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U.S. Department of State - Great Seal

U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

2008 End-Use Monitoring Report: South America


Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 1, 2009

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ASUNCION

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Norberto Gamarra, Tel: 595 21 213 715 ext. 2238: gamarran@state.gov

Inventory System

Post does not have an automated inventory system. Post keeps manual records of donated items.

Staff Member Responsibilities

LES INL Program Assistant Norberto Gamarro is in charge of End Use Monitoring. He conducts all of post’s on-site inventories and inspections. Gamarra reports to Pol/Econ Chief, Joan Shaker. There are no other INL staff positions.

Other USG Agency Assistance

INL collaborates with DEA, USAID and DOJ locally; however, only INL performs on-site inspections of INL-provided resources throughout the year.

Counterpart Agencies

National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD)
Ministry of Industry and Commerce’s Specialized Technical Unit (UTE)
Anti-Money Laundering Secretariat (SEPRELAD)
Women’s Secretariat
Public Ministry’s Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Unit

Receipt

GOP agencies receiving INL-funded donations provide handwritten receipts.

On-site Inspections

About 80% of INL-donated items were inspected in 2008.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles

INL donated 4 Toyota Runners to SENAD in 1999, 1 Toyota Prado to SENAD in 2004, 8 Toyota Hiluxes to SENAD (one in 2001; 6 in 2004); 5 Nissan DX 4-wheel drive vehicles to the Public Ministry in 2005; two Toyota Hiluxes to UTE in 2005 and 2 Mitsubishi L200 pickups to SENAD in 2008. Two Toyota SENAD vehicles are based at SENAD headquarters in Asuncion but are used for anti-drug operations nationwide. The Public Ministry vehicles were used in Asuncion (2) and Ciudad del Este (3). UTE vehicles are based in Asuncion but are used in operations nationwide. All were in good to excellent condition at the year’s end.

SENAD
Toyota 4 Runner4
Toyota Prado1
Toyota Hilux8
Mitsubishi L2002

Public Ministry
Nissan DX5
Toyota Prado1
Toyota Hilux8

UTE
Toyota Hilux2

Canines

INL donated 5 of SENAD’s 13 dogs; two in 2007 and three in 2008. They are used for drug detection in airports in Asuncion and Ciudad del Este, as well as in Encarnacion and PJC. INL provides veterinary care, food, uniforms, and training for the dog handlers, kennel maintenance. The dogs rotate every month between cities. Most are in good health; two dogs will be retired soon.

Computer Equipment

Eleven computers were donated to SENAD in 2007 and 2008. Nine are in Asuncion; one in Ciudad del Este; one in Salto Guaira. The computers are used for counternarcotics office work. Nine in Asuncion were inspected and are in good condition. Four laptops were donated to SENAD and the Public Ministry’s IPR unit in 2007; two for each institution. Three are in Asuncion; one is in Ciudad del Este. Laptops in Asuncion are in good condition. The laptop in CDE was not inspected. Four printers were donated, two for SENAD and two for the Public Ministry between 2007 and 2008. Three are in Asuncion and one is in Ciudad del Este. Printers are in good condition.

Laboratory Equipment

One Agilent Gas Chromatograph, one Mass Spectrometer System (GCMS) and one Gas Chromatograph Flame Ionization Device were donated to SENAD lab in 2004; an auto-injector module for eight sample turrets, an auto-sampler tray module and a Chem-station PC bundle system were donated in 2005. All of the lab equipment is located in SENAD headquarters in Asuncion. The equipment supports investigations and helps bring investigation standards closer to international standards. The lab equipment is in fair condition.

Miscellaneous Equipment

Air conditioners and furniture were donated to Women’s Secretariat, UTE, and SENAD between 2006 and 2008. The furniture and air conditioners are located in Asuncion and in Pedro Juan Caballero. They are good condition.

Six camcorders were donated to the Public Ministry’s IPR Unit in 2007. The camcorders are used for IPR operations. All are in Asuncion. Four digital cameras were donated to the Public Ministry’s IPR unit in 2007. The cameras are used for IPR operations. All cameras are in Asuncion.

Status-Services

Construction Services

The inspection of a TIP shelter for TIP victims in Asuncion was completed in 2008.

Demand Reduction

Public Awareness seminars for students, parents and teachers throughout the country were undertaken in 2008.

Program Impact

The USG continues to support GOP’s institutional capabilities to combat and prosecute transnational and organized crime. All SENAD office equipment, communications equipment, vehicles, the canine program and the new facility in PJC are aimed at bolstering interdiction efforts and operational capabilities. SENAD continues to make progress in the drug enforcement arena, including the seizure of cocaine and marijuana and the disruption of important drug networks that operate in the country.

Vehicles

Without the donation of vehicles, SENAD officials would not have the capacity to execute counternarcotics operations.

Canines

In 2008, the canines seized 53 kilograms of cocaine and 1.148 kilograms of marihuana, primarily through interdiction operations in Asuncion’s international Airport and in Mariscal Estigarriba, near Paraguay’s border with Bolivia.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Post was unable to monitor 100% of INL-donated equipment due to its staffing gap. Post has resolved this situation with the hiring of a new INL assistant, who is conducting regular inspections and will travel to see all INL-supported programs during calendar year 2009.

BOGOTA

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

The NAS has two EUM Coordinators and one EUM reporting Officer who assist program staff with the EUM program:

German Ramirez, 57-1-383-2224; Ramirez@state.gov
Leandro Encisco, 57-1-383-2230; encisol@state.gov

The EUM Coordinators implement updated monitoring procedures, carry out inventory checks and compliance reviews, and oversee the disposal of surplus and hazardous materials. They also confirm and evaluate the methods used to check inventories at different locations throughout Colombia.

Inventory System

The NAS tailors the technology and methods for monitoring to the size and scope of each program. The NAS warehouse/Customs data base and electronic spreadsheets are used as a base. Currently, the NAS is preparing an automated data base with the NAS IT Section to improve the inventory and tracking of equipment donated to the host government (HG). The NAS office which works with the Colombian National Police’s Aviation Wing (ARAVI) has an automated inventory system which uses a database to record and track the distribution of all resources provided to host government agencies and to maintain and retrieve End Use Monitoring information. The NAS’ Air Bridge Denial (ABD) project has its own automated inventory system that is used for tracking resources. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) continues to use a detailed inventory list for CY-2008 as the basis for EUM. The DEA list identifies USG-procured equipment and vehicles by item, brand name, model number/description, quantity, serial number, internal bar code, locations, and condition.

Other USG Assistance

The DEA, Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF), Immigration Customs Enforcement (ICE), Presidential Security Program (PSP), and the Justice Sector Reform Program (JSRP) all maintain databases of equipment provided to their counterpart agencies. These databases identify items by brand, model, serial number, location, and condition. All agencies conducted unscheduled visits to ensure that all USG-funded assets were accounted for and are being used for their intended purposes. The NAS transferred the Presidential Security Program to the Regional Security Office (RSO) in October 2008.

Counterpart Agencies

The NAS held regular working meetings with GOC counterparts to discuss operations and the status of USG-provided assets. They included:

Colombian National Police (CNP)
Colombian Army (COLAR)
Colombian Navy (CILNAV)
CD Brigade (COLMIL)
CNP Aviation Wing (AVARI)
Anti-Narcotics Directorate (DIRAN)

During 2008, the EUM Coordinators, along with the CNP Office of International Cooperation counterparts, performed joint site visits to 29 Carabinero squadrons and 14 Diran groups around Colombia to check commodities against inventory and purchase documents from the NAS and the CNP.

Receipt

Hand-receipts and donation letters and Letters of Agreement (LOAs) are the basis for the transfer of property.

Monitoring Procedures

Scheduled On-site Inspections

During 2008, EUM Coordinators and program staff conducted site visits to GOC facilities and bases throughout the country to review controls and inventories of U.S. provided resources. Individual program managers also performed periodic spot checks. To supplement program manager reviews, the following 40 scheduled on-site inspections were performed during the year to different NAS program by the EUM coordinators. The Programs included in these inspections were Carabineros (CNP), DIRAN (CNP), GRUIN (COLNAV), and CD Brigade (COLMIL). The NAS Aviation Unit (NAU) Logistics and Facilities Section, in coordination with the Colombian Army Helicopter Program and Eradication Program Managers, verified the status of the EUM of U.S. Government property at locations through out Colombia.

02/11/2008 - Bogota and Apiay
02/12/2008 - Bogoa and Apiay
02/13/2008 - Bogota and Apiay
02/14/2008 - Bogota and Apiay
05/07/2008 - Palmira
05/09/2008 - Cali
05/12/2008 - Valledupar
05/16/2008 - Uraba
05/30/2008 - Armenia
06/04/2008 - Manizales
06/11/2008 - Huila
06/11/2008 - Ibague
06/25/2008 - Cucuta
07/07/2008 - Bogota and Baranquilla
07/08/2008 - Bogota and Baramquilla
07/09/2008 - Bogota and Baranquilla
07/10/2008 - Bogoa and Baranquilla
07/11/2008 - Bogota and Baranquilla
07/10/2008 - Tunja
07/18/2008 - Vallagicencio
07/24/2008 - Pijaos Cor
07/24/2008 - Pijaos National Emcar
08/22/2008 - Barranquilla
08/27/2008 - Riochaca
09/03/2008 - Santa Maria
09/18/2008 - Bogota
10/02/2008 - Medellin
05/08/2008 - Tulua
05/16/2008 - Peerto Uraba
05/30/2008 - Larandia
06/25/2008 - Cucuta
07/24/2008 - Espinra
08/07/2008 - Cartegena
09/05/2008 - Santa Maria
09/19/2008 - Caucasia
10/21/2008 - Bogota
11/14/2008 - Facatativa
08/09/2008 - Cartegena
12/15/2008 - Larandia

Starting in January 2008, the NAS implemented EUM procedures identified by the NAS Project Office. The procedures included providing NAU members a list of EUM property to be checked as part of periodic site visits. These procedures ensure that by September 30 of each year, NAU has completed 100% EUM check of property identified by the NAS EUM program. These inspections involved reviews of the NAU property book items, commercial contractor’s property book and field visits. Both the commercial contractor and NAU completed their 100 % annual inventory for 2008. For AVARI, four scheduled on-site inspections were performed at their bases in Guaymaral, Mariquita, Santa Marta and El Dorado. The PSP program uses scheduled and unscheduled site visits, as well as assessment trips to verify inventory and proper use of the items and of training provided to the recipients. For ABD there were two scheduled on-site inspections this year. These were conducted during a semiannual review and yearly certification. During these reviews, a retired U.S. Ambassador and an interagency team came to Colombia and met with GOC representatives to ensure the program met its objectives.

Unscheduled On-site Inspections

The ARAVI had ten (10) unscheduled on-site inspections performed in bases at Guaymaral, Mariquito, Santa Marta, el Dorado and Tulua. The ABD program’s unscheduled site inspections are done monthly. The GOC is usually given a two to three day notice. These are conducted by the ABD Program Manager and Operations Adviser. Each site is visited at least once a month. The CD Brigade program’s unscheduled on-site inspections were conducted on numerous occasions by the Program Adviser.

Number of Sites and Cities visited

For Carabineros: 17; DIRAN 10; GRUIN-COLNAV 1 site was visited at Cartegena; CD Brigade-COLMILl 3 at Larandria, CD Brigade Headquarters, BACNA HQ and Service and Support Battalion HQ; San Jose del Guaviare/Juaquin Pariz COLAR base – BACNA HQ, Tumaco, Nario/Batallon de Infanteria Marina # 70 – BACNA HQ. For AVARI: 5; they were Guaymaril, Mariquita, Santa Marta, el Dorado and Tulua. For PSP: 2 they were Bogota, the Ministry of Defense (MOD) and the Mayor’s Office.

Number of items subject to inspection

Carabin - 8,544
DIRAN - 5,533
ARAVI - 8,838
COLAR - 1,758
GRUIN - 1,897
Brigade - 3,404
PSP - 1,969

Percentage of items personally inspected

Carabin. - 39
DIRAN - 40
ARAVI - 78
COLAR - 100
GRUIN - 100
CD Brig. - 75
PSP - 24

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

PSP secondary methods of monitoring lies in the comparison of program records to the inventory records supplied by counterpart agencies. Some 20% of donated items requiring monitoring were tracked by secondary methods. The CD Brigade Program Adviser compared the host government (CD Brigade) records with the NAS records: One hundred (100) percent of items have been verified using this method. For DEA projects, a 100% physical audit of existing inventories was conducted in various cities throughout the year. The NAS holds discussions with host nation government officials on the status of INL-funded resources when on-site inspections are not feasible. In the ARAVI program, these discussions are held at least twice weekly to discuss conditions and maintenance practices of aircraft and other INL-funded resources. The percentage of donated items monitored using secondary methods by ARAVI was estimated to be 14%.

Status-Commodities

All items donated to the COLAR CD Brigade are being used for their intended purpose and are in good condition. The ABD program determined that all resources provided are at the correct locations, with any movement coordinated ahead of time with the program manager; the contractor provides oversight on-site and also maintains the facilities. All support provided under the PSP, whether advice, training equipment, supplies or service is for the enhancement of the GOC’s ability to protect their senior leaders. Program personnel have noted that items and equipment have remained with the entity or protective detail they were donated to support and for the most part exhibit only normal wear. The CNP Environmental Program supports the Colombian National Police (CNP) in ensuring legally mandated environmental monitoring verification missions and complaint verifications are carried out. All USG-provided communications, computer, and intelligence-related equipment procured for use in DEA programs in CY-2008 for use by CN counterparts was bar coded and inventoried prior to being issued.

Aircraft

The average availability rate for CNP/ARAVI aircraft fleet for 2008 was 55.3 percent with annual procurement flight hours of 21,725 of which 19,860 were actually flown. Embassy authorization is required to use assets for missions that are not strictly counternarcotics or involved in the evacuation of wounded security services personnel, i.e., counter-insurgency, high value targets, etc.

ARAVI Aircraft
HelicoptersFixed wing
One H530FFTwo DHC6-300’s
One H500One C-99
Three 206B’sFive DC-3’s
One 206LOne C-208’s
One 206L3’sTwo C-26A’s
Eleven B212’sFour C-26B’s
Seven UH-60L’sThree C-152’s
Thirty-three Huey II’s


All aircraft continually undergo maintenance inspections and services, and the overall condition of all ARAVI aircraft is very good considering the age of the aircraft and the high operational tempo.

The CNP Eradication/COLAR-The CNP Eradication Program and COLAR Aviation Program are both managed for the USG by the NAU and supported by an institutional contractor. The NAS and the INL Air Wing (INL/A) conducted regular program reviews to ensure that aircraft were bring used for the intended purposes and that the contractor was complying with all contract support requirements.

While the GOC has operational control of U.S. provided aircraft, the United States retains title. The Letter of Agreement (LOA) specifies the authorized program use for all aircraft. Any other use, such as disaster relief or humanitarian assistance, must be approved beforehand by the Embassy. The CNP and COLAR provide regular status reports to the NAS. The NAS conducts regular random services of flight logs for all USG-supported aircraft.

ERADICATION PROGRAM
HelicoptersFixed wing
10 UH-1N’sTwo C-208’s
Thirteen AT-802’s
Three C-27’s

COLAR Helicopters
Eighteen UH-1N
Twenty-two UH-1N II
Thirteen UH-60L

ABD Aircraft- The Air Bridge Denial Program has five SR-560 Citation trackers, two SR-26 reconnaissance aircraft and one Cessna 182 support aircraft to suppress illicit aerial traffic in narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances over Colombia. Aircrews are provided by the Colombian Air Force (COLAF). Aircraft maintenance and safety monitors are provided by the USG through a contract with the commercial engineering services company. Oversight is provided through a Program Manager at the NAS.

AIR BRIDGE DENIAL
Five Citation 560’sOne Cessna 182
Two C-26’s


For the ARAVI program, changes in aircraft numbers occurring during 2008 were as follows: On August 8, 2008, a NAS supported Bell 212, titled to the USG and operated by the CNP crashed during an operational mission and was a complete loss. One UH-1H-1 Huey scheduled for UH-1H-II upgrade/restoration was deemed anti-economical and removed from USG support. One C-26B aircraft was added to the fleet in October 2008. Thirteen GOC titled aircraft (H53) FF, H500, 206B, 206L, 206L3, DHC6-300, C-99 and C-152) were removed from USG support as the first phase of planned Nationalization Process.

The Air Bridge Denial program had five Citation 560 tracker aircraft transferred to the COLAF. Two SR-26 reconnaissance aircraft were delivered to the COLAF after the upgrading of reconnaissance equipment. Both SR-26s were given by the USG to the Colombian Air Force in 1998 under the 506 drawdown program. One SR-26 had an accident and is no longer operable. All aircraft are under US control. The US contractor conducts all maintenance. The CNP Eradication program received three UH-1NST aircraft in April 2008. The two T-65’s, several OV-10’s, and one C-27 were sold and returned to CONUS; four UH-1Ns were sent to CONUS for maintenance. The COLAR program sent to CONUS five K-1200 helicopters which were sold; eighteen UH-1Ns are on loan to the COLAR.

Vehicles

CNP Carabineros-One hundred and thirty-eight (138) Hyundai HD72 medium size trucks were donated to Colombian National Police in 2008. Vehicles are dispersed throughout Colombia and used to mobilize Carabineros groups. CNP is responsible for providing fuel and regular maintenance for these vehicles. No damage or problems have been reported.

Eighty eight (88) Ford F-450 trucks, one hundred and fifty (150) Mitsubishi 1,200 pickups, and two hundred (200) Yamaha XT1225 motorcycles were donated to Carabineros groups in 2006. These vehicles are dispersed throughout Colombia and used to mobilize Carabinerous on field operations. The high cost of maintenance, spare parts, the advanced technology of the Ford F-450 engine, and the poor quality of Colombian diesel fuel present numerous maintenance problems resulting in some fiscal and logistical challenges for the Colombian National Police. Of the Ford F-450 trucks monitored during 2008, only two were out-of-service and beyond economical repair after incidents. Three Mitsubishi’s were out-of- service and beyond economical repair; one was lost during a terrorist attacked in Narino and the other two were involved in accidents. No major problems were reported on the 200 Yamaha XT225.

