printable banner

U.S. Department of State - Great Seal

U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

2013 INCSR: U.S. Government Assistance


Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
Report
March 5, 2013

Share

Department of State Budget

     

U.S. Department of State FY 2012-2013 Budget

 

Counter-Narcotics Program Area

 
     

$ in thousands for all items

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Request

TOTAL

672,417

675,266

Africa

1,050

1,050

Liberia

1,050

1,050

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

1,050

1,050

East Asia and Pacific

2,540

600

Indonesia

490

450

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

490

450

Laos

250

150

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

250

150

State East Asia and Pacific Regional

1,800

-

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

1,800

-

Europe and Eurasia

1,117

569

Georgia

203

120

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

203

-

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

-

120

Russia

614

449

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

614

-

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

-

449

Eurasia Regional

300

-

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

300

-

Near East

1,000

1,000

Iraq

1,000

1,000

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

1,000

1,000

South and Central Asia

191,873

249,299

Afghanistan

169,632

225,381

Economic Support Fund

63,000

65,000

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

106,632

160,381

Kazakhstan

685

724

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

685

-

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

-

724

Kyrgyz Republic

521

780

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

521

-

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

-

780

Pakistan

12,410

12,140

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

12,410

12,140

Tajikistan

1,060

820

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

1,060

-

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

-

820

Turkmenistan

243

298

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

243

-

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

-

298

Uzbekistan

32

156

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

32

-

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

-

156

Central Asia Regional

290

-

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia

290

-

State South and Central Asia Regional (SCA)

7,000

9,000

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

7,000

9,000

Western Hemisphere

388,162

345,313

Belize

-

213

Foreign Military Financing

-

213

Bolivia

7,500

5,000

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

7,500

5,000

Brazil

2,900

1,915

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

2,900

1,915

Colombia

214,902

198,605

Economic Support Fund

88,302

84,633

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

126,600

113,972

Costa Rica

815

1,402

Foreign Military Financing

315

1,402

Ecuador

4,850

8,888

Development Assistance

1,400

4,438

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

3,450

4,450

Haiti

2,570

1,360

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

2,570

1,360

Mexico

67,000

55,000

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

67,000

55,000

Paraguay

175

150

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

175

150

Peru

48,000

47,250

Development Assistance

21,000

25,000

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

27,000

22,250

State Western Hemisphere Regional (WHA)

39,450

25,530

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

39,450

25,530

Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL)-Centrally-Managed Programs

86,675

77,435

INL - CFSP, Critical Flight Safety Program

7,838

8,185

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

7,838

8,185

INL - Demand Reduction

12,500

12,500

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

12,500

12,500

INL - Inter-regional Aviation Support

50,362

41,951

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

50,362

41,951

INL - International Organizations

3,900

3,400

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

3,900

3,400

INL - Program Development and Support

12,075

11,399

International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement

12,075

11,399

 

International Training

International counternarcotics training is managed and funded by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL), and implemented by various U.S. law enforcement organizations including the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP), and U.S. Coast Guard. Major objectives are:

  • Contributing to enhanced professionalism of the basic rule of law infrastructure for carrying out counternarcotics law enforcement activities in countries which cooperate with and are considered significant to U.S. narcotics control efforts;
  • Improving technical skills of drug law enforcement personnel in these countries; and
  • Increasing cooperation between U.S. and foreign law enforcement officials.

INL-funded training supports U.S. counternarcotics priorities worldwide, and focuses on encouraging foreign law enforcement agency self-sufficiency. The overarching goal of U.S. counternarcotics training is to support the development of effective host country enforcement institutions, capable of removing drugs from circulation before they can reach the United States. U.S training can take two forms: as part of a planned bilateral assistance program in target partner countries; and as regional training with international participants from multiple countries. The regional training provided at International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEAs) consists of both general law enforcement training as well as specialized training for mid-level managers in police and other law enforcement agencies.

U.S. bilateral training assistance program works closely with international organizations including the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the Organization of American States. The U.S. coordinates assistance planning with other donors through mechanisms such as the Dublin Group (an informal body of countries and organizations that provide law enforcement training), and the Paris Pact (an informal network of states dedicated to stopping the spread of Afghan opiates). The U.S. continuously works to promote burden-sharing with our allies in the provision of training, as well as ensuring that our respective efforts are complementary and directed towards common goals.

