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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Africa


End-Use Monitoring Report
Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 2006
Report
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ACCRA

Procedures

Post received signed statements from the Executive Secretary of the Ghanaian Narcotics Board (NCB) acknowledging receipt and proper use of the items. The NCB provides an annual report on the status of all equipment provided by USG with INL funds. The NCB report, together with on-site visits by the Political Officer, is the basis for this report.

The NCB has been highly cooperative in the effort to document how equipment has been used and maintained, and has been forthcoming with information about the impact USG support has had on counternarcotics efforts in Ghana.

Status

Computer Equipment

In 2002, post donated three computers and one server to Ghana's Police Service's Women and Juvenile Unit (WAJU). It has been renamed the Domestic Violence Victim Support Unit (DOVVISU), but it still has responsibility for crimes targeting women and children. In February 2005, post donated four HP Compaq computers and one HP Laserjet printer to GPS's Police Intelligence and Professional Standards Unit. The officers have been observed using three of the computers to track human rights, abuses and complaints of misconduct. The fourth computer has been used as a server to permit file sharing by the unit's staff and to store the unit's personnel records. The computers are well-maintained by an outside vendor.

In 2005 ICITAP instructors donated the following equipment for use in basic police skills training course: 1 Hewlett Packard Desktop computer/monitor; 1 Hewlett Packard deskjet color printer; 1 Hewlett Packard laptop.

Communications Equipment

Post distributed a mobile cellular transmitter and a voice stress analyzer to the NCB in calendar year 2002. The NCB has not had occasion to use the voice stress analyzer in interrogations. The Motorola radios received in 2004 are only used for training purposes. Since they are so large they attract attention during counternarcotics operations.

Miscellaneous Equipment

In 2002, post donated 22 bicycles to the Community Policing Unit at the Cantonments Police Station in Accra. An additional 20 bicycles were donated in 2004. In 2005, post donated another 20 bicycles to the Ghana Police Service's Community Policing Unit in Kumasi. Only four of the 42 bicycles donated to the Cantonments program are being used for regular patrols. Thirteen bicycles are broken down, primarily from lack of chain lubricant, worn out brakes, and other parts difficult to replace in Ghana. The 20 bicycles donated to the Kumsai unit are still in storage and have not been deployed because the GPS has not yet trained personnel to man bicycle patrols. The remaining five are with officers who formerly belonged to the unit. Post has called for their return.

Two Ion itemizers, sample traps, and calibration traps were provided to the NCB for detection of illegal substances at the airport. One itemizer is regularly used at Kotoba International Airport and the second itemizer is maintained at NCB headquarters for emergency deployment. The NCB has no budget for keeping the itemizers replenished with consumables. One itemizer is no longer being used for this reason. Post is exploring whether INL funds from prior years can be used to replace the consumables.

Post was unable to observe the covert gym bag, ghost phone or digital camera. NCB says these items are stored at its operation center at Kotoka International airport. An Embassy visit would disrupt their operations.

Vehicles

Two Suzuki motorcycles and eight crash helmets and a KIA surveillance van were provided to the NCB in 2003 to facilitate the general functions of and expeditious response by the NCB in its counternarcotics efforts. Four additional motorcycles and one motorbike were donated in 2004. All are in use. It took two visits to observe the KIA van. Post had difficulty opening the side door. The van has not been used for investigations for some time. The NCB used three of the motorcycles regularly and two are held at the NCB's offices in reserve. The NCBN has been able to obtain a mechanic services without difficulty. All motorcycles are operating without problems.

Two motorcycles were not present at the NCB. The NCB handed these over to the countenarcotics units of the Customs, Excise & Preventive Service (CEPS) and GPS. The10 handcuffs were in use in the field.

Impact

Despite the USG's donations of bicycles to encourage community policing in Accra and Kumasi, these programs are quite "dormant" according to its former commanding officer. The unit has suffered from staff recruitment and retention problems as well as poor bicycle maintenance. The Inspector General pledged to community policing officials that he will provide 12 to 16 new recruits to rejuvenate the bicycle patrol in both cities.

COTONOU

Procedures

The post Narcotics Officer visited the police station on several occasions during the past year. The Government of Benin (GOB) provides periodic reports on the use of all commodities.

Status

Fifteen Motorola Visar radios were distributed to the Benineese National Drug Interdiction Office and various Antidrug squads. The radios are currently being used and maintained properly.

Post received two itemizer chemical detectors for installation at the international airport in Cotonou to assist security-screening personnel. Post has obtained names of the GOB personnel who will use the itemizers, pending INL training.

Impact

The resources have been used extensively daily. The resources have significantly contributed to the GOB antinarcotics mission.

LAGOS

Procedures

During 2005, the INL staff in Lagos used online inspections and periodic spot checks by USG personnel to monitored INL-funded equipment.