COLAR-Two Hyundai HD 72 medium trucks were donated to the Colombian Army in 2008 to secure roads between Bogota and Tolemaida. As they are new, no incidents have been received.

CNP/DIRAN- Ninety-two (92) Suzuki DR200 motorcycles, twelve (12) Hyundai 4.9 ton trucks, and twenty six (26) different brand sedans donated to Colombian National Police Antinarcotics Directorate (CNP/DIRAN) in 2007 were dispersed throughout Colombia. In June 2008, CNP/DIRAN finally received the required budget to get the vehicles into service. The CNP is providing fuel and maintenance. No major problems on these vehicles have been reported by the CNP.

Vehicles CNP/Carabineros
TypeInventory
Motorcycle200
Pick up150
Truck F-45088
Mid Size Truck138

Vehicles PSP
Motorcycle6
Two C-26’s10

Vehicles NAU/COLAR
Mid-size truck2

Vehicles CD Brigade
Motorcycle10

Vehicles US Marshall
SUV5

Vehicles PSP
Zodiac1

Vehicles GRUIN/COLNAVP
Zodiac1

Vehicles CNP/DIRAN/Interdiction
Motorcycle92
Sedan26
Mid size truck12

Vehicles DEA
Minivan1
Motorcycle25
Pick up4
Sedan29
Suv19
Taxi7
Van16

The NAU Logistics and Facilities Section manages the NAU motorpool and provides oversight of all vehicles assigned to the institutional contractor as Government Furnished Equipment. The NAU ensures that all vehicles are maintained in a satisfactorily condition. The contractor and NAU conduct annual 100% inventory in accordance with established procedures. The NAS provided 138 medium size trucks to the CNP Carabineros Program and two other trucks to the COLAR. The NAS provided support to Colombia by providing vehicles to the CNP units, who then provide periodic inventories and status reports. CNP units work closely with this program and manage to remedy issues that arise.

Communications Equipment

All NAS host nation counterpart agencies that receive communications equipment provide inventories and status reports upon request. Equipment includes two-way radios, portable satellite phones, digital hybrid IP PBX, and VHS transmitter receivers. Comparison of the NAS records with analysis of Colombian inventories showed no notable discrepancies. The NAS employs a Communications Adviser who aides the CNP and other GOC entities in identifying requirements, conducting training, and monitoring program implementation. The adviser also works with host nation counterparts to develop a nation-wide strategy for regional and tactical communications support.

CNP Carabineros- Eleven (11) radio handheld receivers ICF-5’s, two (2) Iridium Satellite phones, and four hundred and forty seven radios /thales PRC-148 were donated to CNP/Carabineros in 2008. This equipment is used to support ground operations for the Carabineros Groups. The 11 ICF-5s are located with the”Blogue de Busqueda” and the National Squadrons and are in good shape. Thales PRC-148 radios are located in DICAR sections around the country. These radios are in great shape too. Two Iridium satellite phones were deployed by the National Squadrons to provide long distance communication where the radio networks and cell phones have no coverage.

CD Brigade-The CD Brigade received seventy (70) ICOM radios IC-R20 and there hundred and six (306) Motorola portable radios XTS2500 in 2008. The Motorola XT2500 radios are currently being used as secure squad communication radios during combat and interdiction operations by the CD Brigade. With these radios, squad members can communicate and relay vital information among themselves and to higher headquarters. The ICOM radios IC-R20 are also being used during operations together information on enemy locations and their intent.

The radios and receivers are in good operable condition. Maintenance is being conducted by the specialized COLAR communications personnel.

PSP-Six (6) ICOM radios were donated to the Presidential Security Program in 2008. In September 2008, the NAS donated all PSP program aspects to RSO since then they are responsible for EUM.

CNP DIRAN- Eighty (80) portable radios Motorola XTS5000, two (2) radio Yaesu, ten (10) Quantar family repeaters, one (1) satellite phone were donated to CNP/DIRAN in 2008 to enhance ground operations. Portable Motorola radios were deployed to the three jungle companies and the instructor in Pijaos (Training Facility). In addition, the Quantar repeaters have been deployed to various locations in support of tactical communications, e.g., two repeaters were installed in Covenas to improve tactical communications on the North Coast of Colombia. The satellite phone was deployed to the Santa Marta operational unit to provide long distance communications.

Computer Equipment

CNP DIRAN-Ten desktops (10) thirty-six laptops, four (4) printers, and two (2) videos were donated to DIRAN in 2008. Most of this computer equipment is used by the Judicial Police supporting the jungle operations with actionable information.

CNP Carabineros-One (1) Sony Laptop and sixty-nine (69) desktop computers were donated to Carabineros. The laptop and the sixty-nine desktops are located at the permanent locations around the country in support of the mobile squadron’s mission.

Miscellaneous Equipment

CNP DIRAN-Four hundred (44) laser beams and four hundred (400) EOTACH holographic sights were donated in 2008. Laser beams are used in conjunction with NVD’s to sight in on an enemy target and place well aimed rounds onto the target area. The EOTACH Holographic sights are used to enhance the fighting effectiveness in the jungle. These advanced sights are mostly used on M4s rifles previously donated by NAS. DIRAN is in the process of distributing them to groups at different locations in Colombia.

CNP Carabineros- Two hundred and ten (210) laser beams, two hundred and fifty (250) metal detectors, one hundred (100) ACOG sights were donated in 2008 for support to the rural operations carried out by the EMCAR. The lasers are duel beam target designators and are being used to allow patrol leaders to better control during combat. None have been reported lost or damaged. The metal detectors are in use in manual eradication and other operations to clear mines and search for caches. There are six of these items with each squadron and they have been responsible for saving countless lives. Post is establishing a maintenance facility for them; other than normal maintenance problems, they functioning well. The ACOG sights were bought to allow the squadrons to engage targets at greater distance. They are a very robust sight and none have been reported as damaged or lost.

CD Brigade-Twenty-eight (28) metal detectors and seven (7) weed eaters were donated to 2008. This equipment is used by CD Brigade personnel to help secure locations where illicit crops (coca field) are manually eradicated. No major problems were reported with this equipment during 2008.

Vessels

The COLNAV program received 13 Zodiac rubber inflatable boats at the beginning of Plan Colombia that are still in service.

COLNAV
Zodiac inflatable boats13

PSP
Zodiac inflatable boats1

Weapons

There are strict controls over weapons provided to Colombia by the United States. These items were monitored through site visits. The NAS Weapons Adviser monitors the use and operational status of donated weapons. The NAS staff performed regular inventories to ensure that all weapons were accounted for and provided detailed information on the location, type of weapon, and condition. The LOA specifically requires the Colombian Government officials to notify the NAS immediately of any lost or damaged weapons and of all investigations related to USG-provided weapons. CNP units receiving weapons support provide monthly inventories and status updates which are reviewed by the NAS program managers. Aircraft mounted and small arms weapons, as well as weapons training, were provided to ARAVI under the Security Assistance Program. One (1) M-60 was damaged beyond economical repair and is currently waiting DEMIL and destruction.

During 2008, the COLMIL Program Adviser, through the United States Army Security Assistance Training Management Organization, coordinated weapons Mobile Training Team (MTT) and purchased M16 rifle parts and tools as well as 20 M60 modification kits. The MMT conducted a six-week program of instruction that trained personnel from the CD Brigade on weapons maintenance. The MTT also assisted in performing needed maintenance on over 1,900 M16 rifles and conducted upgrades to twenty M60 machineguns. Weapons are being used by the CD Brigade personnel during eradication security interdiction and high value target operations. The COLMIL program maintains strict control procedures of USG-provided weapons and provides the NAS End Use Monitoring personnel with status reports on weapons and equipment bought for the CD Brigade with US funds.

Currently, assigned weapons and ammunition are monitored and inventories conducted by a designated contractor under oversight. Donated weapons are inventoried and inspected in accordance with End Use Monitoring (EUM) guidance and the Letter of Agreement (LOA) by USG advisers. In fiscal year 2008, USG donated to the Colombian Army Aviation Brigade 10 completed GAU 17 and 22 M-60 weapons assemblies.


Weapons-NAU/COLAR
Gau-1720
M-410
M-6025
M-60D42
NVG19
Pietro Beretta35

Weapons-PSP
M-430
M-601
M-60D42
NVG44
Pietro Beretta35

Weapons-GRUIN/COLNAV
M-60E320
NVD6
NVG20
Pietro Beretta62
Sig Sauer10
S&W M108
S&W M1512

Weapons-CD Brigade/COLMIL
M-16A41936
M-20310
M-440
K-3 Daewoo10
NVG695
Pietro Beretta40
Sig Sauer20
Walther5
S&W revolver3

Weapons-CNP/Carabineros/EMCAR
M-16A21124
M-16A47240
M-203764
M-249659
M-4298
M-60E3171
Metal Detector452
NVG452
Pietro Beretta909
Sig Sauer198
Sniper Riffle215

Weapons-CNP/ARAVI
GAU165
GAU194
GAU1764
M-240D50
M-60D41

Program Impact

All donated USG items have had a direct, positive impact on the Colombian Public Forces whose mission are to locate and destroy narcoterrorists organizations (HCL labs, manual eradication of coca, HVT missions, terrorist camps etc.). Communications equipment, weapons, and vehicles provided much needed support to accomplish this mission. As a result of the continuous support from the NAS, this past year has proven to be the most successful year of GOC interdiction in history. For example, 3,539 HCL and base laboratories were destroyed and the GOC seized 223 metric tons of cocaine and coca base in 2008. Post’s annual goals for aerial eradication were surpassed and the GOC manually eradicated more coca than any other period in its history (a total of 95,620 hectares).

For 2008, the total coca aerially eradicated in Colombia was 133,496 hectares; this success was due in large part to the positive impact of USG in support of the CNP aerial eradication program. During 2008, the CD Brigade secured a total of 86,273 hectares during aerial eradication and 4,408 during manual eradication operations. Investigations conducted by the CN counterparts, in conjunction with DEA, led to a record number of extraditions (208), including several high-profile extraditions, during 2008.

Communications Equipment

The communications support enabled host nation counterparts to enhance command and control at the tactical level and at the national level. The Thales MBITR radios have enabled ground-to-air communication. This has given the ground commanders nationwide communications in areas that do not normally allow for radio communications.

Computer Equipment

The computers and network devices have allowed host nation counterparts the ability to establish expanded data networks and to better organize mission critical information.

Weapons

USG assistance has allowed the CNP to continue to equip the Carabineros Mobile Squadrons (approx. 16,000 police) for assignment in rural Colombia where minimal security existed prior to August 2002. USG weapons support for the CNP Jungle and COLAR units have given them a significant tactical advantage over threats they encounter.

Construction Projects

The NAS’ minor construction projects for rural police bases at La Uribe, Guateque and Plamonte are virtually complete and will be inaugurated in February 2009. Upon occupation by CNP personnel, these bases will allow the GOC to project and sustain a credible police presence in locations which enjoy little GOC control. Other important projects that enhance GOC capabilities and security are the Aviation Maintenance Facility in Tolemaida, upgrades to the CNP base’s water system at Villa Garzon, and improvements underway at the Puerto Estrella police base.

Laboratory Equipment

The NAS has an agreement with the GOC Geographic Institute (IGAC) to build a laboratory and train personnel to analyze the presence of glyphosate in soil samples. The majority of the equipment was issued to IGAC in 2006; however, new items have been purchased to continue the creation of the laboratory. The NAS also has an agreement with the GOC National Health Institute (INS) to build a laboratory for training personnel to analyze water, blood and urine samples for glyphosate residue.

Aircraft

ARAVI aircraft and crews continued to play a significant role in providing support for spray operations. T-65 aircraft were withdrawn from Colombia, and now the one AT-802 Spray Package is supported by ARAVI gunships and SAR helicopters, while the other spray AT-802 Raptor Spray Package has CNP copilots and gunners. CNP gunships provide additional support for spray, interdiction and high value target missions. ARAVI provides aerial intelligence platforms and, with approval from the Embassy, supports all other vetted police units on a “when available” basis. The Citation SR-560 aircraft avionics have reached the end of their useful life. An upgrade program is underway and is expected to be completed by the end of 2009.

Vehicles

Vehicle transportation (especially trucks) support has proven to be a force multiplier with respect to the increased mobility of the counterdrug units. Most units are located in rural areas and do not have the means to meet the transportation needs. With the addition of the trucks, the HN has the capability to better meet the threats posed by these organizations.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Unmonitored resources

Using a combination of primary and secondary methods, post monitored an additional 40% of the property donated to DIRAN programs. Using both methods for the CNP-Carabineros Program, an attempt to inspect the remaining 59 % will be done in 2009.

Re the Presidential Security Program, the NAS moved all program aspects to the RSO in September 2008.

On-site Inspections

The magnitude of the program makes it almost impossible to cover all areas. Scheduled on-site inspections planned for 2009 include nationalized projects, CNP/DIRAN and Carabineros/EMCAR sites not visited in previous years, and the CD Brigade. Random and unscheduled visits will be determined along the way as requested by program officers.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

When on-site inspections are not feasible due to time constraints, security reasons, level of operations, among others, comparison with host nation government written or computerized records with NAS inventory records will be done. There is known absence of an accurate inventory control with a unique procurement software program that makes it almost impossible to implement an effective monitoring program. EUM Coordinators are working on gathering as much information from the NAS and CNP databases at the International Cooperation Office called SICOI. This is expected to become the primary source for comparing program records to the inventory records supplied for CNP/DIRAN Interdiction, CNP’s Air Service (ARAVI) and CNP/Carabineros.

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

The high cost of maintenance and spare parts for some donated vehicles are presenting some fiscal and logistical challenges for the host nation due to lack of vendor facilities. The NAS is making every effort to donate only items that are compatible with the GOC logistical systems. Post anticipates future GOC budgets to be able to better support the maintenance of donated items.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

During the visit to DIRAN’s operational units, the NAS EUM Coordinator found some minor equipment which showed a lack of use. The NAS Program Officer was advised of the problem and is redeploying the equipment to other units for better use. Two Ford F-350 trucks donated in 2003 to the Port Security Program were not being used as they had no legal registry to make them serviceable. The NAS EUM Coordinators provided the required documentation to process the license required to make them serviceable.

Other Problems

No other significant problems were noted. Items which could be more effectively used in other areas were identified and subsequently re-distributed. Equipment that is now obsolete or is no longer in working order was identified and excessed from the inventory list.

BRASILIA

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

NAS Management Analyst Ione Assumpcao, Tel. 55 61 3312 7342, assumpcaoI@state.gov with the advice and supervision of NAS Director Terrence Flynn. Tel. 55 61 3312-7334, flynntr@state.gov

Inventory System

NAS Brasilia records and tracks distribution of donated commodities using a Microsoft Office excel document. The document contains a general worksheet list of all donated commodities and separate worksheets for each project as well. All worksheet lists include the following information: major commodities, type, make, model serial number, project, end user, location and date received. Starting in 2009, pictures of donated commodities will be taken and filed.

Staff Member EUM Responsibilities

The NAS Management Analyst, Ione Assumpcao, under the general supervision of the NAS Director, is responsible for performing the majority of on-site inspections, inventory list control and updates, and preparing the EUM report. The Law Enforcement Adviser is responsible for the project design, implementation, coordination and evaluation.

Other USG Agency Assistance

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

Counterpart Agencies

Department of Federal Police (DPF)
Organized Crime Department
Ministry of Justice/National Secretariat of Public Security (SENASP)
National Department of Prisons (DEPEN)
National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD)
Financial Activities Oversight Council (COAF)
Special Investigative Unit (SIU)

Receipt of Resources by Host Government

A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and joint receiving letter signed by A representative of the USG and the GOB are used to transfer donated items to the GOB.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Post performed scheduled inspections at five counterpart sites during 2008, as follows:

05/15/2008 - SIU Base, Rio de Janeiro
05/16/2008 - SIU Base, Rio de Janeiro
05/17/2008 - SIU Base, Rio de Janeiro
05/18/2008 - SIU Base, Rio de Janiero, San Paulo
05/19/2008 - SIU Base, Rio de Janiero, San Paulo
09/23/2008 - Central kennel, Brasilia
09/24/2008 - Central kennel, Brazilia
09/25/2008 - Central kennel, Brasilia

The percentage of donated items personally inspected was sixty (60) percent.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Discussions about equipment usefulness, quality of service provided, and training results are part of the EUM report used during EUM inspections.

Thirty (30) percent of the commodities were monitored using secondary methods.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

Thirty desktop computers, 2 servers, 1 notebook computer, and two scanners were provided to the SIU in 2004. They are used for intelligence collection and special investigations. They are in fair condition.

Ten desktop computers, 1 server, 2 notebook computers, 1 scanner, were provided in 2004; 12 cellular phones were provided in 2005. They were used for intelligence collection and special investigations. Equipment is in fair condition.

Three servers and one shredder were provided to the SIU in Brasilia in 2004. They were used for intelligence collection and special investigations. Equipment is in fair condition.

One server each was provided to the Brazilian Federal Police in Brasilia, Campo Grande, Manaus, and Teresina and Salem. They are used to support computer equipment system. They are in good condition.

Seven notebook computers were donated to the Brazilian Federal Police Mobile team in support of remote investigations within Brazil. They are in fair condition.

Communications Equipment

Thirty-four (34) cellular phones (NEXTEL) were donated to the Brazilian Federal Police Mobile Team in support of remote investigations within Brazil. They are in fair condition.

Thirteen (13) cellular phones were provided to the Brazilian Federal Police. Seventy (70) cellular phones were donated to the SIU in 2005 and are in fair condition.

Canine Units

Five dogs were provided to the Central Kennel Unit in Brasilia in 2006. They were distributed to Brasilia, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizons, Fortaleza and Porto Alegre. One dog was put to sleep due to Leishmania disease; two were donated because they were not responding to the needs of the service; and two are being used for drug detection.

