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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

2006 End-Use Monitoring Report: Southeast Asia and the Pacific


Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 1, 2007

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BANGKOK

Procedures

Between October and December 2006, the NAS staff made five trips to the regions of the country for physical inspection of commodities. During November and December, the NAS inspected commodities in the Bangkok metropolitan area. In some instances where access is constrained by distance, the recipient RTG units forwarded inventory forms to regional supervisory elements, which were subsequently inspected by USG/RTG teams. This modified procedure occurred only in the case of a few small and isolated RTG units, holding limited quantities of monitorable commodities. NAS Bangkok EUM procedures for CY-2006 resulted in a verification rate of 94.74 percent. A total of 152 end-user sites were visited by the NAS staff. Survey teams physically inspected 2,072 of 2,187 of non-expendable commodity items accounted for in this report.

End Use Monitoring accountability and verification of commodities located at ILEA is provided by the USG officials who serve as Executive and Deputy Director. ILEA inventory and accountability procedures are adequate and records generally appear sufficient and currently maintained. NAS Bangkok and RTG officials assigned to ILEA physically inspected all accountable commodities.

Inspection of equipment donated to the SIU’s was conducted by officials of DEA Bangkok in coordination with the NAS.

Status

All commodities listed below were inspected and found to be in serviceable condition at the intended locations and used for the intended purposes At most units, the commodities provided are the responsibility of the end-user unit chief as governed by RTG property regulations, with an officer assigned to maintain records.

Communications Equipment

Communications equipment consists of one analyzer, audio amplifiers (23), audio surveillance systems (13), audio tape recorders (71), base station radios (3), cellular phones (22), contraband detectors (2), digital sound recorders (6), handheld radios (63), microsette tape recorders (6), mobile radios (6), telephones (29), video transmitters (2).

ILEA equipment consists of cellular phones (11), power megaphone (1), telephones (38).

SIU equipment consists of handheld radios (119), car radios (21), audio tape recorders (60), base station radios (3), antennas (3), and microcassette (22).

Computer Equipment

RTG Computer equipment consists of PC’s (314), printers (313), USP units (323), software (35), servers (20), scanners (63), modems (12), notebooks (44). SIU equipment consist of PC’s (119), notebooks (30), printers (30), scanners (5), servers (5) an UPS’ (119).

ILEA equipment consists of PC’s (37), Notebooks (3), printers (37), scanners (3), UPS’ (3), and modems (5). SIU equipment consists of PC’s (119), printers (30), scanners (5), notebooks (30), UPS’ (119).

Miscellaneous Equipment

Cameras, photocopiers, video cameras, fax machines, televisions, power generator night vision devices, typewriters, tape recorders, overhead projectors, paper shredders, slide projectors, electric fans, washing machines, water coolers, barcode readers, air conditioners, vacuum cleaners, refrigerators, lawn mowers, CD players, and other electronic equipment were provided by the NAS to support Narcotics Crop Control, Demand Reduction, and Law Enforcement Projects. Most of the equipment is in good condition.

The following miscellaneous equipment was provided to ILEA: television, projector, typewriter, digital video camera, fax machine, paper shredder.

The following equipment was provided to the SIU’s: digital cameras, refrigerator, video camera system, vacuum cleaner, copy machine, file cabinets, digital cameras, air conditioners.

Helicopters

From 1974-1979, the USG supplied seven Bell UH-1H (Bell 205A-1) and two Bell 206L helicopters to the RTG. These helicopters have been used by ONCB in support of the RTG opium crop surveillance and crop eradication program in northern Thailand. Most rotary airlift capability for support of the eradication program is provided by the Royal Thai Army Third Region Command. Of the aircraft in the inventory below, 1716 has been in inventory since October 1997; 1717 since July 1999; 1718 and 2401 since 2000; and 2402 since October 1999.

 

Aircraft
Model
Serial
Status/location
   
205A-1
1712
On duty in Tak province
205A-1
1713
Repair in Bangkok
205A-1
1716
On duty in Bangkok
205A-1
1717
On duty in Bangkok
205A-1
1718
Repair in Bangkok
205A-1
1720
On duty in Chiang Mai
206L
2401
On duty in Bangkok
206L
2402
On duty in Bangkok

Vehicles

The NAS and counterparts inspected 7 motorcycles, 15 pickup trucks, 16 sedans, 1 land cruiser, 1 station wagon and 3 vans. All vehicles remaining on inventory that were inspected were found to be in good condition. No significant problems were noted in the End Use Monitoring of motor vehicles. Six sedans, 1 station wagon, and 1 van were assigned to the International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Bangkok. All are in good condition.