International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEAs)

The mission of the regional International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEAs) is to support emerging democracies, help protect U.S. interests through international cooperation, and promote social, political and economic stability by combating crime. To achieve these goals, the ILEA program provides high-quality training and technical assistance, supports institution building and enforcement capability development, and fosters relationships between American law enforcement agencies and their counterparts around the world.

Since the first ILEA opened in Budapest in 1995, the program has grown to five academies worldwide, and has provided training to over 42,000 students in from countries in Africa, Europe, Asia, and across Latin America. ILEAs offer three different types of programs to address global threats: a core program; specialized courses; and seminars and workshops. The core program is a six-week intensive professional development program – the Law Enforcement Leadership Development (LELD) – designed for mid-level law enforcement practitioners , and is tailored to region-specific needs and emerging global threats. The core program typically includes 50 participants, normally from three or more countries. The specialized courses, comprised of about 30 participants, are one or two-week courses for law enforcement or criminal justice officials on a specific topic. Lastly, regional seminars or workshops present various emerging law enforcement topics such as transnational crimes, financial crimes, and counterterrorism.

The ILEAs help to develop an extensive network of alumni who exchange information with their regional and U.S. counterparts and assist in transnational investigations. Many ILEA graduates become the leaders and decision-makers in their respective law enforcement organizations. The Department of State coordinates with the Departments of Justice, Homeland Security and Treasury, and with foreign government counterparts to implement the ILEA programs.

Africa. ILEA Gaborone (Botswana) opened in 2001. ILEA Gaborone delivers four core programs annually and also offers specialized courses for police and other criminal justice officials to boost their capacity to work with U.S. and regional counterparts. These courses concentrate on specific methods and techniques in a variety of subjects, such as anti-corruption, financial crimes, border security, drug enforcement, firearms, explosives, wildlife investigation, gender-based violence and many others. ILEA Gaborone provided training to approximately 740 students in 2012.

Asia. ILEA Bangkok (Thailand) opened in 1999, and focuses on enhancing regional cooperation against transnational crime threats in Southeast Asia. Courses focus on combating illicit drug trafficking, terrorist financing and financial crimes, illicit wildlife trafficking, environmental crimes, and human trafficking. ILEA Bangkok provides one core program and also provides specialized courses on a variety of criminal justice topics each year. ILEA Bangkok trained approximately 1330 students in 2012.

Europe. ILEA Budapest (Hungary) was the first ILEA and was established in 1995. ILEA Budapest delivers five core programs annually and also offers specialized courses on regional threats such as organized crime, environmental and cyber-crime, terrorist financing and financial crimes, women in law enforcement, gender-based violence and many others. ILEA Budapest trained approximately 1100 students in 2012.

Global. ILEA Roswell (New Mexico) opened in September 2001. ILEA Roswell provides the tools necessary to enable partner countries to formulate and execute effective and responsible criminal justice public policy. Unlike other ILEAs, ILEA Roswell draws its recruits from graduates of regional Academies in Budapest, Bangkok, Gaborone, San Salvador and the ILEA Regional Training Center (RTC) in Lima, Peru. ILEA Roswell trained approximately 60 students in 2012.

Latin America. ILEA San Salvador (El Salvador) opened in 2005. ILEA San Salvador delivers four core programs annually and also offers specialized courses on regional threats as well as specialized courses for police, prosecutors, and judicial officials. ILEA San Salvador courses concentrate on anti-gangs, international terrorism, illegal trafficking in drugs, alien smuggling, terrorist financing and financial crimes. ILEA San Salvador trained approximately 1170 students in 2012.

The ILEA Regional Training Center in Lima (Peru) opened in 2007 to complement the mission of ILEA San Salvador. The RTC augments the delivery of region-specific training for Latin America and concentrates on specialized courses on critical topics for countries in the Southern Cone and Andean Regions. The RTC trained approximately 340 students in 2012.

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

The majority of illicit drugs distributed and consumed in the United States originate in foreign countries. DEA’s mission is to enforce the controlled substances laws and regulations of the United States. In furtherance of this mission, DEA targets the cultivation, production, transportation, distribution and financial operations of Drug Trafficking Organizations (DTOs) based in foreign nations and at home. The primary objective behind DEA’s “Drug Flow Attack Strategy” is to cause major disruption to the flow of drugs, money and chemicals between source zones and the United States. In order to dismantle and disrupt DTOs, DEA and other U.S. agencies work hand in hand with our foreign law enforcement counterparts. 