Status

INL-funded equipment was not donated to the Government of Nigeria in 2005. The INL staff enjoys a cordial relationship with the Nigerian Government Agencies. The agencies have tried to maintain the equipment to the best of their ability. The few items that are not operating are beyond repair.

Communications Equipment

The 24 VHF radios donated to the Lagos State Police are in good working order. A Motorola VHF Base Station and 60 Motorola VHF radios were donated to the National Drug Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA). Five VHS radios were assigned to the INL Lagos office.

Computer Equipment

During 2003, post provided 25 computers, monitors, seven printers, and one server for a Research Center at the NDLEA Training Academy. They also provided two laptop computers, two power point projectors, two printers and one overhead projector to the Special Fraud Unit to support the Police Modernization Project. All are in use and in excellent condition.

The Nigeria Police INTERPOL unit received two desktop PC systems and two HP 1200 Laser Jet printers. The computers are in poor condition and not operable. The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) received two Compaq laptops. The National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons received two PC systems and monitors. The Special Assistant to the Presidency on Anti-human Trafficking received two computers All are in good working condition.

Vehicles

Two Hilux pickups, one Haice Mini Bus, one Hilux 4x4 and one Toyota Hilux 2x2s were provided NDLEA. The INTERPOL received one Toyota Hilux 4x4 and one Toyota Condor van. A Toyota Double Cabin and a Toyota Condor wagon were donated to the Special Fraud Unit of the Nigeria Police Force.

All vehicles appear to be in good condition and in constant use. Any repairs needed have been done by the GON. Vehicles are located at INTERPOL, SFU, JOS Academy, Lagos HQS of NDLEA, the airport in Lagos, and Apapa zone and Tincan Island.

Miscellaneous Equipment

During 2003, post provided a digital medical X-ray machine for use by NDLEA at the Lagos International Airport and AFIX tractor (fingerprint machine) for the Special Fraud Unit. The AFIX tractor is scheduled to be moved from the Special Fraud Unit to the Central Registry Unit whose primary duty is to record and store fingerprints and crime statistics. The X-ray machine which became very well maintained and used on a daily basis by the airport command of the NDLEA in Lagos.

The following non-expendable commodities were received by NDLEA in prior years: file cabinets (6); desks (2); leather chairs (2); RICOH fax machines (2); ICOM radio chargers (12); Wang printer (1); ICOM radios (3); Optiquest UPS (3); sharp photocopy machine (1); Sanyo split air conditioners (4); video machines (4); Sharp multi-system TV (1); Panasonic TV (1); Sony handicam (1); Panasonic Camcorder (1); microcassette tape recorders (5); answering machines (2); Panasonic telephones (10); voltage regulators (4); Honda motorcycles (12), itemizers (4).

The following non-expendable commodities were received by the National Agency for Prohibition of Traffic in Persons: CPU (5); flat screen monitor (5); NEC projector (1); Panasonic copier (1); projector screen (1); Smart UPS (3); Sony cyber-shot digital camera (1); Sony laptops (3); LG-VCR+DVD player (1); Sony Wega television (1).

The following equipment was donated to the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC): HP Laser jet 4200N printer (3); NEC projector (1); Elton P420 plastic card printer (1); Sony Cyber shot digital camera (1).

The following equipment was donated to INTERPOL: Gubabi fireproof file cabins (4); Panasonic fax machine (1); AVC 650 VA UPS (2); generator (1).

The following equipment was donated to the Lagos State Police: bulletproof vests (4) flashlights (70).

Impact

The X-ray machine at the Murtala Mohammed Airport in Lagos has been very helpful in drug interdiction. It has been used to detect illicit drugs swallowed by drug traffickers. Since its installation, many drug traffickers have been arrested at the airport. It has also served as a deterrent to drug traffickers, by shifting drug couriers to other airports in Nigeria and countries in West Africa sub-region, which do not have the equipment.

NAIROBI

Procedures

The resources were provided to the Anti-Narcotics Unit (ANU). The ANU provides post a report summarizing the location and condition of the equipment. The ANU provides ready access to the equipment upon request. Post will continue to inspect the equipment, as feasible.

Status

In 2002, ten computers were provided to the ANU. Nine of the ten computers are still in use. Post maintains regular contact with the ANU to allow close monitoring of the computers. The ANU also provides periodic reports on the use of the computers, including the location and condition of the equipment. The computers have not been exclusively used by the ANU. The CID controls their dissemination and placement within the Kenya Police Service (KPS). The ANU reports that the nine computers are in use at nine different police stations throughout the nation.

Problems

Continuing corruption concerns, coupled with diminished control by the designated recipient over the dissemination of resources, has hampered post's provision of additional assistance.

