encouraged to work with international organizations and the private sector to implement these plans. U.S. survey teams, which include one U.S. Customs Inspector, visited Kenya in March 1999, Cote d'Ivoire in July 1999, and Tanzania in November 1999.

  • A U.S. Customs canine expert traveled to Colombia during January 1999 to conduct a Post-funded canine program assessment and management training at the Port of Cartagena.

  • A U.S. Customs training team traveled to Costa Rica during January 1999 to provide DEA-funded on-the-job land border interdiction training for Costa Rican Drug Control Police and customs officers.

  • Three Short Term Advisory projects were conducted in Venezuela during 1999: In January, a U.S. Customs officer provided Post-funded training in the use of inspectional equipment recently purchased for the Venezuelan National Guard; During June and September, U.S. Customs teams provided INL-funded assistance to GOV officials on money laundering investigations.

  • A U.S. Customs canine team (dog/handler) traveled to the Bahamas during February 1999 on a Post-funded operation to assess and assist the Bahamian canine program at the Freeport International Airport.

  • U.S. Customs training teams traveled to Bolivia during April and July 1999 on a DEA-funded operation to provide land border interdiction training to Bolivian narcotics police officers.

  • A U.S. Customs canine expert traveled to Brazil during May 1999 on a DEA-funded operation to assist the Sao Paulo Military Police Canine Program in the development of a narcotics detector program.

  • Under the FY98 Counternarcotics Drawdown Order, U.S. Customs was directed to provide narcotics detector dogs and training to nine Honduran canine officers. In anticipation of the training, a U.S. Customs canine expert traveled to Honduras during May 1999 to conduct a U.S. Customs-funded assessment of the Honduran canine program and to brief GOH and U.S. Embassy officials on the requirements to support and maintain an effective canine program.

  • A U.S. Customs canine team (dog/handler) traveled to Honduras during May 1999 on a DEA-funded operation to assist with special road block searches near the land borders.

  • U.S. Customs conducted an INL-funded Integrity Reinforcement/Anti-Corruption Seminar in San Juan, Puerto Rico, for 29 participants from 28 member countries of the Caribbean Customs Law Enforcement Council (CCLEC).

  • A U.S. Customs team traveled to Jamaica on a Post-funded operation to assess the effectiveness of the Jamaica Customs Contraband Enforcement Team (CET) at the Port of Kingston. As a follow-up to the assessment, six Jamaican Customs CET officers traveled to Port Everglades, Florida, to observe U.S. Customs CET operations during July 1999.

  • Two U.S. Customs officers traveled to South Africa during July 1999 to advise and assist with the first Regional Border Control Course conducted by the South African Regional Police Commissioners Conference (SARPCCO).

  • Two U.S. Customs experts traveled to Costa Rica during August 1999 to conduct a Post-funded assessment of the Penas Blancas port of entry along the Costa Rican/Nicaraguan border. Recommendations for infrastructure improvements to the port facilities and enhanced border control were provided to the U.S. Embassy.

  • A U.S. Customs training team traveled to the Dominican Republic during September 1999 to provide Post-funded formal classroom training and field practical exercises in land border interdiction to 38 officers of the Dominican Counternarcotics Border Unit.

  • U.S. Customs funded a joint USCS/U.S. Internal Revenue Service assessment in Aruba during September 1999 focused on management controls and integrity issues within the Ministry of Finance, Tax and Customs Directorate.

  • U.S. Customs provided one expert instructor to assist with the conduct of two one-week DEA Airport Interdiction Courses in Lima, Peru, during October 1999, for a total of 83 participants. Funding for this training was provided by DEA.

  • U.S. Customs provided one expert instructor to assist with the conduct of back-to-back U.S. Coast Guard Maritime Security Courses in Trinidad & Tobago and Belize during October 1999, for a total of 48 participants. The U.S. Coast Guard provided funding for this training.