DEA establishes and maintains working relationships with host nations by staffing 85 DEA offices located in 66 countries. DEA’s foreign offices act as conduits of information to DEA components in the United States and vice versa. In this manner, investigators are able to target DTOs from the source to the end user. DEA’s foreign offices are tasked with the following objectives: 

  • Conduct bilateral investigations with foreign law enforcement;
  • Coordinate counternarcotics intelligence gathering with host governments;
  • Conduct training programs for host country police agencies (contingent on host nation being a recipient of US counter narcotics assistance;
  • Assist in the development of host country drug law enforcement institutions and develop mutually beneficial law enforcement relationships with foreign law enforcement agencies.

The emphasis placed on each objective is determined by the host nation’s unique conditions and circumstances related to their infrastructure and law enforcement capabilities. DEA works side by side with host nation counterparts to develop relevant training initiatives, promote intelligence sharing and support joint operations. The following examples highlight the assistance and joint enforcement efforts undertaken by DEA and host nation counterparts in 2012. 

$150 Million Seizure in Hezbollah-related Money Laundering Scheme: In 2007, DEA identified an ongoing, international trade-based money laundering conspiracy led by Lebanese national Ayman Joumaa designed to conceal the proceeds obtained from illicit drug sales and other criminal activity through the purchase and shipment of used vehicles from the United States to West Africa. The Joumaa Drug Trafficking Organization (DTO) was suspected of laundering more than $400 milllion annually in proceeds through the Lebanese Canadian Bank (LCB) and Lebanese exchange houses. On December 15, 2011, DEA and the U.S. Attorney’s Office at the Southern District of New York (USAO-SDNY) filed an asset forfeiture and civil money laundering complaint describing Hezbollah’s involvement in the trade based money laundering scheme, an action which precluded a foreign terrorist organization (FTO) from infiltrating the U.S. financial system and profiting from a money laundering mechanism. Joumaa was also indicted on December 12, 2011, for drug and money laundering offenses in the Eastern District of Virginia. 

On August 15, 2012, DEA New York Field Division and USAO-SDNY filed a request for and obtained seizure orders seeking funds contained in the correspondent US bank accounts of Banque Libano–Francaise. DEA believed that forfeitable assets tied to the sale of LCB were maintained in escrow at Banque Libano–Francaise totaling approximately $150 million. On August 20, 2012, Banque Libano–Francaise complied with the order and wired $150 million to a federal account. 

Operation Log Jam: This multi-jurisdictional initiative was conducted by DEA and Homeland Security Investigations, and targeted a group of manufacturers, wholesalers, sub-distributors and retail distributors involved in the illegal distribution of synthetic cannabinoids (“spice”) and synthetic cathinones (“bath salts”). On July 25, 2012, more than 90 individuals were arrested and more than five million packets of designer synthetic drugs were seized in the first nationwide law enforcement action against the synthetic designer drug industry responsible for the production and sale of synthetic drugs often marketed as bath salts, spice, incense, or plant food. More than $36 million in cash, 4.8 million packets of synthetic cannabinoids and 167,000 packets of synthetic cathinones were seized. Materials necessary for the production of an additional 13.6 million cannabinoids and 392,000 packets of synthetic cathinones were also seized. 

Operation Resolute: On April 17, 2012, foreign nationals Harouna Toure and Idriss Abdelrahman both pled guilty to one count of conspiring to provide material support to a designated FTO. Toure, Abdelrahman and co-conspirator Oumar Issa were charged in connection with their agreement to transport cocaine through West and North Africa, intending to support the drug trafficking activities of Al-Qaida in the Lands of the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) and the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Issa pled guilty to one count of conspiring to provide material support to a FTO on November 15, 2011. This is the first case with Al-Qaida connected subjects convicted in the U.S. involving drug related activities. 

Operation Lockdown: On December 26, 2011, Jorge Fadlallah-Cheaitelli, a Lebanese-Colombian based in Panama, and multi-million dollar international money launderer with ties to Hezbollah and the Sinaloa Cartel, was arrested in Costa Rica. DEA coordinated the arrest with authorities in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Honduras, and Colombia. He was extradited to New York on July 30, 2012. 

