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Diplomacy in Action

Southeast Asia and the Pacific


End-Use Monitoring Report
Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 2006
Report
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BANGKOK

Procedures

The NAS conducted inspection visits to Judicial Technical Police (JTP) in the Bangkok Metropolitan area in August-September 2005 and to all three regions of Thailand. In some instances, the Royal Thai Government (RTG) agencies in Bangkok had forwarded accountable items to regional offices which NAS subsequently inspected. This occurred occasionally and affected limited quantities of monitorable commodities. Counterpart agencies were cooperative and responsive in implementing End Use Monitoring procedures, which resulted in a verification rate of 88 percent. A total of 164 end-user sites were visited by NAS staff. Survey teams physically inspected 2,160 of the 2,453 non-expendable commodity items that are accounted for in this report. Based on these inspections, inventory verifications and other information available to post, the NAS knows of no instance in which monitorable INL-funded commodities are not dedicated to the support of the RTG activities against abuse, trafficking and production of illicit drugs, or measures against other forms of crime, to which they were assigned.

End Use Monitoring accountability and verification of commodities located at ILEA is provided by the USG officials who serve as Executive and Deputy Director. ILEA inventory and accountability procedures are adequate and records generally appear sufficient and currently maintained. NAS Bangkok and RTG officials assigned to ILEA physically inspected all accountable commodities.

Inspection of equipment donated to the SIU's was conducted by officials of DEA Bangkok in coordination with the NAS.

Status

At most units, the commodities provided are the responsibility of the end-user unit chief as governed by RTG property regulations, with an officer assigned to maintain records.

Communications Equipment

Communications equipment consists of one analyzer, audio amplifiers (23), audio surveillance systems (13), audio tape recorders (71), base station radios (3), cellular phones (22), contraband detectors (2), digital sound recorders (6), handheld radios (63), microsette tape recorders (6), mobile radios (6), telephones (29), video transmitters (2).

ILEA equipment consists of cellular phones (11), power megaphone (1), telephones (38).

SIU equipment consists of handheld radios (119), car radios (21), audio tape recorders (60), base station radios (3), antennas (3), and microcassette (22).

Computer Equipment

RTG Computer equipment consists of PC's (314), printers (313), USP units (323), software (35), servers (20), scanners (63), modems (12), notebooks (44). SIU equipment consist of PC's (119), notebooks (30), printers (30), scanners (5), servers (5) an UPS' (119).

ILEA equipment consists of PC's (37), Notebooks (3), printers (37), scanners (3), UPS' (3), and modems (5).

SIU equipment consists of PC's (119), printers (30), scanners (5), notebooks (30), UPS' (119).

Miscellaneous Equipment

Cameras, photocopiers, video cameras, fax machines, televisions, power generator night vision devices, typewriters, tape recorders, overhead projectors, paper shredders, slide projectors, electric fan, washing machines, water coolers, barcode readers, air conditioners, vacuum cleaners, refrigerators, lawn mowers, CD players, and other electronic equipment were provided by the NAS to support Narcotics Crop Control, Demand Reduction, and Law Enforcement Projects. Most of the equipment is in good condition.

The following miscellaneous equipment was provided to ILEA: television, projector, typewriter, digital video camera, fax machine, paper shredder.

The following equipment was provided to the SIU's: digital cameras, refrigerator, video camera system, vacuum cleaner, copy machine, file cabinets, digital cameras, air conditioners.

Helicopters

From 1974-1979, the USG supplied seven Bell UH-1H (Bell 205A-1) and two Bell 206L helicopters to the RTG. These helicopters have been used by ONCB in support of the RTG opium crop surveillance and crop eradication program in northern Thailand. Most rotary airlift capability for support of the eradication program is provided by the Royal Thai Army Third Region Command. Of the aircraft in the inventory below, 1716 has been in inventory since October 1997; 1717 since July 1999; 1718 and 2401 since 2000; and 2402 since October 1999.

