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Diplomacy in Action

Africa


End-Use Monitoring Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
December 2003
Report
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ACCRA

Procedures

Post has received signed statements from the Executive Secretary of the NCB acknowledging receipt and proper use of the items. Items are available for inspection. Post performed periodic spot checks during regular on-site visits.

Status

Communications Equipment

Post disbursed a mobile cellular transmitter and a voice stress analyzer to the NCB in calendar year 2002. The items are in new condition and are performing according to specifications. The cellular transmitter is carried by various undercover narcotics agents. The stress analyzer is employed in an interrogation room at NCB headquarters.

Miscellaneous Equipment

The two four-drawer safes and video camera are in the custody of the NCB and remain operational.

Problems

There have been no problems thus far with the use of the items. The only potential problem post foresees is the usual difficulty government offices in Ghana face in gaining operating funds for re-supply of consumable items (e.g., batteries, printing paper). While NCB officials assert that they will have funds available for future supply, the NCB budget for future years cannot be assured, as the GOG is perpetually short of funding. Post and the NCB are exploring ways to guarantee funds for future re-supply.

Impact

Since items were furnished in December 2002, it is impossible to assess their impact at this time. However, NCB officials have demonstrated a capability to use the equipment and post foresees significant impact in the form of increased operations and pursuit of illegal activity.

ADDIS ABABA

Procedures

The political section works with USAID in providing oversight of project funds. USAID made two site visits during 2002 to monitor activities. The Good Samaritan Center submitted activity reports in 2002. Post is satisfied with the combination of its site visits and activity report from the center, as well as with the level of cooperation from the Ministry of Health.

Status

A total of $50,000 was given through the U.N. fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) to the Good Samaritan Center to initiate a rape crisis intervention center in Addis Ababa, to provide direct services to sexual assault victims. Part of the funding was used to conduct a baseline study of the city. The baseline study revealed the limitations of the local police capabilities in dealing with victims of sexual assault. Local police do not have a forensic laboratory. The Good Samaritan Center redirected its focus from initially one of providing direct services to sexual assault victims to providing training to rape crisis counselors.

Problems

A 2001 external audit of the rape crisis intervention center by a local auditing firm documented instances of financial improprieties and lax accounting practices. However, the audit report did not indicate any evidence of theft or fraud. A representative from USAID's Office of Financial Management has counseled the management on shoring up its management deficiencies and instituting tougher financial oversight controls.

Program Changes

The Good Samaritan Center has expressed interest in expanding its services to include providing counseling to women on breast cancer and on dealing with handicapped and AIDs-infected children. However, it realized it must proceed slowly until it can demonstrate success with the rape crisis center.

Impact

The rape crisis intervention project has had success in instilling a culture of awareness in primary care providers of the needs of sexual assault victims.

COTONOU

Procedures

The post narcotics officer visited the police station on several occasions during the past year. The Government of Benin (GOB) provides periodic reports on the use of all commodities.

Status

Fifteen Motorola Visar radios were distributed to the Benineese National Drug Interdiction Office and various Antidrug squads. The radios are currently being used and maintained properly.

Post received two itemizer chemical detectors for installation at the international airport in Cotonou to assist security-screening personnel. The itemizers were misplaced recently during the tenure of one of the several TDY RSO's. They were located in a storage room next to the office of the FSN investigator. Post has obtained names of the GOB personnel who will use the itemizers and completed record checks with local police.

Impact

The resources have been used extensively daily. The resources have significantly contributed to the GOB antinarcotics mission.

LAGOS

Procedures

The Embassy's Narcotics and Law Enforcement Officer (RNLEO) conducted an unannounced inspection of most items at the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA) headquarters in Lagos. The NDLEA was extremely cooperative.

Status

Communications Equipment

Many of the hand-held radios provided to the NDLEA in 1992 are not functioning due to broken antennas and/or dead batteries. They are nearing the end of their useful life and will be discarded.

Vehicles

Twelve Honda CG-125 motorcycles were provided to the NDLEA in 1999. They have been distributed to the field.

