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Other Counternarcotics Programs


International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2003 Budget Justification
Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
May 2002
Report
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                              International Organizations

FY 2001 Actual

FY 2002 Estimated

FY 2003 Request

12,000

16,000

13,000

Objectives

    Justification

    The attacks of September 11, 2001 highlighted the close connections between illicit drug trafficking, organized crime and terrorism. There is strong political support worldwide to target these connections through coordinated efforts. International organizations (IOs), as established leaders in international counternarcotics and anti-organized crime efforts, are well positioned to provide law enforcement training and technical assistance on border security, money laundering and other intersecting issues. It is essential that INL take advantage of the post-September 11 international unity of purpose to fight illicit drugs, international crime and terrorism by supporting IO programs that promote modernization of criminal justice systems, help to establish high standards in law enforcement, and promote multinational cooperation.

    U.S. support for multilateral organizations complements our bilateral and unilateral programs by stimulating cooperation among countries and within regions. Multilateral approaches highlight the international nature of the problems caused by drugs, crime and terrorism, generate increased "buy-in" by more countries, broaden the base of support, and stimulate contributions from other donors. Multilateral programs can also reach regions where the U.S. is unable to operate bilaterally, for political or logistical reasons. In addition, activities or initiatives sponsored by the United Nations (UN), the Organization of American States (OAS) and other multilateral organizations are often more palatable to countries sensitive to sovereignty issues and bring the weight of the international community to bear on a problem or an issue of general concern.

    INL provides direct funding to international organizations such as UNDCP, the OAS’ Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS/CICAD), and the Colombo Plan’s Drug Advisory Program, and through them, to smaller sub-regional programs and organizations. In addition, UN agencies, international financial institutions and multilateral banks engaged in development programs in drug source countries can have a major positive impact by factoring counternarcotics goals into their activities. INL encourages program collaboration among these organizations.

    UNDCP

    For most donor countries, the UN is the primary, or only, vehicle for contributing to international drug and crime control efforts. Active U.S. engagement is key to keeping them involved in, and committed to, what must be a truly international effort.

    The UN will play a key role in efforts to strengthen border controls and border security in Central Asia and counternarcotics challenges in Afghanistan. The U.S. has supported UN training and technical assistance to law enforcement and customs institutions in Central Asia and expects to expand those programs in the aftermath of September 11. Before then, the U.S. was just beginning to fund alternative development and subsistence assistance to Afghan farmers through UNDCP (the projects were suspended after September 11). When rebuilding efforts begin, increased alternative development and drug law enforcement programs will be critical.

    U.S. contributions to UNDCP have fostered an expansion of the Southeast Asia program that targets the second largest opium producer, Burma, where opium production is beginning to decline. This UN-led program encompasses China, Thailand and Laos, and includes projects in the Wa-controlled area of Burma and major alternative development projects in Laos. In addition, U.S. contributions to UNDCP support judicial and prosecutorial training in east Asia, Ecuador, the Dominican Republic and southern and eastern Africa; precursor control in central Asia, Bolivia and Colombia; border and seaports programs in southern and eastern Africa; computer-based amphetamine training in East Asia; the ASEAN and China Cooperative Operations in Response to Dangerous Drugs (ACCORD) plan to address amphetamine-type stimulants; an international law enforcement academy in Turkey; the Global Money Laundering Program; a maritime training and cooperation program; a data bank for precursors control; a legal advisory program promoting accession to and implementation of the international drug control conventions; and development and implementation of a new financial tracking system for UNDCP.

    UNDCP Executive Director Pino Arlacchi will leave that position in early 2002. His departure should allow management reforms to go forward with greater speed. INL will continue to closely monitor management issues, working with the new leadership to ensure that reforms are implemented and sustained and programs are effective and efficient.

