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U.S. Government Assistance


International Narcotics Control Strategy Report
Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
March 2002
Report
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DoS (INL) Budget by Program ($000)

 

FY 2000 SUPP

FY 2001 Actual

FY 2002 Estimate

FY 2003 Request

Andean Counterdrug Initiative (ACI)1

 

 

 

 

Bolivia: Interdiction & Eradication

25,000

35,000

48,000

49,000

Alt Dev/Institution Building

85,000

17,000

33,000

42,000

Colombia: Interdiction & Eradication

635,500

48,000

243,500

275,000

Alt Dev/Institution Building

203,000

137,000

164,000

Ecuador: Interdiction & Eradication

12,000

2,200

15,000

21,000

Alt Dev/Institution

8,000

10,000

16,000

Peru: Interdiction & Eradication

32,000

21,000

75,000

66,000

Alt Dev/Institution

27,000

67,500

69,000

Brazil

3,500

2,000

6,000

12,000

Venezuela

3,500

1,200

5,000

8,000

Panama

4,000

1,363

5,000

9,000

Latin America Andean Regional

7,000

Total for ACI

1,018,500

154,763

645,000

731,000

 

 

 

 

 

International Narcotics and Law Enforcement (INCLE)

 

 

 

 

Other Counternarcotics Programs

 

 

 

 

Other Latin America

 

 

 

 

Bahamas

1,200

1,200

1,200

Guatemala

3,000

3,500

3,400

Jamaica

257

1,550

1,300

Mexico

10,000

12,000

12,000

Latin America Regional

8,537

10,000

9,500

Subtotal Other Latin America

22,994

28,250

27,400

Asia Regional

 

 

 

 

Laos

4,200

4,200

3,000

Pakistan

3,500

2,500

4,000

Pakistan Border Security Supplemental

73,000

Thailand

4,095

4,000

3,750

Asia Regional Cooperation

2,233

5,050

4,500

Southwest Asia Initiative

3,000

3,000

Subtotal Asia Regional

14,028

91,750

18,250

Interregional Aviation Support

50,000

60,000

65,000

Subtotal Country Programs (includes ACI)

1,018,500

241,785

825,000

841,650

International Organizations

12,000

16,000

13,000

Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction2

4,500

5,000

5,000

Systems Support/Upgrades

4,000

6,000

4,000

Program Development & Support3

12,187

13,703

14,563

Total Counternarcotics Programs (includes ACI)

1,018,500

274,472

865,703

878,213

Anticrime Programs

 

 

 

 

INL Anticrime Programs

22,450

20,330

14,000

Civilian Police Contingent

10,000

5,000

Africa Regional Anticrime

7,500

7,500

7,000

International Law Enforcement Academy

7,300

14,500

14,500

Trafficking in Persons

3,250

7,670

10,000

Total Anticrime Programs

50,500

50,000

50,500

Total INCLE (excludes ACI)

170,209

270,703

197,713

 

 

 

 

 

Total INL Programs4

1,018,500

324,972

915,703

928,713

1The Andean Counterdrug Initiative (ACI), the INL component of the Andean Regional Initiative, began in FY 2002.
2Regional Law Enforcement Training funding moved to Anticrime Programs in FY 2002. FY 2001 was adjusted accordingly.
3The FY 2003 total for Program Development and Support includes $ 0.713 million for full funding of federal employee retirement costs. The comparable amounts for FY 2002 ($ 0.703 million) and FY 2001 ($ 0.687 million) are included in totals.
4The totals do not include FSA and SEED Act funding transfers from USAID, nor PKO funding allocated by State PM. The total for FY 2001 includes a rescission of $ 0.715 million. The INL Programs total minus the ACI subtotal equals the INCLE total.

DoS (INL) Budget by Function ($000)

 

FY 2001 Actual

% of Total

FY 2002 Estimate.

% of Total

FY 2003 Request

% of Total

             

Counternarcotics Programs

           

Law Enforcement Assistance and Institution Development

115,126

35.5

542,171

59.2

524,321

56.5

Eradication, Crop Control and Alternative Development

105,270

32.4

258,585

28.3

286,905

30.9

International Organizations

12,000

3.7

16,000

1.8

13,000

1.4

Drug Awareness and Demand Reduction1

8,309

2.5

9,630

1.0

11,820

1.3

Program Development and Support 2

33,767

10.4

39,317

4.2

42,167

4.5

Total Counternarcotics Programs

274,472

84.5

865,703

94.5

878,213

94.6

             

Anticrime Programs

 

 

 

 

 

 

INL Anticrime Programs

22,450

6.9

20,330

2.2

14,000

1.5

Civilian Police Contingent

10,000

3.1

0.0

5,000

0.5

Africa Regional Anticrime

7,500

2.3

7,500

0.8

7,000

0.8

International Law Enforcement Academy

7,300

2.2

14,500

1.6

14,500

1.6

Total Anticrime Programs

50,500

15.5

50,000

5.5

50,500

5.4

             

Total INL Program Plan3

324,972

100

915,703

100

928,713

100

1Regional Law Enforcement Training funding was moved to Anticrime Programs in FY 2002. FY 2001 was adjusted accordingly.
2The FY 2003 total for Program Development and Support includes $ 0.713 million for full funding of federal employee retirement costs. The comparable amounts for FY 2002 ($ 0.703 million) and FY 2001 ($ 0.687 million) are included in those totals.
3The totals do not include FSA and SEED Act funding transfers from USAID, nor PKO funding allocated by State PM. The total for FY 2001 includes a rescission of $ 0.715 million.

International Training

International counternarcotics training is managed/funded by INL and carried out by the DEA, U.S. Customs Service, and U.S. Coast Guard. Major objectives are:

  • Contributing to the basic infrastructure for carrying out counternarcotics law enforcement activities in countries which cooperate with and are considered significant to U.S. narcotics control efforts; 
  •  Improving technical skills of drug law enforcement personnel in these countries; and 
  • Increasing cooperation between U.S. and foreign law enforcement officials.  

Over 3,500 persons participated in the United States Government's international narcotics control training program in FY 2001.

INL training continues to focus on encouraging foreign law enforcement agency self-sufficiency through infrastructure development. The effectiveness of our counternarcotics efforts overseas should be viewed in terms of what has been done to bring about the establishment of effective host country enforcement institutions, thereby taking drugs out of circulation before they begin their journey toward the United States. U.S. law enforcement personnel stationed overseas are increasingly coming to see their prime responsibility as promoting the creation of host government systems that are compatible with and serve the same broad goals as ours.