Aircraft  

 

 

 

Model

Serial

Status/location

 

 

 

205A-1

1712

On duty in Chiang Mai

205A-1

1716

Repair in Bangkok

205A-1

1717

Repair in Bangkok

205A-1

1718

Repair in Bangkok

205A-1

1720

On duty in Chiang Mai

206L

2401

Repair in Bangkok

206L

2402

Repair in Bangkok


Of the ten Bell helicopters, four are grounded at the Police Aviation Unit in Bangkok; three are being used by the Police in Bangkok; three are being used by ONCB in support of RTG opium crop surveillance and crop eradication programs in northern Thailand.

Vehicles

The NAS and counterparts inspected 7 motorcycles, 15 pickup trucks, 16 sedans, 1 land cruiser, 1 station wagon and 3 vans. All vehicles remaining on inventory that were inspected were found to be in good condition. No significant problems were noted in the End Use Monitoring of motor vehicles. Six sedans, 1 station wagon, and 1 van were assigned to the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Bangkok. All are in good condition.

A total of 47 motorcycles, 26 pickup Trucks, 24 sedans, 7 SUV's, and 4 vans were assigned to 10 Sensitive Investigative Units (SIU) sites. All inventoried vehicles are in serviceable condition, although some items purchased more than five years ago are reaching the end of their useful lives. Many of the vehicles have exceeded 100,000 miles of use. No vehicles appear to have been used for other than its intended purpose and no equipment was unaccounted for.

All vehicles procured specifically for use by the SIU's were assigned by the RTP and ONCB to cooperate directly with DEA in this program. The SIU's are located in Bangkok, Chiang Mai, and Chiang Rai provinces.

Six sedans, 1 station wagon and 1 van were assigned to the International Law Enforcement Agency (ILEA) in Bangkok. ILEA vehicles have all exceeded their useful lives. They will be replaced in 2006.

Defense Articles

In November 2003, the U.S. military donated 250 M4 carbines, with associated parts and support equipment, to the Border Patrol Police (BPP). In Chiang Mai, an interagency Intelligence Fusions Center (IIFC) was completed, including delivery and installation of a significant amount of data processing and communications equipment. FMF grant funds appropriated for 2002 were allocated to enhance the effectiveness of the BPP and the capabilities of all RTG agencies with counternarcotics missions in the northern region that participate in the IIFC.

Problems

During inventories conducted by the Royal Thai Marine Police in Samut Praharn Province, 15 items were discovered to be missing. The NAS Director wrote to the Commander of the Marine Police and the Director General of TICA to advise of the problem. The NAS subsequently verified that the commodities had been returned. The NAS and DEA continue to work with Thai Government agencies to try and locate the other missing items. During inventories in 2004, no additional equipment was unaccounted for.

Impact

The overall impact of the Thai Government programs has been considerable and positive in all respects. The Thai opium poppy reduction program is one of the most effective in the world. USG assistance has been critical to attaining the crop control strategic success. Effective RTG drug law enforcement efforts have resulted in significant identified diversion of illicit international movements. Illicit drug production, trafficking and abuse remain a substantial problem in Thailand. The Thai Criminal Justice Sector remains in need of continuing technical and material assistance to respond to the growing new challenges of terrorism, money laundering and other transnational and organized crime.

Program Changes

During 2005, the NAS concurred with the ongoing RTG program being implemented by counterpart agencies to identify unserviceable or overage motor vehicles (or other monitorable items) provided by NAS projects over ten years or more and to delete them from project inventories. Proceeds derived from the sale of such items are returned to INL program for use in implementing drug and crime control projects supported by NAS. The overall size of the INL program in Thailand continues to decrease. There is less need for commodity-heavy traditional crop control and drug law enforcement and a continuing emphasis on training and technical assistance in crime control and the criminal justice sector.

JAKARTA

Procedures

The DEA Singapore /Indonesia country office conducted an on-site inspection of the equipment transferred to the Indonesian Police (INP).

Status

All of the donated equipment is in good operable condition and resides in the originally assigned locations. Post has found that the INP is very meticulous and responsible in the maintenance and operation of the equipment provided. It has found no instances where the equipment has been misused or used for purposes outside of agreement made between INP and INL.