    OAS/CICAD

    The OAS, through CICAD, has played a key role in building a hemispheric consensus on drugs that has resulted in a formal counternarcotics alliance. Through that alliance, all OAS member states have now become parties to the 1988 UN Drug Convention and, through implementation of the Anti-Drug Strategy in the Hemisphere, are proceeding to develop comprehensive national drug plans, pass modern counternarcotics legislation, initiate drug abuse prevention and other key programs, and take other necessary actions. The work of OAS/CICAD was endorsed by the Heads of State at the Quebec Summit (April 20-21, 2001), including encouragement of the Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism (MEM), a peer review system to evaluate national and regional counternarcotics performances in implementing the goals of the hemispheric drug strategy and the 1988 UN Drug Convention. The success of the MEM will be measured by how effectively they are implemented by individual countries. The MEM will produce a report each year, one a detailed evaluation with recommendations followed the next year by a review of the status of implementation of those recommendations. The EU, the UN and other bodies are watching the MEM closely as a possible model for monitoring national compliance with other multilateral agreements or conventions.

    OAS/CICAD’s principal project areas are legal development, control measures/law enforcement, demand reduction/prevention/treatment, and alternative development. It also manages a hemispheric information system—the Inter-American Observatory on Drugs—encompassing demand and supply/seizure data as well as a data bank of documents and reference materials and is working with member states to develop national data collection systems and observatories. CICAD has various initiatives underway to promote information sharing among national authorities, such as the Inter-American Telecommunications Network for Drug Control (RETCOD).

    INL contributions have supported projects in all of these areas. Some direct results include: model regulations on money laundering and asset forfeiture, chemical diversion, and trafficking in firearms (along with training and technical assistance to implement them); national drug strategies (29 of 34 member states now have such plans); a regional Central American legal development and training center that assists governments in developing counternarcotics laws and sentencing guidelines; a regional demand reduction strategy for the hemisphere; coordination of demand reduction programming for street children and women; drug abuse prevention programs for under-served indigenous communities in Central America; drug abuse prevention and treatment training for nursing school personnel, counselors and others who work with street children; projects to promote communication and cooperation among regional customs services, port authorities, and drug law enforcement agencies; and the establishment of a telecommunications network for control of precursor chemicals in the Andean producer countries and neighbor states.

    CICAD supports a number of projects that support alternative development and supply reduction, such as the Generalized Land-Use Evaluation and Management Tool (GLEAM) used to map land use, both legal and illegal, and support law enforcement, alternative development and integrated pest management projects that assist growers of legitimate crops (e.g., coffee, cacao, bananas) working in drug crop-producing areas. CICAD supports money laundering prevention programs for financial institutions throughout the hemisphere, including training for bank regulators and supervisory agencies, judges, prosecutors, and financial intelligence/analysis units. CICAD has conducted youth gang prevention seminars to assist regional governments confront this growing regional threat to our youth and to public safety.

    FY 2003 Programs

    UNDCP

    FY 2003 presents a prime opportunity for the U.S. to capitalize and build on the international consensus for a coordinated and integrated approach to fighting illegal drugs, crime and terrorism. Central Asia and South Asia will continue to require significant resources to strengthen borders and law enforcement capacity. Synthetic drug abuse is evolving and increasing, requiring more coordination to identify and track precursor chemicals. The U.S. must maintain momentum toward reaching the UNGASS goal of eliminating or significantly reducing the illicit production of narcotics by 2008, as well as other UNGASS targets. Notable progress has been made in some areas towards the ambitious UNGASS goals, though serious challenges remain. UNDCP has established itself as a respected, effective multilateral channel, and can provide invaluable expertise, as well as the ideal multilateral forum, as countries look to expand and coordinate their counternarcotics efforts.

    FY 2003 contributions will allow UNDCP to assist countries to implement a broad-based, long-term change from poppy crops to alternative crops. They will assist Afghanistan’s neighbors to increase effectiveness in controlling borders and tracing and seizing illegal proceeds. While much of the focus will be on Central Asia, U.S. funds will also continue to be needed to realize a decline in opium production in Burma and Southeast Asia, where the U.S. has limited access. Along with a new focus on Central Asia, continued support will be needed for effective programs elsewhere that: strengthen drug control institutions and regional cooperation in the NIS, coordinate and provide law enforcement training, judicial assistance, and demand reduction assistance to Russia and Africa, and strengthen Western Hemisphere institutions to investigate, prosecute, and confine major drug traffickers. Through UNDCP global programs, FY 2003 contributions will bolster new international initiatives to track and seize illegal proceeds and control the precursor chemicals used in illicit drug production.