Vessels

The USG donated 14 Boston Whaler vessels to the DPF mostly dating from 1991. They are assigned to different areas in the northern region of Brazil. The DPF informed the NAS that the four assigned to Manaus are all functioning on a daily basis and are in good condition; the one assigned to Foz do Iguacu was loaned to the Drug Enforcement Division in Curitiba, but it will be returned to Foz do Iguacu within the next three months; the two assigned to Porto Velho and Guajara-Mirim are not working due to electrical, motor, and instrument problems; the two assigned to Macapa need maintenance but are waiting for funds to be authorized. There are also three in Belem, one in Santarem and one in Tabatinga, but the DPF Drug Enforcement Division has been unable to provide their status. The NAS will include all Boston Whalers in the EUM visits in 2009.

The 36-foot patrol boat provided under the 506(A) drawdown was fully renovated by the Brazilian Police and inaugurated in May of 2001. The DPF installed GPS/VHS equipment, as well as a depth finder and a police siren. The vessel is used exclusively in harbor patrol crime prevention activities. It is currently in the water at Praca 15 de Novembro (Rio de Janeiro’s city port). However, the vessel is not functioning due to a cracked hull and motor problems. The Federal Police have estimated a cost of $90,000 to repair the vessel.

Federal Police Organized Crime Department
Boston Whaler14
36-foot patrol boat1


Program Impact

Communications Equipment

The communications equipment donated to the SIU has been instrumental in the preservation and upgrading of the intelligence collection capabilities of the Brazilian Federal Police against international drug traffickers in Brazil and on an international scale. During 2008, the SIUs have been successful in dismantling significant criminal organizations including the extradition to the United States of a Colombian kingpin who had established operations in Brazil. The SIU’s will expand operations to other locations during this fiscal year.

Miscellaneous Equipment

In 2002, the NAS provided basic law enforcement equipment to the Civil Police Forces of nine Brazilian States in the Amazon Section through the Brazilian National Public Safety Secretariat (SENASP). The equipment includes computer equipment, narcotics kits, flashlights, bulletproof vests, first aid kits, CPR masks, life vests stearns, night vision goggles, handcuffs, gun cabinets, and bullet proof vests. The equipment was determined by post to have exceeded its useful life and was not monitored in 2008.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

Maintenance and repair of donated equipment purchased in the United States has always been a problem for post’s counterparts. The warranty doesn’t cover the maintenance in Brazil and the high cost of shipping makes it a very expensive procedure. Furthermore, replacement parts for U.S. produced computers are not available in Brazil. The computers in Brazil are different models. This will be addressed in 2009.

BUENOS AIRES

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Theodore J. Craig, Tel: 54-11-5777-4858; craigtj@state.gov

Other U.S. Agency Assistance

Drug Enforcement Administration

Counterpart Agencies

Argentine Federal Police (PFA)
Argentine Border Patrol (GNA)
Argentine Coast Guard (PNA)
Provincial Police Forces (Buenos Aires, Salta, Misiones, Mendoza)

Receipt

The items and services provided to the above-mentioned agencies are done through MOU’s, diplomatic notes, official letters, and donation ceremonies.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Post’s Narcotics program has been unable to fund on-site inspections or periodic spot checks.

Other Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

The Program Coordinator has relied on DEA officers to assess appropriate usage and verification of the condition of INL-funded resources and equipment.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles

One Chevrolet double cabin pickup was provided to the NBTF in 2006; it is currently in use by the NBTF. One Ford Cargo Van and one sedan were purchased in May 2006. They are being used by the Mendoza Provincial Police Counternarcotics unit. Vehicles provided in previous years (1993-1997) have over 200,000 miles on them and require fairly extensive routine maintenance on suspension and brakes. A few vehicles purchased in 1989 have reached the end of their useful lives.


Salta Provincial Police
Jeep Cherokee2

NBTF
Cleo3
Chevrolet pickup1

Mendoza Provincial Police
Ford Cargo van1
sedan1

Dogs

The two dogs provided to the Northern Border Task Forces (NBTF) in 1988 are healthy, but old and have reached, or are nearing, the end of their useful lives. The Government of Argentina bred six additional dogs for the program. The total force of six dogs allows the handlers to maintain a rotation schedule that ensures the safe and efficient use of the animals.

Miscellaneous Equipment

One gas tank fiberscope and 20 digital cameras were purchased in 2006; the fiberscope was provided to the NBTF; out of the 20 cameras, sixteen were provided to the Argentine counterparts and four are still to be distributed to DEA. Post continues to personally observe that both National and Provincial Police Forces make good use of the miscellaneous equipment (handcuffs, vests, flashlights, cameras, etc.) provided to them in previous years.


Communications Equipment

Communications equipment has not been donated in the last few years. Radio transmitters provided to the Northern Border Task Force (NBTF) require routine maintenance and repair. Many hand-held radios provided to Federal and Provincial Police throughout Argentina need to be repaired or replaced because of wear and tear resulting from routine use under harsh operational conditions.

Computer Equipment

Two laptops with networking systems and 18 desktops were provided in 2006 to the Northern Border Task Force (NBTF) and other GOA counterpart agencies.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Post lost its Narcotics Coordinator position in June 2006. These additional duties were assumed by the Political Military Officer. A lack of PD&S resources limits the Narcotics Coordinator’s effectiveness in managing post’s INL account.

The Political Military Officer has requested PD&S funding to conduct a comprehensive review of donated equipment, establish an effective End-Use Monitoring System, and fund an eligible family member or locally employed position to help manage this important program.

Program Impact

While the INL-funded program in Argentina has been a small one, it continues to have a positive impact especially on the perennially under-funded Provincial Police Anti-Drug Units operating in the Northern provinces. Argentina’s law enforcement agencies have reported large increases in cocaine seizures over the past several years. Post, lead by DEA, has actively assisted local law enforcement in their counternarcotics efforts. Drug seizures by GOA law enforcement agencies are up, including those resulting from complex investigations, indicating increased capacity on the part of these agencies.

Post’s INL program is a valuable tool in implementing and advancing post’s counternarcotics/transnational crime agenda with the GOA. GOA law enforcement agencies remain focused on this agenda and look to post agencies for advice and assistance in implementing their national drug plan. In the coming years, the INL program will become increasingly important in meeting USG counternarcotics objectives in Argentina and the region.

CARACAS

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Evan Owen 58-212-907-8493; owene@state.gov

Inventory System

Post is transitioning from Microsoft Office based products to a WebPass automated inventory system.

Staff Member EUM Responsibilities

The NAS Logistics Specialist assists in conducting inventories, on-site inspections and secondary monitoring. The NAS Program Assistant assists in monitoring and auditing expenditures. NAS Caracas relies on the GSO for Customs clearances and FMC for budgeting, financial planning, and voucher examiner services. As of July 2008, NAS Caracas did not have a full-time FSO dedicated to NAS. The Deputy Political Counselor assisted by a Political Officer, supervises Embassy Caracas’ NAS programs.

Other USG Assistance

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), U.S. Military Group (USMILGP), United States Defense Attache (USDAO) and Legal Attache (LEGATT) have been unable to assist in EUM due to the Government of the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela’s (GBRV) policy of non-cooperation with the United States in counternarcotics.

Counterpart Agencies

National Drug Office (ONA) previously known as CONACUID
National Guard Anti-Drug Command (GNAD)
Prosecutors Drug Task Force (PDTF)
Criminal Investigative Police (CICPC)
National Guard (GN)
National Bolivarian Armada, formerly knows as the Venezuelan Navy (ANB)
Venezuelan Coast Guard (GC)
Superintendency of Banks (SUDEBAN)
Zulia Regional Police (POLIZULIA)
El Hatillo Municipal Police
Chacao Municipal Police
San Francisco Municipal Police
Sucre Municipal Police
Baruta Municipal Police
Margarita Maritime Policed

Receipt

Memoranda of Understanding (MOU), Letters of Agreement (LOA) or receipts were used for provision of equipment to host government agencies.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Six (6) scheduled and three (3) unscheduled on-site inspections were performed in 2008 at three counterpart sites as follows:

01/09/2008 - San Francisco Municipal Police
01/10/2008 - San Francisco Municipal Police
03/18/2008 - Baruta Municipal Police
04/03/2008 - El Hatillo Municipal Police
07/07/2008 - Port Project Puerto Cabello
08/21/2008 - el Borrogal Community Center
09/17/2008 - Port Security Project Cabello
10/22/2008 - Zulia State Police
11/06/2008 - NGO Alliance for a Drug-Free Venezuela

The total number of donated items subject to inspection was 833. The percentage of items inspected was 16%.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

NAS has been able to hold discreet discussions with contacts in some agencies to determine the status of INL-funded resources.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles

Twelve (12) mountain bicycles were donated to the El Hatillo Municipal Police in 2008 for community oriented police and demand reduction. All are currently operational. One Suzuki motorcycle was donated in 2007 to the Caracas Interpol Office in support of Administration of Justice and is currently operational. One 32-passenger bus was donated to the BGO Programs, Juvenile Missionero in 2007 in support of demand reduction and is currently operational. Nineteen (19) automobiles and two (2) motorcycles were donated to the PDTF; one (1) Toyota Hilus pickup was donated to the ONA; one (1) Toyota Land Cruiser and one Jeep Cherokee to the Puerto Cabello port security project.

Municipal Police
Mountain bicycles12

Interpol Office
Suzuki motorcycle1

NGO Programs Juvenil Missionero
Suzuki motorcycle1

Prosecutors Drug Task Force
sedans19

National Anti-Drug Office
Toyota Hilus pickup1

Port Security Project
Toyota Land Cruiser1
Jeep Cherokee1

Defense Articles

In 1999, the USG completed delivery of the following items to the Government of Venezuela (GOV) under Presidential drawdown authority under Section 502 (A) (2): 82-foot Point Class Coast Guard cutters (2); LCM 8 utility Landing Craft (1); PBR Riverine patrol boats (6); C-26 aircraft (2); PRC 77 radio sets and related equipment (77). The MILGRP plays an active role in checking on the status of these items but has not had access to monitor their use since 2001.

Cutters-The two 82-foot Point Class cutters named the Albatross and Pelican were last observed in the Punta Fijo naval base on Venezuela's Caribbean Coast. The starboard engine on the Pelican was replaced in 2002. Both are used in detection and monitoring patrols off the east coast of Venezuela and along the maritime boundary with Trinidad and Tobago. The MILGP played an active role in checking on the status of these items but has not had access to monitor their use since 2002.

Vessels

Vessels-Two 82 foot Point Class cutters, formerly USS Albatross and USS Pelican, were delivered to the ANB by Presidential drawdown authority under sedition 502 (A) in 1999; six Boston Whaler riverine project patrol boats were delivered to the ANB by Presidential drawdown authority under Section 502 (A) 2 in 1999; one LCM 8 utility craft was delivered by Presidential drawdown authority under section 502 (A) 2 in 1999.


Venezuelan Navy
82-foot point class cutter2
Boston Whaler6
LCM 8 utility landing craft1

Aircraft

Two C-26 aircraft were delivered to the ANB by Presidential drawdown authority under section 502 (A) 2 in 1999.

Venezuelan Navy
C-262

Computers

Twelve (12) computers donated in 2008 to the San Francisco Municipal Police in support of drug interdiction are currently operational. The San Francisco mayor elected in November 2008 and closely allied with the national government, alleged without proof that these computers were being used to smuggle weapons from Israel to the Colombia.

Fifteen (15) computers were donated in 2005 to the Caracas Interpol Office in support of administration of Justice are currently operational.

Thirty (30) computers donated in 2007 to the Zulia Regional Police in support of drug interaction and the Administration of Justice is currently operational.

Twelve (12) computers donated in 2006 to the Baruta Municipal Police in support of drug interdiction and the Administration of Justice are currently operational.

Four (4) computers donated in 2007 to the Sucre Municipal Police Academy in support of Administration of Justice are currently operational.

Twelve (12) computers donated in 2007 to the Jorge Washington School in Maracaibo to support demand reduction are currently operational.

Ten (10) computers donated in 2005 to the Programa Juvenile Missionero in Caracas to support demand reduction are currently operational.

Eight (8) computers donated in 2007 to the Hogar Renacer drug recovery clinic in Caracas to support demand reduction are currently operational.

Six (6) computers donated in 2007 to the Bucaral Community Center in Caracas to support demand reduction are currently operational.

Four (4) computers donated in 2005 to IPSA legal clinic in Caracas to support the Administration of Justice are currently operational.

One computer donated in 2006 to the Higher Institute of Law in Caracas to support the Administration of Justice is currently operational

One computer donated in 2007 to Alternative Prevention in Caracas to support the Administration of Justice is currently operational.

Communications Equipment

Seventy (70) PRC-77 radio sets were delivered by Presidential drawdown authority under section 502 (A) 2; thirteen (13) communications intercept sets were donated to ONA.

Laboratory Equipment

Mass spectrometers, gas chromatographs, infrared spectrometers, microscopes, digital scales and other items were assigned to the National Guard central laboratory in Caracas and field laboratories in San Cristobal and Puerto La Criz.

Miscellaneous Equipment

One air conditioning unit was donated to the Community Center and one air conditioning unit to the Jorge Washington School to cool computer rooms in 2007.

One C-30 contraband detection kit was donated to the San Cristobal Municipal Police in 2007 and two C-30 kits in 2008 to the San Francisco Municipal Police in support of drug interdiction. They are currently operational.

One fax machine and one GPS receiver donated to the Margarita Maritime Police in 2007 in support of drug interdiction re currently operational.

Twelve (12) bunkbeds donated in 2007 to the Hogar Renace drug recover clinic in Caracas to support demand reduction are currently operational.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Unmonitored Resources

Until there is a change in policy by the host government, NAS Caracas and assisting agencies will have no ability to assess the status or impact of commodities and resources on counernarcotics efforts in Venezuela. If post is allowed in, this is normally NGO’s schools, state and municipal entities run by opposition political leaders. When it is a Central government entity, military unit, state or municipality run by a Chivista, post has no access In November 2008, for example, the municipality of San Francisco where post previously had great cooperation and full access, changed hands from an opposition mayor to a Chavista mayor. All cooperation stopped. People won’t even talk to post employees on their phones for fear of losing their jobs.

Embassy Caracas will continue to seek and engage state and municipal law enforcement agencies and NGO’s favorably disposed to working with the United States. Embassy Caracas will continue to renew bilateral CN cooperation.

LA PAZ

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Rosalyn Anderson, Tel: 591-278-4811 ext. 3217

Inventory System

NAS La Paz maintains a comprehensive inventory under the NEPA system that identifies the location and the accountable personnel for the items issued at each organization.

In conjunction with the NAS, the Logistics Section of the Bolivian Special Force For the Fight Against Narcotics Trafficking (FELCN) developed an End Use Monitoring (EUM) software package in Access called the Sistma de Administration de Material (SAM), which assists as the end user track system for items issued by the NAS. These records are compared with Property Management Units records for cross-reference. The software was developed in 2006. Implementation and training were carried out on a nationwide basis throughout 2007 and 2008. Currently, the NAS and FELCN are in the process of visiting sites to determine the performance of the system.

In addition, once the FAT (Fast Asset Tracking) mobile is implemented, nonexpendable items will be updated and available for any authorized use.

Staff Member EUM Responsibilities

As of the end of 2008, the NAS La Paz staff consisted of four U.S. direct hires and three U.S. Personal Services Contractors (PSCs). There are four U.S. PSC positions in Santa Cruz and Cochabamba, with one position filled in January 2009 for the Red Devils Task Force (RDTF) in Santa Cruz and one additional open position. These staff positions supervise and monitor all procurement, warehousing, personnel, communications, transportation and other administrative and budgetary requirements related to NAS-funded projects.

NAS Project Officers, NAS Regional Directorates in Santa Cruz and Cochabamba, and the NAS Resources Control Staff assist the NAS Management Officer in the EUM preparation. The Logistics Section of the FELCN is the most developed logistics entity within the GOB and assists in EUM for interdiction programs.

US Direct Hires Project Officers require adequate justification and strict accountability prior to initiating new procurement actions. NAS staff members and officials of other agencies and offices, principally DEA, USMILGP, USAID, and INL Air Wing, conduct regular reviews to account for and verify the condition and use of the equipment and property provided by the USG to the USG-GOB counter-narcotics program. NAS Project Officers, Regional Directors and the Management Officer conduct regular announced and unannounced field visits to all projects, and maintain frequent contact with project personnel. NAS Budget and Resources Control staff conduct spot inspections of property records, imprest funds record keeping, and vehicle/fuel usage reports. Fuel consumption reports countrywide are consolidated and reviewed by the NAS/Bolivia Resources Control Unit on a monthly basis.

NAS Project Assistants are responsible for EUM of all items issued to the NAS supported projects. These items include, but are not limited to, office supplies, cleaning supplies, military equipment and non-expendable items. Each project assistant is provided with a copy of the EUM inventory sheets for their respective projects so that they may perform spot checks of inventory when visiting project sites.

The Aviation Advisor regularly reports on the operational status of all NAS-supported aviation assets to the NAS Director and Deputy Director. The NAS aviation contract personnel participate in inventory management and property oversight.

NAS Motor pool personnel in the regional offices conduct unannounced checks of vehicles two or three months after a charge of pilferable items (e.g. batteries, voltage regulators, etc.) to ensure that they were not removed from the vehicles by project personnel and replaced with older ones. This practice has proven to be effective in discouraging pilferage.

Other personnel involved in the physical control of USG and GOB property (Property Custodial Offices) include the Supply Supervisor, Program Coordinators and Assistant, Warehouse Supervisors and Supply Clerks. Custodial office responsibilities include the physical control of USG and GOB property within the designated area of responsibility, including (1) signing, receiving, and inspecting accountable property on behalf of the USG as defined in 14 FAM 413.3; (2) custody, care, and safekeeping of all accountable property; (3) periodically completing and reconciling a physical inventory; (4) completing required reports as outlined in the NAS procedures; (5) supervising and training personnel assigned property management duties; (6) preparing survey reports documenting inventory shortages or damages for the accountable property officer; and (7) implementing NAS property management policies and management directives.