Impact

The ANU reports that the provision of the computers has enabled the KPS (and by extension the ANU) to improve recordkeeping and nationwide data collection. As a result, the ANU is able to compile data to provide more comprehensive, detailed, and reliable reports on anti-narcotics related activities.

PRETORIA

Procedures

During 2005, NLEA and the U.S. Secret Service (USSS) inspected the equipment provided to the South African Government and governments in the SADC region. NLEO visited the Special Investigative Unit (SIU) and physically viewed its equipment. The ICITAP Technical Adviser to the Johannesburg Metropolitan Police (JMPD) has access to some of the equipment and receives reports on the equipment dispersed to the officers. USSS officers travel frequently throughout the region and thus can conduct a physical inventory.

Status

Miscellaneous Equipment

Seven desk stations, three drawer compartments, 5 four drawer steel filing cabinets, 2 steel lockable cupboards, 3 five tiered bookcases, nine chairs, 2 letter trays, and 3 waste bins were provided to the Special Investigative Unit (SIU) in 2005. In 2004, the SIU received 68 desks, 11 conference tables, 32 filing cabinets, 27 cupboards, 58 five tier shelves, 4 four legged chairs, 42 high back chairs, 14 mid-back chairs, 1 boardroom table, 90 stacker chairs, 13 workstations, 1 lectern, 2 reception desks, 2 coffee tables, and 4 waiting chairs.

In 2004, one infrared spectrometer, one gas chromatographer, one liquid chromatographer, 5 video recorders, 8 cassette recorders, 7 projectors, 1 DVD player, 76 flashlights, 2 laminators, 4 microscopes, 4 VHS tape duplicators, 2 shredders, 1 forensic tool kit, 91 cameras, and 6 thumb drives were donated to the South African Police Services (SAPS).

In 2003, 299 breath analyzers, one projector, one VHS player/recorder, one television, and one external mouse were given to the Johannesburg Metropolitan Police Department. The breath analyzers are in constant use as preliminary indicators of drunken driving, including roadside checks. The VHS player/recorder and TV are working well. The Swaziland Police were given 50 back-pack sprayers for use in drug eradication.

Communications Equipment

In 2004, five (5) video recorders, eight (8) cassette recorders, seven (7) projectors, one (1) DVD player, four (4) cell phones, 76 flashlights, two (2) laminators, four (4) microscopes, four (4) VHSD tape duplicators, ten (10) Motorola radios, ten (10) Motorola batteries, ten (1) Motorola desktop chargers were given to the SAPS and Scorpions during the Financial Crimes and Forensic Training.

A PABX System, which provides voice over IP via a WAN system, was provided to the SIU for use in operations in East London, Pretoria, Durban, Nelspruit, Umtata and Capetown.

Computer Equipment

The South African Police Service (SAPS) and Scorpions were given 25 scanners, ten (10) laptops, 22 forensic computers, 43 printers, four (4) Iomega CD-RW external drives, ten (10) palms, 21 external hard drive, forty (40) mouse and keyboards, and two (2) AXTZ microchips. The Kenya Police Service received two (2) forensic tool kits, two (2) 200 GB hard drives, one (1) microscope and two (2) printers. The Tanzania Police Service received one (1) forensic tool, one (1) 200 GB had drive, and one (1) printer. The Zambia Police Service received one (1) forensic tool kit, one (1) 200 GB hard drive, and one (1) printer. The Ghana Police Service received one (1) forensic tool kit, one (1) 200 GB hard drive, and one (1) printer. The Swaziland's Police Service and Uganda's Police Service each received one (1) microscope.

Impact

The increased demand by the various Departments of the South African Government for SIU to investigate corruption resulted in SIU's rapid growth. The equipment provided by INL for SAPS, the National Directorate for Public Prosecution, and six southern African countries, will allow for extraction of crucial information from computers seized during the course of an investigation.

YAOUNDE

Procedures

The U.S. Government and the Government of Cameroon (GRC) signed a bilateral anti-narcotics agreement in 1992. Post presented three safes and three scales in 1997 to Cameroon's Customs Service. Post monitors the use of the scales and safes through contacts at the Cameroon Civil Aviation Authority (CCAA).

Status

One safe and one scale are currently being used by Cameroonian Customs at each of the country's three international airports: Douala, Yaounde, and Garoua. All equipment at the Younde and Garoua airports are in good working order. The safe at the Doroua International Airport has been out-of-service since the death of the one officer in possession of its combination. Little or no maintenance has been performed on the equipment. The CCAA has requested assistance and on-the-job screening training for the servicing of the equipment, including assistance with opening the safe in Douala.

Impact

The host government reported that this equipment has contributed immensely to produce statistics in the worldwide fight against the use of narcotics at airports.



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