    OAS/CICAD

    CICAD’s solid track record in designing and implementing effective programs has attracted a widening source of international donors. INL continues to be the largest funding source. The FY 2003 budget request will support the effective operation of the MEM and enable CICAD to provide the follow-up training and technical support that member states will need to remedy the shortcomings identified by the MEM. INL will fund program activities to strengthen national drug commissions; develop and implement comprehensive national drug strategies; promote regional cooperation on the control of drug smuggling, money laundering, chemical diversion, and arms trafficking; provide specialized law enforcement training, such as customs inspection and maritime interdiction; promote administration of justice reform; reduce or prevent drug abuse; develop or refine sub-regional models and curricula for drug awareness and crime prevention/antigang education; promote best practices or establish regional standards for drug treatment; mobilize communities against drug abuse and trafficking; and promote sustainable alternative development in narcotics-producing regions. It will also be used to reinforce practical, effective sub-regional cooperation, such as in Central America, the Andes, and the Caribbean, to address cross-border or spillover effects of the drug problem.

    Effectiveness Measurements

      International Organizations

      INL Budget

      ($000)

       

      FY 2001

      FY 2002

      FY 2003

      UN International Drug Control Program (UNDCP)

      9,000

      10,000

      7,800

      OAS Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS/CICAD)

      2,800

      6,000

      5,200

      Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Program1

      200

       

      ______

      ______

      ______

      Total

      12,000

      16,000

      13,000

      1Funding for Colombo Plan Drug Advisory Program was moved from the International Organizations account to the Demand Reduction account beginning in FY 2002.

      Demand Reduction

      Budget Summary ($000)

      FY 2001 Actual

      FY 2002 Estimated

      FY 2003 Request

      4,500

      5,000

      5,000

      Objectives

        Justification

        The Demand Reduction program seeks to reduce the worldwide demand for illicit drugs by motivating foreign governments and institutions into giving increased attention to the negative effects of drug abuse on society. It is important to note that additional funding for these activities comes from other program categories within the INL budget.

        Demand reduction efforts aim to reduce the use and abuse of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances worldwide. The need for demand reduction is reflected in escalating drug use and abuse that takes a devastating toll on the health, welfare, security, and economic stability of all countries. Foreign countries recognize the vast U.S. experience and efforts in reducing drug demand and increasingly request technical and other assistance from the USG to address their problems. Assisting countries to reduce drug consumption helps in a small but important way to preserve the stability of that country. On the other hand, INL support for public/private sector networks (national and regional) of demand reduction programs helps facilitate support for overall USG counternarcotics policies in foreign countries. This involves the development of coalitions of private/public social institutions, the faith community, and law enforcement entities to mobilize national and international opinion against the drug trade and encourage governments to implement strong counternarcotics policies and programs. Lastly, foreign countries are collaborating with the USG on developing model research-based programs to improve the delivery of prevention/treatment services and reduce drug-related violence among youth.

        As a result of INL-funded training and technical assistance, host governments are engaging their own national institutions, communities, and resources to address their demand for illicit drugs. Countries in Southeast Asia continue to develop and staff their own treatment/prevention programs. In Thailand, with INL-funded training, the Department of Health established nine pilot treatment sites to treat the growing epidemic of methamphetamine users. Further, the Thai Department of Corrections instituted drug intervention programs in 75 institutions covering 2,500 drug addicted inmates daily. Governments in South America have implemented their own national-level counternarcotics media campaigns: local media advertisers and business in Chile, Venezuela and Brazil contribute between $5-18 million annually to counternarcotics media advertisements. South Africa is developing a national counternarcotics media campaign. INL has co-sponsored regional training events in Latin America, Asia, and Russia/Eastern Europe and specialized prevention projects for high-risk youth in Latin America. Youth-based drug intervention programs in Latin America that were developed from INL training have produced high retention and success rates (i.e., reintegration into society) that were the subject of a recently published study that may help improve U.S.-based programs. Finally, public/private sector demand reduction networks significantly increased membership in the Western Hemisphere to 3,000 organizations and internationally to 6,000 organizations from over 70 countries.

