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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

2007 End-Use Monitoring Report: Africa


Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 1, 2008

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ACCRA

Procedures


Post received signed statements from the Government of Ghana (GOG) acknowledging receipt and proper use of the items. The Political Officer conducted site visits to inspect all of the equipment in this report. In addition, the Director of the Community Policing Program at the Ghana Police Service provided the Political Officer with a written report of that unit’s status, including a report on bicycles donated by the USG and a discussion of maintenance challenges. GOG officials were extremely cooperative in allowing access for all site visits.

Status

Computer Equipment

In 2002, post donated three computers and one server to Ghana’s Police Service’s Women and Juvenile Unit (WAJU) of the Ghana Police Service (GPS). The unit, since renamed the Domestic Violence Victim Support Unit (DOVVSU), has responsibility for crimes targeting women and children. The server and all three computers are no longer functioning and have not been replaced due to difficulty in obtaining replacement parts. All of the data was retrieved and transferred to thumb drives for continued use in computers from other donors.

In 2004, post donated one laptop computer and one projector to the Narcotics Control Board. The equipment is functioning properly and is used regularly for off-site trainings and for giving presentations.

In February 2005, post donated four HP Compaq computers and one HP Laserjet printer to the Monitoring and Inspections Unit of the Ghana Police Service. The unit was later renamed the Police Intelligence and Professional Standards Unit (PIPS). PTPS offices were observed using the computers, all of which are functioning properly. The computers are well-maintained by GPS technical staff and an outside vendor. The printer has been recently serviced by the police technical support unit and was functioning well.

In 2005, the Department of Justice ICITAP police instructors donated INL-funded equipment used in the 14-week Basic Policing skills course to the Police Training College in Tesano, Acca. The equipment included one HP desktop computer/monitor, one HP Deskjet 5500 color printer/copier/fax, one HP laptop, and one Epson printer. The laptop was damaged but repairable. In 2006, ICITAP instructors donated additional equipment to the Police College in Tisane, including a second HP desktop computer/monitor, a second HP laptop computer, a second HP printer, and a second Epson projector. The equipment is routinely used in training, and is lent to other Ghana Police Service training schools when not in use at the college. A staff member at the Police college maintains the equipment.

In 2006, ICITAP instructors donated the following equipment to the Police College in Tesano: a second HP desktop computer/monitor, a second HP laptop computer, a second HP printer, a second HP laptop computer, and a second Epson projector. The equipment is all in excellent working order and kept locked in a separate office. The Police College commandant told the Political Officer during a site visit that the equipment is routinely used in training and is lent to other GPS training schools when not in use at the college.

In 2002, post donated a ghost mobile cellular transmitter and a voice analyzer to the NCB. The voice analyzer is in very good condition, but is not currently being used.

Communications Equipment

Post distributed a mobile cellular transmitter and a voice stress analyzer to the Narcotics Control Board (NCB) in calendar year 2002. In 2004, post donated two Garmin GPS units and six Motorola two-way radios to the NCB. The voice stress analyzer is in very good condition. However, much of the NCB’s equipment was never fully put to use. The only NCB employee trained on the use of the voice stress analyzer was dismissed and indicted in December 2006 following the loss of 5 kg of cocaine from a NCB safe under his control. Much of the communications equipment has been stored in his office, but was transferred to a secure general store room following his departure. The current administration only became aware of the equipment during post’s End Use Monitoring visit.

In 2006, ICITAP police instructors donated four Motorola handheld radios to the Police College at Tesano, one of which has been lost. As with all other INL- funded equipment donated to the Police College, the three remaining radios are in excellent condition and are regularly used for training.

Miscellaneous Equipment

Two Ion itemizers, sample traps, and calibration traps were provided to the NCB for detection of illegal substances at the airport. Both itemizers have had their explosives-detecting sensors removed to make them more sensitive to narcotics. They had broken prior to October 2007, but have since been repaired and are in full use at the airport. The Administration reports that maintenance and consumables expenses have now been included in the operational budget.

Post donated a covert gym bag for surveillance to the Narcotics Control Board in 2003. In 2004, post donated one Kodak Easyshare digital camera, four training guns, and one tripod for supporting a surveillance telescope. The camera is used for creating ID cards. The other equipment was in good condition in the storeroom, but not in use.