United States Coast Guard (USCG)

The USCG plays a crucial role in efforts to keep dangerous narcotic drugs moving by sea from reaching the United States. Working within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in carrying out its responsibilities within the National Drug Control Strategy, the USCG leverages its unique maritime security authorities, capabilities and partnerships to mitigate risk and improve security in our domestic ports, on the high seas, and abroad. The overarching strategy is to increase maritime border security through a layered security system that begins beyond the country’s physical borders. This layered approach begins in foreign ports where the Coast Guard conducts foreign port assessments, leveraging the International Port Security Program to assess the effectiveness of port security and antiterrorism measures. Offshore, maritime patrol aircraft provide broad surveillance capability enabling cutters and law enforcement detachments (LEDET) embarked on U.S. Naval ships and Allied Nation vessels to respond to potential threats, launch boats and aircraft in adverse sea states, and maintain a presence through all weather conditions. Well before vessels arrive in ports, screening and targeting operations provide critical information regarding vessels, crews, passengers, and cargo destined for the United States. To maximize the operational success, the USCG uses maritime counterdrug bilateral agreements and operating procedures with partner nations to coordinate detection and monitoring (D&M) and interdiction and apprehension (I&A) endgame activities and coordinate joint operations.

D&M and I&A: Detection of narcotics trafficking vessels occurs principally through the collection, analysis, and dissemination of tactical information and strategic intelligence combined with effective sensors operating from land, air and surface assets, for which Joint Interagency-South (JIATF-S) is lead. The six million square mile transit zone is far too expansive to randomly patrol; targeting information is necessary to focus efforts. Upon detection, the USCG, and other similar U.S. and partner nation law enforcement agencies provide monitoring, relaying data, imagery and position information until an appropriate interdiction asset arrives on scene. The USCG is the lead U.S. federal agency for drug interdiction on the high seas. Interdiction success causes Drug Trafficking Organizations (DTOs) to incur greater costs and decreases their efficiency in moving illicit products to market. A crucial element in USCG success for drug interdiction is the system of agreements with many countries around the world, which permit USCG law enforcement officers to stop, board, and search vessels suspected of transporting narcotics.

International Cooperative Efforts: The Coast Guard has 52 personnel deployed abroad to facilitate maritime counterdrug activities including security assistance, intelligence collection and dissemination, and liaison internally and externally. There are 45 maritime counterdrug bilateral agreements or operational procedures in place between the United States and partner nations. These agreements greatly increase the operational reach of U.S. assets, and help partner nations protect their sovereignty. The Coast Guard sponsors a semi-annual Multilateral Maritime Counterdrug Summit with partner nations in the primary drug transit zone that gives participants the opportunity to share, exchange, and improve “best practices,” and to think creatively about employing new tactics, techniques, and procedures to counter drug trafficking organizations. To counter the cocaine flow across the Atlantic Ocean into Africa and Europe, the USCG continues to work with U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) to expand maritime training and operations for West African countries through the African Maritime Law Enforcement Partnership (AMLEP).

International Training and Technical Assistance: The USCG conducts International Training and Technical Assistance in support of drug interdiction programs through various means. The USCG Technical Assistance Field Team (TAFT) provides engineering expertise, vessel assessments, and major repair contracting services to the maritime services of the countries in the Eastern Caribbean’s Regional Security System (RSS). The USCG’s Security Assistance Program offers both resident training programs and mobile training teams (MTTs) to partner nation maritime services around the world to advance the capability of their naval and coast guard forces. In 2012, the USCG deployed 76 MTTs to 35 countries, and 61 partner nations enrolled students in 232 resident courses at USCG training installations.

Operational Highlights: In 2012, the Coast Guard expended over 1,924 cutter days and 3,860 aircraft hours on counterdrug patrols; conducted 12 joint operations with partner nations; and deployed 17 LEDETs aboard British, Dutch and Canadian warships. As a result, the Coast Guard disrupted 162 drug smuggling attempts, which included the seizure of 70 vessels, detention of 352 suspected smugglers, and removal of 107 metric tons (MT) of cocaine and 56 MT of marijuana. Nearly all of these interdictions involved some type of foreign partner support or cooperation, either through direct unit participation, or through the exercise of bilateral agreements including entry into territorial waters, granting permission to board, or logistics support.



Back to Top
Sign-in

Do you already have an account on one of these sites? Click the logo to sign in and create your own customized State Department page. Want to learn more? Check out our FAQ!

OpenID is a service that allows you to sign in to many different websites using a single identity. Find out more about OpenID and how to get an OpenID-enabled account.