Miscellaneous Equipment

The following non-expendable commodities were received by NDLEA: file cabinets (6); desks (2); leather chairs (2); RICOH fax machines (2); ICOM radio chargers (12); Wang printer (1); ICOM radios (3); Optiquest UPS (3); sharp photocopy machine (1); Sanyo split air conditioners (4); video machines (4); Sharp multi-system TV (1); Panasonic TV (1); Sony handicam (1); Panasonic Camcorder (1); microcassette tape recorders (5); answering machines (2); Panasonic telephones (10); voltage regulators (4); Honda motorcycles (12).

Of this equipment, the following was misappropriated by NDLEA chairmen: Sony VHSX 715 VCR (1); Panasonic camcorder (1); microcassette recorders (4); answering machine (1); voltage regulator (1); Sony handicam. The office of the current NDLEA chairman is attempting to recorder the equipment. The two chairmen who misappropriated the equipment have been censored and their NDLEA privileges removed.

Impact

The commodity assistance provided to NDLEA significantly promoted bilateral cooperation on counternarcotics. The imminent formation of a Special investigations Unit reflects the level of that cooperation.

LOME

Procedures

No inspections were conducted in 2001.

Status

The eight hand-held radios provided to the Judiciary Police are currently inoperable and in secure storage. They were seldom used because there is no repeater system. They were ineffective in the city and have little use in urban undeveloped areas.

Impact

The equipment provided has had little impact on narcotics interdiction. All of the equipment has outlived its useful life.

LUSAKA

Procedures

The Drug Enforcement Commission (DEC) provided reports on the resources provided. They were very cooperative.

Status

Twenty-four (24) drug identification kits were provided to the Zambian Drug Enforcement Commission in 2000. Fifteen of the kits were delivered to DEC field offices outside Lusaka, and the remainder were used by investigators in the capital. All but one of the kits in Lusaka has been completely used up. The kits in outlying areas have not been used as intensively because officers in those areas typically encountered only cannabis.

Impact

The kits have made an important difference in DEC operations. The kits have made screening in the field more effective, with the result that the central laboratory was no longer burdened with frequent testing of often innocuous substances. As a result of field testing, there is no longer a need to detain suspects for three or four days while investigators wait for the lab results from Lusaka. Investigators are able to spend more time on substantive cases.

NAIROBI

Procedures

The resources were provided to the Anti-Narcotics Unit (ANU). The ANU provide post a report summarizing the location and condition of the equipment. The ANU provides ready access to the equipment upon request. Post will continue to inspect the equipment, as feasible. Many of the computers are being used in various parts of the country.

Status

Miscellaneous Equipment

Cameras (2), microcassette recorders (4), binoculars (2), and video cameras (5) have been disseminated among the ANU posts. Most of the video and audio surveillance equipment donated in 1997 is maintained at ANU headquarters. Some equipment is in use at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport (JKIA), at ANU’s post office Intelligence Unit, and at ANU’s Mombasa office. All equipment remains in good working condition. The two VHF radios are no longer functioning. They are housed at the ANU headquarters.

Computer Equipment

Nine computers, nine monitors, and nine printers were donated to the ANU of the Kenya police in 2002. A printer, monitor and CPU were destroyed in a fire in April.

Impact

Given the challenges faced by the police in Kenya, these new computers will enable many ANU offices, particularly in more remote parts of the country, to store and share information much easier than in the past. While many of the offices are unable to establish internet connectivity due to poor telecommunications infrastructure, the presence of modern computer equipment will prepare these officer for such a connection when it becomes available.

YAOUNDE

Procedures

The U.S. Government and the Government of Cameroon (GRC) signed a bilateral anti-narcotics agreement in 1992. Post presented three safes and three scales in 1997 to Cameroon’s Customs Service. Post monitors the use of the scales and safes through contacts at the Cameroon Civil Aviation Authority (CCAA).

Status

One safe and one scale are currently being used by Cameroonian Customs at each of the country’s three international airports: Douala, Yaounde, and Garoua. All equipment is in good working order.

The effective use of the safes and scales provided in 1997 depends on the ability to seize narcotics through baggage searches. Therefore, post has requested training for airport law enforcement officers (Customs, Police, Gendarmerie) in search techniques as a way to maximize the use of the equipment.



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