In 2006, ICITAP police instructors donated INL-funded equipment used in their 14-week Basic Policing Skills Course to the Police Training College in Tesano. The equipment included three HP digital cameras, one sharp VCR, one Sony Hi-8 video camera, one UPS uninterruptible power supply, six Air-Soft Glock Model 17 training handguns, two Air-Soft AK-47 electric training rifles, two Air-Soft training shotguns, ten padded training batons, six holsters, 12 pairs of safety glasses, two portable white boards, two inflatable mannequins, and one camera tripod.

In 2006, an ICITAP instructor donated additional equipment to the Police College in Tesano, including two Air-Soft Accushot Navy Seal UTGS training guns, and four plastic training knives. Except for one defective training shotgun, the equipment from 2005 and 2006 is in excellent working order and kept locked in a separate office. The equipment is routinely used in training and is loaned to other Ghana Police Service training schools when not in use at the college.

Vehicles

In 2002, post donated 22 bicycles to the Community Policing Unit at the Cantonments Police Station in Accra. In August 2004, post donated an additional 20 bicycles to this unit. In 2005, post donated 20 bicycles to the Ghana Service’s Community Policing Unit in Kumasi which were subsequently transferred to the Accra community Policing Unit. Of the sixty (60) motorcycles, 49 are now usable and 11 are in the workshop, requiring multiple repairs to seats, brakes, and chains. Eleven (11) bicycles are in constant use by patrols; the others are in a secure storeroom at ridge Warehouse.

Two Suzuki motorcycles, eight crash helmets, and a KIA surveillance van were provided to the NCB in 2003. Four additional motorcycles and one motorbike were donated in 2004. Of the six motorcycles, two were in working order and regularly used for surveillance. Two were undergoing repairs and two were unable to be repaired. The surveillance van has been repaired and is being used. The surveillance equipment was temporarily removed in 2006, but will be reinstalled.

Uniforms and Field Gear

In 2004, post donated 15 tactical vests and ten sets of handcuffs to the NCB. The equipment is in good condition and is used regularly by NCB Staff. However, with recent restructuring and the increase in staff, NCB relayed a need for additional vests.

Problems

Difficulty in obtaining spare parts on the local market was cited as a common challenge and delay in maintaining the equipment, but most equipment was ultimately fixed. The Narcotics Control Board noted that with any future provision of equipment and training they would prefer the training be in Ghana vice the United States so that more offices, and more agencies, could benefit to allow the maximum use of equipment.

Impact

As reported previously, police training programs have had a tremendous positive impact on the Ghana Police Service. In Januaury 2006, the police adapted the Basic Police Skills training and used for ICITAP graduates to train 134 cadets in Winneba and Bolgatanga. In mid 2006, following two train-the-trainer ICITAP courses, the Police service decided to incorporate the entire ICITAP curriculum into its basic training package at the Police College (the first three months are entirely based on the ICITAP curriculum, while the second three months are the traditional Ghanaian curriculum). In 2007, 132 cadets and 500 general recruits were trained using this curriculum and the donated equipment.

PIP made crucial contributions to post’s annual human rights and Trafficking-In-Persons reporting by sharing case updates and statistics that are processed using the INL-funded computers donated by the USG. Use of computers is crucial for PIPS in these efforts.

The itemizers at the airport continue to have a strong impact. UK Customs Officials reported that following a January site visit by the Political Officer to the airport to see the itemizers in use, NCB agents used the equipment later that evening to successfully identify two individuals who had swallowed cocaine pellets.

The Community Policing program remains small, having not yet grown beyond the size of a pilot program with 30 officers. Nevertheless, they report success in conducting community sensitization outreach programs to educate the public on how community policing works. In the area with bicycle patrolling, they report a stronger police community relationship.

Program Changes

The ICITAP basic police skills training program has the potential to transform the Ghana Police, reduce human rights abuses, and lead to human trafficking investigations and prosecutions. It also plays a significant role in helping the Mission to achieve its human rights and law enforcement cooperation goals. The current IGP and Commandant of the Police College are very interested in this training and have fully supported it.