A total of 47 motorcycles, 26 pickup Trucks, 24 sedans, 7 SUV’s, and 4 vans were assigned to 10 Sensitive Investigative Units (SIU) sites. All inventoried vehicles are in serviceable condition, although some items purchased more than five years ago are reaching the end of their useful lives. Many of the vehicles have exceeded 100,000 miles of use. No vehicles appear to have been used for other than its intended purpose and no equipment was unaccounted for.

All vehicles procured specifically for use by the SIU’s were assigned by the RTP and ONCB to cooperate directly with DEA in this program. The SIU’s are located in Bangkok, Chiang Mai, and Chiang Rai provinces.

During 2005/2006, the NAS concurred with an ongoing RTG program by TICA and counterpart agencies to identify unserviceable or overage motor vehicles (or other monitorable items) provided ten years or more ago by the NAS and purge them from project inventories. Proceeds from the sale of such items are returned to TICA which continues to employ the funds in implementing drug and crime control projects supported by the NAS.

Defense Articles

In November 2003, the U.S. military donated 250 M4 carbines, with associated parts and support equipment, to the Border Patrol Police (BPP). In Chiang Mai, an Interagency Intelligence Fusion Center (IIFC) was completed, including delivery and installation of a significant amount of data processing and communications equipment. FMF grant funds appropriated for 2002 were allocated to enhance the effectiveness of the BPP and the capabilities of all RTG agencies with counternarcotics missions in the northern region that participate in the IIFC.

Problems

During inventories conducted by the Royal Thai Marine Police in Samut Praharn Province, 15 items were discovered to be missing. The NAS Director wrote to the Commander of the Marine Police and the Director General of TICA to advise of the problem. The NAS subsequently verified that the commodities had been returned. During inventories in 2004, no additional equipment was unaccounted for.

Impact

Although it is difficult to make a direct and measurable link between a specific commodity and the overall rate of law enforcement effectiveness, the INCLE-funded commodities listed in this report undoubtedly have increased the capabilities of the RTG to combat narcotics and have clearly helped to produce a highly cooperative relationship between the US mission in Thailand and RTG law enforcement agencies.

During 2006, the NAS concurred with an ongoing RTG program by TICA and counterpart agencies to identify unserviceable or overage motor vehicles (or other monitorable items provided ten years or more ago by the NAS) and purge them from project inventories. Proceeds derived from the sale of such items are returned to TICA which continues to employ the funds in implementing drug and crime control projects supported by the NAS. The overall size of the INL program in Thailand continues to decrease with relatively less need for commodity-heavy traditional crop control and drug law enforcement and a continuing emphasis on training and capacity building technical assistance in crime control and the criminal justice sector.

BISHKEK

Procedures

INL Bishkek conducted inspection of equipment provided to host government agencies. These agencies include the State Forensic Center under the Ministry of Justice Prosecutor General’s Office, the Ministry of Interior, and State Customs Inspection. The agencies were cooperative and provided all necessary information and access to the sites. During the inspection, INL personnel found some inaccuracies in the brand of the equipment, model and quantity.

Status

Communications Equipment

In July 2004, 1 computer, 1 UPS, 1 black and white printer, and one power surge Tripplite were donated to the canine unit.

In 2005, the Department of the Organizational Provision and International Relations of Prosecutor General’s Office received 5 sets of computers. 2 printers, 1 scanner.

In 2004, one stationary radio, one mobile radio, and four portable radios were donated to the Canine Unit of the Ministry of Interior in 2004. The portable radio was lost. A portable radio is broken and cannot be repaired. Post will obtain the inoperable radio and determine if it can be repaired or should be salvaged.

Of 30 portable Motorola radios provided to the Anti-Drug Department of the Ministry of Interior, 12 were at site and used properly. Another 17 were allocated to Kata-Balta and Chui Oblast Anti-Drug units. A Motorola base station was established on the “Artek” base up in the mountains. Two stationary and one automobile radio were not in use.

