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2011 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report (INCSR)--Volume II: Money Laundering and Financial Crimes Country Database--Money Laundering/Financial Crimes Countries


Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
May 20, 2011

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Every year, U.S. officials from agencies with anti-money laundering responsibilities meet to assess the money laundering situations in 200 jurisdictions. The review includes an assessment of the significance of financial transactions in the country’s financial institutions involving proceeds of serious crime, steps taken or not taken to address financial crime and money laundering, each jurisdiction’s vulnerability to money laundering, the conformance of its laws and policies to international standards, the effectiveness with which the government has acted, and the government’s political will to take needed actions.

The 2011 International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, Money Laundering and Financial Crimes, highlights the most significant steps countries and jurisdictions categorized as “Major Money Laundering Countries” have taken to improve their anti-money laundering/counter-terrorist financing (AML/CFT) regimes. The report provides a snapshot of the AML/CFT legal infrastructure of each country or jurisdiction and its capacity to share information and cooperate in international investigations. For each country where they have been completed, the write-up also provides a link to the most recent mutual evaluation performed by or on behalf of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) or the FATF-style regional body to which the country or jurisdiction belongs. When applicable, relevant country reports also provide links to the Department of State’s “Country Reports on Terrorism” so the reader can learn more about issues specific to terrorism and terrorism financing. Providing these links will allow those interested readers to find detailed information on the country’s AML/CFT capacity and the effectiveness of its programs.

In addition, the report contains details of United States Government efforts to provide technical assistance and training as well as information on the multilateral organizations we support, either monetarily and/or through participation in their programs. In 2010, USG personnel leveraged their expertise to share their experience and knowledge with over 100 countries. They worked independently and with other donor countries and organizations to provide training programs, mentoring and support for supervisory, law enforcement, prosecutorial, customs and financial intelligence unit personnel as well as private sector entities. We expect these efforts, over time, will build capacity in jurisdictions that are lacking, strengthen the overall level of global compliance with international standards and contribute to an increase in prosecutions and convictions of those who launder money or finance terrorists or terrorist acts.

Money laundering continues to be a serious global threat. Jurisdictions flooded with illicit funds are vulnerable to the breakdown of the rule of law, the corruption of public officials and destabilization of their economies. The development of new technologies and the possibility of linkages between illegal activities that generate considerable proceeds and the funding of terrorist groups only exacerbate the challenges faced by the financial, law enforcement, supervisory, legal and intelligence communities. The continued development of AML/CFT regimes to deter criminal activity and detect illicit proceeds is reflected in this report again this year. Political stability, democracy and free markets depend on solvent, stable, and honest financial, commercial, and trade systems. The Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs looks forward to continuing to work with our U.S. and international partners in furthering this important work and strengthening capacities globally to combat money laundering and the funding of terrorists and terrorism.

Countries and Jurisdictions Table

Countries/
Jurisdictions of Primary Concern

Countries/
Jurisdictions of Concern

Other Countries/
Jurisdictions Monitored

Afghanistan

Liechtenstein

Albania

Moldova

Andorra

Malawi

Antigua and Barbuda

Luxembourg

Algeria

Monaco

Anguilla

Maldives

Australia

Macau

Angola

Montenegro

Armenia

Mali

Austria

Mexico

Argentina

Morocco

Benin

Malta

Bahamas

Netherlands

Aruba

Nicaragua

Bermuda

Marshall Islands

Belize

Nigeria

Azerbaijan

Palau

Botswana

Mauritania

Bolivia

Pakistan

Bahrain

Peru

Brunei

Mauritius

Brazil

Panama

Bangladesh

Poland

Burkina Faso

Micronesia FS

British Virgin Islands

Paraguay

Barbados

Portugal

Burundi

Mongolia

Burma

Philippines

Belarus

Qatar

Cameroon

Montserrat

Cambodia

Russia

Belgium

Romania

Cape Verde

Mozambique

Canada

Singapore

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Samoa

Central African Republic

Namibia

Cayman Islands

Somalia

Bulgaria

Saudi Arabia

Chad

Nauru

China, People Rep

Spain

Chile

Senegal

Congo, Dem Rep of

Nepal

Colombia

Switzerland

Comoros

Serbia

Congo, Rep of

New Zealand

Costa Rica

Taiwan

Cook Islands

Seychelles

Croatia

Niger

Cyprus

Thailand

Cote d’Ivoire

Sierra Leone

Cuba

Niue

Dominican Republic

Turkey

Curacao

Slovakia

Denmark

Norway

France

Ukraine

Czech Rep

South Africa

Djibouti

Oman

Germany

United Arab Emirates

Ecuador

St. Kitts & Nevis

Dominica

Papua New Guinea

Greece

United Kingdom

Egypt

St. Lucia

Equatorial Guinea

Rwanda

Guatemala

United States

El Salvador

St. Maarten

Eritrea

San Marino

 

Guernsey

Uruguay

Ghana

St. Vincent

Estonia

Sao Tome & Principe

Guinea-Bissau

Venezuela

Gibraltar

Suriname

Ethiopia

Slovenia

Haiti

Zimbabwe

Grenada

Syria

Fiji

Solomon Islands

Hong Kong

 

Guyana

Tanzania

Finland

Sri Lanka

India

 

Honduras

Trinidad and Tobago

Gabon

Sudan

Indonesia

 

Hungary

Turks and Caicos

Gambia

Swaziland

Iran

 

Ireland

Vanuatu

Georgia

Sweden

Iraq

 

Jamaica

Vietnam

Guinea

Tajikistan

Isle of Man

 

Jordan

Yemen

Iceland

Timor-Leste

Israel

 

Kazakhstan

 

Kyrgyz Republic

Togo

Italy

 

Korea, North

 

Lesotho

Tonga

Japan

 

Korea, South

 

Liberia

Tunisia

Jersey

 

Kosovo

 

Libya

Turkmenistan

Kenya

 

Kuwait

 

Lithuania

Uganda

Latvia

 

Laos

 

Macedonia

Uzbekistan

Lebanon

 

Malaysia

 

Madagascar

Zambia



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