Under the supervision of the accountable Property Office, Area Custodial Offices are required to take a 100% inventory annually and submit results for consolidation between October 1 and January 30. If there are any major problems/discrepancies, these are reviewed during February and the report is submitted to A/LM prior to March 15 of that year.

Bi-annual inventories of selected high dollar value and sensitive items are conducted by regional warehouse personnel covering the projects within their region.

The Accountable Property Office (APO) and Resources Control personnel perform on-site inspections. However, Program Officers, Assistants and Regional Directors, as well as other managers and upper management, are encouraged to carry out these types of inspections.

The Property Management Officer and Accountable Property Officer are responsible for implementing monitoring procedures. The receiving agent is responsible for the receipt and inspections of all property and the preparation and distribution of receiving reports. The Property Disposal Officers and NAS Program Officers oversee disposal of material.

Other USG Agency Assistance

Officials of other agencies (including DEA, USMILGP, and USAID) assist the NAS Management Officer in End Use Monitoring. AID/EXO provides Customs clearance services under ICASS for Bolivia. In cases of possible fraud, the RSO is involved.

Counterpart Agencies

Agricultural Reconversion (DIRECO/DIGPROCOCA)
Air Force Black Devil Task Force (BKDTF)
Air Force Red Devil Task Force (RDTF)
Anti-Narcotics Training Center (GARRAS del Valor)
Bolivian Army Transportation Battalion Green Devil Task Force (GDTF)
Chemical Investigations Group (GISUQ)
Directorate of Seized Assets of the Bolivian National Police (DIRCABI)
Drug Detection Canine Unit (K-9)
Ecological Police (ECOPOL)
Economic & Financial Investigations & Analysis Group (GIAFF)
Financial Investigation Unit of the Bolivian National Police (FIU)
Joint Task Force (JTF)
Law /Enforcement Training and Development Program (LETDP) for the Bolivian National Police
Mobile Rural Patrol Unit (UMOPAR)
National Council for the Fight Against Illicit Drugs (CONALTID)
Navy Blue Devil Task Force (BDTF)
Office of Professional Responsibility of the Bolivian National Police
Prosecutors Program (Fiscal)
Special Force for the Fight Against Narcotics Trafficking (FELCN)
Special Group for the Coca Leaf Control (GECC)
Special Intelligence and Operations Group (GIOE)
Special Operations Force (FOE)
Trafficking in Persons Offices of the Bolivian National Police (TIPS)
Vice Ministry for Social Defense (GOB)

Receipt

Procedures used to document the provision of items provided to agencies are as follows: All inter-agency transfers are documented using Form DS-584. Provisions to host nation-supported projects are documented on the OF-127 or DS-127. Receipts generated from the Property Management Section using the National Integrated System (NIS) are signed at the time of delivery by the end-user.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

On-site inspections were performed in 77 sites and cities as follows:

12/15/2008 - Chimore-Garras-OPR-Santa Cruz-JTF
12/16/2008 - Chimore-Garras-OPR-Santa Cruz-JTF
12/17/2008 - Chimore-Garras-OPR-Santa Cruz-JTF
12/18/2008 - Chimore-Garras-OPR-Santa Cruz-JTF
12/19/2008 - Chimore-Garras-OPR-Santa Cruz-JTF
10/21/2008 - Yungas, Irupana, Caranavi, Guanay, Suapi, Coroico
10.22/2008 - Yungas, Irupana, Caranavi, Guanay, Suapi, Coroico
10/23/2008 - Yungas, Irupana, Caranavi, Guanay, Suapi, Coroico
10/24/2008 - Yungas, Irupana, Caranavi, Guanay, Suapi, Coroico
10/25/2008 - Yungas, Irupana, Caranavi, Guanay, Suapi, Coroico
09/30/2008 - San Matias
09/24/2008 - Puerto Quijaro, Oruro, Tambo Quemado, Oruro
09/25/2008 - Puerto Quijaro, Oruro, Tambo Quemado, Oruro
09/26/2008 - Puerto Quijaro, Oruro
09/27/2008 - Puerto Quijaro, Oruro
09/28/2008 - Puerto Quijaro, Oruro
09/16/2008 - Cobija, Riberalta, Guayaramerin
09/17/2008 - Cobija, Riberalta, Guayaramerin
09/18/2008 - Cobija, Riberalta, Guayaramerin
09/19/2008 - Cobija, Riberalta, Guayaramerin
09/20/2008 - Cobija, Riberalta, Guayaramerin
09/21/2008 - Cobija, Riberalta, Guayaramerin
08/28/2008 - Tarija, Bermejo
08/29/2008 - Tarija, Bermejo
08/30/2008 - Tarija, Bermejo
07/28/2008 - Santa Cruz, Chimore
07/29/2008 - Santa Cruz, Chimore
07/30/2008 - Santa Cruz, Chimore
08/01/2008 - Santa Cruz, Chimore
08/02/2008 - Santa Cruz, Chimore
07/18/2008 - Sucre, Yotala
07/19/2008 - Sucre, Yotala
07/15/2008 - Trinidad
07/16/2008 - Trinidad
06/30/2008 - Cochabamba
07/01/2008 - Cochabamba
07/02/2008 - Cochabamba
07/03/2008 - Cochabamba
06/20/2008 - Santa Cruz
06/21/2008 - Santa Cruz
06/02/2008 - Trinidad, Sucre, Potos
06/05/2008 - Trinidad, Sucre, Potos
06/06/2008 - Trinidad, Sucre, Potos
06/07/2008 - Trinidad, Sucre, Potos
06/08/2008 - Trinidad, Sucre, Potos
05/28/2008 - Cochabama
05/29/2008 - Cochabama
05/30/2008 - Cochabama
05/19/2008 - Montero, San Mtias
05/20/2008 - Montero, San Mtias
05/21/2008 - Montero, San Mtias
05/13/2008 - Irupana, Coroico, Rinconada
05/14/2008 - Irupana, Coroico, Rinconada
04/09/2008 - Suapi
04/10/2008 - Suapi
03/30/2008 - Santo Cruz
03/31/2008 - Santa Cruz
04/01/2008 - Santa Cruz
04/02/2008 - Santa Cruz
03/28/2008 - Santa Cruz
03/24/2008 - Cochabama, Chimore
03/25/2008 - Cochabama, Chimore
03/26/2008 - Cochabama, Chimore
03/27/2008 - Cochabama, Chimore
03/28/2008 - Cochabama, Chimore
03/15/2008 - Riberalta
03/11/2008 - Potos, Sucre, Uyuni
01/27/2008 - Yacuiba
01/28/2008 - Yacuiba
01/29/2008 - Yacuiba
01/30/2008 - Yacuiba
01/31/2008 - Yacuiba
02/01/2008 - Yacuiba
01/15/2008 - Santa Cruz, Chimore
01/14/2008 - Buena Vista
01/15/2008 - Buena Vista
01/16/2008 - Buena Vista
01/09/2008 - Puerto Quijarro
01/10/2008 - Puerto Quiijaro
01/11/2008 - Puerto Quiljarro

There are about 11,000 donated items subject to inspection nationwide valued at over $10 million. About 50% of the items were inspected throughout the year in addition to personally carrying out preventive and corrective maintenance.

Status-Commodities

Aviation

Under the Black Devils Task Force (BlkDTF), three C-130B transport planes ferry cargo to and from the United States, as well as personnel and cargo within Bolivia. NAS/Bolivia projects also include two light, fixed-wing aircraft and ten helicopters, maintained under the Red Devils Task Force (RDTF) program.

The NAS-supported BlkDTF, under the supervision of a US PSC Aviation Advisor, flies three C-130B’s that were transferred to the GOB through the DOD Excess Defense Articles (EDA) program. The BlkDTF consists of six FAB pilots, copilots, flight engineers and navigators, in addition to 35 enlisted maintenance personnel.

The BlkDTF is also supported by four Third Country National (TCN) contract mechanics in La Paz that provide quality assurance and supervision for Bolivian Air Force mechanics. One NAS FSN provides logistics support and manages the C-130B warehouse operation, thus guaranteeing accountability for C-130B parts and equipment. The US PSC Aviation Adviser, the NAS Deputy Director, and the Director approve all routine and operational missions and expenditures for the BlkDTF project.

Bolivian Air Force (FAB) personnel assigned to the Red Devil Task Force (RDTF) operate the INL/NAS supported aviation assets controlled by this project. RTBF is comprised of about 159 Bolivian Air Force personnel. They are assisted by 18 DynCorp International contactor personnel in the areas of aircraft maintenance, operational standardization, safety and information technology. Fourteen NAS Foreign Service Nationals and a U.S. Personal Services Contractor (PSC) provide oversight and End Use Monitoring of NAS and INL resources.

The RDTF operates a fleet of 10 Bell UH-1H helicopters, and two Cessna 206’s. The operation, employment, and maintenance of the aircraft, as well as the aircrew and mechanic training, are conducted under the regulatory guidance of the Department of State INL Air Wing located at Patrick Air Force Base, Florida. The helicopters are the property of the USG; the airplanes belong to the GOB. The primary base of operations is located in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, at El Trompillo Airport. The RDTF operates out of two permanent Forward Operating Locations (FOLS) located in Chimore and Trinidad.

DynCorp provides maintenance and logistical support, technical expertise, and oversight directly to the RDTF personnel with additional training support provided through USMILGP. The fixed-wing aircraft maintenance program is now mostly managed by the Government of Bolivia.

Operational control of the aircraft resides with the NAS Director in Bolivia and is exercised through an RDTF Senior Aviation Advisor, who is one of two PSC advisers. Both PSCs are accountable to the NAS Director and provide oversight of NAS-provided commodities to ensure they are used extensively for the NAS-funded/authorized activities. Only the Ambassador, Deputy Chief of Mission, or the NAS director can authorize non-routine missions.

Additionally, oversight of INL resources, as well as contractor logistical support contract compliance is provided by the Senior Aviation and Maintenance Advisors.

Aircraft status is tracked continually through daily reports and a weekly report of flying operations and maintenance status provided by the Senior Aviation Adviser to the NAS Director. Aviation Resource Management inspections, all aspects of flying operations-training, and operations and maintenance are thoroughly reviewed. Early in 2008, significant corrosion was discovered on the majority of the fleet aircraft. As a result, the fleet was entirely grounded until repairs could be made. The RDTF is currently back to nine “Fully Mission Capable” aircraft. The expectations are to have ten fully capable aircraft by the beginning of April 2009.

RDTF
UH-1H10
Cessna2

BKDTF
C-130B23

Vehicles

The NAS maintains more than 1,554 vehicles, including GDTF vehicles, of which 305 are over 10 years old.

Bolivian Army Transportation Battalion-The NAS-supported Green Devils Task Force (GDTF) operates and shares a military post with a logistics battalion in Santa Cruz. The GDTF's primary mission is to support NAS-funded activities by transporting fuel, cargo and personnel anywhere in Bolivia via ground. Its secondary mission is to train Bolivian Army personnel in conducting all levels of specialized vehicle maintenance, warehousing operations, and operation of heavy US military vehicles. Currently, there are 119 vehicles in the GDTF of which 107 are military vehicles acquired through Foreign Military Financing (FMF) program managed by the USMILGP. The GDTF manages all of these military vehicles. The GDTF vehicle fleet consists of 58 two and a half ton trucks, two M49 two and a half ton fuel trucks, 23 HMMWV'S, four HMMWV ambulances, eight five-ton dump trucks, three five-ton tractors, two 5-ton wreckers, two forty-ton tractors, two contact trucks, three International Harvester fuel trucks, two fuel tankers (5,000 gallons), two 12-ton semi-trailers, one (40-ton) semi-trailer low-bed, four water trailers, one Hyster fork lift (with a capacity of 6,000 pounds), two petty bone fork lists, and seven NAS project vehicles.

One hundred twenty-five Bolivian Army personnel, commanded by a Lieutenant Colonel, staff the GDTF. Also, a total of nine NAS FSN personnel (supervised by one US PSC) are responsible for ensuring operational readiness. In 2008, the average operational readiness posture was maintained at 98%.

The GDTF US military fleet is maintained according to the US Army Maintenance Standards to include annual, semiannual services. The current condition and daily usage of the 107 specialized vehicles at post are “Mission Capable” at 98% operability.

The repair parts inventory is managed using an US Army Supply inventory and control computer program with slight modifications.

All other project vehicles are maintained through one of the eight major full service motor pool facilities, NAS-operated remote service areas, and designated approved outside service facilities (contractors). All vehicles are identified and evaluated when they arrive for fuel, service maintenance or repair. If a vehicle arrives in poor condition, the motor pool requires official reports from the responsible employee describing the vehicle’s condition and/or the incident.

ANDEAN/FOE
Trucks1
SUV5
Pickup4
BDTF
Truck1
SUV17
Motorcycle19
Pickup6
Tractor2

BLKDTF
Truck1
SUV7
Motorcycle2
Pickup5
Quadra trucks3

Canine
SUV23
Pickup11
Bus1

DIGPROCOCA
Truck4
SUV40
Motorcycle12
pickup47

EcoPol
Truck5
SUV1
Motorcycle9
47

FELCN
Sedan1
Truck62
SUV52
Motorcycle31
Pickup1
Quadra Truck1

FOE
Sedan87
Truck1
SUV56
Motorcycle103
Pickup16
Van3

GARRAS
Truck8
SUV2
Motorcycle3
Pickup2
Bus2

GTDTF
Truck11
SUV4
Motorcycle2
Pickup2
HMMWV27
Military truck58
Cranes2
Tractor6
Dump truck7
Van1

GECC
SUV15
Motorcycle19
Pickup28

GIAEF
Sedan4
SUV2
Motorcycle15
Pickup4

GISUQ
Sedan9
SUV12
Motorcycle31
Pickup13
Van1

GOB
SUV1

INFRA
Truck24
SUV42
Motorcycle12
Pickup28
Tractor1

JTF
SUV14
Pickup13

LEDP
SUV24
Pickup42

OPRP
SUV4
Motorcycle37
Pickup6

Prevention
SUV3
Motorcycle5

Prosecutors
Sedan5
SUV21
Motorcycle26
Pickup7

RDTF
Sedan2
Truck8
SUV14
Pickup3
Bus1

SIU/FOE
Sedan26
SUV50
Motorcycle18
Pickup7
Van2

TIPS
SUV3
Motorcycle3
Pickup1

UMOPAR
Truck2
SUV102
Motorcycle64
Pickup58
Quadra truck4

Vessels

The NAS-supported Blue Devil Task Force (BDTF) is a 140-person Riverine unit of the Bolivian Navy organized into six task groups, with a headquarters and Riverine Training School in Trinidad. The BDTF groups are located at Trinidad, Riberalta, Guayaramerin, La Horquilla, Cobija, and Puerto Villaroel. The NAS Regional Office in Trinidad supports the BDTF headquarters, the Riverine School, and all task groups (except for the group in Puerto Villaroel, which is supported by NAS/Chimore). The BDTF has three mother ships, 33 Boston Whaler-type patrol boats, and 50 Zodiacs (of which only 27 are currently operable, largely due to age). These boats were transferred to the Bolivian Navy via FMF funding or constructed (in the case of mother ships) with INL funding. The NAS will reduce the scale of the program in 2009 to accommodate a limited operating budget but will continue to provide parts and supplies to maintain the operational readiness of the Task Force.

BDTF
Mother ships3
Boston Whalers33
Zodiacs50

Weapons

The FELCN currently has a total of 1,056 M-16s, 615 Berettas, 4 M-249s, 280 M-4s, 11 M-60s, 23 M-60s, 183 Mossberg shotguns, 88 M-79s, and 43 M-203s in its inventory, donated in prior years by USMILGP. FELCN maintains a computerized inventory of these weapons. Due to tensions between the police and military, it is no longer feasible to store FELCN weapons at the Ingavi Army base. The majority of FELCN weapons have been transferred to alternate locations until a proper arms warehouse can be constructed on FELCN property. The NAS does not provide any lethal assistance to Bolivian police or military units. Two Beretta pistols were seized by GOB police units during a forced inspection of SIU units in Santa Cruz in November 2008. The FELCN has requested that the weapons be returned.

The BDTF weapons include 80 M-16s (3 operable, 1 missing) 51 M-60s (11 inoperable, 1 missing), 118 M-9’s (1 inoperable, 2 missing), 27 Cassesas (11 inoperable, 1 missing), 3 Sig 510s (1 inoperable, 1 missing). All arms reported as missing were lost or stolen prior to 2001. No arms were reported as missing in 2008.


FELCN
M-161,056
Barettas615
M-2494
M-4280
M-6011
Mossberg shotguns183
M-7988
M-20343

BDTF
M-1680
M-6051
M-2494
M-9118
Cassesa27
Sig 5103

Computer Equipment

The NAS provided 420 pieces of computer equipment, 50 printers, 56 scanners, 583 notebooks, 27 canopy antennas, 3 new Dell servers, 6 Cisco switches, 8 Nortel connectivity firewalls, 6 fiber optic transceivers, 2 VOIP central phone systems including one BCM 400 and one BCM 50, 3 copier machines, and other devices to the NAS and GOB agencies participating in the NAS-funded activities.

The NAS currently maintains about 4,041 pieces of computer equipment (CPU, monitors, printers, scanners, laptops, and projectors) and 15 servers (13 for NASBOL, two for FOE) at its offices and project sites. The canopy antennas were installed in two offices of the FELCN and two regional offices of the NAS to improve the internet and data transfer.

A total of 112 pieces of computer equipment (CPU, monitors, printers, scanners, laptops) were disposed of in 2008.

Canine Program

There are 78 working K-9’s in Bolivia, of which 5 are for the detection of explosives. At the present time, the program has 96 adult K-9’s and 33 K-9 puppies (3-9 months old) that are in different stages of training. The program currently supports 78 guide dog teams assigned to various FELCN posts, which is half the ideal number but near the maximum that can be sustained with current program support and DEA/FELCN operational priorities. The NAS supports FELCN’s canine training center (NAS and DEA-funded) in El Paso, near the city of Cochabamba, as well as a recently completed training center in La Paz. In 2008, the NAS reinitiated the FELCN breeding program and does not expect to purchase puppies in 2009. Puppies that don’t respond to training and retired K-9s are put up for adoption. The NAS provides 100% of all support to the K-9 program.