Computer Equipment

The following equipment was donated to the Scientific Research Center of the Ministry of Interior in July: 1 computer, 1 UPS, 1 black and white printer HP Laserjet 1200, 1 scanner ScanJet 3570. All are in use.

The Police School under the Ministry of Interior received a set of computer equipment in 2004, including 2 computers, 2 UPS’, 2 modems, 1 projector, 1 digital camera, 1 copier, 1 color printer, 1 black and white printer and 1 scanner. The serial numbers were verified with receiving reports by Embassy warehouse personnel.

The Prosecutor General’s Office received a computer, UPS, printer, scanner and digital camera. At a meeting with the Prosecutor General’s Office, it was emphasized that their office is one of the least equipped state agencies in the country.

In 2005, the Department of the Organizational Provision and International Relations of Prosecutor General’s Office received five sets of computers, two printers, and one scanner. The equipment is maintained and used properly.

In July 2004, one computer, one UPS, and one LaserJet printer were donated to the Canine Unit of the Ministry of Interior. All of the equipment is in use.

Nine computers, nine UPS’, nine power surge “Tripplite” and eight printers were distributed among Police Department of the Anti-Drug Department of the Ministry of Interior. One computer and one printer, not yet donated by INL, were destroyed by a fire in the warehouse.

Laboratory Equipment

In 2005, the State Forensic Center received laboratory equipment including GAS Chromatography System with mass selective detector, liquid Chromatography system with diode-array detector, UV visible Spectroscopy System, FTIR Spectroscopy system with video microscope, analytical and precision balances and solvents.

All laboratory equipment was on site and used properly except for the liquid chromatography system. The liquid chromatography is not in use due to the absence of liquid nitrogen. The solvents were very helpful and necessary. The Forensic Center was unable to find a specialist who could calibrate the equipment. Post will seek someone to do the calibration. The specialist of the Forensic Center reported that over 70% of all requests for examination are done in the Forensic Center.

In 2005, the Criminalistics Laboratory of the Ministry of Interior (MOI) received a lab thermo spectrometer, gas generator, and different solvents. The equipment is in the laboratory but all is not being used due to the absence of liquid nitrogen. Solvents were found to be very helpful and necessary. About 85% of the solvents have been used.

Vehicles

The Customs Office was provided with three Russian vehicles “Niva.” During inspection, only one vehicle was parked in the garage. Customs advised that one vehicle was on patrol in the mountains and the other was kept in Osh city to bring another shift to the Customs Office.

A vehicle was donated to the Prosecutor General’s Office in July 2004. According to the GOK documents, the vehicle is in use by the District Prosecutor’s Office in Naryn Province. Due to their remoteness of the Naryn Province, the inspection of the vehicle is scheduled for next year.

In July 2004, a vehicle was donated to the Canine Unit of the Ministry of Interior. The vehicle was on site and in use.

Miscellaneous Items

Twelve bookcases, six tables, five chairs and were furnished to the information center of the Prosecutor General’s Office in 2005.

A copier, digital camera, multimedia projector, and fax machine were provided to the Police Academy in July 2004. All are in use.

Problems

In August 2005, the INL office was staffed completely with new people. The current INL staff could retrieve most but not all information about equipment transferred to the host government. The absence of serial numbers, confusion with brand and models of the equipment in the transceiving acts made the End Use Monitoring difficult or sometimes impossible. It appears that former staff distributed equipment without a thorough accountability for the donated items. In the near future, a more in-depth analysis of donated equipment will be conducted by Post. At this time, it is not clear how the process of equipment distribution was conducted.

JAKARTA

Procedures

The DEA Singapore /Indonesia Country Office conducted an on-site inspection of the equipment transferred to the Indonesian Police (INP).

Status

All of the donated equipment is in good operable condition and resides in the originally assigned locations. Post has found that the INP is very meticulous and responsible in the maintenance and operation of the equipment provided. It has found no instances where the equipment has been misused or used for purposes outside of agreement made between INP and INL.

Vehicles

Trucks were donated to the INP for use in transporting Logistics Unit personnel as follows: North Sumatera Regional Police (3); South Sumatera Regional Police (3); Jakarta Regional Police (4); West Java Regional Police (4); South Sulawesi Regional Police (4); Yogyakarta Regional Police (3); Sorong Divisional Police (1); Pania Divisional Police (1); South Sorong Divisional Police (1); Regional Police East Java (4); Marine Police Directorate Tanjung Priuk (2); DIT Samapta Polda Nad Aceh (4).