During FY 2001, law enforcement training continued to devote increased attention to the development and support of infrastructure building in those countries which posed the greatest threat to the U.S. as a result of their role as source or transit countries for narcotics destined for the United States. INL received positive feedback both from U.S. Embassies and foreign governments on the direct benefits gained from this training, including the discovery of illegal narcotics as a result of techniques learned during a program.

INL funding has also been provided for the establishment and operation of International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEA's) in Budapest and Bangkok. The regional training provided at the ILEA's consists of both general law enforcement training as well as specialized training for mid-level managers in police and other law enforcement agencies.

INL-funded training will continue to support the major U.S. and international strategies for combating narcotics trafficking worldwide. Emphasis will be placed on contributing to the activities of international organizations, such as the UNDCP and the OAS. Through the meetings of major donors, the Dublin Group, UNDCP and other international fora, we will coordinate with other providers of training, and urge them to shoulder greater responsibility in providing training, which serves their particular strategic interests.

INL will maintain its role of coordinating the activities of U.S. law enforcement agencies in response to requests for assistance from U.S. Embassies. This will avoid duplication of effort and ensure that presentations represent the full range of USG policies and procedures.

 Training Statistics

 

Number of Participants

Number of Programs

Drug Enforcement Administration

   

Training in Host Countries

 

 

In-Country Drug Enforcement Seminar

396

13

Advanced Drug Enforcement Seminar

265

14

Int'l Asset Forfeiture Seminar

35

3

Airport Operations

31

3

Specialized

229

159

Subtotal

965

192

U.S. Customs Service

   

Training in Host Countries

 

 

Specialized Training

1,596

30

Overseas Enforcement Training

55

2

Regional Overseas Enforcement Training

225

6

Train-the-Trainer Workshop

22

2

Short Term Advisory

117

2

Contraband Enforcement Team

162

6

Integrity/Anti-Corruption

186

10

Subtotal

2,363

58

U.S. Coast Guard

   

Training in Host Countries

 

 

Specialized Training

127

5

Maritime Law Enforcement

186

5

Subtotal

313

10

Total INL-Funded Training FY 2001

3,632

260


Drug Enforcement Administration

The preeminent responsibility of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is to reduce and ultimately minimize the impact posed to our nation by illicit drugs. All cocaine and heroin, as well as some marijuana and other dangerous drugs, are produced outside the United States. These illegal drugs are smuggled from the countries of their source, usually through other countries and ultimately ending in the United States. Thus, the reduction of illicit drug availability in the United States requires a strong international counternarcotics strategy. In cooperation and coordination with other nations, as well as with other U.S. agencies, DEA strives to concurrently suppress illicit drug production; disrupt the availability of these drugs in the distribution chain; arrest and prosecute those involved in any aspect of illegal drug trafficking; and seize their profits and assets.

The primary contribution of DEA in implementing our international counternarcotics strategy is accomplished through the 77 offices in 57 countries worldwide. The DEA overseas mission is as follows:

  • Conduct bilateral investigative activities,

  • Coordinate intelligence gathering,

  • Coordinate training programs for host country police agencies, and

  • Assist in the development of host country drug law enforcement institutions and engage in foreign liaisons.

In most countries where DEA maintains offices, DEA carries out all of the above functions. However, the emphasis on each function is determined by the existing conditions in the host nation. For example, in some countries where the drug enforcement system is advanced, a DEA Country Office may limit its role to selected activities instead of the full range of programs. The following sections highlight the assistance that DEA provided during 2001 to host nation counterparts in support of the four function areas.

Bilateral Investigations

DEA'S Country Offices work with elements of the host nation law enforcement agencies to investigate activities of drug traffickers that lead to indictments and prosecutions in either the host country, the United States, or a third nation. When appropriate and feasible, DEA shares intelligence information on major traffickers operating in host countries with foreign counterparts to enhance their investigative knowledge. The examples that follow accentuate DEA's role in bilateral investigations.

In May 2001, Oded Tuito, a fugitive from the United States, was arrested in Barcelona, Spain. Tuito had been the target of numerous ecstasy and cocaine trafficking investigations by DEA offices in the United States, England, France, Germany, Israel, The Netherlands, and Spain. As a result of the investigation, 39 individuals were arrested and 1,022,648 MDMA tablets were seized.

Operation TIGER TRAP fugitive YANG Wan Hsuan was extradited from Thailand to face prosecution in the Eastern District of New York for attempted heroin importation, distribution, and conspiracy. TIGER TRAP was a 1994 multi-agency international operation that disrupted the trafficking activities of the world's largest heroin trafficking organization, the Shan United Army. To date, YANG is the highest level trafficker ever extradited from Southeast Asia to face prosecution in the United States.

The Brasilia and Bogota Country Offices conducted a multilateral investigation in collaboration with Brazilian, Colombian, and Paraguayan counterparts. The investigation led to the arrest of Luis Da Costa, head of the international multi-ton cocaine trafficking organization with close ties to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) leadership. Da Costa was subsequently expelled to Brazil.

DEA Paraguay, in conjunction with the host nation counterparts, coordinated the follow- up investigation into the Luis Fernando Da Costa international drug trafficking organization. Leomar De Oliveira-Barbosa was identified as an associate of Da Costa and the lieutenant in charge of conducting drug and firearm trafficking in Paraguay. Barbosa had been arrested and sentenced to 14 years in a Brazilian prison in 1999. However, on February 21, 2001, Barbosa escaped and fled to Paraguay. During October 2001, he was apprehended and deported to Brazil to face drug, homicide, and escape charges. The Madrid, Nicosia, and Ottawa Country Offices, in conjunction with their counterparts, conducted a multilateral investigation into one of the most significant cocaine smuggling organizations in Europe. This year-long investigation resulted in seven arrests on a vessel carrying 4.5 tons of cocaine. Simultaneously, Spanish law enforcement arrested Jose Ramon PRADO-BUGALLO and five other associates. Spanish authorities believe that PRADO-BUGALLO is the most significant cocaine trafficker in Spain.

DEA in Russia, in coordination with Russian and Colombian authorities, concluded a successful delivery of 2.6 kilograms of cocaine from Colombia to Russia. This successful operation, followed by a second DEA-coordinated controlled delivery from Ecuador to Russia, led to the dismantling of a Russian-based polydrug trafficking organization. This organization was responsible for smuggling multi-kilogram quantities of cocaine from South America to Europe and Russia, and Southeast and Southwest Asian heroin from the Far East to Russia, Europe, and the United States. The leader and 12 criminal associates were arrested or detained in Russia and Belarus.