        FY 2003 Program

        INL-funded training will continue to strengthen host nation counternarcotics institutions so that they can conduct more effective demand reduction and public awareness programs on their own. The program will give particular attention to cocaine producing and transit countries in Latin America, address the emerging serious methamphetamine abuse problem in Southeast Asia, and address the heroin threat for Asia and Colombia. An expanded area of focus will be the Middle East and South Asia where several hundred counternarcotics programs are members of INL’s global drug prevention network. INL will increase support to its sub-regional demand reduction academies in Brazil and Columbia with an aim to increase by 100 percent the number of students trained at the centers. INL will establish new regional technology transfer centers in Eastern Europe, including establishing an Eastern European Institute for Substance Abuse Prevention in the Czech Republic and an Addiction Technology Transfer Center for the Asia/Pacific region. These activities will be undertaken in collaboration with other donor countries and international organizations to reflect an emphasis on increased multilateral activities.

        The training and technical assistance program in FY 2003 will be designed to prevent the onset of use, to intervene at critical decision points in the lives of at-risk populations to prevent both initial use and further use, and to improve effective treatment and prevention programs. The program will expand its emphasis on the development of national, regional, and international coalitions of public/private sector organizations to strengthen international cooperation and actions against the drug trade. Programs will continue to facilitate cross-cultural, comparative research to directly benefit foreign and U.S.-based demand reduction programs. The results of this research will be a compilation of best-practices, common program elements, and lessons learned from organizations in selected countries that have developed successful demand reduction programs, both INL- and self-funded. Research will evaluate treatment and youth-gang violence best-practices studies and evaluate juvenile correctional institutions to identify drug prevention best practices programs. The findings of two countries’ programs will be the basis of a first international drug prevention research study. INL will also conduct four technology transfer studies of programs developed from INL-funded training and technical assistance, and provide support for three international drug treatment best practices research studies and drug-related antiviolence best practices studies.

        The Demand Reduction Program budget will also support the enhancement of the abilities of host countries to build public support and strengthen the political will for implementing strong counternarcotics programs. Training will emphasize the development of national-level drug awareness campaigns that demonstrate connections between the drug trade and other concerns such as economic growth, democracy, and the environment. On the local level, training will target the establishment of effective drug awareness/education campaigns in schools and communities, including the use of the media and advertising resources. Technical assistance will support host governments’ efforts to conduct and sustain drug awareness campaigns by building linkages between the corporate sector and the mass media. This assistance will result in an increase from five to seven countries that have established private-sector media partnerships for drug prevention education. The Demand Reduction Program budget request will also accommodate the increased need for training, enhance the development of international, regional, and national counternarcotics partnerships, and facilitate cross-cultural, comparative research designed to improve U.S.-based services. At the policy level, the program will focus assistance on building and strengthening national-level counternarcotics institutions with the capacity to develop comprehensive policies, programs, and strategies. At the international and regional levels, the program will enhance regional and international coalitions of NGOs developed previously, to mobilize international opinion against the drug trade, and encourage governments to develop and implement strong counternarcotics policies and programs. With INL continued support, technical assistance provided by the global /regional drug prevention networks to foreign countries will increase by 50 percent.

        INL funds will expand the Colombo Plan’s regional networks of public/private sector demand reduction organizations, in addition to linking the Asian networks to their counterparts in Latin America and other regions. These regional and international networks will allow us to mobilize Asian and international opinion and cooperation against the drug trade, encourage governments to develop and implement strong antidrug policies and programs, and strengthen support for USG counternarcotics policies and objectives in the Asian region.

        At the grassroots level, the program will continue to help establish and sustain strong community partnerships and coalitions of public and private sector programs for drug prevention, expand community mobilization efforts, and create or enhance effective community- and school-based prevention programs. A goal of strong community-based partnerships is to establish demand reduction programs that address drug-related crime and violence and support national policies. Continued INL support for these coalitions will allow membership in the Western Hemisphere Drug prevention program to increase by 250 programs or individuals, and the Global Drug Prevention Network to increase by 500 the number of its affiliated programs or individual members.