The GOG’s restructuring of the Narcotics Control Board continues to progress and it has been restructured into three divisions: Enforcement and Control; Demand Control; and Finance and Administration. There are 80 new recruits, with a total staff strength of 120. Some basic equipment could improve the security of the new offices, particularly vests. During a recent meeting, the new Executive Secretary highlighted some new initiatives in anti-narcotics education and demand reduction. NCB currently conducts a training every day in a high school in Accra that could expand with additional projectors and laptops. NCB has also created some public service announcements. The long-term plan is for NCB to expand into each of Ghana’s regional capitals beginning with Tamale and Kumasi in 2008.

For the community Police Unit, post will not request additional bicycle parts or training until the planned staffing increases are completed. The unit director requested a laptop, projector and pen drives for use during presentations and sensitization programs. Post will consider this request.

COTONOU

Procedures

Procedures to document the provision and use of two drug detection itemizers units have not been established as the units have never been put into use. When the units are installed, the RSO will work with Beninese Customs to monitor the units, and the units’ performance, and to track their effectiveness. This will be accomplished by periodic on-site inspections.

Status

In 2002, post received two itemizer chemical detectors for installation at Cotonou International Airport and Police Headquarters to assist security-screening personnel. The units were not installed at their intended destinations due to a lack of air-conditioned spaces. Such spaces were identified in late 2007. RSO has since been communicating with INL about having the units installed, providing training to the Beninese Customs and Police, and providing supplies for the units.

Embassy Customs does not have personnel qualified to install the units for drug detection purposes nor provide user training. Post does not have the funds available for consumable supplies. The two units are stored within the RSO’s office space awaiting installation and use. These units are the only INL-provided equipment related to Regional Security Office at Embassy Cotonou.

LAGOS

Procedures

The INL staff in Lagos and Abuja used online inspections and periodic spot checks by USG personnel to monitor INL-funded equipment.

Status

INL donated 10 fire-proof cabinets to Nigeria Law Enforcement Agency (NDLEA) in November 2006. The INL staff enjoys a cordial relationship with the Nigerian Government Agencies. The agencies have tried to maintain the equipment to the best of their ability. The few items that are not operating are beyond repair.

Communications Equipment

The Motorola VHF Base Station and 20 Motorola VHF radios donated to the NDLEA are in good condition.

Computer Equipment

During 2003, post provided 25 computers and monitors, seven printers, and one server to the Research Center at the NDLEA Training Academy. Post also provided two laptop computers, two power point projectors, two printers and one overhead projector to the Special Fraud Unit to support the Police Modernization Project. All are in use and in excellent condition.

The Nigeria Police INTERPOL unit received two desktop PC systems and two HP 1200 Laser Jet printers. The computers are in poor condition and not operable. The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) received two Compaq laptops. The National Agency for the Prohibition of Trafficking in Persons received two PC systems and monitors. The Special Assistant to the Presidency on Anti-Human Trafficking received two computers All are in good working condition. The laptop donated to the Special Assistant is not operational due to failure of the power pack.

Vehicles

Two Hilux pickups, one Haice Mini Bus, one Hilux 4x4 and one Toyota Hilux 2x2s were provided to NDLEA. The INTERPOL received one Toyota Hilux 4x4 and one Toyota Condor van. A Toyota Double Cabin and a Toyota Condor Wagon were donated to the Special Fraud Unit of the Nigeria Police Force.

All vehicles appear to be in good condition and in constant use. Any repairs needed have been done by the Government of Nigeria (GON). Vehicles are located at INTERPOL, SFU, JOS Academy, Lagos HQS of NDLEA, the airport in Lagos, Apapa Zone and Tincan Island.

Miscellaneous Equipment

During 2003, post provided a digital medical X-ray machine for use by NDLEA at the Lagos International Airport and AFIX tractor (fingerprint machine) for the Special Fraud Unit. The AFIX tractor has been moved from the Special Fraud Unit to the NPF Forensics Unit. It is in good working condition and used regularly. The X-ray machine is well-maintained and used on a daily basis by the airport command of the NDLEA in Lagos.