Vehicles

Vehicles were donated to the INP for use in transporting Logistics Unit personnel as follows: North Sumatera Regional Police (4); South Sumatera Regional Police (3); Jakarta Regional Police (4); West Java Regional Police (4); South Sulawesi Regional Police (5); Yogyakarta Regional Police (3); Sorong Divisional Police (1); Pania Divisional Police (1); South Sorong Divisional Police (1); Regional Police East Java (4); Sub Regional Police Surabaya (1).

All vehicles are well-maintained; assigned as agreed upon between INL and INP; and used only in the performance of official duties and tasks.

Communications equipment

Motorola ATS VHF radios donated to the INP were distributed as follows: Regional Police South Sumatera (50); Regional South Sulawski (20); District Police Sukabumi (50); Police Academy (95); ACEH Regional Police (75).

Two hundred thirty-five (235) radios are in INP inventory awaiting distribution in correlation with INP restructured Polres and Polsek alignment.

Computer Equipment

Four desktop computers, four monitors, and four laptops are assigned to the Regional Police Center Sulawesi; four desktops, four monitors, are assigned to the Regional Police Maluku; four laptops, four desktops, and four monitors are assigned to the Police School Seulawah Aceh; six laptops are assigned to the South Sulawesi Regional Police.

Miscellaneous

Eight donated overhead projectors and twelve micro cassette recorders are used by the Regional Police Center Sulawesi.

Impact

The equipment continues to assist the INP with their counternarcotics efforts in Indonesia. The INP is severely understaffed relative to police to population ratios, as well as under-resourced. INP's ability to respond to public service demands and expectations and to replicate and integrate training would not have been actualized without INL funded assistance.

KUALA LUMPUR

Procedures

Post has provided no assistance to the Government of Malaysia since 1966 due to Malaysia's refusal to sign a letter of agreement with INL.

Status

The Motorola repeater station for Royal Malaysia Customs and Excise (RMCE) was used at Subang Airport for several years. It has now been dismantled and is no longer in use. RMCE has no plans to use the station in the future and has erected its own new repeater station as a replacement.

PHNOM PENH

Procedures

In 2005, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) inspected the drug analysis equipment.

Status

In 1997, INL supplied drug analysis equipment to the Cambodian Anti-Narcotics Department laboratory in Phnom Penh. However, the equipment was never unpacked due to political strife in Cambodia at the time. DEA arranged for a team of Vietnamese experts to assess the equipment. The team determined that the equipment is completely unusable due to seven years without climate controlled storage. Post is exploring options to dispose of the equipment. Any proceeds from the sale of the equipment will go back into the program.

VIENTIANE

Procedures

Inspections of INL-provided equipment and INL-funded construction projects were conducted during field trips to projects throughout the year. The NAS used these visits to discuss maintenance problems and to insure that INL-funded commodities are being used properly and are contributing to the overall success of the projects. Lao counterparts have made all INL-provided equipment available for inspection.

Status

Vehicles

Vehicles are used for hauling supplies and providing transportation in direct support of project activities. Vehicles are used strictly for project activities.

All trucks provided to the Lao American Project, Phonsgaly are in good condition except for one pickup truck which was damaged in an accident. One vehicle is based at Vientiane; three in Bountai. One pickup truck was transferred to the Provincial Committee for Drug Control, Phongsaly Province. One Isuzu Trooper II was transferred for use in the NAS. One motorcycle is in Vientiane; one in Samphan and nine in Bountai. All motorcycles are in good condition.

All trucks provided to the Lao American Project, Liang Prabang are usable. Two are based in NGOY district and one is based in Viengkham district. Nine motorcycles are in Viengkham and NGOY districts.