        The demand from foreign countries for INL-sponsored technical assistance on drug prevention programming continues to increase rapidly. Membership in INL-sponsored international and regional demand reduction networks has expanded exponentially, and initial findings from INL-funded research shows potential to directly enhance U.S.-based programs. Increased funding will allow us to better mobilize international opinion and cooperation against the drug trade, encourage governments to develop and implement strong counternarcotics policies and programs, and strengthen support for USG counternarcotics policies and initiatives.

        Effectiveness Measurements


          Demand Reduction

          INL Budget

          ($000)

        • Increase by 100 percent the number of Latin American students trained in the Colombian and Brazilian sub-regional demand reduction academies;
        • Establish an Eastern European Institute for Substance Abuse Prevention in the Czech Republic;
        • Establish an Addiction Technology Transfer Center for the Asia/Pacific region;
        • Conduct two international drug-related, antiviolence best practices research studies;
        • Publish the first international drug prevention best practices research studies by reporting findings from two countries;
        • Conduct four technology transfer assessment studies to document self-sustaining programs developed from INL-funded training and technical assistance;
        • Conduct three international drug treatment "best practices" research studies;
        • Increase the number of private-sector media partnerships for drug prevention education from five to seven countries;
        • Increase technical assistance provided by the Global/Regional Drug Prevention Networks to foreign countries by 50 percent;
        • Increase membership in the Western Hemisphere Drug Prevention Network by 250 programs or individuals; and
        • Increase membership in the Global Drug Prevention Network by 500 programs or individuals.
        •  

          FY 2001

          FY 2002

          FY 2003

          Contracts, Grants & Agreements

          2,500

          3,000

          3,000

          Training

          2,000

          2,000

          2,000

           

          ______

          ______

          ______

          Total

          4,500

          5,000

          5,000

          Systems Support and Upgrades

          Budget Summary ($000)

          FY 2001 Actual

          FY 2002 Estimated

          FY 2003 Request

          4,000

          6,000

          4,000

          Objectives

            Justification

            The Systems Support and Upgrade Project has historically included C-26 support, an airborne surveillance initiative, refurbishment of OV-10 Broncos, and UH-1H helicopter upgrades. Through this funding, specialized systems that were previously not available were to be provided to meet counternarcotics mission requirements in support of surveillance, detection, eradication, interdiction and logistics. This project also allowed INL to improve the performance characteristics of existing systems to better utilize their capability, extend their useful life, and increase the effectiveness of reconnaissance, eradication and interdiction efforts.

            INL has contracted for engineering and modification services to modify C-26 aircraft (owned by the host governments of Barbados, Colombia, Peru, Mexico, Venezuela and Trinidad and Tobago) with a suite of surveillance sensors. To ensure effective utilization of these powerful resources, host countries must be taught the appropriate tactics, techniques, and related doctrine that will lead to a systems approach in their counternarcotics surveillance and interdiction efforts. In addition, with appropriate information management protocols in place, these host nation operations will generate surveillance information of import to the U.S. and other donor nations. As C-26 operations mature, the need for optimized sparing protocols (both airframe and sensor system) will be of increasing importance. An appropriately tailored sparing protocol could save C-26 user nations as much as 50 percent of the cost of traditional spares packages.

            To date, we have completed sensor upgrades for the Barbados C-26 (used by the Regional Security System or RSS) and the Colombian National Police. By the end of FY 2002, we also will have completed sensor upgrades for Trinidad and Tobago. The C-26 programs in Barbados and Colombia are already providing valuable information and results. The Barbados aircraft conducted an operation in Puerto Rico that resulted in a multi-ton seizure of cocaine from non-commercial maritime drug traffickers. The Colombian CNP C-26 program has been providing valuable signal communications information that the Colombian police and military forces have used in drug laboratory seizure and aerial eradication missions.

            FY 2003 Program

            C-26 Support

            Host nation aviation operations are significantly affected by their ability to fund the procurement of spares and general operating and maintenance expenses. It is, however, one of the fundamental tools that can be applied in an effort to reduce capital expenditures and recurring costs associated with spares replenishment and associated logistics. For FY 2003, INL will support C-26 programs in Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, Mexico and Peru and for the Colombia National Police. Program support will include training of sensor operators and pilots, contract logistical support, and provision of spare parts and maintenance.