Uniforms and Field Gear

The NAS issues uniforms and equipment to the JTF, FELCN and Umopar personnel and all other NAS-supported projects on a regular basis. The NAS has contracted for an IDIQ contract to assure itself of timely delivery of uniforms for issue. In 2008, the NAS procured about 16,000 sets of BDU’s, boots, hats and such field gear as web belts, field packs, hammocks, tents and entrenching tools in support of 1,600 FELCN police officers and 2,200 military personnel assigned to various CN projects including eradication.

Status-Services

Construction Projects

An inspection of the following construction projects completed in 2008 was completed.

NAS Trinidad Offices and Warehouse
Rehabilitation Center
Sanitary system-second phase
New Dormitories and offices RDTF
Canine facilities el Alto Airport
Bulo bulo checkpoint enlargement
Prosecutor house protection
Training Center protection against Huaricully River El Paso
Bermejo kennels and storage areas
Maintenance works for Umopar simulator at BNP
Irpavi II Rehabilitation center
Suapi architectural designs
Motor pool renovation
UMOPAR Rrinconada electrical three-phase line extension
Green Devils Task Force repairs

The NAS Construction Section also completed 946 infrastructure maintenance requirements nationally as follows using FSN maintenance technicians and outside contractors.

La Paz, Yungas - 28
Cochabamba - 174
Chimore - 664
Santa Cruz - 80

Demand Reduction Services

In 2008, NAS supported 12 demand reduction programs in addition to various other activities. The DARE (Drug Abuse and Awareness Educational) program supports public awareness campaigns that stress the threat of domestic drug consumption. The program also works with NGO’s and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNDOC) to develop a drug prevention program in the teacher colleges. The DARE program reached 22,000 students in 2008. The NAS is expanding DARE to include more grade school levels. The NAS also funded periodic independent studies to determine drug consumption and public attitudes in Bolivia to develop the appropriate context for Embassy strategies.

The NAS conducted twelve civic action events in the three regions of Beni, Tarija, and Chuquisaca in 2008. The goal was to teach about 9,000 children and youths from low income families and those most vulnerable to drug trafficking of the ill effects of drug consumption combined with basic health prevention (basic hygiene, dental, etc). The NAS distributed dental kits, vitamins, food, music and sports equipment, among other items.

Other Professional Services

The NAS treats medical emergencies of both staff and project personnel, such as bullet wounds, snake bites, tropical disease (such as salmonella), multiple traumas, and general contusions caused by different types of accidents (vehicles, work-related, etc). The medical supplies and medicines totaled about $170,000 for the year including wheelchairs, stretchers, oxygen, minor surgical equipment, antibiotics.

Two X-ray machines donated to the UMOPAR project are located at the Sana Cruz and Cochabamba airports. One X-ray machine is located in Chimore for the FELCN project. All equipment is in good working condition.

The NAS provided food service to various branches of the Bolivian Armed Forces, National Police and civilian personnel in the field for 2008. Food services for the year totaled over $3 million and consisted of food supplies, preparation and delivery.

Program Impact

Eradication in the Cochabambo Tropics (once Bolivia’s principal region for the cultivation of illegal coca and the production of cocaine) is essential for any realistic Bolivian CN strategy. Successive Bolivian Governments have been unable to move beyond the planning stages for controlling coca cultivation in the Yungas. The GOB eradicated 5,484 hectares of coca cultivation in the entire country in 2008, which was a 13% decrease from 2007. Overall, in 2008, coca cultivation increased to 32,000 hectares, while potential cocaine production increased dramatically to 195 metric tons (MT).

In 2008, the FELCN seized 2,066 MT of coca leaf, 28.8 MTs of cocaine hydrochloride and cocaine/base as well as 1,383,596 liters of liquid precursor chemicals (acetone, diesel, ether, etc) and 440.7 MTs of solid precursor chemicals (sulfuric acid, bicarbonate of soda, etc.). FELCN also destroyed 4,988 cocaine base labs and made 3,525 drug-related arrests.

The NAS continues to adequately equip and support more than 1,500 police agents working in counter-narcotics. The NAS will maintain the capacity of FELCN and other police units to combat drug trafficking and other crimes such as Trafficking-in-Persons. The expulsion of DEA from Bolivia seriously damaged the ability of the FELCN to identify and dismantle drug trafficking organizations and conduct intelligence-based operations.

Communications Equipment

NAS-provided equipment enabled efficient and effective communications within the various projects and between the projects and NAS project management personnel. Due to the remote nature of the work in Bolivia, reliable equipment is essential and has also assisted in medical emergencies.

Weapons

Bolivia has strict laws regulating the use of weapons by GOB personnel. Weapons are only used in self-defense and as a deterrent. Weapons provided by the USG enhanced the security of Bolivian CN units allowing them to conduct interdiction and eradication operations in hostile territory.

Construction Projects

NAS construction engineers/architects advise, design and provide oversight during all phases of construction projects related to NAS-funded activities. The engineers are also responsible for executing projects by direct administration. The impact of the construction projects has brought living and working conditions to counternarcotics personnel in remote places of Bolivia to a better standard, creating an environment whereby greater efficiency and effectiveness is being achieved.

Vessels

The vessels donated to the BDTF support interdiction across the country’s extensive river system and provide the means necessary to collect actionable intelligence.

Laboratory Equipment

The NAS purchased laboratory supplies for FELCN laboratories which rely on manual techniques. The three X-ray machines and some expendable supplies, including reagents and glass flasks are used in detecting narcotics at the various airports. In 2007, there were 68 operations in the Cochabamba airport with 161 grams of cocaine and 880 grams of marijuana seized. Due to personnel rotations, 2008 figures are not available at this time.

Aircraft

The C-130s fly in-country missions to support DEA and UMOPAR counternarcotics operations as well as in-country logistics and overseas cargo missions in support of all NAS-funded projects. In 2008, the C-130’s flew 123 missions, 529 sorties, transported 1,207,899 lbs of cargo, and 4,295 passengers in support of counternarcotics operations.

Vehicles

The NAS is providing needed assistance to the GOB to eradicate all coca in the National Parks and move an increasing number of resources to the Yungas, where over two-thirds of all Bolivian coca is grown. Work in the Yungas will require greater support in vehicles, smaller eradication camps, food service provisions, boots, tents, all under very difficult and extenuating physical conditions and terrible road infrastructure.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Unmonitored Resources

Weapons Accountability-Accountability and safeguarding of weapons is a continuing concern. With the current political situation, contact with the Bolivian military and police has become more difficult. However, USMILGP continues to work with the Bolivian Army to ensure 100% accountability. The expulsion of DEA and the potential distancing of Bolivian Police Units from the U.S. Embassy could make weapons accountability a serious issue in the near future. For police counternarcotics interdiction programs, increased vigilance by NAS-supported Police Internal Affairs Investigators has helped reduce the number of losses and/or thefts of weapons reported.

Property Accountability- It remains difficult to track equipment and defense articles issued to projects. For NAS-issued property, the FELCN’s record-keeping system and procedures are not sophisticated enough to consistently track property from unit to unit and through special operations. Troops only check, fix, and account for those items that they know their commander is interested in. The NAS Property Management Unit, in conjunction with FELCN Logistics Section (S-4), completed development of and started using an EUM module. This will help tracking of NAS as well as the agency-provided expendable and non-expendable supplies from the units to the end user. The NAS continues to support FELCN logistics by keeping parallel records, using the NEPA property accountability system, and extensive warehouse facilities. The NAS will assist FELCN in establishing a permanent arms storage and maintenance facility to provide better accountability and safeguarding of weapons.

NAS Bolivia operates eight warehouses in these locations: two in La Paz, one in Cochabamba, two in the Chimore area, two in Santa Cruz, and one in Trinidad. Additionally, there are GOB warehouses supervised by PSC’s and FSN’s, one at headquarters of Devils Task Force (GDTF), one at the Red Devils Task Force (RDTF) in Santa Cruz, and one at the Black Devils Task Force (BLKDTF) in La Paz. There is an additional GOB warehouse in Trinidad (Blue Devil Task Force), which is not supervised by USG hired personnel. This management shortfall will be resolved by moving stock items to the soon-to-be-completed NAS-controlled warehouse in Trinidad. The resolution of this management shortfall was attempted last fiscal year. However, the Mocovi facility delivery was substantially delayed and by the time the installation was ready, the relations between GOB and USG were in such a delicate state that this transfer could not be implemented. Even now, BDTF personnel do not wish to turn over items for final disposal that they no longer require (boat spare parts). This will be re-visited and resolved by the Regional Director, in conjunction with NAS upper management.

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

Due to the large number of vehicles that need to be maintained every 5,000 kms (per standard procedures) and the limited number of mechanics, delays can occur in repairing and maintaining vehicles. The standard mileage for regular maintenance is being raised to 8,000 kms and the NAS National Motorpool Supervisor has implemented many quality controls and policies and procedures to address this issue. The figures per location are being monitored weekly.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

Personal use of vehicles by GOB officials and its careless operation continue to be a problem, but serious accidents and misuse have declined significantly. This is largely due to increased investigations and disciplinary sanctions by the police internal affairs investigators of the NAS-supported FELCN Office of Professional Responsibility.

The NAS continues to assist FELCN by supporting continued training on proper operations of vehicles, as well as holding program participants accountable. In 2008, the NAS/FELCN implemented driver’s training programs. NAS Regional Directors and other NAS staff also continue unannounced checks of recently maintained vehicles in seach of auto parts theft. With regard to fuel accountability and safety, and in line with NAS’ efforts to achieve certification in ISO 9000 procedures, checks and balances have been implemented at all NAS sites.

Management

NAS Bolivia continues making refinements in its National Integrated System (NIS) which integrates most of the NAS administrative functions throughout Bolivia through the NASBOL Wide Area Network. It has evolved into a key tool in the internal control and accountability system. A planned major update for the system would enable the NIS accountability information to match figures in the Department’s RFMS. The new feature would bypass the manual data entry now required to coordinate information from the two systems and provide accurate, current figures to senior management.

A number of offices have been trained in the concept of ISO 9000, but the NAS was forced to postpone seeking certification while implementing recommendations from the 2007 INL MAV report and preparing for the 2008 OIG embassy inspection. Most of the FSN/PSA employees have already received some training and efforts have been resumed to fully implement ISO 9000 processes in the first half of 2009, subject to funds availability.

LIMA

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Richard Loveland, Tel. 618-2815, rloveland@naslog.org.pe

Inventory System

Post uses Microsoft Access software with an integrated bar code system.

Staff Members EUM Responsibilities

Logistics Staff-The Logistics Management Adviser in Lima is principally responsible for developing and implementing EUM procedures. He monitors the scheduling of inspections and actively participates in EUM inspections. He participates and monitors reconciliation of inventories and discrepancies. He instructs staff; monitors and documents donations and transfer and disposal of materials. He is also responsible for Customs clearances of all counternarcotics materials.

The Senior Logistics Supervisor in Pucallpa actively participates in EUM inspections and monitors reconciliation of inventories and discrepancies. He instructs staff and monitors and documents the disposal of materials at the Forward Operating Base (FOB).

Two Logistics Specialists in Lima and one Logistics Technician in Pucallpa, along with other logistics duties, are responsible for a large percentage of the travel to counterpart sites to physically verify existence, condition and proper use of donated materials. This staff works closely with the Logistics Management Adviser in developing and implementing EUM procedures. It recommends and verifies disposal of inoperative or obsolete materials.

The Vehicle Maintenance Supervisor works closely with counterparts to recommend, coordinate, and supervise disposal by auction or other means of obsolete and inoperative donated vehicles. On occasions, they coordinate and oversee repairs of donated vehicles.

The Logistics Customs Agent, along with other Customs and freight related duties, obtain Customs clearances for all counternarcotics materials. He also participates in preliminary inspections and inventories in bonded warehouses prior to Customs release.

The Logistics Customs Dispatchers conduct preliminary inspections and inventories received at bonded warehouses to facilitate Customs release and to deliver materials to the NAS warehouse.

NAS Aviation Staff-The Embassy Field Coordinator coordinates all flights, fixed-wing and rotary-wing, and monitors aircraft.

The NAS Field Adviser/Security Specialist, along with the daily duties, is responsible for providing oversight of all USG materials or equipment donated and or used by the counterparts and for advising Logistics of any notable damage or missing items.

NAS Police Staff-The NAS Senior Police Adviser authorizes donations; the Deputy Police Adviser oversees use and maintenance of donated equipment; the Logistics Administrative Coordinators receive and distribute materials to Forward Operations Locations (FOL’s); the Logistics Coordinators maintain inventories.

NAS Posts/Maritime Staff-The NAS Port Program Adviser authorizes and oversees use of donated equipment and materials; the NAS Port Police Program specialist oversees use and maintenance of donated equipment.

CORAH staff-CORAH is the GOP coca eradication agency. CADA is a subsidiary of CORAH and is responsible for coca management and eradication verification. CADA is funded by the NAS under a different budget. The CORAH staff is also responsible for oversight of NAS funding of the Instituto de Cultivos Troppicales (ICT), a NGO that conducts studies on cacao and coffee cultivation as alternative crops to coca. Additionally, ICT conducts soils studies and extension training for farmers.

The Narcotics Control Officer authorizes donations; the Eradication Operations Officer is principally responsible to oversee correct usage and maintenance of NAS donated property.

ICT-This institute is mentored by the NAS CORAH Project and is visited periodically for oversight of activities funded by NAS and EUM.

DEA-The Program Logistics Specialist for the Sensitive Investigation Unit is responsible for conducting an annual inventory of donated items and delivering equipment to Peruvian National Police (PNP).

MAAG-The Air Force Section Chief is responsible for developing and implementing EUM Standard Operating Procedures for the MAAG, and actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Air Force (FAP) installations throughout the entire country.

The Army Section Chief actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Army installations throughout the entire country. He also monitors donations to EP.

The Navy Section Chief actively participates in EUM inspections when visiting Peruvian Navy (MGP) installations throughout the entire country. He also monitors donations to MGP.

All listed counterparts have facilitated access and provided cooperation during EUM inventories/inspections and, in general, responded well in inventory reconciliation when requested. Most counterparts also maintain detailed inventories of materials received. NAS Logistics has not experienced any serious problems with counterpart cooperation.