All vehicles are well-maintained; assigned as agreed upon between INL and INP; and used only in the performance of official duties and tasks.

Communications Equipment

Motorola ATS VHF radios donated to the INP were distributed as follows: Regional Police South Sumatera (50); Regional South Sulawski (20); Regional Police Timur Sulawesi (20); Regional Police West Java (80); Police Academy (95); ACEH Regional Police (75); Regional Police Yogyakarta (50); Regional Police Jakarta Metropolitan (45); Regional Police Banten (35); Regional Police East Nusa Tenggara (16); Regional Police East Java (5); Head of INP (10); POSO Communications & Electronic Center (24).

All of the INL-financed communications equipment has been well-maintained and is in operable condition, assigned as agreed upon between INL and the INP and are only being used in the performance of official duties and operations.

Computer Equipment

Computer equipment donated to the INP was distributed as follows: Regional Police Center Sulawski (3 desktops, 4 laptops, 3 projector screens); Regional Police Maluku (4 laptops, 4 monitors, 4 desktops, 3 projectors); Police School Seulawah Ache (4 laptops, 4 desktops, 4 monitors, 4 LCD projectors, 4 overhead projectors, 4 projectors screens); South Sulawesi Regional Police (6 laptops); Aceh Regional Police (5 computes, 5 monitors, 5 printers); Langsa Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); South Aceh Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 2 printers); Simeulue Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Aceh Jaya Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Naga Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); South Western Aceh Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Bener Meriah Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 printer, 1 monitor); East Aceh Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Aceh Tamiang Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Gayo Luwes Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Bhayangkara Police Hospital (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); West Aceh Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Aceh Singkil Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Lhoksukon Divisional Police (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); Directorate of Downstream Chemical Industry of Industry Republic (1 computer, 1 monitor, 1 printer); National Police School Medan (4 laptops, 2 LCD projectors, 2 printers, 1 fax); Marine Police Program Ditrol Office (1 laptop,); Cyber Crime Meg Mendung (28 desktop computers, 1 printer, 2 servers); Cyber Crime INP headquarters (1 printer, 4 servers); Marine Police Directorate Tanjung Priok (5 laptops, 4 monitors, 5 printers, 4 overhead projectors); Pusdikeskrim Mega Mendung, West Java (3 monitors, 28 desktop computers, 1 printer, 3 servers); Polda Nangroe Aceh Darussalam (4 laptops); National Police School of North Sumatera (1 computer, 3 LCD projectors); North Sumatra Regional Police (2 printers, 2 projector LCD, 1 computer); Marine Police Directorate Tanjung Priok (2 laptops, 8 desktops).

All of the INL-financed communications equipment has been well-maintained and is in operable condition, assigned as agreed upon between INL and the INP and are only being used in the performance of official duties and operations.

Miscellaneous

Twelve micro cassette recorders are used by the Regional Police Center Sulawesi.

