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The INL Beat, January 2014


Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
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Date: 01/30/2013 Description: Logo for Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs of the Department of State - State Dept Image


Largest Class in Recent History Graduates from Haitian National Police Academy

Date: 01/29/2014 Description: Cadets during drill exercises at the event. - State Dept Image Cadets during drill exercises at the event.

It was 80 degrees and sunny on Friday, December 27, 2013, when 1,058 newly minted Haitian National Police (HNP) cadets stood in perfect formation on the parade grounds of the Police Academy in Port-au-Prince. More than ten percent of this 24th class of graduating cadets is female, and all were wearing uniforms donated by the United States Government, through INL. Observing the newest inductees to Haiti’s sole security force were Haitian President Michel Martelly, U.S. Ambassador Pamela White, the Minister of Justice, and the Director General of the HNP.

Four years after the 2010 earthquake, Haiti is slowly rebuilding itself with the help of the international community. The HNP, with assistance from the UN Stabilization Force for Haiti (MINUSTAH), is responsible for keeping the peace in Haiti. Crime and citizen security, a history of political demonstrations, and responding to natural disasters such as hurricanes are key challenges facing Haiti’s police. U.S. assistance has included the provision of new infrastructure and equipment, but training on democratic policing standards is now a cornerstone of our support to Haiti’s efforts to develop a more credible and competent police force – progress that is clearly reflected in the 1,058 men and women who donned their crisp yellow uniforms for the first time last month. The class is one of the largest since the establishment of the HNP in 1995 and represents a major step towards achieving the Government of Haiti’s goal of increasing force size from 10,000 in 2012 to 15,000 by 2016.


A number of the graduates are slated for specialized functions. Eighty will serve as corrections officers, 100 will receive additional training as special counter-narcotics police in the elite La Brigade de Lutte contre le Trafic de Stupéfiants (BLTS) unit, and 40 will be assigned to the recently established community policing program in an underserved area of Port-au-Prince. The community policing program, the brainchild of an FBI-trained HNP Commander, was developed through assistance from a cadre of NYPD officers that INL supports on long-term deployments to Haiti.

Date: 01/29/2014 Description: Cadets standing tall on graduation day. - State Dept Image Cadets standing tall on graduation day.

In addition to uniforms, INL also provides a food supplement and hygiene supplies to all of the recruits who can receive no compensation during their basic training at the academy. The academy itself has benefitted from INL-funded refurbishments and renovations. The medical and psychological phases of the next recruiting process are already underway for the 25th Promotion, with training due to begin in February. Thanks to a grant from INL to a local clinic for these services, approximately 1,900 candidates have already been screened. The goal is to identify and select more than 1,000 cadets, who would graduate in the fall. With this added strength, hopefully the HNP will soon enjoy a future just as promising as the bright sun at last month’s graduation ceremony in Port-au-Prince.



INL-Supported Indonesian National Police Distance Learning Program

Date: 01/29/2014 Description: A discussion of training projections between INL Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Carol Perez and Deputy Indonesian National Police (INP) Chief Oegroseno at the Police Science College in Jakarta.   - State Dept Image A discussion of training projections between INL Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Carol Perez and Deputy Indonesian National Police (INP) Chief Oegroseno at the Police Science College in Jakarta.

Indonesia’s police force of 400,000 officers is spread over 4,000 islands. In December 2013, INL Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary Carol Perez met with Indonesian Deputy National Police (INP) Chief Oegroseno at the Police Science College in Jakarta. While the two discussed the INP’s plans to increase the number of women police officers, launch a public complaint line, and implement an electronic police officer recruitment system, the core of the discussion involved the INP’s new distance learning program.

The INL-funded distance learning program for INP is implemented by the U.S. Department of Justice’s International Criminal Investigative Training and Assistance Program (ICITAP), which has developed a deep partnership with the INP to improve both curriculum and delivery systems, such as the new distance learning platform. Not a one-time project, this distance learning program is part of a larger national training reform program that ICITAP has developed with the INP since 2012. It began with the 2012 Indonesian National Police Job Task Analysis and Curriculum Report, which informed a major overhaul of the curriculum used at police colleges and academies in Indonesia. Distance learning courses will be delivered to police officers nationwide beginning in February 2014.

Deputy Police Chief Oegroseno thanked ICITAP and INL for the assistance, along with Northern Arizona University, which aided in the design of distance learning platform and provided INP with the basic skills needed to develop online curriculum, but the actual course materials were produced by the INP themselves. While all core courses offered at the Police Science College are destined for inclusion in the online curriculum, among the first to be delivered will be on the Use of Force policy, which is how minimal necessary levels of authorized non-lethal or lethal methods shall be used in the course of their official duties in various situations. That policy was developed by ICITAP and INP, with INL support, and subsequently signed into Indonesian law in 2009.

Date: 01/29/2014 Description: A screenshot from a course on criminal psychology. - State Dept Image A screenshot from a course on criminal psychology.

Oegroseno noted that each online course will be preceded by a video introduction and course outline, followed by a required evaluation and certificate of completion. Progress toward completion of courses will be tracked and supervisors will be notified when subordinates do not complete the courses in the required time period.
Apart from delivery of basic police science courses, Oegroseno said he envisions the distance learning program as a tool for long-term professional development, particularly during the first seven years of officers’ careers. PDAS Perez praised the distance learning initiative as a means to ensure training consistency throughout the country and to update officers on new and revised policies and best practices.

 

 


INL and the Arizona Administrative Office of the Courts Partner to Improve Jamaica’s Criminal Justice System

A backlog of files in a court house in Kingston, Jamaica.