Twenty-seven (27) motorcycles were provided to the Provincial Committee for Drug Control. Two Landcruisers, two Toyota pickup trucks and 22 motorcycles were provided to the Drug Control Department, Law Enforcement Project. One Isuzu Trooper, three motorcycles, and two Toyota pickup trucks were provided to the Lao National Commission for Drug Control (LCDC) and Supervision. Two of the motorcycles were stolen. LCDC replaced them. Two Toyota Hilus pickup trucks and nine motorcycles were provided to Savannakhet Counternarcotics Unit; four motorcycles and one Toyota Hilus Pickup truck were provided to the Bokeo Counternarcotis Unit; six motorcycles and one pickup truck were provided to the Oudomkay Counternarcotics Project; six motorcycles and one pickup truck were provided to the Houaphan Counternarcotis Office; six motorcycles and one pickup truck were provided to the Phonosaly Counternartics Office. (Two of the motorcycles are broken.); seven motorcycles and one pickup truck were provided to the Narcotics Unit Customs (one pickup is undergoing repair); five motorcycles and one pickup were provided to the Champasack Counternarcotics Office; eleven motorcycles and one pickup were provided to the Luang Prabang Counternarcotics Office; six motorcycles and one pickup were provided to the Xayaboury Counternarcotics Office; twelve motorcycles and one pickup were provided to the Vientiane Capital; one pickup was provided to the Xiengkhouang Counternarcotics Office.

Most are in good condition and well maintained. A full-time mechanic controls the project motor pool operation and maintenance. Vehicles are used strictly for project activities.

Communications Equipment

In the Lao-American project, the Motorola base stations provide communications between Vientiane and the project offices in Phongsaly Province. The mobile radios allow for communication between the project area staff and the district offices. All equipment is dedicated to the Anti-Narcotics Crop Control Project with little opportunity for diversion.

Two HF-SSB radios, three VHF-FM mobile radios, ten handheld are used by the Savannakhet counternarcotics Office. One HF-SSB radio and two VHF FM radios are used by the Oudomxay Counternarcotics Office. Twelve hand-held radios are used by the Xayaboury Counternarcotics Office. One HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios, and 20 hand-held transceivers are used by the Champasack Counternarcotics Office. One HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios, and 20 hand-held transceivers are used by the Phongsaly Counternarcotics Office. One HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios, and twelve handheld radios are used by the Houaphan Counternarcotics Office. One HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios and 33 handheld radios are used by the Vientiane Capital (one radio is lost, four require batteries, and two are nonfunctioning); one HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios, and 17 handheld transceivers are used by the Luang Prabang Counternarcotics Office. One HF-SSB radio, five VHF-FM radios, and 55 hand-held transceivers are used by the Drug Control Department; one HF-SSB radio and one VHF FM base station are used by the Bokeo Counternarcotics Unit.

Radio maintenance and repairs were performed either by the U.S. owned distributor of Motorola equipment or by the Ministry of Interior technical staff sent to the CNO's.

Computer Equipment

Most commodities were purchased prior to CY-2003. Three Dell computers and one laptop computer were purchased in CY-2001. Four Notebook computers were purchased in CY-2004. A total of 7 Dell computers have replaced the old Gateway and Compaq Presserio computers. All items are in good condition.

Computers need constant maintenance and repair. Since computer service in the provinces is irregular, such computers must be brought intoVientiane for service. Moreover, the supply of electricity in some areas is unreliable. So post is very reliant on generators. The NAS keeps careful inventory of the whereabouts of all computer components at all times.

Miscellaneous Equipment

Fax machines, VCR's, binoculars, cameras, television monitors, cassette recorders, and copy machines are used throughout the projects. They are all in good condition. Copy machines need maintenance and repair regularly in some northern provinces, where the electrical supply is not stable.

Problems

Maintenance of equipment, especially computers require constant monitoring. The NAS has urged on numerous occasions that counterparts report problems with equipment and installations both during and between inspection visits.

Impact

USG funding and commodities remain the keys to project success in Laos. As one of the world's poorest countries, Laos has virtually no funding available for counternarcotics activities and would be unable to actively pursue counternarcotics goals without foreign donor support. The Lao government continues to seek such support. The U.S. is the largest donor in the counternarcotics area, both via the bilateral projects and through UNODC projects.



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