            Airborne Surveillance Initiative

            One of the critical shortfalls in the current counternarcotics operational structure overseas is the lack of host government surveillance, detection, and monitoring capability. Traffickers operate with near impunity as they violate border integrity while transporting a variety of forms of contraband. Customs laws have been meaningless as air, land and maritime traffickers choose arrival points at their discretion. In short, many nations lack the fundamental means of assuring their own sovereignty.

            INL will continue to modify C-26 aircraft with surveillance systems and train host nation forces to utilize this technology in a manner that benefits domestic, international and U.S. counternarcotics objectives. Training will include the disciplines of data management and analysis and will strongly promote the development and implementation of information sharing protocols across host nation interagency and regional counternarcotics communities. A systems approach to maritime- and land-based surveillance operations will emphasize the requirement for effective coordination between strategic and tactical airborne surveillance units as well as those directly involved in ground-based interdiction activities. INL will take advantage of contractor, U.S. military, and other law enforcement expertise to provide the international C-26 community with the tools to effectively prosecute their drug law enforcement missions.

            OV-10 Refurbishment/A-10 Testing

            INL received 22 OV-10D aircraft previously used by DOD that increased capabilities for conducting massive coca and opium aerial eradication campaigns throughout Latin America. The employment of these additional U.S.-owned aircraft, equipped with armored cockpits and twin engines, has increased speed, range, pilot safety and herbicide-carrying capacity, compared to the existing T-65 aircraft. The OV-10 refurbishment program will allow for major modification of these airframes to reduce weight and modernize electrical, avionics, cockpit configuration, and special mission equipment to take full advantage of the aircrafts’ capability and extend their useful life. Aircraft so modified will have full day and night eradication capability.

            In connection with the OV-10 program, INL intends to conduct testing to determine the feasibility of using excess A-10 aircraft as the next generation spray platform. Successful testing could lead to the eventual employment of these aircraft as spray planes with dramatically increased range, speed, payload and pilot protection.

            Effectiveness Measures

               

              Program Development and Support

              Budget Summary ($000)1

            • Increase the number of detections of drug trafficking events and seizures of illegal drugs in the Eastern Caribbean; and
            • Improve performance capability of existing systems to extend their effectiveness and useful life.
            • FY 2001 Actual

              FY 2002 Estimated

              FY 2003 Request

              12,187

              13,703

              14,563

              1 The FY 2003 Program Development and Support total includes $ 0.713 million for full funding of federal employee retirement costs. The comparable amounts for FY 2002 ($ 0.703 million) and FY 2001 ($ 0.687 million) are included in those totals.

              Objectives

              • Maintain a competent, motivated, skilled and diverse workforce essential to achieving international narcotics control goals and objectives;
              • Develop, manage and coordinate international counternarcotics policies, programs and activities of the U.S. Department of State;
              • Provide the infrastructure needed for bureau personnel to pursue policy objectives and effectively manage INL programs; and
              • Provide program and administrative management oversight and direction to embassies worldwide to assure effective implementation of INL policies and projects.

              Justification

              The Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) is charged with developing strategies and programs to achieve international counternarcotics and criminal justice foreign policy objectives. INL maintains a cadre of both domestic and overseas program and technical experts to carry out a wide range of initiatives. Washington personnel functions include, but are not limited to: international narcotics control and law enforcement policy formulation and implementation; coordination of policies and programs with other USG agencies and with other governments and international organizations; budget and financial management activities; program administration and analysis including development, implementation, oversight and evaluation of overseas programs; contract, procurement and information systems support; field assistance visits to Embassy Narcotics Affairs Sections and Law Enforcement Sections to review, analyze and make recommendations on programs, funds control and procurement; sponsoring regional policy and program management conferences and seminars; and, developing and providing training programs both domestically and overseas for embassy and INL personnel.