  • U.S. Customs conducted a regional Integrity Reinforcement/Anti-Corruption Seminar in Guatemala during December 1999 for 32 participants from six Central American countries. This training is the first of four phases included in this integrity and risk management project which is funded by INL through the Central America and Caribbean Emergency Disaster Recovery (Hurricane Mitch) supplemental appropriation.
Industry Partnership Programs

Carrier Initiative Program (CIP) and Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition (BASC) training are conducted for U.S. Customs' industry partners. The Carrier Initiative Program provides counternarcotics and security training to air, sea and land commercial transport companies (carriers) and emphasizes public-private partnerships in which U.S. Customs and the car-rier companies cooperate to prevent commercial conveyances from being utilized to smuggle narcotics.

The Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition (BASC) is a business-led, U.S. Customs-supported alliance created to combat narcotic smuggling via commercial trade. As a voluntary program for businesses, with no Government-imposed mandates, corporate participants are expected to set self-imposed business standards that will significantly deter narcotics traffickers. The BASC program examines the entire process of manufacturing and shipping of merchandise from foreign countries to the United States, emphasizing the creation of a more security-conscious environment at foreign manufacturing plants to eliminate, or at least reduce, product vulnerability to narcotics smuggling. By examining packing and shipping practices and identifying and correcting deficiencies along the spectrum of the import process, businesses can reduce their exposure to the likelihood that their shipments will be used as narcotics smuggling vehicles.

FY 1999 was the ninth year in which INL has funded Customs' international training for the Carrier Initiative Program, and the third in which INL funding was provided for the BASC. INL funds were used to present CIP and BASC training to 630 employees in 10 foreign training seminars. These seminars and site surveys were offered in the following countries: Aruba, Costa Rica, Curacao, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Jamaica, Mexico, Nigeria, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela. Costs relating to these programs are partially offset by the sponsoring commercial transportation companies.

At present, over 3,900 carriers operating in the maritime, trucking, rail, and air environments participate in the Carrier Initiative Program. Over 200 foreign manufacturers and exporters have begun participation in the BASC since its inception in 1996. In FY 1999, Customs Industry Partners effected 190 foreign interceptions of illegal drugs, with a total weight of 35,640 pounds. They also provided information and assistance leading to 42 drug seizures at the U.S. border, with a weight of 8,428 pounds. In total, CIP and BASC participants contributed to 232 interceptions and seizures, preventing 44,068 pounds of illegal drugs from entering the United States.

U.S. Customs and the Mattel Corporation, one of private industry's first proponents of the Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition (BASC), addressed the 10th Working Group meeting of the World Customs Organization's (WCO) Alliance of Customs and Trade for the Interdiction of Narcotics (ACTION/DEFIS). Discussed were the development of the BASC program, reasons why industry desired such a program, and the benefits enjoyed by Customs and industry as a result of the program. It was announced that the International Chamber of Commerce has endorsed BASC and hopes to work with the WCO in expanding BASC around the world.

The Americas Counter Smuggling Initiative (ACSI) is a priority undertaking established by U.S. Customs to build upon the success of the CIP and BASC, by strengthening and expanding our anti-narcotics security programs throughout Central and South America. Under the auspices of ACSI, U.S. Customs officials are being detailed to select Central and South American countries to assist businesses and host governments in developing security programs and initiatives to safeguard legitimate shipments from being used to smuggle narcotics. A parallel track of the ACSI includes the training of counterpart customs administrations and other appropriate foreign government anti-drug forces. During 1999, U.S. Customs successfully introduced ACSI to the governments and trade and transportation entities in the seven targeted countries (Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Venezuela).

Results

Particularly noteworthy in assessing U.S. Customs international counternarcotics training and assistance during 1999 are the following reports on the results of the training efforts in terms of narcotics seizures, improvement in the organization of counternarcotics law enforcement, and increased public awareness:

  • In a cable dated March 15, 1999, the U.S. Embassy in Laos attributes a recent increase in narcotics seizures at the Wattay International Airport in Vientiane to an INL-funded U.S. Customs Airport Narcotics Interdiction Course conducted during September 1998.

  • Following the Post-funded observation tour of six Jamaican Customs Contraband Enforcement Team (CET) officers to Port Everglades, Florida, during July 1999, The U.S. Embassy forwarded a reporting cable to INL which stated the following: "The training clearly raised the level of enthusiasm of the Jamaicans for their work, and reinforced their resolve to carry out their work and to uncover contraband in and out of Jamaica." "U.S. Customs went out of its way to demonstrate to the Jamaicans the professionalism for which it is known. Such professionalism is in and of itself a valuable contribution to INL efforts to assist the GOJ in strengthening its law enforcement efforts."