Counterpart Agencies

Superintendencia Nacional de Aduanas (SUNAT)
Aduana-Aerea brigade de operaciones expeciales (SUNAT-AERA)
Intendencia Nacional de Prevencio Del Contrabando Y control Fronterizo-Boe (SUNAT-MARTIMA)
Intendencia de Aduana Postal (SUNAT_POSTAL)
Autoridad Portuatia Nacional OPD (Organiso Publico Decentralizado (APN)
Business Allinace for Secure Commerce–Basic Peru
Centro de Informacion y Educacion Para la Prevencion del Abuso de Drogas (CEDRO)
Centro de Estudios de Prevencion Tratamiento Investigacion y de Salud (CEPTUS)
Capital Humand y Social Alternativo (CHSA)
Control y Reduccion del cdultivo de la Coca en el Alto Huallaga (CORAH)
Cuerpo de Asistencia para el Desarrollo Alternativo (CORAH-CADA)
Cooporacion Peruana de Aeropuertos Aviacon Comerciall S.A (CORPAC)
Presidente de la Corte Superior de Ucayalo (Juzgado de Aguaytia) (COORTE SUPERIOR UCAYALI)
Centro de Estudios y Assesoria en Conductas de Riesgo Social y Promocion Desarrollo Integral (CREWSIER)
Comision Nacional Para el Desarrollo y vida sin Drogas (DEVIDA)
Dialogo Ciudadano (Diqalogto Ciudadano)
Direccion General de Migraciones y Naturalizacion (DIGEMIN)
Ejercito Peruano (EP)
Fuerza Aerea del Peru (FAP)
FAP-Comando de Operaciones-Centro de Informacion de Defensa Aerea Nacional (FAP-COMOP-CIDAN)
FAP-Direccion de Inteligencia-Centro de Inteligencia Aerotecnica (FAP-DIFAP-CINAT)
Congregacion Hermanas Adoratrices (HNAS DORATRICES)
Instituto de Cultivos Tropicals (ICT)
Instituto de Educacion y Salud (IES)
Asociacion Kallpa-Para la Promocion Integraol de lea Salud y el Desarrollo (KALLPA)
Ministerio del Interior-Oficina de Asuntos Internos (MINISTER-ASUNTOS INTGERNOS)
Ministry of Interior-Oficina de comunicacion Social MINISTER-OCOSMIN)
Minister-Oficina Ejecutva de Control de Drogas (MINISTER-OFECOD)
Minister-Oficina General de Defensa Nacional (MINISTER-OGDEN)
Ministerio Publico-Fiscalio de La Nacion-Segunda Fiscalia Suprema Especializada en (MP-FN-SFSP-FEA)
Ministerio de Transportes y Comunicaciones-direccion Aeronautica Civil-Direccion Di (MTC-DGAC-TID)
Marina de Guerra del Peru-Direccion de Capitania de Puertos-Ofinina de Coordinacion (NAVY_DICAPI)
PNP-Direccion de Instruccion Escuela Tecnico Superior (PNP-DINST-ETS)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Centro Operative Polical (PNP-DIRANDRO-CEOPOL)
Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogaqs-Destacamento Antidrogas (PNP-DIRANDRO –DAD)
Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Departmento de Operacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD)
Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ)
Policia Nacional del Peru-direccion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ-DIE)
Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division of Investigacion Fim (PNP-DIRANDRO-DINFI)
Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Direccion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIRECCION)
Policia Nacional del Peru-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID)
Policia Nacional del Peru-Dieeccion Nacional Antidragas-Division de Investigation (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID-AIR)
Police Nacional del Peru Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Division de Investigacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID-DIE)
PNP Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especialses Antidrogas (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD)
PNP-Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES1)
PNP-Dirandro-Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de Operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES2)
PNP-Dirandro-Division de Operaciones Especiales Antidrogas-Departmento de Operations (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES3)
PNP-Dirandro Divoed-Departmento de Operaciones Especiales –Control de Insumos (PNP/DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CIQPF)
PNP-Dirandro Division de Operaciones Especiales Androgas-Unidad Canina (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-K9)
PMP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Operaciones Tacticas Antidrogas (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD)
PNP-Direccion Antidrogas-Equipo Inteligencia (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD-EQUINT)
PNP-Dirrecion Nacional Antidrogas Division de Prevencion del Trafico Ilicito del Drug (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVITID)
PNP-Dirandro Division de Prevencion del /trafico Ilicito de Drogas Proyeccion Social (PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVPTID-PROY.SOCIAL)
PNP-Dirreccion Nacional Antidrogas-Escuela de Investicion del Trafico Ilicito de (PNP-DIRANDRO-ESINTID)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-estado Mayor (PNP-DIRANDRO-ESTADO-MAYOR)
PNP-Direnado-Jefature de Estado Mayor (PNP-DIRANDRO-JEM)
PNP-Dirandro-Oficina de Administration (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFAD)
PNP-Dirandro-Oficina Administrativa-Unidad de Recursos Humanos
PNP-Direccion de Operaciones Antidrogas Oficina de Analysis Especial (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFANESP)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Oficina de Criminalistica (PNP/DIRANDRO-OFCRI)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Oficina de Inteligencia (PNP-DIRANDRO of INT)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Departmento de Opeeraciones Tacticas
Antidrogas (PNP-DIREADRO-OFINT-RIG)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Ofina de Inteligencia-Unidad de contrainteligent (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFINT-UNICOUNT)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas-Odicina de Telematica (PNP-DIRANDRO-OFITEL)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Secretaria (PNP-DIRANDRO SECRETARIA)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Telematica (PNP-DIRANDRO TELEMATICA)
PNP-Direccion Nacional Antidrogas Unidad de Informacion (PNP-DIRANDRO-UNINFO-RR-PP)
PNP-Direccion Antigragas Unidad de Planeamiento Operative (PNP-DIRANDRO UPO)
PNP-Direccion de Aviacion Policial (PNP-DIRAVPOL)
PNP-Direccion Ejectiva de Operaciones Policials (PNP-DIREOP)
PNP Direccion General Tribunal Adminitrativo Disciplinary Nacional (PNP-DIRGEN-TRIADN)
PNP-Direccion de Investigacion Criminalistica y Apoyo a la Justicia (PNP-DIRINCRI)
PNP-Direccion de Inteligencia (PNP-DIRINT)
PNP-Direccion de Seguridad Publica-Division de Operacciones Especiales (PNP-DIRSEPUB)
PNP-Direccion de Turismo y Ecologia Division de Policia Ecologica (PNP-DITUEC-DIVPOECA)
PNP-Division Antidragas (PNP-DIVANDRO)
PNP-Division Antidragas Departmento Caning Political (PNP-DIVANDRO-DEPCAPOL)
PNP-Direccion Frente Policial Huallaa Oficina de Inteligencia Provincial (PNP FPH-OFINPRO)
PNP-Direccion Frente Policial Huallaga-Oficina de Inteligencia Provincial (PNP-FPH-OFINPRO)
Xi Direccion Territorial de Policial Ayacucho (PNP-IX-DIRTEPOL)
PNP-Seguridad del Estado Departmento de Extranjeria Aijch (PNP-SE-DEPEXT)
PNP-V Region Policial Direccion General (PNP-V-REGION DIRECCION)
PNP-V Region Policial Unidad de Inteliencia (PNP-V REGION INTELLIGENCIA PRISMA)
Minisgerio de la Produccion Direccion de Insumos y Productos Quimicos Fiscaizados Proyecto luli (PRODUCE PROYECTO LULU)
Servicios Urbanos y Mujeres de Bajos Ingresos (SUMBI)
Unidad de Ingelobencia Financiera (UIF)

Receipt

Items authorized by Project Advisers for donation are issued to counterparts with a computerized document of issue detailing description, model, make, serial number, EUM bar code number, etc. and followed up with a letter of donation presented to the commander/director of the unit/section stating the terms to include a recall if the item is found not to be used as indicated. The NAS has included a statement in its donation letters clarifying that if no acceptance of donation response is received within 30 days of the letter, NAS will consider the donation as accepted. This was required due to some counterparts delaying acceptance and official transfers to them thus compelling the NAS to cover vehicle insurance and other owner related expenses.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

There were 87 scheduled inspections during 2008 of 4,925 items. The percentage of donated items was 33%. The balance was inspected in 2007. Unscheduled inspections are practically impossible as coordination for access to bases, warehouses and offices are normally granted by commanders/directors upon receipt of a written request.

SUNAT-ADUANAS-AERA - 32
SUNAT-ADUANAS-MARTIMA - 141
SUNAT-ADUANAS-POSTA -L 9
CEDRO - 32
CEPTIS - 5
CORAH - 357
CORAH-CADA - 35
CORPAC - 5
CRESAR - 1
DEVIDA - 12
FAP - 5
HNAS ADORATRICES - 1
ICT - 187
KALLPA - 3
MP-FN-SFSP-FEA - 90
MTC-DGAC-TID - 137
NAVY-DICAPI - 27
PNP-DINST-ETS - 2
PNP-DIRANDRO-ASJUR - 1
PNP-DIANDRO-DEPOTAD - 137
PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ - 16
PNP-DIRANDRO-DICIQ-DIE - 2
PNP-DIRANDRO-DIRECCION - 5
PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID - 11
PNP-DIRANDRO-DITID-SERPOST - 1
PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVEAD - 2
PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES1 - 4
PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES2 - 1
PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CIQPF - 2
PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD - 69
PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVPTID - 1
PNP-DIRANDRO-DIVPTID-PROY.SOCIAL - 2
PNP-DIRANDRO-ESINTID - 3
PNP-DIRANDRO-JEM - 13
PNP-DIRANDRO-OFAD - 25
PNP-DIRANDRO-OFAD-UNIREHUM - 1
PNP-DIRANDRO-OFANESP - 272
PNP-DIRANDRO-OFCRI - 9
PNP-DIRANDRO-OFINT - 35
PNP-DIRQANDRO-OFINT-UNICOINT - 2
PNP-DIRANDRO-OFITE - L 6
PNP-DIRANDRO-SECRETARIA - 1
PNP-DIRANDRO-UNINFO-RR-PP - 1
PNP-DIRAVPOL - 35
PNP-DIRGEN-TRIADN - 3
PNP-DITID-DEPCAPOL - 1
PNP-DIRANDRO - 12
PNP-SE-DEPEXT - 2
PRODUCE - 8
SUMBI - 1

TOTAL ITEMS - 1633
TOTAL SITES - 87

Secondary Method of Monitoring Resource Status

The NAS requests annual inventories from all counterparts in possession of commodities donated under the bilateral agreement. Counterparts normally comply.

In some cases involving extremely small and remote sites with just a few items, NAS Logistics communicates with the counterpart and without stating the serial number requests that they confirm an item and give NAS the correct serial number on specific pieces of equipment. When the counterpart responds with the correct number, it would indicate that the piece of equipment is at that location. The NAS will then request operational status. If the counterpart does not respond with the proper serial number, NAS Logistics conducts follow up questioning.

Status-Commodities

Canine Program

Thirteen (13) dogs were provided to the DNCD in 2005. Four are in Punta Cana; five in La Romana; four in Santo Domingo. They are used for explosives detection. Twelve are in good health; one dog in Punta Cana is ill and will soon be retired.

Computer Equipment

The NAS continues to donate computer systems to Peruvian counterpart institutions for use in counternarcotics and data keeping. These systems are located at Forward Operating Locations (FOL’s) and maintained by the NAS IT section. As the units become obsolete, they are upgraded or replaced with new units. Computer systems have been donated to NGO’s with the majority located in Lima. Maintenance for the systems remains the sole responsibility of the counterpart.

Communications Equipment

Additional base stations and hand-held radios were donated to the Peruvian Police and CORAH to improve coordination and communications for interdiction and eradication. These items are maintained by the counterpart with oversight from the NAS and monitored during EUM inspections.

Surveillance Equipment

The NAS Port program donated a computerized surveillance system to augment an existing system at the sea port in Callao. The existing system had several serious blind spots which make it possible for Port personnel to manipulate cargo in shipping containers after they had been inspected. During installation of the additional system, the NAS IT encountered considerable interference and delay by Port authorities which were finally overcome and the project was compeleted. Although the NAS IT has spent a considerable amount of time training SUNAT personnel to monitor and record events at the Port, consistent results continue to be hampered.

Vehicles

NAS Peru donated a total of 43 vehicles during 2008, 33 of which are motorcycles. The major of these vehicles were donated to the Peruvian Police Drug Units. The units have responsibility for maintenance. The NAS occasionally funds and oversees some repairs and maintenance due to lack of funding on the behalf of the GOP.

CORAH
Truck16
Pickup13
Motorcycle3
Van2
sedan2

ADUANAS MARITIMA
Vans3
Sedan1

CORAH-CADAS
Pickup12

CORPAC
Aircraft tractor2

ICT
Motorcycle8
Pickup3
Tractor1

FAP
Aircraft Tug2

MP-FN-SFSP-FEA
Pickup12

PNP-DINST-ETS
SUV3
motorcycle3

ASJUR
Sedan1

DEPOTAD
Motorcycle40
Pickup33
Taxi2
All Terrain2
Bus1
Van1
Tractor1

DICIQ
Sedan6
Pickup3
Motorcycle3

DIE
Sedan4
Motorcycle1

DINFI
Sedan1
Pickup2
Motorcycles2

DIRECCION
Sedan4
Pickup2
SUV1

DITID
Sedan6
Pickup4
Motorcycle5
Van2

AIR
Pickup2
Van1

SERPOST
Van1

DIVOEAD-DEPOES1
Pickup5
Motorcycles6
Taxi1

DIVOEAD-DEPOES2
Pickup4
Motorcycle1

DIVOEAD-DEPOES3
Pickup6
Motorcycle20

DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CIQPF
Pickup3
Motorcycle1

DIVOTAD
Pickup19
SUV3
Motorcycle19
Bus1
Motocar1
Taxi1
Tractor1

EQUINT
Taxi1
Motorcycles3

DIVPTID
Pickup1

PROY SOCIAL
Pickup1
Motorcycle1

ESINTID
Sedan2
Van1

JEM
Sedan2
Motorcycles1
SUV1

OFAD
Pickup10
Truck4
SUV1
Sedan2
Motorcycle3
Bus1

OFANESP
Pickup10
Sedan17
Van3
Station wagon2
Motorcycle5

UNIREHUM
Sedan1

OFCRI
Pickup1
Sedan2

OFINT
Pickup16
Sedan17
Van2
SUV3
Motorcycle15
Motocar2
Taxi2

OFINT-RIG
Pickup5
Motorcycle6

UNICOINT
Sedan1
Motorcycle1

SECRETARIA
Motorcycle1

UNINFO
Pickup1

DIRAVPOL
Pickup2
Truck4
SUV1

DEPCAPOL
Motorcycle1

DIVANDRO
Pickup6
Van2
Taxi1
Motorcycle1

DIRECCION
Pickup1
Motorcycle1

INTELIENCIA
Motorcycle1

Vessels

The NAS did not donate any vessels in 2008. The vessels donated in prior years are maintained by the Peruvian Coast Guard. Many of the smaller craft are presently inoperative due to lack of funds.

AVY-DICAPI
Survival raft6
Boston Whaler3
22-foot Simai2
Motorcycle1

DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD
Aluminum boat4
Zodiac3
22-foot Simai2
2 ½ lb wooden boat1

DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD
Aluminum boat7

DIRANDRO-OFANESP
Aluminum boat1

DIRANDRO-OFINT-RIG
Aluminum boat1

INTELIGENCIA
Aluminum boat1

DIVANDRO
Aluminum boat2

Weapons

All weapons are closely monitored by NAS personnel during routine inspections. They are distributed in various locations throughout the country, mostly on Peruvian Police bases.

NAVY-DICAPI
M-60 rifle80

DIRANDRO-DAD
M-60 rifle14

DIRANDRO-DEPOTAD
5.56 45 mm rifle98
M-60 rifle48

DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES2
5.56 45 mm rifle19
M-60 rifle4

DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES3
M-60 rifle4

DIRANDRO-DIVOEAD-DEPOES-CI
M-60 rifle1

DIVOTAD
5.56 45 mm rifle10
M-60 rifle27

DIRANDRO-DIVOTAD
5.56 45 mm rifle5
M-60 rifle2

DIRANDRO-OFAD
5.56 45 mm rifle19
M-60 rifle4

DIRAVPOL
Armament Systems15
M-60 rifle45

Aircraft

The four C-26 Aircraft donated to the Peruvian Air Force and supported by NAS Aviation assisted GOP and CN/CT operations. NAS Aviation installed a forward Looking Inferred (FLIR) digital camera from one C-26 to the other as needed for operations. It is used for reconnaissance and identifying clandestine runways and drug production activities. The C-26’s are also used in support of Joint Armed Forces Command and Peruvian Police Command. They are also used for transporting Peruvian CN police units.

The total number of A-37’s the FAP has in the inventory is 23. Of these, six are static displays at different locations. Of the remaining 17, only four to six are operational (the number fluctuates). The remaining aircraft are in various states of disrepair. At one time, they had 40 but over the years, 14 have been lost in accidents and three have disappeared. The A-37 has three missions: counterdrug, primary interceptor and advance fighter tactics training for fighter pilots.

Peruvian Air Force
C-262
A-3723

X-Ray Units

Several sophisticated X-ray units, mobile and stationary, including body scanners have been donated to Customs for use at the principal airports and sea ports of Peru. They are used to scan air cargo and passengers along with shipping containers. They are maintained by a contract with the vendor’s local representative. Cooperation between Customs and DIRANDRO (Peruvian Drug Police) has caused delays this year.

Status-Services

Demand Reduction Services

Combating TIP- NAS Lima engages with both the NGO sector, multi-national organizations, the police and various Peruvian government agencies to train police, prosecutors, and judges to recognize TIP cases; make the appropriate changes; provide victim assistance; enforce existing TIP laws; and raise general public awareness.

Public Awareness Campaign on Drug Consumption

The campaign engages and educates children, parents, policy makers and the general public on the growing use of and availability of illegal drugs not just in the schools, but in the neighborhoods and on the streets.

Anti-Drug Community Coalitions

The coalition creates grass roots neighborhood organizations with representatives from different sectors of the community to identify community level problems; engage the police; and work together towards creative solutions.

Media/Monitoring Services

The services include the monitoring of pro-narcotics trafficking messaging east of the Andes and the daily monitoring of all radio and television news outlets broadcasting in controlled areas of the country.

The services provide an alternative voice-radio and internet news service and comprehensive reporting for the narco-controlled areas east of the Andes as a counter voice to the pro-cocalero, pro-narcotrafficker, anti-alternative development messages that predominate the airways in these regions.

The academic voice-supports academic research and discussion of the issue of narcotics and narcotic trafficking in Peru so as to fuel the policy debate.

Program Impact

NAS Aviation Commodities/Service

The donation of miscellaneous equipment by NAS Aviation improved eradication and CN interdiction operations in Santa Lucia, Tingo Maria and Palma Palmpa.

In 2008, these aircraft equipped as such and in coordination with the Peruvian National Police (PNP) ground units, captured two drug aircraft in Puerto Maldonado area.

CORAH Commodities/Services

INL Project funds provided through NAS Lima are the sole source of funding for CORAH and CADA in support of their mission (coca eradication and monitoring). INL through NAS Lima partially funds the Instituto de Cultivos Tropicales (ICT) in support of the activities.

CORAH conducted a total of 301 eradication mission during 2008, eradicating 10,143 hectares which exceeded the projected goal of 108,000 hectares.

The majority of commodities purchased included satellite imagery, survey equipment, communications, computer equipment and field gear. These commodities permitted CORAH and CADA to perform the functions required to conduct eradication in a programmed manner. These functions include identification of coca growing areas, quantification of coca under cultivation, physical eradication of coca in the field, reporting and verification.

ICT Commodities/Services

ICT worked in 250 locations in Huanuco and San Martin Provinces. ICT conducted 250 educational events mostly related to cacao and coffee cultivation methods to increase production. In addition, ICT hosted an international congress related to soils. ICT provided technical assistance to plant 562 hectares of cacao and rehabilitated 286. They were an integral part of the creation of an agricultural cooperative dedicated to cacao commercialization. This cooperative has 885 members and their goal is 1,500. Major commodity purchases with NAS provided funding was very limited in 2008. These purchases include photo and video equipment and computer equipment.

DEA- Commodities-Services

A large variety of equipment is provided to the PNP SIU through the DEA Lima Country Office SIU program. Items include, but are not limited to, computers, printers, vehicles, electronics, cameras, etc. The PNP SIU program benefits greatly from the use of such equipment which enables the police unit to maximize efficiently in all aspects of its administration and investigations, including evidence gathering, analysis, enforcement operations, and prosecutions.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

On occasion, donated vehicles do not receive proper maintenance due to lack of counterpart funding. The NAS is obligated to cover repairs and maintenance to keep the vehicles operative. This only applies to special cases approved by the individual Project Adviser.

The FAP has a Foreign Military Sales case open to repair J-85 engines. Twelve engines will be overhauled resulting in an additional four or five A-37’s becoming operational. The MAAG is actively engaged with the FAP to restore their A-37 fleet.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

Two body scans originally received in country in February 2008 and donated to Customs for use at airports have not yet been installed. One unit, destined for Tacna is not in use and the counterpart has not prepared the facilities. The other unit designated for Cuzco was originally delayed due to a factory problem. After technicians from Germany repaired the unit, the delay continued due to major changes in counterpart management. NAS Porta/Maritine program is working the issue and may consider recalling the unit for Cuzco and donating it to the police.