Miscellaneous equipment donated to INP was distributed as follows: CIC Megamendung (3 full-face respirator and canisters, 7 Hazmat boots, 2 Petzl headlamps, 1 com wire cutters, 1 field spade, 2 hand lanterns, 1 latex safety gloves, 1 magnifier, 1 half mask respirator, 1 tool set, 1 tool set); CID Balikpan (5 full-face respirators, 1 Sirius multi gas detector, 2 hand lanterns, 5 safety glasses, 4 half mask respirators, 3 Glock field spares, 3 folding pocket magnifier, 4 Petzl headlamps, 1 latex safety gloves, 4 respirator cartridges, 2 leatherman new wave tool); Marine Police (5 full-face respirators, 1 Sirius Gas detector, 9 Hazmet boots, 1 Felco wire cutters, 1 Glock field spade, 1 half mask respirators); Forensic Laboratory Center Jakarta (9 full-face respirators, 2 Sirius multi gas detectors, 11 Hazmet boots, 6 Petzl headlamps, 5 Glock field spade, 3 Hazmet overalls, 3 leatherman new wave tool, 8 half-mask respirators, 8 respirator cartridges, 4 latex safety gloves); Forensic Laboratory Surabaya (5 full-face respirators, 1 Sirius multi gas detector, 8 Hazmet boots, 4 Glock field spade, 3 hand lantern, 4 half-mask respirators, 3 leatherman new wave tools); Forensic Laboratory Denpasar (5 full-face respirator and canister combo, 1 Sirius multi gas detector, 8 Hazmet boots, 4 Petzl headlamps, 3 Glock field spade, 3 Hazmat overalls, 2 latex gloves, 3 leatherman new wave tool); Forensic Laboratory Medan (5 full-face respirator and cannister combo, 1 Sirius multi-gas detector, 8 Hazmet boots, 1 Glock field spade, 2 Hazmet coveralls, 4 half mask respirators, 3 latex gloves, 3 leatherman new wave tool); Forensic Laboratory Semarang (5 full-face respirator and canister combo, 1 Sirius multi gas detector, 7 Hazmet boots, 3 Glock field spade, 5 safety glasses, 4 half-mask respirator, 3 leatherman new wave tool, 3 folding chair magnifier); Forensic Laboratory Makassar (5 full-face respirator and canister combo, 1 Sirius multi gas detector, 7 Hazmat boots, 4 Petzl headlamps, 3 Glock field spades, 5 safety glasses, 2 latex gloves, 3 laetherman tools); Forensic Laboratory Palembang (5 full-face respirator and canister combo, 1 Sirius multi gas detector, 7 Hazmet boots, 3 glock field spade, 2hand lanterns, 3 latex safety gloves, 3 leatherman new wave tool); National Police School of North Sumatera (1 cassette recorders, 1 fax machine); Pusdikeskrim Mega Mendung, West Java (7 air conditioners, 2 televisions); Marine Police Directorate Tanjung Priok (875 light sticks, 80 face masks, 72 megaphones, 40 dry suit undersuit, 40 snorkels, 40 overalls, 40 flashlight under water, 120 hose protectors, 40 knives, 80 power inflators, 40 weight bests, 80 power inflators).

Field Gear

Field Gear was donated to INP and distributed as follows: Polda Nangroe Aceh Darussalam (30 radios, 300 riot helmets, 300 riot shields, 600 belt keepers, 300 gas masks, 4 binoculars, 9 gym mats, 300 duty belts, 300 shin and angle guards, 300 side handle batons, 300 handcuffs, 1,000 disposal restraints); Marine Police Directorate Tanjung Priok (73 air horns, 40 back pack harnesses, 40 binoculars, 3 binoculars night vision, 80 boot tanks, 8 bag lifts).

Impact

The INP has continuously demonstrated its ability and willingness to integrate INL-funded training and technical assistance into all aspects of the organization. The equipment provided has significantly augmented its operational, organizational, and training capacity. The INP is severely understaffed relative to police to population ratios, as well as under-resourced and their ability to respond to public service demands and expectations and its ability to replicate and integrate training would not have been actualized without INL-funded assistance. All of the INL-funded equipment continues to reside in the originally assigned locations, continuously and frequently used and in good operable condition. The INL/DOJ/ICITAP staff has found that the INP is very meticulous and responsible in the maintenance and operation of equipment provided and has found no instances where the equipment has been misused or used for purposes outside of agreements made between INP and INL.

PHNOM PENH

Procedures

The Political FSN conducted an on-site inspection of the equipment transferred to the National Authority for Combating Drugs (NADC) laboratory in Phnon Penh.

Status

In 1997, INL supplied drug analysis equipment to the Cambodian Anti-Narcotics Department laboratory in Phnom Penh. However, the equipment was never unpacked due to political strife in Cambodia at the time.

DEA arranged for a team of Vietnamese experts to assess the equipment. The team determined that the equipment is completely unusable due to seven years without climate controlled storage. Post was informed by DEA Bangkok personnel as it was exploring options to dispose of the equipment that the Vietnamese team that assessed the equipment was not familiar with the equipment and should not have made an assessment. DEA recently identified a Thai sister company to the US manufacturer to assess the equipment. Post is trying to obtain the funding to bring the team out to do the reassessment.

One computer, workstation, including CPU, monitor, and printer were also purchased in 1997 and donated to the NADC in 1999. The equipment is to be used to analyze the data from the drug analysis equipment, once installed.

SINGAPORE

Procedures

Post conducted an on-site inspection of the equipment donated to the Indonesian National Police (INP) to determine if the equipment was being used properly in accordance with the Letters of Agreement. Inspections were conducted at the Indonesian National Police Headquarters in Jakarta as well as at the INP Park Royale Complex in Jakarta.