Collaboration between German and Dutch authorities and DEA Germany and The Hague led to the seizure of 1.6 million MDMA tablets and the arrest of three defendants. When intelligence information revealed that the tablets had been destined for Australia, the head of the organization, along with several other high-level officers, was arrested in Australia. It is believed that this group was responsible for the distribution of tens of millions of MDMA tablets worldwide. The investigation also included domestic DEA offices in New York, Houston, and Gainesville.

Arturo Paez-Martinez, a DEA fugitive and top lieutenant for the Arellano-Felix Organization, was flown to the United States after being surrendered to U.S. authorities in Mexico. He was arraigned in San Diego on a six-count federal indictment charging him with Operating a Continuing Criminal Enterprise, Money Laundering, and the Distribution of Narcotics.

Thai authorities arrested two significant drug traffickers in an operation based upon months of close coordination between the Office of the Narcotics Control Board, Royal Thai Armed Forces, the U.S. Intelligence Community, and DEA offices in Thailand. Approximately 125 kilograms of heroin and approximately 7.8 million methamphetamine tablets were seized, making this is the largest Thai seizure to date. DEA's Sensitive Investigative Unit Program played an integral role in the technical information gathering aspect of the operation.

DEA in Argentina, in conjunction with host nation counterparts and several domestic offices, conducted an investigation into an international heroin trafficking organization headed by Dina Gloria Dercan. The investigation yielded the arrest of 20 members of the organization, including Dercan and her Colombian source of supply as well as the seizure of 71 kilograms of heroin bound for the U.S. market.

Following a bilateral investigation involving the Government of Mexico and the DEA Merida Resident Office, authorities arrested Mario Villanueva Madrid, a fugitive who formerly served as the Governor of the State of Quintana Roo. He was charged for his significant involvement in the cocaine trafficking activities of Alcides Ramon Magana, a former member of the Amado Carrillo-Fuentes drug trafficking organization.

As a result of a bilateral investigation by Mexican authorities and the Mexico City Country Office, authorities arrested fugitive Alcides Ramon Magana. In recent years Magana has emerged as a significant trafficker heading his own cocaine trafficking organization.

DEA offices in Hong Kong and the Philippines coordinated efforts against major Southeast Asian crystal methamphetamine traffickers. Through bilateral investigative efforts, approximately 850 kilograms of crystal methamphetamine were seized in the Philippines.

The Fiji National Police, supported by DEA in Australia and Singapore, arrested DEA fugitive Philip Hastings. Hastings and 21 co-conspirators were indicted for their involvement in a conspiracy to import and distribute 18,000 lbs. of marijuana from Thailand to the United States. To date, 18 of the 21 conspirators are in custody. Hastings had been a fugitive since 1996.

DEA in Islamabad and Pakistani law enforcement officials raided a stash house and seized 96 kilograms of morphine base. The seizure was the result of intelligence gathered by the Islamabad Country Office on the movement of heroin from Afghanistan into Pakistan by a trafficking organization with connections to the Taliban regime.

DEA in Bolivia coordinated a joint initiative with counterparts to disrupt the flow of drugs/chemicals in the Chapare region. At the conclusion of the 41-day operation, more than 22 metric tons of precursor chemicals were seized and 31 individuals were arrested. Additionally, more than 222 cocaine base laboratories and 276 maceration pits were destroyed.

DEA in Mexico, Panama, Bogota, and Florida, assisted by other U.S. law enforcement agencies, undertook an initiative targeting Colombian cocaine traffickers utilizing maritime smuggling methods in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Due to close coordination among the agencies, 80 tons of cocaine and 25 vessels were seized and 155 defendants were arrested.

The DEA offices in Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama, along with their host nation counterparts, participated in a five day intensive multinational drug enforcement effort along the Pan American Highway. This highway has served as the primary conduit for land-based trafficking headed for the United States. As a result of this operation, 6,754 vehicles were searched and 40 vehicles were seized; in addition, 130 kilograms of cocaine, 543 grams of heroin, and 14.5 tons of marijuana were confiscated. There were also 35 drug-related arrests.

Based on information provided by DEA in Mexico and Miami, 9,343 kilograms of cocaine were seized from a fishing vessel and 19 Mexican crewmembers were arrested.

DEA in the Dominican Republic, in coordination with Dominican authorities, seized 186 kilograms of cocaine and arrested two Dominican nationals. This was the result of an investigation into an international drug trafficking organization responsible for the distribution of multi-kilogram quantities of cocaine to the United States.

A total of 1,237 kilograms of cocaine were seized in Jamaica from a go-fast boat travelling from Colombia. This seizure was the result of a joint investigation between DEA Jamaica and Colombian law enforcement agencies.

DEA in Greece, in conjunction with Hellenic authorities, seized 25 kilograms of heroin and arrested one defendant. The seizure resulted from a joint investigation between Hellenic and Albanian authorities who were targeting a group of Albanian traffickers responsible for the delivery of multi-kilograms of cocaine and heroin throughout Western Europe.

The Bern Country Office, in conjunction with the Swiss Police, arrested the source of supply for an MDMA organization suspected of shipping over one million tablets to the United States.

Intelligence Gathering

DEA coordinates intelligence worldwide on the cultivation and manufacture of illicit substances, the sale of precursor chemicals for making illegal drugs, and the transportation routes of these drugs into the United States. The following activities demonstrate the breadth of DEA involvement worldwide.

The Lima Country Office, in conjunction with host nation counterparts, has established a Riverine Interdiction Program. This program serves to target organizations using the Amazon fluvial rivers to transport drugs and/or precursor chemicals to Peru. Close coordination has produced significant results in stemming the flow of drugs and chemicals through the established river commercial traffic. The Riverine Program also serves as an intelligence collection initiative to support the Sensitive Investigative Unit.

The Curacao Country Office and the Korps Politie Suriname Vetted Unit have conducted several intelligence gathering operations targeting international narcotic trafficking organizations operating in Suriname. Intelligence from these operations led to numerous arrests and the seizure of a total of 775 kilograms of cocaine from two separate operations. Additionally, the operations have provided investigative leads to several DEA foreign and domestic offices.