The following non-expendable commodities were received by NDLEA in prior years: file cabinets (6); desks (2); leather chairs (2); RICOH fax machines (2); ICOM radio chargers (12); Wang printer (1); ICOM radios (3); Opt quest UPS (3); Sharp photocopy machine (1); Sanyo split air conditioners (4); video machines (4); Sharp multi-system TV (1); Panasonic TV (1); Sony handicam (1); Panasonic Camcorder (1); microcassette tape recorders (5); answering machines (2); Panasonic telephones (10); voltage regulators (4); itemizers (4).

The following non-expendable commodities were received by the National Agency for Prohibition of Traffic in Persons (NAPTIP): CPU (5); flat screen monitor (5); NEC projector (1); Panasonic copier (1); projector screen (1); Smart UPS (3); Sony cyber-shot digital camera (1); Sony laptops (3); LG-VCR+DVD player (1); Sony Trinitron television (1).

The following equipment was donated to the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC): HP Laser jet 4200N printer (3); NEC projector (1); Elton P420 plastic card printer (1); Sony Cyber shot digital camera (1).

The following equipment was donated to INTERPOL: Gubabi fireproof file cabins (4); Panasonic fax machine (1); AVC 650 VA UPS (2); generator (1).

The following equipment was donated to the Lagos State Police: bulletproof vests (4) flashlights (70).

All items were observed to be in use and in good condition.

Problems

The itemizers at the airports are not in use due to a lack of required consumables. The power pack for the laptop donated to the Special Assistant to the President on Trafficking in Persons (NAPTIP) is not operational due to a faulty power pack. The few items that are not operating are beyond repair.

Impact

The X-ray machine at the Murtala Mohammed Airport in Lagos has been very helpful in drug interdiction. It has been used to detect illicit drugs swallowed by drug traffickers. Since its installation, many drug traffickers have been arrested at the airport. It has also served as a deterrent to drug traffickers, by shifting drug couriers to other airports in Nigeria and countries in West Africa sub-region, which do not have the equipment.

Program Changes

INL Assistant Secretary has approved the purchase of new, state of the art X-ray machines for all Nigerian international airports.

LUSAKA

Procedures

The computer equipment and software provided to the Zambian Police Service were transferred via a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA). The MOA specifics the location for the equipment, inventories the items provided and specifies terms of use. IOM and Pol/Econ staff also perform spot checks of the equipment when meeting with VSU contacts. Status

Computer Equipment

Two of the computers, both printers, and one flash drive are located in the VSU headquarters in Lusaka, and one computer and one flash drive are located in the Crime Statistics Office (CSO) at the ZPS headquarters in Lusaka. The SPSS program was loaded onto the computer at the VSU.

The computers are being used for data collection and analysis on Trafficking In Persons and other crimes in Zambia. Judging from a visit by Pol/Econ officer to the recipient offices, the equipment is in good condition and is well- maintained.

Construction

The construction supplies and furnishings for the interview room renovation portion of the project were purchased in Lusaka by IOM and transferred to the various police stations, including Lusaka Central, Livingstone, Sesheke, Siavonga, Nakonde, Chirundu, Chipata, Kasumbalesa, and Mokambo. IOM followed up on the construction projects with site visits, and certified that the construction materials and furnishings were being used in accordance with project requirements. As of the end of 2007, the interview rooms and furnishing were in good condition.

Problems

No problems were encountered with the computers, printers, and software. There were slight delays in the provision of construction materials/furnishings for interview rooms due to weather. The onset of the rainy season delayed the start of the project.

Impact

The computers and related equipment/software were delivered to the ZPS in August. Training on the software and data management occurred in November. The new equipment improves ZPS’s data collection and management capabilities for cases of Trafficking In Persons. Personnel working with the VSU and the CSO report that the flow of data has improved and that data analysis and manipulation is much easier with the new computers. Such improved capabilities will translate into availability of better data on Trafficking In Persons. The interview rooms are being used currently to afford victims of crimes greater privacy when making reports; the districts chosen for the program are border posts with higher incidences of trafficking. Officers report that interview rooms are a great help in providing privacy and comfortable surroundings for victims of trafficking and other crimes.
MONROVIA

Procedures

End Use Monitoring procedures included a physical inspection of accountability procedures, daily observance of the equipment by team members, and discussions with individual at the Temple of Justice (Supreme Court) and Ministry of Justice.