Status

In 2001 and 2003, DEA Singapore Country Office (SICO) transferred equipment to the INP to assist in their efforts in Indonesia. INP/Narkoba is maintaining the equipment, including all repairs on the vehicles.

Vehicles

The following vehicles were donated to INP/Narkoba: Toyota Kijang (4); Suzuki (15); Yamaha motorcycles (4); Honda (5). Eight Suzuki’s, 1 Yamaha, and 4 Honda’s were out of operation. The other are in good condition and used for their intended purpose. They are used in various INP/Karkoba jurisdictions throughout Indonesia. INP/Narkoba is maintaining this equipment, including all repairs.

Due to the harsh road conditions and constant use of the vehicles, it is anticipated that the remaining life expectancy is one more year.

Communications Equipment

Twenty (20) Motorola radios were donated to the INP/NARKOBA. All but four were out in the field during the inventory. One was broken and inoperable.

VIENTIANE

Procedures

Lao counterparts made all INL-provided equipment available for inspection. NAS staff inspected supplies and equipment provided to local provincial drug control committees, counternarcotics police units and/or Customs, and to drug demand programs during visits to the Lao American Crop Control Projects in Phong Saly and Luang Prabang.

Inspection of INL-funded construction projects were made during field trips by NAS personnel; review of host government reports; physical counts of stocks; periodic spot checks and unannounced visits to local government and law enforcement units; and meetings with host government officials.

Status

Vehicles

Vehicles are used for hauling supplies and providing transportation in direct support of project activities. Vehicles are used strictly for project activities.

Vehicles provided to the Lao-American project are used for hauling supplies and providing transportation in direct support of project activities. All vehicles provided to the Lao American Project, Phonsgaly are in usable condition. Three Toyota pickups, one Isuzu Trooper II and ten lightweight motorcycles are in Bountai; one motorcycle is in Samphan. All vehicles provided to the Lao American Project, Luang Prabang are in usable condition. Two Toyota pickups are in Ngoy; one pickup and three motorcycles are in Viengkham; and nine motorcycles are in Bountai. One pickup and 27 motorcycles were provided to the Lao American Project office in Vientiane. The motorcycles are used by the Provincial Committee for Drug Control in Luang, Prabang, Oudmxay, Phongaly, Bolikhamxay, Houaphan, Savannakhet, Bokeo and Vientiane. All trucks provided to the Lao American Project, Liang Prabang are usable. Two are based in Ngoy district and one is based in Viengkham district. Nine motorcycles are in Viengkham and Ngoy districts.

Twenty-seven (27) motorcycles were provided to the Provincial Committee for Drug Control. Two Landcruisers, two Toyota pickup trucks, and 22 motorcycles (4 are unserviceable) were provided to the Drug Control Department, Law Enforcement Project. One Isuzu Trooper, three motorcycles, and two Toyota pickup trucks were provided to the Lao National Commission for Drug Control (LCDC) and Supervision. Two Toyota Hilus pickup trucks and six motorcycles were provided to Savannakhet Counternarcotics Unit; four motorcycles and one Toyota Hilus pickup truck were provided to the Bokeo Counternarcotis Unit; seven motorcycles and one pickup truck were provided to the Oudomxay Counternarcotics Project; six motorcycles and one pickup truck were provided to the Houaphan Counternarcotis Office; four motorcycles and one pickup truck were provided to the Phonosaly Counternartics Office; seven motorcycles and one pickup truck were provided to the Narcotics Unit Customs; four motorcycles and one pickup were provided to the Champasack Counternarcotics Office; eleven motorcycles and one pickup were provided to the Luang Prabang Counternarcotics Office; six motorcycles and one pickup were provided to the Xayaboury Counternarcotics Office; twelve motorcycles and one pickup were provided to the Vientiane Capital; one pickup and one motorcycle were provided to the Xieng Khouang Counternarcotics Office; one motorcycle was provided to the Luang Namtha Counternarcotics unit. All are in good condition.

LCDC provided one pickup truck to the Lao National Radio and Television for use in drug awareness program production.

Most are in good condition and well maintained. A full-time mechanic controls the project motor pool operation and maintenance. Vehicles are used strictly for project activities.