The Bogota Country Office, in conjunction with Colombian authorities and DEA domestic offices, culminated an 11-month operation that focused on the money laundering activities of a Colombian national. The success of this operation was due largely to the sharing of intelligence between Colombian and U.S. authorities. The Colombian phase of this operation resulted in the arrest of eight principal targets and the seizure of numerous documents related to money laundering.

The Buenos Aires Country Office and host nation counterparts have been gathering intelligence to combat the dramatic increase of heroin trafficking cells based in Argentina. As a result of intelligence provided by DEA in Bogota, investigations have resulted in the identification of cell heads and couriers, as well as the arrest of 20 people and the seizure of over 32 kilograms of heroin.

The Brasilia Country Office has been instrumental in assisting Brazilian counterparts in establishing a regional intelligence fusion center in Brazil. This center was established to enhance communication between countries in the Southern Cone region and to assist them in coordinating drug-related investigations. The center is staffed by representatives of neighboring countries, including Peru and Colombia.

The acquisition and submission of authentic narcotics samples to DEA's Special Testing and Research Laboratory (STRL) is an ongoing initiative in Southeast Asia. Heroin, methamphetamine, marijuana, and other dangerous drug samples are routinely acquired and submitted to the STRL. For the first time, narcotics samples were provided to DEA by host nation counterparts in the Peoples Republic of China and Vietnam.

Based on intelligence provided by DEA, Australian authorities seized approximately 1,000 kilograms of cocaine. This was the largest cocaine seizure in Australia to date.

Due to intelligence leads and an intensive three-month training course on container inspections by the Islamabad Country Office, Pakistani law enforcement officials seized 113 kilograms of heroin from 266 paint cans in a container shipment.

Based on intelligence provided by DEA in Turkey, the Turkish National Police seized 103 kilograms of heroin and arrested ten Turkish/Iranian nationals. The Iranian source of supply was one of the arrested defendants.

Intelligence was provided by DEA in Paris about a vessel suspected of smuggling cocaine from Venezuela to Spain. This intelligence led to the seizure of 450 kilograms of cocaine.

Based on the sharing of information, DEA in Nicaragua arranged for lookouts on two suspect vessels. Search of one vessel uncovered 8 metric tons of cocaine; 13 metric tons of cocaine, concealed in a diesel fuel tank, were discovered in the other vessel. Twenty members of both crews, including the captains, were arrested.

Coordinate Training Programs for Host Country Police Agencies

DEA's international training activities are conducted in coordination with DEA's foreign office, U.S. Missions, and the Department of State, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs. The full range of the international antinarcotics training program is addressed in the International Training Section.

Institution Building and Foreign Liaisons

DEA Agents establish close relationships and networks with their counterparts that foster cooperation in international drug law enforcement. DEA Agents meet with their counterparts to discuss policy and legislative issues and provide assistance in developing drug control laws and regulations. DEA also provides training and material support to foreign law enforcement partners to help them combat major drug trafficking organizations and the production and transportation of illicit drugs. The activities described below are representative of DEA's efforts in foreign liaison and institution building activities.

In April 2001, DEA sponsored the 19th annual International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC). At the conference, senior drug law enforcement officials from 32 member countries throughout the Western Hemisphere and observers from Europe, Asia, and Australia met to discuss and exchange insights on counternarcotics enforcement activities. Presenters described their counternarcotics law enforcement strategies and shared lessons learned from multilateral investigations and operations. Members adopted initiatives pertaining to the development of regional multinational enforcement investigations and operations targeting major drug traffickers in the hemisphere. The conference provided a forum for the delegates to exchange information and build personal relationships that are key to enhancing closer coordination among law enforcement agencies.

DEA Country Offices in Colombia, Venezuela, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, and Argentina played a leadership role in supporting two regional operations. One operation targeted trafficking organizations in South America that transport heroin to the United States. The other operation targeted illicit precursor and essential chemical trafficking throughout South America. Although both operations have yielded very high statistical results, the operations best serve to foster and enhance relations between and amongst the South American countries. By initiating and supporting these programs, DEA promotes positive working relationships among the participating countries.

The Nicosia Country Office and Special Agents from the New York Field Division participated with the Israeli National Police in executing the arrests without incident of three Israeli nationals in Tel Aviv. This is the first time a mutual legal assistance treaty involving the United States and Israel has allowed for the search of the defendants' property and the questioning of the defendants in accordance with U.S. laws. In addition, representatives from DEA were allowed to participate in the proceedings. The three were charged with conspiracy to distribute more than one million MDMA tablets in the United States.

The Panama Country Office continued its airport interdiction program, which includes DEA and three Panamanian national law enforcement agencies. The program targets airport passengers transiting from Colombia to Panama with onward destinations worldwide. Since October 1, 2000, the operation has been responsible for the seizure of 141 kilograms of heroin, 245 kilograms of cocaine, and the arrest of 110 traffickers.

DEA Bolivia has worked extensively with host nation counterparts to train police officers, prosecutors, and judges in implementing the new Bolivian counternarcotics legislation. Bolivian Law 1008 contains strict guidelines for both law enforcement and judicial officials, including trials by jury and provisions for police officers to work undercover.

DEA offices in Thailand are playing an integral role in a U.S. Embassy Bangkok, Thailand initiative to provide expertise in the development of a Thai military and law enforcement task force to combat the security threat posed by drug trafficking organizations operating along the Thai/Burma border. DEA has provided operational support, promoted intelligence fusion and sharing, and provided training and organizational support in the creation of the task force. Additionally, DEA has identified necessary legal tools for police and judges to use in combating sophisticated drug trafficking organizations.

DEA has supported the development of an intelligence center network, provided expertise in the establishment of the Anti-Money Laundering Office, and sponsored the Sensitive Investigative Unit Program in Thailand. The success of these initiatives has resulted in the seizure of approximately $24 million USD.

DEA in Hong Kong hosted a "Far East Regional Precursor Chemical Conference." Representatives from Hong Kong, the Peoples Republic of China, Thailand, Burma, Australia, Japan, Laos, Korea, Philippines, Malaysia, and Vietnam attended. The primary goal of the conference was to develop a tracking initiative within the Far East Region that would concentrate on precursor chemicals used in the production of amphetamine-type stimulants. All participants agreed on an initiative to track ephedrine, which is the primary precursor in the production of methamphetamine.


DEA Summary of International Asset Forfeiture Sharing

(FY01)

DEA Case Number and Location

Total Amount Forfeited in the U.S.