              The Program Development and Support (PD&S) account funds the domestic administrative operating costs associated with the Washington-based INL staff. Over three-quarters of the PD&S budget request is programmed for salaries and benefits of U.S. Direct Hire (USDH) employees, personal services contracts, rehired annuitants and reimbursable support personnel. Currently, INL funds support 119 USDH and 23 other INL personnel based in Washington, D.C. Eleven additional domestic positions support the Interregional Aviation Support program, but are funded from the Interregional Aviation Support account. It should be noted that ten positions in the INL Office of Anticrime Programs are funded from the Department of State D&CP account.

              Field travel for the INL personnel based in Washington is funded from the PD&S account. This is an essential component of the bureau’s program, needed for program development, implementation, oversight and review, as well as for the advancement of international counternarcotics and criminal justice foreign policy objectives. PD&S funds are utilized to maintain a reliable and secure information resource management system and operating infrastructure to enable bureau employees to pursue policy objectives and complete work requirements effectively and efficiently. In addition, funding for the following expenses ensure an adequate level of administrative support to allow the bureau to function effectively: office equipment rental, telephone services, printing and reproduction, miscellaneous contractual services (Information Management non-personal services contractor personnel, INL office renovation expenses, etc.), materials, supplies, furniture, furnishings and equipment.

              FY 2003 Program

              The PD&S budget request for FY 2003 will cover the annual, government-wide cost of living increase, in-grade step increases and promotions that occur during that fiscal year. It will also cover the annualized portion of wage increase for positions that INL plans to fill during FY 2002 to improve program oversight and expanded programs. An additional $ .713 million is included in this request for full funding of federal retiree costs. Higher costs resulting from inflation for field travel and transportation costs; equipment rentals, communications and utility expenses; printing and reproduction; miscellaneous contractual services; and furniture, furnishings and equipment have been factored into the FY 2003 budget request.

              Program Development and Support

              INL Budget

              ($000)

               

              FY 2001

              FY 2002

              FY 2003

              Personnel Compensation

              7,900

              8,425

              8,950

              Personnel Benefits

              2,400

              2,575

              2,735

              Field Travel and Transportation

              265

              570

              610

              Equipment Rentals, Communications and Utility Expenses

              195

              200

              210

              Printing and Reproduction

              165

              170

              180

              Miscellaneous Contractual Services

              980

              1,475

              1,575

              Materials and Supplies

              220

              225

              235

              Furniture, Furnishings and Equipment

              62

              63

              68

               

              ______

              ______

              ______

              Total1

              12,187

              13,703

              14,563

              1 The FY 2003 total for Program Development and Support includes $ 0.713 million for full funding of federal employee retirement costs. The comparable amounts for FY 2002 ($ 0.703 million) and FY 2001 ($ 0.687 million) are included in those totals.

            • Provide program cost savings through standardization of services, support and upgrade aviation performance characteristics through economy of scale procurement;
            • Provide standardization and sustained support to those countries that have received C-26 aircraft from the United States; and
            • Provide flexibility for contracting cost fluctuations by maintaining a separate account for equipment upgrades and other contracting requirements.
            • Encourage drug producing and transit countries to invest resources in drug awareness, demand reduction and training to build public support and political will for implementing counternarcotics programs;
            • Strengthen the ability of host nations to conduct more effective demand reduction programs.
            • Improve coordination of, and cooperation in, international drug awareness and demand reduction issues involving the U.S., donor countries and international organizations; and
            • Utilize accomplishments in the international program to benefit both U.S. and foreign demand reduction services
            • Three UNDCP programs funded by the U.S. will specifically target the relationships between illicit drug trafficking, organized crime and terrorism;
            • Increase in the number of UNDCP programs targeting sub-regions (rather than individual countries) from 17 in FY 2001 to 21 to better respond to transnational realities;
            • Add a long-term evaluation component to five UN programs to assess their effectiveness one year after project completion;
            • Increase the number of parties to the 1988 UN Drug Convention from 162 in FY 2002 to 165;
            • Double the number of Muslim-based counternarcotics programs in South Asia from three in FY 2001 to six; and
            • Increase Asian participation in the Global Drug Prevention Network from 50 to 100 organizations.
            • Maximize opportunities to integrate and coordinate counternarcotics programs with anticrime and, where appropriate, counterterrorism programs; and
            • Promote regional coordination and leadership in the international drug control effort.
            • Budget Summary ($000)



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