Communications Equipment

In the Lao-American project, the Motorola base stations provide communications between Vientiane and the project offices in Phongsaly Province. The mobile radios allow for communication between the project area staff and the district offices. All equipment is dedicated to the Anti-Narcotics Crop Control Project with little opportunity for diversion.

One HF-SSB radio, 4 VHF-FM mobile radios, 55 VHF hand-held transceivers were donated to the Drug Control Department. One HF SSB radio and 52 handheld radios (batteries not rechargeable) are unserviceable and will be deleted from inventory. Two HF-SSB radios, three VHF-FM mobile radios, ten handheld radios are used by the Savannakhet counternarcotics Office. One HF-SSB radio and two VHF FM radios are used by the Oudomxay Counternarcotics Office. Twelve hand-held radios are used by the Xayaboury Counternarcotics Office. One HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios, and 20 hand-held transceivers are used by the Champasack Counternarcotics Office. One HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios, and 10 hand-held transceivers are used by the Phongsaly Counternarcotics Office. One HF SSB base station and two VHF FM base stations are used by the Houaphan Counternarcotics Office. One HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios and 33 handheld radios are used by the Vientiane Capital (one radio is lost, four require batteries, and two are nonfunctioning). One HF SSB radio, two VHF FM radios, and 17 handheld transceivers are used by the Luang Prabang Counternarcotics Office. One HF-SSB radio, five VHF-FM radios, and 55 hand-held transceivers are used by the Drug Control Department. One VHF FM base station and ten hand-held radios are used by the Bokeo Counternarcotics Unit.

Radio maintenance and repairs were performed either by the U.S. owned distributor of Motorola equipment or by the Ministry of Interior technical staff sent to the CNO’s.

Computer Equipment

Nine computers were donated to each of the Provincial Committees for Drug Control of Lao-American Control Project. The two computers donated to the Drug Control Department in 2004 are unserviceable and will be deleted from inventory. Five Dell desktop computers, four Gateway and two laptops were donated to the Lao National Commission for Drug Control and Supervision (LCDC). Two of the Gateway computers are unserviceable.

Computers need constant maintenance and repair. Since computer service in the provinces is irregular, such computers must be brought into Vientiane for service. Moreover, the supply of electricity in some areas is unreliable. Consequently, post is very reliant on generators. The NAS keeps careful inventory of the whereabouts of all computer components at all times.

Miscellaneous Equipment

Fax machines, VCR's, binoculars, cameras, television monitors, cassette recorders satellite dishes, slide projectors, typewriters, cell phones, and copy machines, furniture, refrigerators, X-ray machines, filing cabinets, are used throughout the projects. They are all in good condition. The X-ray machines are installed in Wattay International Airport and the Vientiane Post Office. Copy machines need maintenance and repair regularly in some northern provinces, where the electrical supply is not stable.

Three Yashica cameras, 1 Panasonic video camera, 1 Panasonic Video cassette recorder, CTV, 17 cell phones donated to the Drug Control Department in 1994 are unserviceable. One microsette recorder, 1 video camera, provided to the Champasack counternarcotics unit are unserviceable; one VCR provided to the Xayaboury Counternarcotics Unit is unserviceable.

Construction Projects

Construction projects completed in 2006 included miscellaneous road repairs, four small primary schools, one village water supply system, five small village meeting buildings, one small rural health clinic for the Lao American Project, Phong Saly; and the ATS amphetamine Detox and rehabilitation Center for the Savannakhet Province.

Problems

Maintenance of equipment, especially of computers and radios is challenging at best in the face of the dust and power surges common in remote areas. Host nation personnel are not well trained in equipment maintenance and repair facilities are scarce outside of Vientiane. This situation tends to shorten the useful life of equipment, despite NAS efforts to advise and assist with maintenance.

There is only one copy machine in Luang Prabang which is unserviceable. Two standard non-digital cameras from PCDC Luang Prabang and Phongsaly have been lost.

Impact

USG funding and commodities remain the keys to project success in Laos. As one of the world’s poorest countries, Laos has virtually no funding available for counternarcotics activities and would be unable to actively pursue counternarcotics goals without foreign donor support. The Lao government continues to seek such support. The U.S. is the largest donor in the counternarcotics area, both via the bilateral projects and through UNDP projects.



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