Recipient Country

Amount of Transfer

Transfer Date

RL-98-0492

RL-98-0009

RL-98-0045

Western Washington and Central California

$248,1901

Canada

$89,129.622

3/15/01

M9-96-0060

Southern Texas

Aircraft valued at $200,000

Costa Rica

Aircraft

4/01

R2-91-0113

Southern California

$393,892

Cayman Islands

$146,874.34

5/11/01

G1-95-0345

Southern Florida

3 aircraft valued at $1,911,110

Dominican Republic

$1,139,399.77

4/2/01

1Total of all three cases.
2$12,500 transferred 6/99.


United States Coast Guard

Overview

The Coast Guard's multiyear campaign plan to combat the dynamic maritime drug trafficking threat Campaign Steel Web - is currently being revised to reflect changes in drug trafficking trends.

Strategic Goals. Steel Web 2002 is fully aligned with Goal 4 (Shield America's air, land and sea frontiers from the drug threat) and Goal 5 (Break foreign and domestic drug sources of supply) of the National Drug Control Strategy (NDCS), and complements the contributions of our law enforcement (Customs, DEA, local LEAs) and DoD partners in this effort.

Strategic Framework. Three pillars form the foundation of Steel Web 2002 for operations planning, cooperative efforts and regional engagement activities to combat drug smuggling in the transit and arrival zones:

  • Denial of maritime drug smuggling routes by developing a dynamic interdiction presence in the transit and arrival zones, and applying intelligence information to focus limited resources on maximizing the rate of removal of cocaine being smuggled via three major smuggling vectors: Eastern Caribbean, Western Caribbean, and Eastern Pacific.

  • Strengthening ties with source and transit zone nations to increase their capabilities in maritime law enforcement, reduce drug-related activities and enhance legitimate commerce within their territorial limits.

  • Support of interagency efforts to combat drug smuggling through coordination operations planning and execution.

The key to success of Steel Web 2002 is adherence to the concept of centralized planning and decentralized execution. Pursuit of international engagement opportunities is also necessary and will be coordinated by the Coast Guard International Affairs department. Partnering with law enforcement officials of other nations helps develop indigenous interdiction forces, and enhances the cumulative impact of interdiction efforts directed at drug traffickers in the region.

Combined Operations

The Coast Guard conducted Operation Caribe Venture, operation Rip Tide, and Operation Seguridad during 2001.

Operation Caribe Venture: International effort to deny smugglers the use of maritime routes along the islands of the eastern Caribbean. The U.S., France, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, Barbados, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, St. Lucia, Dominica, St. Kitts and Nevis, Dominican Republic and Antigua/Barbuda participate. During 2001, The second of two scheduled operations was cancelled due to the terrorist attacks and the resultant focus on maritime homeland security. Operation Rip Tide: A combined U.S./Jamaica/Grand Caymans (UK) effort to deny smugglers the use of maritime smuggling routes into Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. Rip Tide is coordinated by the 7th Coast Guard District in Miami and was conducted twice in 2001.

The Coast Guard also participates in several JIATF East and JIAFT West combined operations in Central America. During 2001 Coast Guard assets took part in Operation Mayan Jaguar (U.S./Guatemala) and Operation Chokehold (U.S./Costa Rica).

Operation Bahamas, Turks and Caicos (OPBAT): A Memorandum of Understanding with the UK, the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos to combat trafficking in the Turks and Caicos and the Bahamas. USCG contributes aircraft and aircrew on a steady-state basis. Also referred to as the TRIPART agreement, the U.S. is a signatory to the MOU, signed in JUL 90. USCG does not provide law enforcement personnel to OPBAT. Law enforcement is carried out by Tripart Team Members (TTMs), who are either Bahamian or Turks and Caicos law enforcement authorities. The DEA provides LE officers, but they operate only to assist the TTMs and do not have law enforcement jurisdiction. In 2001 OPBAT forces, with Coast Guard support, Seized 6,026 pounds of cocaine, 24,159 pounds of marijuana, arrested 105 persons ans seized 24 vessels.

U.S./Mexico Interdiction Working Group

The U.S./Mexico Interdiction Working Group (IWG grew from the bilateral cooperation experienced during maritime interdictions in 1999 and is based on a November 1999 Mexican proposal accepted by HLCG. USIC leads the U.S. side of JIATF-East, JIATF-West, Customs, CGD8, CGD11, DEA and the U.S. Embassy Narcotics Affairs Section. Mexican representation includes FEADS (DEA equivalent), CENDRO-6 (national counterdrug unit), SRE (foreign ministry), PFP (Federal Preventative Police), DEFENSA (Army), MARINA (Navy) and SCT (Captain of the Port/Merchant Marine). The IWG has significantly enhanced CD cooperation efforts by facilitating initiatives such as the U.S./MEX Communications Plan for use in law enforcement interdiction operations and Post Seizure Analysis Training/Exercise with the MEXNAV and the FEADS. IWG efforts have also led to coincidental operations with the Coast Guard and the Mexical Navy in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Eastern Pacific to assist the MXNAV in their counterdrug efforts. In 2001, the Coast Guard provided direct support to MEXNAV in 4 cases resulting in the seizure of 23,096 pounds of cocaine. Among the most significant of these seizures were the F/V Tolteca I with 8,529 pounds, and two go-fasts totaling 10,719 pounds.

Interaction with Colombia

In 2001, the Coast Guard continued to enjoy exceptional cooperation from the Government of Colombia in maritime interdiction resulting in the seizure of over 29,000 pounds of cocaine. The U.S.-Colombian Ship boarding Agreement allows the U.S. to exercise jurisdiction over CO flagged vessels located outside the CO EEZ, if the U.S. has initiated an ongoing investigation. The Colombians have authorized all 90 request for USCG boardings of Colombian flagged vessels since October 2000. Successful cocaine seizures as a result of the agreement include F/V RECUERDO (17,177 lbs), and four go-fast vessels (12,045).