  • Six months after the completion of the INL-funded U.S. Customs Seaport Contraband Enforcement Team training program in South Africa during March 1999, the U.S. Embassy sent a follow-up reporting cable dated September 16, 1999, which stated the following: "Graduates of the course have been engaged in in-house training at their duty stations. Moreover, the South Africans attribute an improvement in search techniques and a subsequent increase in contraband seizures directly to the course".

  • The following excerpt was taken from a cable sent by the U.S. Embassy in the Dominican Republic on October 08, 1999, following the Post-funded U.S. Customs land border interdiction training provided to the Dominican Counternarcotics Border Unit: "The (Customs) agents were successful in both tailoring their training to the needs of the (Unit) in its current stage of development and in modeling and fostering within the group a sense of teamwork." "INL expects the most results of this effort will come from the (Unit's) improved understanding of the scope of the interdiction mission and the officer's greater professionalism and ability to correctly perform both searches and data collection."

  • During September 1999, U.S. Customs conducted an INL-funded Seaport Contraband Enforcement Team training program in Cartagena for Colombian Counternarcotics Police and port security officers. During the vessel search practical exercise at the Port of Cartagena, the search of a coastal freighter revealed a hidden compartment which included traces of cocaine and hashish as determined through the use of an ionscanner. On the day after the conclusion of the training program, the Colombian Counternarcotics Police discovered 22 kilograms of cocaine in a shipment of farm machinery at the Port of Cartagena, and the Colombians attributed this seizure to the detection methods learned in the U.S. Customs course.
Customs Mutual Assistance Agreements

1n 1999, the United States Government signed Customs Mutual Assistance Agreements (CMAAs) with the Governments of the Peoples Republic of China, Colombia, Lithuania, and Panama, and pending signatures with Bulgaria, Chile, Malta, and South Africa. CMAA negotiations are currently on-going with the Governments of Brazil and Kuwait. CMAAs provide for mutual assistance in the enforcement of customs-related laws, and U.S. Customs utilizes these agreements to assist in evidence collection for criminal cases involving narcotics smuggling and money laundering. U.S. courts have ruled that evidenced gathered via these executive agreements is fully admissible in U.S. court cases.

The United States Government signed a CMAA with the Government of Mexico in 1976. However, following a series of informal discussions between the U.S. and Mexican Customs Departments, it was agreed to pursue an updated and amended U.S./Mexico CMAA. The new CMAA will, among other things, improve conformity to current operational practices unique to the countries' shared border status, reflect the recent reorganization of Mexico's Ministry of Finance, and take into account issues of both the U.S. Departments of State and Justice thus providing U.S. Customs with an updated legal framework with which to exchange information. Negotiations have been concluded, and it is expected that the amended CMAA will be formally signed during 2000.

Shared Financial Assets

In FY 1999, U.S. Customs shared financial assets on nine occasions with five countries:

Canada

$39,875

United Kingdom

$439,469

Honduras

$139,720

Portugal

$85,840

Switzerland

$17,647

Total

$722,551

U.S. Customs Counternarcotics Training Statistics

Programs

Number of Programs

Number of Participants

     

Training in the U.S.

   

International Visitors Program

101

368

     

Training in Host Countries

   

Overseas Enforcement Training

6

168

Regional Overseas Enforcement Training

3

96

Train-the-Trainer Workshop

2

29

Regional Train-the-Trainer Workshop

1

12

Short Term Advisory

11

110

Contraband Enforcement Team

3

78

Integrity/Anti-Corruption

3

83

Intelligence Training

2

70

Seized Property Handling

1

24

Carrier Initiative Program Seminars/Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition

10

630

Total

143

1,668

[End.]



Back to Top
Sign-in

Do you already have an account on one of these sites? Click the logo to sign in and create your own customized State Department page. Want to learn more? Check out our FAQ!

OpenID is a service that allows you to sign in to many different websites using a single identity. Find out more about OpenID and how to get an OpenID-enabled account.