In Tarapoto, four (4) Prosecutor’s Offices have copy machines that were not being used at the time of inspection due to lack of funds for toner. This lack of use has been communicated to the Program Adviser.

The Hauncayo and Piura Prosecutors Offices also have copy machines that were not being used at the time of inspection due to lack of funds for toner. This lack of use has been communicated to the Program Adviser.

Reporting of Donated Materials

Accurate reporting of many donated materials has been a problem due to several projects having their own Logistics Section, warehouses, procedures and forms and are not responsible for reporting to NAS Logistics.

Being principally responsible for accurate tracking of EUM materials, NAS Management has directed that all logistics operations report directly to NAS Logistics to standardize forms and procedures thus reducing over-all costs and improve reporting, accuracy and security of material. Standardization assures that all the required information is properly reported to a central unit.

MONTEVIDEO

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Erin Markley, Tel. 598-2-418-7777 ext. 2429; markleyen@state.gov

Counterpart Agencies

The Directorate General for the Repression of Illicit Drug Trafficking (DRGTID)
The Coast Guard (Prefetura)
The National Drug Secretariat (JND)
The Cental Bank of Uruguay (BCU)
The Ministry of Interior (MOI)

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Embassy officials have conducted one on-site inspection at the counterpart site on equipment purchased since 2003. Post inspected all items available that had been purchased in the last five years. About 50% of the items were available for inspection; the other 50% were in use in the field or in use at other sites.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

About 50% of donated items were monitored through discussions with host government officials.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

The US-provided computers, monitors, printers, and servers were in good condition and operated with the current version of software. These systems were used to cultivate and analyze intelligence for the GOU’s central counternarcotics database. Older computers have been restored and sent to police stations throughout the country to improve communications and data sharing within the police force. The computers were provided to the DGRTID in Montevideo and their satellite office in Rivera, on the border with Brazil. Other commodities include cameras and digital scopes which were not monitored because they were in the field.

Program Impact

In 2008, 2,280 individuals were arrested; 668 criminals prosecuted; 1,058, 416 kg of marijuana, 818,522 kg of cocaine and 95,643 kg of cocaine paste were seized.

Computer Equipment

Computer equipment provided to the DGRTID has formed comprehensive information networks that are improving data sharing between Uruguay’s drug enforcement agencies.

Wiretapping

INL funding made a significant impact in the GOU counternarcotics effort, particularly through improved wiretapping and the collection of evidence. The newly installed wiretapping system and assistance not only allows more accurate interdiction but also amplifies the cases against traffickers. Without INL funding and assistance, many anti-narcotics projects would not be possible in their current form.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Identifying INL-Donated Computers

Most of the equipment to be monitored is computers, which blend in with the GOU-purchased equipment as well as with donations from other entities. To identify INL-donated equipment, post will mark new equipment so that it is identifiable for future reporting officers.

PARAMARIBO

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Geneve Mensher. Pol-Econ Chief, te4l. 579 472-900 ext. 2205, menscherGe@state.gov

Inventory System

Post does not have an automated inventory system for INL donations. Post
keeps track of resources provided to host government agencies in a Word
document master list. This is feasible because of the limited amount of INL funds
received by post annually.

Staff Member EUM Responsibilities

Post’s EUM Program Coordinator has responsibility for coordinating the EUM; but most EUM is conducted by Regional Security Officer (RSO) Doug Martin, LES Security Investigator Rene Sabajo, and LES Security Investigator Gilberto Blagore. Some EUM was conducted by TDY RSO Steven Baker, EUM Coordinator Geneve Mensher, and the LES Pol/Labor Assistant (position vacant). The Management Section’s Financial Management Office and General Services Office assist in INL-related procurements.

Other U.S. Agency Assistance

While the DEA Country Attache sits on the Law Enforcement Working Group (LEWG), the EUM itself is conducted by Department of State employees.

Counterpart Agency

Anti-Narcotics Unit
Arrest Team
Attorney General's Office
Cantonal Court
City Police Office
Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU)
Judicial Intelligence Unit Maritime Police
Police Academy
Police Forensics Department
Police Liaison Bureau
Police Ombudsman Unit
Special Surveillance Unit
Suriname Police Force (KPS)
Trafficking in Persons Office
Vehicle Inspection Unit

Receipt

Post uses a word document that lists the conditions of INL such as End Use Monitoring and is signed and dated by the recipient organization.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

07/20/2008 - Police TIP unit 4WD vehicles
11/25/2008 - Arrest Team
01/26, 2009 - Narcotics vehicle
01/26/2009 - Judicial Intelligence Unit Vehicle Police Unit 01/26/2009 Financial Intelligence Unit

There were 1041 items subject to inspection. Thirty-one (31) percent of the donated items were personally inspected.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Gear currently in use was monitored via comparison of records and discussions. One vehicle was monitored via discussion.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

One DSL Package Brons 128/64 was donated to the Police TIP unit to set up a Police TIP Office in Paramaribo. It is located in the Police TIP office to support combating TIP and is in good condition.

Six 8 Pentium CPU’s were donated to the Police TIP unit to set up a police TIP office in Paramaribo. These computers include modems and faxes. They are located in the Police TIP office to support combating TIP and are in good condition.

Six LCD flat panel computer monitors were donated to the Police TIP unit to set a Police TIP office in Paramaribo. They are located in the Police TIP office to support combating TIP and are in good condition.

Six UPS were donated to the Police TIP unit to set up a Police TIP office in Paramaribo. They are located in the Police TIP office to support combating TIP and are in good condition. Six DVRs were donated to the Police TIP unit to set up a Police TIP office in Paramaribo. They are located in the Police TIP office to support combating TIP and are in good condition.

One scanner was donated to the Police TIP unit to set up a Police TIP office in Paramaribo. It is located in the Police TIP office to support combating TIP and is in good condition.

Two laser printers were donated to the Financial Intelligence Unit. They are used to combat money laundering and are in excellent condition.

Four CPU’s with monitors and keyboards were donated to the Financial Intelligence Unit. They are used to combat money laundering. Two of the CPU’s no longer work and one is in fine condition. The fourth CPU is located at the Attorney General’s Office.

One scanner was donated to the FIU. It is used to combat money laundering and is in excellent condition.

One printer was donated to the FIU. It is used to combat money laundering and is in excellent condition.

One server Dell power edge 2850 was donated to the Police Forensics Unit. It is used with the fingerprint software to combat crime. It is in excellent condition.

Four Dell Dimension 4700 workstations were donated to the Police Forensic Unit. They are located at the Police Forensics Unit/ Financial Intelligence Unit and are used with the donated fingerprinting software to combat crime. They are in excellent condition.

Six Biometrics Fingerprint Scanners were donated to the Police Forensics Unit. They are used with the donated fingerprinting software to combat crime and are in excellent condition.

Two Link Systems were donated to the Police Forensics Unit in support of money laundering. They are in excellent condition.

One fingerprint matching software was donated to the Police Forensic Unit. Post learned that the scanner used to bulk scan fingerprint cards into the system does not work properly because the fingerprint cards are not a standard size. About seven prevent of fingerprint records were scanned in one-by-one. The biometric scanners work, but the suspects were transported to the location that has the scanners. The software does not accept fingerprints from various sources and needs to be modified. In addition, the software is not correctly matching fingerprints from the database, often pulling the fingerprints of the wrong person by mistake. Since January 2009, post’s Law Enforcement Working Group (LEWG) has explored possible solutions and is in the final stages of coordination with the Police Commissioner prior to awarding a contract to a software contractor to modify the software and add additional features.

Communications Equipment

One DVD player, one Tashiba flat screen TV, and one telephone fax machine were donated to the Police TIP unit to set up a Police TIP unit in Paramaribo. They are in good condition.

One copy machine and one fax machine were donated to the Financial Intelligence Unit to support combating money laundering. The copy machine is in excellent condition. The fax machine is in fair condition.

Miscellaneous Equipment

One refrigerator, three vertical blinds, two paper shredders, six office chairs, six desks, two file cabinets, and one color photocopier were donated to the Police Office for combating TIP. They are in excellent condition.

Two four-drawer file cabinets, one copy machine, one shredder, one conference table, and five office desks were donated to the Financial Intelligence Unit to combat money laundering. They are in excellent condition.

Fifteen pairs of boots were donated to the Arrest Team. During End-Use-Monitoring, the RSO did not observe these boots.

Fifteen Tactical Squad Suits and mission vests were donated to the Arrest Team. During End Use Monitoring, post learned that most were issued and in use by the Arrest Team. The Arrest Team has responsibility for arresting the most dangerous and armed criminals.

Ballistic helmets (15), face shield direct mounts (15), tactical elbow pads (15), tactical knee pads (15), tactical black gloves (15), Maglites (30), flashlight rings (30), ceramic rifle plates (30), backpack entry kits (2), and entry shields (2) were donated to the Arrest Team for use in arresting armed criminals. They are in excellent condition.

Vehicles

The two Toyota wagons used by the Police TIP unit are in good condition. A pickup is in excellent mechanical condition but has body damage due to saltwater/rust damage. The Arrest Team has a Nissan sedan that has minor damage due to the running of the vehicle off the road. The Judicial Intelligence Unit has a Toyota Corolla in passable condition. The Anti-Narcotics Unit has two Toyota Landcruisers with transmission problems.

Police TIP Unit
Toyota wagon2
Pickup truck1

Arrest Team
Nissan sedan1

Judicial Intelligence Unit
Toyota Corolla1

Anti-Narcotics Unit
Toyota Landcruiser2

Vessels

The Arrest Team has an Aluma craft all-welded boat in fair condition.

Arrest Team
Aluma Craft1

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Unmonitored Commodities

Post experienced several setbacks in the 2008 End Use Monitoring. For example, the Political/Labor LES Assistant, who has responsibility for assisting In End Use Monitoring resigned in October 2008. At the same time, the Pol-Econ position was vacant from 9/27/08 to 11/24/08 as well. In addition, the RSO who assists in End Use Monitoring was on paternity leave for several weeks in the fall. Post will do a better job of spreading its monitoring responsibilities over four quarters in 2009 rather than monitoring just once a year in the fall.

Disposal of Commodities

Three reconditioned Toyota Corolla station wagons donated to the Police Liaison Office in 2004 have transmission problems and should be disposed of.

QUITO

Background

EUM Program Coodinator

NAS Director, John Haynes, Tel. 593-2 9205-2601, haynesjd@state.gov

Staff Member Responsibilities

The NAS Deputy Director supervises the implementation and planning of the End Use Monitoring and resolves problems that might arise during the inventory. The POC for post’s Military Group is MSGT Roberto Caceres, Logistics NCO.

Inventory System

NAS Ecuador uses two types of databases to record and track the distribution of all resources provided to host government agencies and to maintain and retrieve End Use Monitoring information. The NAS Inventory Assistant uses an Access database on a laptop computer to monitor all of NAS’s donated resources. The NAS Mobility Assistant uses an Excel database to monitor NAS’ donated vehicles.

The MILGP maintains an Excel data base to record all military deliveries. The database includes information such as description, location, recipient, and condition of donated items. Deliveries to Ecuadorian Military Units are recorded on hand receipts signed by/for the unit commanders. The MILGP monitors all of these items annually and records updates to the items by location, use and condition of equipment.

Staff Member Responsibilities

The NAS Deputy Director coordinates all of the activities regarding End Use Monitoring. He works closely with the NAS FSN-10 Program Specialist, Monica Vilacreces, who assists in the coordination of EUM activities. She assists with the implementation and direction of the monitoring and works closely with the FSN-8 Mobility Assistant, Galo Defaz, who conducts the mobility inventory, FSN Project /Engineering, Mario Narvaez, who provides the inventory of the facilities, and FSN Inventory Assistant, Nelson Estrella, who conducts the physical, on-site inventory verifications.

Other USG Agency Assistance

The USMILGP conducts regular reviews and monitoring of NAS-donated resources to their military counterparts.

Counterpart Agencies

Ecuadorian Anti-Drug National Police (ENP-DNA)
Sensitive Investigative Unit (SIU)
Anti-Smuggling Unit (Migration Control, formerly COAC)
Ecuadorian Military (ECUMIL)
Ecuadatorian Judicial Police (JPA)

Receipt

The issuing of NAS donated resources is done through a receiving and inspection report. The receiving agency inspects the items and takes receipt of them by signing the receiving and inspection report. A signed memorandum by the NAS and the Ecuadorian counterpart is also used to document some transfers. The MILGP also maintains a separate receipt documenting the transfer of equipment to military units.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

The NAS performed 20 scheduled and 6 unscheduled inspections at 18 locations. The number of donated items personally inspected was 95%.

11/24/2008 - Pichincha
11/25/2008 - Pichincha
01/06/2009 - Sucumbios
01/06/2009 - Coca
12/08/2008 - Tulcan
12/08/2008 - Esmeraldas
12.08/2008 - Santo Domingo
12/09/2009 - San Lorenzo
12/10/2008 - San Jeronimo
12/10/2008 - Mascarillas
11/26/2008 - Imbabura
11/05/2008 - Del Jobo
11/04/2008 - Machala
10/20/2008 - Manta
10/21/2008 - Portoviejo
10/08/2008 - Guayaquil
04/03/2008 - Cuenca
04/04/2008 - Loja

A total of 9,000 items were subject to inspection. Ninety-five percent (95%) of those items were personally inspected.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Secondary methods of End Use Monitoring were used for the Anti-Drug National Police (DNA) units (2) located in the Galapagos and Cotopaxi areas. There was insufficient time and opportunity for a physical inspection of NAS resources in these areas this year.

The MILGP sends their inventory list to the Ecuadorian Military Joint Command requesting input on the location, use and condition of each item. In addition, the MILGP often has personnel on-site to monitor the equipment donated to the military units. In addition to comparison of records, the MILGP holds permanent discussions on the use, location, and condition of deliveries during formal meetings with the Ecuadorian military units.

DNA officials contacted the units in the Galapagos and Cotopaxi areas and compared the existing NAS inventory with their inventory. No discrepancies were noted according to DNA officials. The percentage of commodities monitored by secondary methods was 5%.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles

The NAS Mobility Program had 233 vehicles and 131 motorcycles delivered as endowment to DNA. The Mobility Program is in charge of the expenses of maintenance and fuel for these vehicles. The vehicles are divided between automobiles, pickups, vans, SUVs, trucks. The DNA has different branch offices such as the canine centers, intelligence units, etc. Vehicles are distributed to units depending on the duties of each branch office. All of the vehicles are used for different duties by the Antinarcotics Ecuadorian Police branch agencies. The pickups are used for operations to control drug distribution in each city. Sedans are used in undercover operations. Some are painted like taxis. The canine units use the pickups and trucks in the transportation and logistics of the canines.

The NAS Mobility program has 2 backscatter vans. One of the vans is located in the coastal area in the south of the country and the other one along the Northern Border. The fleet is in good condition. Due to a vacancy in the Mobility Assistant position, there was a two-month gap where only emergency maintenance was provided. Due to the arrival of the new Mobility Assistant, the NAS is providing fuel maintenance and fuel services to the NAS donated vehicles. Some vehicles, which are located at towns with poor road conditions, suffered more deterioration than vehicles located in the cities. The NAS Mobility Program has BPAs with maintenance shops, tire vendors, and gas stations in almost all the provinces to maintain the vehicles in good working condition.

DNA Quito
Nissan Sentra2
Chevrolet Corsa Evoulution2
Volkswagon GOL5
Mitsubishi Montero sport3
Ford Explorer SUV1
Ford Ranger1
Ford F-3501
Chevrolet LUV pickup2
Nissan Frontier pickup11
Chevrolet DMAX pickup4
Toyota Hilux pickup6
Nissan Urvan van1
Toyota Hiace van1
Chevrolet NPR bus1
Hyundai country bus1
International 3800 bus1
Ford E-350 bus1
Hino Dutro truck1

JPA Pichincha
Volkswagon GOL5
Nissan Sentra1
Skoda Fabia2
Ford explorer SUV1
Nissan Frontier pickup3
Mazsa B2200 pickup3
Nissan Urvan Van1
Hyundai county bus1
Honda XL200 motorcycles9

CAC Quito
Volkswagon GOL1
Nissan Frontier Pickup4
Chevrolet Dmax pickup1
Toyota Hilux pickup1
Hino Dutro truck1
Honda Motorcycles4

UIAP Quito
Nissan Sentra2
Skoda Fabia2
Chevrolet DMax pickup1
Honda XL200 motorcycles5

JPA Guayas
Nissan Sentra4
Volkswagon GOL4
Chevrolet Dmax pickup1
Nissan Frontier pickup4
Mazda B2200 pickup1
Nissan Urvan van1
Daihatsu Delta truck1
Hino Dutro truck1
Honda XL200 motorcycles7

Gema Baeza
Nissan Frontier Pickup3
Chevrolet Dmax pickup1
Toyota Hilux pickup1
Mazda B2600 pickup1
Toyota Hiace van1
Hyundai county bus1
Hino Dutro truck1
Honda motorcycle1

GEMA Y Del Jobo
Ford Ranger pickup1
Nissan Frontier pickup3
Toyota Hilux pickup1
Honda motorcycles2

GEMA San Lorenzo
Chevrolet LUV pickup2
Chevrolet LUV D/Max Pickup1
Toyota Hilux pickup1
Honda motorcycles2

GEMA San Jeronimo
Chevrolet LUV pickup1
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Toyota Hilux pickup1

SIPA Guayas
Nissan Sentra2
Chevrolet LUV pickup2
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Mazda B2600 pickup1
Chrolet LUV D/MAX pickup1
Toyota Hilus pickup1
Honda XL200 motorcycles3

JPA Azuay
Volkswagon GOL2
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycles3

JPA Carchi
Volkswagon GOL2
Nissan Sentra2
Ford Ranger Pickup5
Nissan Frontier pickup3
Mazda B2600 pickup1
Toyota Hilux pickup1
Nissan Urvan van1
Daihatsu Delta Truck2
Nissan Frontier pickup11
Motorcycle CB2501
Motorcycle XR2501
Motorcycle XL2003