USCG Technical Assistance

FY01 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Albania

Disaster Preparedness Assessment

15 Sep 00

28 Sep 00

DOD

Albania

Patrol Planners Mobile Training Team

7 May 01

12 May 01

IMET

Antigua

Operational Information Management Mobile Training Team

23 Oct 00

3 Nov 00

Embassy

Antigua

Operational Information Management Mobile Training Team

24 Jun 01

7 Jul 01

Embassy

Antigua (RSSTU)

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 00

30 Sep 01

INL

Azerbaijan

Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile Training Team

21 Oct 00

28 Oct 00

DOS

Azerbaijan

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

11 Jun 01

22 Jun 01

DOS

Azerbaijan

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

20 Jul 01

04 Aug 01

DOS

Bahamas

Advanced Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer and Interdiction Planning Mobile Training Team

8 Jan 01

26 Jan 01

IMET

Bahrain

Assessment Team

26 Apr 01

2 May 01

TCA

Bermuda

Assessment Team

10 Sep 01

14 Sep 01

DOD

Bolivia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 00

30 Sep 01

Embassy

Bulgaria

Advanced Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

18 Oct 00

6 Nov 01

INL

Bulgaria

Maritime Command and Control Subject Matter Expert Exchange

23 Apr 01

28 Apr 01

JCTP

Colombia

Advanced Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile training team

29 Jan 01

9 Feb 01

FMS

Colombia

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

22 Apr 01

5 May 01

INL

Costa Rica

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

19 Feb 01

2 Mar 01

INL

Costa Rica

Operational Training Program Development Mobile Training Team

4 Dec 00

8 Dec 00

IMET

Costa Rica

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

1 May 01

7 Dec 01

IMET

Croatia

Maritime Traffic Control Team

5 Mar 01

9 Mar 01

JCTP

Ecuador

Counter Drug Training Support Mission

24 Sep 01

6 Oct 01

DOD

Ecuador

Advanced Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

24 Jun 01

6 Jul 01

IMET

El Salvador

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

8 Jan 01

19 Jan 01

IMET

Georgia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 00

30 Sep 01

USCS

Georgia

Engineering and Logistics Mobile Training Team

3 Dec 00

13 Dec 00

USCS

Greece

MLE - Hidden Compartments Course Mobile Training Team

19 Mar 01

29 Mar 01

DEA

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)

FY01 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Greece

MLE - High Risk Boardings Mobile Training Team

2 Apr 01

6 Apr 01

Direct

Guyana

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

20 Aug 01

31 Aug 01

 

Haiti

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 00

3 Dec 00

IMET

Iceland

MLE Seminar with exercise evaluation

12 Jun 01

23 Jun 01

TCA

Jamaica

Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

14 May 01

25 May 01

IMET

Kenya

Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile training team

19 Mar 01

23 Mar 01

TCA

Kuwait

Assessment

21 Apr 01

24 Apr 01

TCA

Kuwait

Maritime Smuggling Interception Subject Matter Expert Exchange

3 Feb 01

5 Feb 01

TCA

Latvia

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

13 May 01

19 May 01

DOS

Latvia

Model Maritime Service Code

1 Apr 01

4 Apr 01

INL

Lebanon

Model Maritime Service Code

9 Apr 01

13 Apr 01

INL

Madagascar

Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile training team

7 Feb 01

21 Feb 01

TCA

Malta

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

24 Sep 01

3 Oct 01

IMET

Mexico

IONSCAN - Crime Scene Management Mobile Training Team

5 Nov 00

11 Nov 00

INL

Mexico

IONSCAN - Legal Aspects Mobile Training Team

18 Feb 01

24 Feb 01

INL

Mexico

IONSCAN - Mobile Training Team

17 Sep 01

5 Oct 01

INL

Mexico

IONSCAN - Mobile Training Team

19 Mar 01

23 Mar 01

INL

Mexico

Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile training team

15 Apr 01

21 Apr 01

INL

Netherland Antilles

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

19 Mar 01

24 Mar 01

FMS

Netherland Antilles

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

26 Mar 01

30 Mar 01

FMS

Nicaragua

MLE Interdiction Planning, Advanced Counter Narcotics Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

7 May 01

26 May 01

IMET

Pakistan

Advanced Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

10 Mar 01

23 Mar 01

INL

Panama

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 00

30 Sep 01

INL

Peru

Port Security Subject Matter Expert Exchange

27 Nov 00

1 Dec 00

TCA

Peru

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

01 Oct 00

30 Sep 01

INL

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)

FY01 (Completed)

Country

Course Title

Start Date

Finish Date

Funding Source

Portugal

Pre-Training Survey Team

10 Mar 01

17 Mar 01

IMET

Portugal

Counter Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

9 Jul 01

19 Jul 01

IMET

Qatar

Port Security/ Port Vulnerability Mobile training team

31 Mar 01

4 Apr 01

TCA

Uruguay

Pre-Training Survey

1 Apr 01

7 Apr 01

IMET

Uruguay

Incident Command System Mobile Training Team

16 Jul 01

20 Jul 01

IMET

Uruguay

Small Boat Maintenance Subject Matter Expert Exchange

24 Jun 01

30 Jun 01

TCA

Venezuela

Assessment

10 Feb 01

16 Feb 01

TCA

Zambia

Pre-Training Survey

15 Jul 01

21 Jul 01

IMET

 

USCG Technical Assistance

FY02 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Funding

Albania

Maritime Law Enforcement Interdiction Techniques Seminar

JCTP

Antigua and Barbuda

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

INL

Aruba

Instructor Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

FMS

Bahamas

Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Bahamas

Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement, Instructor Course, Mobile Training Team

IMET

Belize

Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Benin

Advanced Outboard Motor Maintenance Mobile Training Team

Embassy

Bolivia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

 

China

Assessment

INL

China

Port Physical Security / Port Vulnerability Assessment Basic Mobile Training Team

INL

China

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

INL

Colombia

Joint Boarding Officer Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Costa Rica

Engineering Mobile Training Team

INL

Costa Rica

Smallboat Operations Mobile Training Team

INL

Costa Rica

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Costa Rica

Small Boat Operational Training Program Development Mobile Training Team

IMET

Costa Rica

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

INL

Djibouti

Assessment

TCA

Curacao

Instructor Course, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

FMS

Ecuador

Assessment

TCA

Ecuador

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

FMS

El Salvador

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

El Salvador

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

El Salvador

Joint Boarding Officer, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Eritrea

Assessment

TCA

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)

FY02 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Funding

Gabon

Assessment

DOS

Georgia

Engineering/Logistics Administration Mobile Training Team

DOS

Georgia

Hull Maintenance & Damage Control Mobile Training Team

DOS

Georgia

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

DOS

Ghana

Pre-Training Survey

IMET

Ghana

Fisheries & Counternarcotics Boarding Officer, Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Honduras

Smallboat Assessment

TCA

Honduras

Smallboat Operations Mobile Training Team

INL

Jamaica

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Jamaica

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Japan

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

Direct

Jordan

Engineering Mobile Training Team

IMET

Jordan

Port Security & Vulnerability Mobile Training Team

IMET

Kenya

Crisis Command & Control Mobile Training Team

IMET

Lebanon

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3

INL

Lebanon

Port Security & Vulnerability Mobile Training Team

IMET

Lebanon

Model Maritime Service Code Phase 3 - Development

INL

Lebanon

Advanced Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Lebanon

Marine Safety and Environmental Security Seminar

IMET

Lithuania

Crisis Command & Control Mobile Training Team

IMET

Lithuania

International Maritime Law Subject Matter Expert Exchange

JCTP

Malawi

Assessment

IMET

Malta

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

IMET

Malta

Port Security & Vulnerability Mobile Training Team

IMET

Mauritania

MLE Pre Training Survey

IMET

Mauritius

East Africa Regional Fisheries Seminar

DOS

Mexico

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

DOD

USCG Technical Assistance (Cont.)