INL is focusing on fighting crime and lawlessness in the Caribbean nation of Jamaica through a multifaceted approach. Not only is INL supporting law enforcement programs with the Jamaican Constabulary Forces (JCF), but INL also is seeking to build the Government of Jamaica’s ability to combat activities that facilitate and enable the narcotics trade, namely organized crime, financial crime, money laundering, and corruption. Despite some setbacks and persistently high levels of crime, Jamaica has seen notable progress – including a 29 percent drop in the country’s murder rate since 2009 that was helped, in part, by the U.S. extradition of drug lord Christopher Coke in 2010. 

 

But success in combatting narcotics, corruption, and other criminal activities brings with it new and different challenges. In the case of Jamaica, better law enforcement is being constrained by an inefficient, outdated, and under-resourced judicial system that is unable to handle its caseload and obtain adequate convictions

Date: 01/29/2014 Description: A newly refurbished court room in Kingston, Jamaica. - State Dept Image A newly refurbished court room in Kingston, Jamaica.

A well-functioning criminal justice system is essential to Jamaica’s further development. Without timely, consistent, and transparent justice, citizen security is weakened and public confidence in the rule of law declines. The Jamaican justice sector faces enormous challenges as a whole. The criminal and criminal procedure codes are very outdated and jurisdictional rules create situations where the same criminal episode can require multiple trials or dispositions. However, the greatest challenge by far is the slow crawl of cases through the courts. While there is plenty of blame to go around, there is no hard data on what causes most of the delays and inefficiencies in the judicial system. Consequently, it is difficult for INL and other international partners to know how to best allocate resources to correct the problems.

Date: 01/29/2014 Description: A standard hand-written ledger book for cataloging court files in Kingston, Jamaica. - State Dept Image

A standard hand-written ledger book for cataloging court files in Kingston, Jamaica.

During the week of December 9, INL’s Debra Perlin traveled to Jamaica with Clerk of the Arizona Supreme Court Janet Johnson. INL has a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the Administrative Office of the Arizona Supreme Court and this was the second deployment under that agreement. Debra Perlin and Janet Johnson reviewed and documented Jamaica’s capacity to collect statistics on its criminal court system and provided recommendations on how the United States can support the Government of Jamaica by developing a method to gather accurate statistics on the system’s performance. This information will help the Government of Jamaica and the international donor community to accurately identify the bottlenecks in the system and appropriately target resources to fix them.

By working with the Government of Jamaica to design and implement an accurate system to collect criminal court statistics, we hope to move towards helping Jamaica improve its pace of justice and continue to promote the rule of law throughout the island.


INL Assisting Sindh Police in Pakistan with Tools and Training

Date: 01/29/2014 Description: Acting CG Anu Prattipati and the Inspector General of Sindh Police Shahid Nadeem Baloch check out the 48 new four-wheel pickup vans which were officially handed over to the Sindh Police in a ceremony at Sindh Police Headquarters. Sindh Police will use the trucks in Sindh province, including Karachi, to increase police presence in critical areas and enhance police response time. - State Dept Image

Acting CG Anu Prattipati and the Inspector General of Sindh Police Shahid Nadeem Baloch check out the 48 new four-wheel pickup vans which were officially handed over to the Sindh Police in a ceremony at Sindh Police Headquarters. Sindh Police will use the trucks in Sindh province, including Karachi, to increase police presence in critical areas and enhance police response time.

In December 2013, INL Bureau and the U.S. Consulate General in Karachi presented 48 new pickup trucks to the Sindh Police during an official handover in Karachi, Pakistan. The donation of these trucks will increase police presence, improve mobility, and shorten response time in Karachi and throughout Sindh Province. In attendance were Acting U.S. Consul General Anu Prattipati, INL Country Director John Hennessey-Niland, and Inspector General of Sindh Police Shahid Nadeem Baloch.

“We are happy to continue our cooperation with Sindh Police to address the law and order challenges they face,” said Acting U.S. Consul General Prattipati. “These new trucks are only a small piece of the more than $20 million worth of equipment, training, and infrastructure support that the American people have provided to Sindh Police since 2011.” Through previous programs, INL has also provided armored personnel carriers, vehicles, specialized forensic equipment, bulletproof jackets and helmets, and vehicle GPS trackers to the Sindh Police.

 

Date: 01/29/2014 Description: Acting Consul General Anu Prattipati, INL Country Director John Hennessey-Niland and the Inspector General of Sindh Police Shahid Nadeem Baloch check out the 48 new four-wheel pickup vans which were officially handed over to the Sindh Police in a ceremony at Sindh Police Headquarters. . - State Dept Image Acting CG Anu Prattipati (driving), INL Country Director John Hennessey-Niland and the Inspector General of Sindh Police Shahid Nadeem Baloch. The Sindh Police will use the trucks in Sindh province, including Karachi, to increase police presence in critical areas and enhance police response time.

For nearly three years, INL has partnered with the Sindh Police Department to reduce crime and improve the rule of law in Karachi and throughout Sindh. INL is currently helping the Sindh Police to develop curriculum for new recruits and in-service training to enhance the capacity and professionalism of its police officers; and reconstruct a Criminal Investigation Department building damaged in a suicide attack.

They will also collaborate to renovate three of the dedicated police stations in Karachi which are staffed by women officers to discretely receive crime reports from women victims. INL recently collaborated with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Women’s Police Support Program to conduct the first-ever joint training for female prosecutors and police investigators. The program brought together police investigators and female prosecutors from Karachi and interior Sindh Province to receive specialized training from Pakistani and American experts in forensics, interview techniques, trial preparation, and crime scene analysis.



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