UCA Manta
Volkswagon GOL1
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Toyota Hilus pickup1

JPA Imbabura
Volkswagon GOL1
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Honda motorcycles XL2004
Daytona motorcycles GY2001
Traxx motorcycle GY1501

DNA
Sedans44
Pickups153
SUV5
trucks7
Buses6
Vans8
Backscatter vans2
Motorcycles131

SIU
Sedans17
Pickups12
SUV9
Van1

JPA Tungurahua
Volkswagon GOL1
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycles XL2003

JPA Loja
Nissan Sentra1
Volkswagon GOL1
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Chevrolet LUV pickup1
Chevrolet LUV D/Max pickup1
Honda motorcycles4

Judicial Police
Pickups3
SUV1

Migration Control (formerly COAC)
Sedans2
Pickup1
Van2
Motorcycle4


JPA Cotopaxi
Skoda Fabia1
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycles XL2004

JPA Esmeraldas
Ford Ranger pickup1
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Chevrolet LUV D/max pickup1
Honda motorcycles3

UCAG Puerto Maritimo
Chevrolet LUV pickup1
Nissan Frontier pickup3
Mazda B2200 pickup1
Toyota Hilux pickup1
Honda motorcycle XL2004

GEMA Guayaquil
Chevrolet LUV pickup1
Honda motor cycle XR2501

UCA Puerto Esmeraldas
Chevrolet LUV pickup1

SJPA Santo Domingo
Chevrolet LUV pickup1
Honda motor cycle XL2001

JPA Cotopaxi
Skoda Fabia1
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycles XL2004

SJP Santo Domingo
Chevrolet LUV pickup1
Honda motorcycle XL2001

JPA El Oro
Chevrolet LUV pickup1
Toyota Hilux pickup1
Honda motorcycles XL2003


UCA Machala
Honda motorcycle XL12003

GEMA Arosemena Tola
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Chevrolet LUV D/MAX pickup1
Mazda pickup1

GEMA Arosemena Tola
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Chevrolet LUV D/MAX pickup1
Mazda pickup1
Hyundai van1

UCAMS Aeropuerto
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Chevrolet LUV D/MAX pickup1
Mazda pickup1
Hyundai van1

UCAG Aeropuerto
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Mazda pickup1
Hyundai van1

JBA Bolivar
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle XL2002

JBA Sucumbios JPA Sucumbios
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Chevrolet LUV D/MAX pickup1
Mazda pickup1
Hino Dutra truck1
Honda motorcycle3

UCA Puerto Manta
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle XL2001


UCA San Loenzo
Nissan Frontier pickup1

JPA Pastaza
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle XL2003

GEMA Tulcan
Mazda pickup1
Toyota Hilux pickup1

JPA Esmeraldas
Mazda pickup1

SLPA Manta
Mazda pickup1
Honda motorcycle3

UCA Tulcan
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Toyota Hilus pickup1
Honda motorcycle1

JPA Napo
Nissan /frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle3

UCA Mascarillas
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle1

UCA Santo Domingo
Nissan Frontier pickup1

UCA Esmeraldas
Nissan Frontier pickup1

JPA Canar
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle2

JPA Manabi
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle3


JPA Galapagos
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle2

JPA Santo Domingo
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle2

JPA Chimborazo
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle3

SIPA Manabi
Nissan Frontier pickup1

UCA El Oro
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle3

UCA Cotopaxi
Nissan Frontier pickup1

JPA Santa Elena
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle2

JPA Los Rios
Nissan /Frontier pickup1
Honda motorcycle2

JPA Morona
Chevrolet LUV D/MAX pickup1
Honda motorcycle2

Giace
Chevrolet LUV D/Max pickup1
Honda motorcycle2

GEMA Tabacundo
Honda motorcycle1

JPA Orellana
Honda motorcycle4

JPA Zamora
Honda motorcycle3

UIES
Chevrolet Corsa1
Ford Ranger pickup1

PJ Quito
Nissan Frontier pickup2
Ford Ranger pickup1
Ford Exployer SUV1
Honda motorcycle1

Aeropolitical Santo Domingo
Nissan Frontier pickup1
Ford Ranger pickup2

COAC Quito
Volkswagon GOL2
Chevrolet LUV pickup1
Hyundai Hido2
Honda motorcycle4

Miscellaneous Equipment

One body scan X-ray machine was donated to the ENP/DNA. It is located at the Guayaquil Airport. One Hazmat ID system was donated to the DEA sponsored Special Investigative Unit. Ten IO scanners were donated to the Ecuadorian Military. Six Identity IRs detectors were donated to the DNA. Forty sets of scuba gear with compressors (2) were donated to the DNA/GEMA. Fifteen CT-30 Contraband Inspection kits were donated to the DNA. Two chromatographers were donated to the PJ. Nineteen sets of individual equipment (clothing, footwear, eye protection, and police related items and communications accessories) were donated to the COAC. Computer equipment (17 PCs, 4 servers, 17 hard drives, 2 UPS, 6 printers, 1 scanner, 10 CCTV cameras, 4 INFOCUS projectors, 2 security bundles, 2 switches, 2 routers, and miscellaneous software) were donated to the FIU. Living room furniture was donated to the DNA/UCA Quito Airport (2 sofas, one loveseat, and 4 chairs). Fifteen air conditioning systems were donated to the SPA unit in Guayaquil.

Canine Program

Nineteen (19) canines were bought for both the ENP and the USMILGP. They are located in Quito. They were used for drug detection at different units around the country. Eighty-three (83) NAS donated dogs are in the DNA inventory; nineteen (19) of which are newly acquired. Thirty-eight are in Pichincha; 15 in Guayas; one in San Jeronimo; one in Sucumbíos; six in Imbabura; five in Manta; one in Baeza; four in Tulcan; two in San Lorenzo; one in Esmeraldas; 7 in Machala; two in Ydel Jobo.

Vessels

Four Boston Whalers were donated to the Ecuadorian Military through the USMILGP. Five Zodiac boats w/engines (2 each) were donated to the ENP/DNA/GEMA. They are located at Y del Jobo/GEMA and used for post operations along the coastal areas.

Ecuadorian Military
25-foot Boston Whaler7
Zodiac Boat 47010
Jet piranhas15

Weapons

The NAS had previously contributed weapons to the Ecuadorian National Police Anti- Drug Units. There is still a deficiency in weapons and ammunition within the DNA. However, the majority of the police units have a stock of weapons to issue to personnel for use during operations.

ENP/DNA
Pietro Beretta43
Sig-Sauer700
Colt AR-151


Status-Services

Demand Reduction

The USG has made several attempts to provide training and equipment to the GOE in the fight against TIP. Unfortunately, these attempts have been unsuccessful at this time. The GOE is moving forward with setting up a TIP unit that will answer directly to the Ministry of Government. The unit won’t have any funding from the GOE until 2010. This new TIP unit would focus on TIP in general; not only on crime news against women and children. DINAPEN is the current GOE law enforcement agency investigating TIP cases as they relate to children and women. Most, if not all, of the training has been provided by IOM. The GOE is moving forward in training prosecutors in TIP. The GOE has sent their top TIP prosecutor to Vienna for training on the fight against TIP.

The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) signed a grant with the National Council for the Control of Drugs (CONSEP) to integrate drug abuse prevention in urban communities in Manta, Loja, Ambato, Esmeraldas, Ibarra and Santa Cruz.

Construction Projects

The facilities donated to the Police are used by the Antinarcotics Police Unit for canine units, mobile units, and Special Forces that control the drug’s traffic. The remodeled and constructed buildings are used for offices and barracks for the antinarcotics police personnel to live and to have a safe area.

The donated buildings are in good condition for their normal operations, except for the following police units that need small improvements at maintenance levels: integrated police check point in San Geronimo, police check point in La Y del Jobo, and Carchi antinarcotics police headquarters in Tulcan. To improve the maintenance, post is developing a maintenance contract for the equipment.

Inspections of the following construction projects completed in 2008 were performed:

Troops Barracks, dining room and kitchen for CICC DNI
Maintenance work for Airport canine unit, Mana
Cover of parking area for GEMA group, Baeza
Adaptation of kennels for the canine center at Quito airport
Remodeling offices and troop barracks for canine unit at port Guayaquil
Enlargement of Troop barracks for the canine training center, Quito
Metallic Divisions and Ceiling for the DNA warehouse, Quito
Roof change from kennels area to the canine center, Quito
Construction of fence and cover for kennels at Manta
Remodeling facilities of Pichincha headquarters anti-drug police, Quito
Removing an installation of new doors for JPAP
Improvement of Fiscals office for JPAP, Quito
Installation of electrical system for computers at JPAP offices, Quito
Remodeling of office for the Judicial Police
Adaptation of barracks and construction of kennels for the anti-narcotics police
Construction of water tank and installation of one 2 HP pump, Baeza
Training rooms for dogs at the canine training center, Quito
New water supply for GEMA group in Baeza
Diesel tank for generator at San Jeronimo police checkpoint
Parking area national police at San Lorenzo
Remodeling of kennels for the Canine Training Center, Quito
Construction of warehouses for CONSEP Guayaquil
Enlargement of GEMA police checkpoint in Baeza
Construction of kennels for the Police Canine Unit, San Domingo
Remodeling of officers dormitories at the Canine Training Center, Quito
Construction of kennels for the canine unit at the airport, Guayaquil
Renovation of roof for the DNA headquarters, Quito
Remodeling of office and dormitories and the canine unit, Santo Domingo
Installation of ceramic tiles and ceiling for instruction room in Cema Baeza Remodeling maintenance workshop for BAL 72, Quito
Remodeling workshop for tactical vehicles for Ecuadorian Navy, Esmeraldas Adaptation of a maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles for BI 39 BGalo Molina, Tulcan
Adaptation of a maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles of BI 39 Galo Molina, Tulcan
Provision and installation of one 30KVA transformer for the maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles at GFE-25 Esmeraldas
Enlargement of the workshop and construction of parking area for vehicles for The Ecuadorian van, San Lorenzo
Design and construction of one tactical tower for Ecuadorian army Maldonado, Carchi
Construction of shelters for the ECU army Esmeraldes
Construction of workshop for tactical vehicles
Maintenance workshop for tactical vehicles for Yahuachi
Ibarra Police port inspection facilities in Puerto Bolivar-el Oro
Area police control base in Santo Domingo de los Colorados
Carchi antinarcotics polio headquarters in Tulcan
Police port inspection facilities in Esmeraldas
Construction of barracks and office for Canine Training Center, Quito
Construction of barracks and offices for Canine Airport Unit, Guayaquil
Construction military base, Sucumbios
Construction and remodeling of Villa military base, Sucumbíos

Program Impact

Drug seizures and arrest statistics for the calendar 2008 are (metric tons)

Seizures

Cocaine hydrochloride - 21.82
Coca Base/paste - .65
Cocaine total - 22.47
Heroin - .18
Cannabis - .74

Drug Laboratories - 2.00

Arrests - 3,034.00

Communications Equipment

Harris radio products donated to the Ecuadorian Miliary’s 4th Division enabled the unit to better communicate with subordinate units throughout the Sucumbíos and Orellana provinces. This enhanced communications allowed the unit to streamline the decision-making process and more rapidly execute missions or changes to missions already taking place. Additionally, the formal and informal classes/instructions provided by Harris instructors were absolutely invaluable to the ECUMIL.

Construction Projects

The projects have improved the standard of living of the anti-narcotics police personnel which has helped to rejuvenate the police’s motivation. In addition, the work and office area for the police has improved dramatically, thereby increasing the performance of the police. Increased technology in the facilities has also facilitated a responsive force; these new and renovated facilities also provided the police a stronger and more visible presence.

Construction of the vehicle repair and wash facilities has significantly improved the maintenance capabilities of the unit. The new installations provide a sheltered, all-weather maintenance area that allows the unit to better service their vehicles day or night under adverse weather conditions. The wash facility better enables the unit to maintain the cleanliness of vehicles which thereby enables the unit to easily identify leaks, damaged parts or to other maintenance issues.

Vessels

The Riverine program, run by the Ecuadorian Military along the northern border, has increased the patrolling capacity of the Ecuadorian military along the rivers. This has been accomplished with a growing program that consists of 10 Zodiacs, Boston Whalers and 15 refurbished jet boat piranhas.

Laboratory Equipment

The NAS donated equipment to the Forensic Laboratory for use in analyzing chemicals and drugs in an efficient manner to expedite the resolution of drug cases. The laboratories are equipped with gas chromatographers.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Unmonitored Resources

Although the NAS has a complete inventory of the vehicle fleet, the Mobility Assistant has monitored only a small percentage of them because he began two months ago. However, these items were inspected by verification of hand receipt by each local logistics/supply officer.

Due to the vacancy in the Mobility Assistant position, the NAS Inventory Assistant conducted inventories of the vehicle and motorcycle fleet.

The Mobility Assistant will make one monitoring trip a month in 2009. Post anticipates that 75% of vehicles will be monitored during the calendar year,

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

The NAS has identified a couple of cases of misuse of vehicles resulting in vehicular accidents. The NAS has sent a number of social memorandums detailing these incidents; a request for a review of police policies regarding this misuse has been sent to the National Director of the Anti-Narcotics Police. The NAS has also held formal meetings with DNA officials, including the National Director, to discuss these accidents. The NAS will continue to closely monitor any future vehicular accidents. The DNA has acknowledged that they are aware of this issue and are working to rectify the situation.

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

There are some maintenance issues with police units in towns which are located at large distances from larger cities. For this reason, the NAS donated vehicles in these towns often have to travel at least two hours for maintenance or repair of these vehicles. This year, the newly hired NAS Mobility Assistant will personally inspect these vehicles and search for quality maintenance shops at closer locations. If no local shops are identified, the NAS Mobility Assistant will provide basic servicing supplies such as oil and filters.

SANTIAGO

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Patrick Fischer, 56-2-330-3394; fischerPJ@state.gov

Inventory System

Post uses a Sums word list and Excel spreadsheet to track INL-funded project resources. The list and spreadsheet are maintained jointly by the EUM Program Coordinator and the management sections.

Recipient Agencies

The Chilean Investigative Police (PDI)
Aduanas (Chilean Customs)
Carabineros (Chilean Uniformed Police)
INTERPOL
DIRECTEMAR (Coast Guard)

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Post is able to take advantage of official travel for spot-checking on an ad hoc basis. However, scheduled and unscheduled on-site inspections are infrequent given the small size of the program. Experience has shown the Chileans to be reliable in their reporting. Post completed one on-site inspection. There are 157 items subject to inspections. The percentage of items inspected was 78%.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Post supplements personal inspections with information obtained from Chilean contacts about the use and status of the equipment.

Status-Commodities

Communications Equipment

The Police have one radio scanner, one base station (fair condition), four walkie-talkies, and two hand-held high radios (fair condition). Customs has one base station in fair condition.

The Carabineros has four telephone systems in five locations. Three are in good condition; one is in fair condition. The Carabineros also has seven telephone message systems in five locations. They are in fair to good condition.

Computers

The Carabineros has 32 computers and one server in 17 locations. All are in good condition. Carabineros has three laptops and two printers in Santiago in good condition.

In March 2007, Interpol received 9 Intel P4 computers, 9 Acer LCD monitors, 2 printers, 1 Netgear Prosafe Switch, and 1 Netgear Smart Switch. These computers are being used for the purpose intended and are in good working condition. They constitute 50% of Interpol Santiago’s IT infrastructure.

In 2006, INL donated the following to the PICH-Santiago Narcotics Unit: one Systemax Mission small office server; 20 Systemax Intel P4 computer hard drives (with warranties and data security protection); 21 Magavision MV177V 17” monitors; 15 Microsoft Windows server user license agreements; six Microsoft 3PK OEM Office basic packages; two Microsoft 1PK OEM Office basic packages; two Hewlett Packard HP Laserjet 1320 network printers; two Hewlett Packard HP color Laserjet 3600n printers; one Netgear FS108P Prosafe Switch; and one Netgear GS724T 513MB USB flash drive.

The equipment is in excellent working condition. It was installed in the PICH-Santiago Narcotics Office in December 2006. PICH-Narcotics uses this equipment daily and has expressed gratitude for the resulting increased productivity of their police unit.

In 2007, the following items were purchased for the Task Force Africa: 20 workstations, one Systemax Small Office server, 20 Intel PC’s, 21 monitors, two HP Laser Jet Network printers, and two HP color Laser Jet printers. The equipment was delivered to PICH-Africa in June and December respectively and is operational. The equipment was purchased to equip the PICH’s Anti-Narcotics Brigade in Africa, Chile. This brigade houses primarily PICH-Africa, but also includes representatives from other Chilean Government agencies such as Customs and Coast Guard and a task force.

A workstation and chair were purchased for the PICH Transnational Crime Unit in December 2007. Computers are also being purchased and will be delivered early 2008.

Miscellaneous Equipment

In 2007, the following equipment was purchased for the Task Force Africa: 2 conference tables, 45 chairs, 9 desks/modular units, 14 cabinets, 5 benches/sofas, 2 waste baskets, 1 coffee table, 1 TV rack, 1 data show equipment and screen and tripod.

The following equipment was purchased for the Carabineros in 2007: two 42” plasma televisions, 1 computer with a 17” monitor, 2 television supports, 4 desktop computers, 1 server, and one 17” monitor for the server. The Carabineros, with the help of LEGATT, intends to set up a crisis operational command center with the equipment.

Program Impact

Computer Equipment

The computer equipment permits the recipient agencies to gather, organize, sort, and share information. The equipment allows the recipient agencies to operate efficiently and increase their productivity. The equipment enhances their knowledge and promotes information sharing.

Office Equipment

The office equipment permits the recipient agencies to work in a professional environment, hold meetings, and properly store their materials. The office equipment provides the basic needs for the recipient agencies to function and is essential to their success.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Stolen/Damaged Items

The following items were stolen and /or damaged during transit and are in unusable condition: one computer with a 17´monitor; four desktop computers, one server, one 17” monitor for the server. Post is working to resolve the situation and replace the equipment.



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