FY02 (Proposed)

Country

Course Title

Funding

Mexico

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

DOD

Mexico

Riverine Small boat Operations Mobile Training Team

DOD

Nicaragua

Assessment

DOD

Nicaragua

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Nicaragua

Interdiction Planning, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Oman

Port Security & Vulnerability Mobile Training Team

TCA

Pakistan

Port Security & Vulnerability Mobile Training Team

INL

Pakistan

Small boat Operations Mobile Training Team

INL

Panama

Joint Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Boarding Officer Mobile Training Team

INL

Panama

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

Embassy

Panama

Small Boat Operations Mobile Training Team

INL

Peru

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

DOS

Portugal

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Russia

Instructors Course, MLE CG-03

INL

Russia

Miscellaneous Mobile Training Team Out-CONUS

IMET

Samoa

Leadership and Management

IMET

Sao Tome

Pre-Training Survey

 

Sierra Leone

Pre-Training Survey

 

Solomon Islands

Leadership and Management

IMET

Thailand

Assessment

DOD

Tunisia

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

IMET

Uzbekistan

Boarding Officer, Advanced, Counternarcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Uzbekistan

Boarding Officer, Counter-Narcotics Maritime Law Enforcement Mobile Training Team

INL

Yemen

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development - CG Advisor

FMS

Yemen (Sanaa)

Maritime Commerce Control, Infrastructure Development Mobile Training Team

FMS

United States Customs Service

The United States Customs Service processes all goods and merchandise imported into and exported from the United States. Inspectors, mail examiners and canine officers are tasked with intercepting contraband, illicit goods and unreported currency as it crosses our borders. Interdiction efforts are conducted with a minimum disruption of legitimate trade, by utilizing techniques of selectivity and targeting to identify high risk shipments for more intensive examination. Seizure statistics indicate that the U.S. Customs Service is among the most successful border control agencies in the world, and its officers operate with a high level of independence, efficiency and integrity. On the average day, U.S. Customs examines 1.3 million arriving passengers, 410,000 arriving conveyances, effects seizures of $500,000 in currency and 2 tons of narcotics, arrests 65 fugitives or violators, while conducting the business of processing incoming commercial merchandise. The State Department Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs and the U.S. Customs Service promote international cooperation through an interagency agreement that provides funding for training and assistance programs throughout the world. The agreement enables the U.S. Customs Service to offer tools and technologies for combating transnational crime to border agencies in other countries, to the benefit of international law enforcement.

International Training and Assistance

U.S. Customs conducted a number of programs in response to emerging priorities during 2001:

  • U.S. Customs provided technical training and assistance in support of the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) programs currently operating in Bangkok, Budapest and Gaborone. The mission of the ILEA is to promote social, political and economic stability by combating crime. To achieve this goal, ILEA provides high-quality training and technical assistance, supports institution building and enforcement capability and fosters improved relationships between American law enforcement agencies and their counterparts in the region. ILEA also encourages strong partnerships among regional countries, to address common problems associated with criminal activity. U.S. Customs has developed and conducted specialized training on topics which include: International Controlled Deliveries and Drug Investigation conducted jointly with DEA; Complex Financial Investigations, conducted jointly with IRS; and Intellectual Property Rights, conducted with the FBI. Customs provided assistance for 14 ILEA programs.

  • U.S. Customs incorporated hazardous materials training for narcotics programs in Mexico and Kyrgyzstan. The hazardous materials training targeted the border control environment. International placarding, labeling and documentation standards are taught with emphasis on safety procedures for inspecting cargo shipments. Standards applying to the transport precursor chemicals, narcotics substances and radiological materials were addressed.

  • U.S. Customs developed and implemented a Colombian training and assistance initiative, focusing on narcotics interdiction efforts, combating the Black Market Peso Exchange, gathering of intelligence, and bilateral cooperative efforts between the government of the U.S. and Colombia. In support of Plan Colombia, U.S. Customs will provide training and assistance focusing on integrity, border interdiction, trade fraud, intelligence collection, industry partnership programs, and financial crimes issues in Colombia. In addition, an Andean Regional Initiative has been developed to counter the effects of Plan Colombia in the Andean Region. Program initiatives were planned and scheduled during FY2001 that will be delivered during FY2002.

  • The Safe Skies for Africa Initiative promotes sustainable improvements in aviation safety and security in Africa and creates the environment that fosters the growth of aviation services between Africa and the US. The initiative recognizes that Safe Skies are a prerequisite for increased trade and investment and long-term economic development in Africa. In support of this initiative, the U.S. Government surveys the aviation needs of the selected countries and assists them in developing work plans to improve and enhance their aviation infrastructure. These countries then work with international organizations and the private sector to implement the plans. U.S. survey teams, including one U.S. Customs Inspector, visited Angola.

  • A U.S. Customs canine officer traveled to Colombia during March 2001 to conduct a Post-funded canine program assessment. Hurricane Mitch Supplemental funding allowed 6 Honduran canine officers to participate in canine training programs at the Canine Training Center located in Front Royal, Virginia.

  • Post-funded Short-Term Advisory projects were conducted in Panama, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, Qatar, China, and Israel.

Industry Partnership Programs

Currently, the U.S. Customs Service has three active Industry Partnership Programs (IPP) that are designed to deter and prevent narcotics from being smuggled into the United States via commercial cargo and conveyances, and to enlist the trade's support in narcotics interdiction-related activities, both domestically and abroad. The programs are:

  • The Carrier Initiative Program (CIP), established in 1984, is a joint effort among air, sea, and land, railroad carriers and U.S. Customs. There are over 4,100 carriers currently participating in the CIP. The program encourages the carriers to improve their security practices in striving to prevent narcotics from getting onboard their conveyances.