Status

Vehicles

In 2006, two buses were donated to the Ministry of Justice and one to the Temple of Justice to provide daily transportation. The bus at the Temple of Justice is in excellent condition and maintenance is being carried out faithfully by a local dealership. The two buses at the Ministry of Justice had an outward appearance of being dinged, dented and scraped. The Ministry determined that the drivers were not taking care of the buses. The Ministry implemented a written policy that if a driver had an accident and was responsible, the driver would be held liable for the cost of repairs. The policy was handed out to the drivers and posted on the bulletin board. The Ministry made an example of one driver by charging him $100 for repairs. Since that incident, the Ministry has not seen further scrapes, dents or dings on the vehicles.

Computer Equipment

Eighteen (18) desktop computers, three laptops, and seventeen (17) printers were donated to the Ministry of Interior. One computer is in the shop for repairs. All other computers are accounted for with proper documentation signed by responsible individuals. Procedures set forth in Standard Operating Procedures (SOP’s) appear to have been followed.

Furniture

Most of the desks and chairs donated to the Temple of Justice were on site. However, many were in poor condition. The movable shelves built through post are in use by the Defense Counsel Offices. The permanent shelves built for the Chief Justice were torn down at the direction of the Chief Justice and replaced by movable shelves similar to those in the Defense Counsel Offices. The desks and chairs located in the Ministry of Justice appear to be in fair condition.

NAIROBI

Procedures

Computers were provided to the Anti-Narcotics Unit (ANU). The ANU provides post a report summarizing the location and condition of the equipment. Regular meetings are conducted with the Director of the Criminal Investigations Division (CID), which has oversight responsibility for the ANU.

Status

In 2002, ten computers were provided to the ANU. Two are located at headquarters and the rest have been distributed to outlying ANU stations around the country. The majority are still functioning; a few are beyond repair. Post maintains regular contact with the ANU to allow close monitoring of the computers. The CID controls their dissemination and placement within the Kenya Police Service (KPS). The ANU reports that they are in use at the following locations: Jomo Keyatta International Airport, Malaba, Eldoret Airport, and Busia.

Problems

Continuing corruption concerns, coupled with diminished control by the designated recipient over the dissemination of resources, hampered post’s provision of additional assistance.

Impact

The ANU reports that the provision of the computers has enabled the KPS (and by extension the ANU) to improve recordkeeping and nationwide data collection. As a result, the ANU is able to compile data to provide more comprehensive, detailed, and reliable reports on anti-narcotics related activities.

Program Changes

Post is undertaking a review of past and proposed assistance in light of current needs of the ANU and KPS to identify opportunities where additional assistance might be most effectively employed.

PRAIA

Procedures

Two vessels were transferred to the Cape Verde Coast Guard through provisions in a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU). Post’s Security Assistance Office (SAO) routinely conducts on-site inspections of the items and receives full cooperation from the counterpart agency.

Status

A 51-foot patrol boat was transferred to Coast Guard in 1992. The patrol boat is housed on the island of Nindelo, but is used on occasion to patrol around the island of Santiago, specifically the Port of Praia. It is used for military training exercises and for patrolling during the US Military ship visits. It is in fair condition.

A 19-foot Rigid Inflatable Boat (RHIB) was provided to the Cape Verde Coast Guard in 2005. The RHIB is used for shore patrol on the island of Santiago. The vessel is in good condition.

Impact

The vessels serve to protect Cape Verdean waters and train the military.

RABAT

Procedures

The Rabat INL office will use a formal letter delineating the type of equipment provided to Moroccan law enforcement. The Moroccan agency will acknowledge receipt of the equipment by signing a copy of the letter. No INL-funded equipment was distributed during CY-2007.

Status

Drug Identification Kits

The drug identification kits associated with the Drug Identification course arrived late in 2007 and were not able to be distributed during the training courses. The status of the kits will be reflected in post’s CY-2008 report.

Training Courses

Three INL training courses were conducted in 2007 including Drug Identification, Document Fraud, and USCG Port State Control.



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