  • The Business Anti-Smuggling Coalition (BASC), initiated in March 1996, BASC is a business-led, Customs-supported alliance created to combat narcotics smuggling via commercial trade. BASC was designed to complement and enhance the CIP program. The idea behind BASC is to examine the entire process of manufacturing and shipping merchandise from foreign countries to the United States. The program also heightens business awareness about narcotics smuggling in the import and export communities.

  • The Americas Counter Smuggling Initiative (ACSI) is a priority undertaking, established by Customs, to build upon the success of the CIP and BASC by strengthening and expanding our anti-narcotics security programs with industry and government throughout Central and South America. Since January 1998, Customs has detailed officers to assist businesses and government in developing security programs and initiatives that safeguard legitimate shipments from being used to smuggle narcotics. Target countries include Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela.

Current Status

In FY 2001, participants in these Industry Partnership Programs provided information to U.S. Customs, which has resulted in 70 domestic seizures totaling 17,560 pounds of narcotics and assisted in 173 foreign intercepts of 28,680 pounds of narcotics destined for the United States from abroad.

From FY95 - FY01 participants in these programs have provided information to Customs, which has resulted in domestic seizures totaling over 108,560 pounds of narcotics.

During the same period, (FY95 - FY01) program participants helped intercept over 241,240 pounds of narcotics destined for the United States from abroad.

Through the BASC program, Customs is working with the business community throughout the United States, to include the locations of Otay Mesa, Ca.; Nogales, Az.; El Paso, Tx.; Laredo, Tx.; McAllen, Tx.; and Miami, Florida.

There are currently U.S. BASC chapters in Miami, Florida and McAllen, Texas

BASC Chapters have been established by the private sector in Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Panama and Mexico.

BASC has been promoted to the World Customs Organization (WCO) and is included into the "WCO Business Partnership" program. This provides a means by which Customs administrations can work together with trade associations to combat the international trade of illicit drugs.

(Note: On November 2, 1999, the President of the International Chamber of Commerce sent a letter to the Secretary General of the WCO expressing support of BASC as an effective approach to deter drug smuggling in legitimate commercial trade.)

The Customs Service, in conjunction with our support of Plan Colombia, supported the First Worldwide BASC Conference that was held in Cartagena, Colombia in May 2001.

Customs Mutual Assistance Agreements

CMAA negotiations are currently on-going with the Governments of Brazil, Chile, India, Kuwait and Paraguay. CMAAs provide for mutual assistance in the enforcement of customs-related laws, and U.S. Customs utilizes these agreements to assist in evidence collection for criminal cases involving narcotics smuggling and money laundering. U.S. courts have ruled that evidenced gathered via these executive agreements is fully admissible in U.S. court cases.

Shared Financial Assets

In FY 2001, U.S. Customs shared financial assets with three countries:

Cayman Islands

$14,324

Netherlands

$144,220

Canada

$210,256

Total

$368,800


Training in the U.S.

International Visitors Program. Visiting foreign officials consult with appropriate high level managers in US Customs Headquarters, and conduct on-site observational tours of selected ports and field operations. The focus includes narcotics enforcement policies, port security issues, counterterrorism programs and intelligence operations. The IVP was delivered to 850 participants for 257 programs to benefit 124 countries.

Training in Host Countries

Overseas Enforcement Training. Program combines formal classroom training and field exercises for border control personnel. The curriculum includes narcotics interdiction, identifying falsified travel documents, targeting, search techniques, WMD and hazardous materials identification in the border environment. Program was delivered to 166 participants in 7 countries.

Train-the-Trainer Workshop. The Train-The-Trainer Workshop is a program oriented to prepare a nucleus of instructors who can teach border control interdiction techniques as part of a formal classroom training program. Institutionalizes training methodology and prepares a cadre of trainers for the host governments. Program was delivered to 24 participants in 2 countries.

Short Term Advisory. Commits an on-site US Customs expert to assist the host government agencies with selected projects of institution building and improved interdiction capabilities. These may focus on specific narcotics threats, port security, counterproliferation of WMD. Advisors are also fielded for strategic planning, commercial processing, investigations, automation and border/trade facilitation. In FY2001 35 short term advisors were fielded to 7 countries.

Contraband Enforcement Team. Course assists host agency to develop and operate a mobile Contraband Enforcement Team. It is offered as a 3-phase program: an observational tour to the US for 4 prospective supervisors; in-country formal training for the prospective team members; and a US short-term advisor who remains for 1-2 weeks following the in-country training. Program was delivered to 72 participants in 3 countries.

Passenger Enforcement Rover Training. Rovers are plain-clothes Customs inspectors who mingle with arriving passengers to identify irregularities. The goal is to develop interdiction skills for falsified documents, high-risk passengers, and interdiction of narcotics, WMD and other contraband in the airport environment. The PERT program was delivered to 24 participants in 1 country.

Passenger Interview and Vehicle Inspection Training. This course is specialized for the risks at the land border environment. The course combines classroom training and field exercise. It offers training in interview strategies, counterfeit travel documents, targeting for narcotics/WMD/ contraband, search techniques, port security, and safety practices for hazardous materials. PIVIT was delivered to 48 participants in 2 countries.

Integrity/Anti-Corruption. Course is designed to promote professionalism and integrity within the workforce of agencies particularly vulnerable to bribery and corruption. Focus is on integrity awareness training and development of internal investigation organizations. Course was delivered to 264 participants in 11 countries.

Canine Training (U.S. Based). Designed to assist countries that export significant amounts of narcotics to the US to initiate and maintain a viable detector dog program. Canine training was delivered to 38 participants from 2 countries.

Looking Ahead

The country of Afghanistan is once again emerging as a primary supplier of the world's heroin. A Carnegie Endowment paper written in March 2000 asserts that Osama bin-Laden "finances his terrorist activities with profits from his opium syndicate that he operates from western Afghanistan." The link between the corrupting influences of narcotic trafficking and the devastation of terrorist activities cannot be denied. The illicit proceeds of transnational narcotics enterprises finance a range of criminal and terrorist objectives; the disproportionate profits overshadow legitimate trade and economic development at all levels of society. The US Customs Service has powerful technological and law enforcement resources to share with countries working to combat narcotics trafficking. Computer capability, financial investigations, and border interdiction skills are offered in a spirit of international cooperation by the US Customs Service. The objectives are the same worldwide: to disrupt and defeat narco-terrorism where ever it appears on the map.



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