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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

2008 End-Use Monitoring Report: South and Central Asia


Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 1, 2009

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ASTANA

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Anthony T. Beaver, 77172 702296; beaverat@state.gov

Inventory System

Post does not have an automated inventory system. Each program manager maintains inventory lists by program. The list is used to record and track distribution of all resources provided to the host government.

Staff Member Responsibilties

Each of the three INL Program Managers inspects provided equipment and renovated premises during program-related travel.

Counterpart Agencies

Border Guard Service of the Committee for National Security (BGS)
The Military Institute of the Committee for National Security (KNBMI)
The Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD),
The Study Center for Combating Illegal Migration
Trafficking in Persons of the Karaganda Law Institute of the Ministry of
Internal Affairs (Anti-TIP Center),
The Counternarcotics Scientific Analytical Training Against Drug Trafficking
of the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD CN Center),
The Statistics Committee of the Procurator General’s Office (PCO Statistics
Committee),
The National Laboratory of Forensics Control of the Ministry of Justice (MOJ
Forensics Lab),
The Agency on Combating Economic and Corruption Crimes (Financial
Police), the Financial Police Academy (FPA) and Customs Control Committee
of the Ministry of Finance (CCC).

Receipt

Posts uses letters of transfers as well as transfer and acceptance acts to document the provisions of the items to counterpart agencies.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Over the course of the year, post conducted End Use Monitoring of the equipment delivered in prior years in conjunction with separate programs, including meetings, training events, site visits and follow up trips. On-site inspections, provided equipment, and other requested information is detailed below by program.

The INL Program Manager for the border security and counternarcotics programs conducted eleven (11) unscheduled and five (5) on-site inspections:

01/15/2008 - KNB Military Institute
07/10/2008 - Saryagash Border Control Training Center
08/04/2008 - KNB Military Institute in Almaty
08/05/2008 - KNB Military Institute in Almaty
08/06/2008 - KNB Military Institute in Almaty
08/05/2008 - CCC Canine Center In Almaty
08/11/2008 - Merke Railroad Border Checkpoint
08/12/2008 - Merke Railroad Border Checkpoint
01/14/2009 - Training Center in Uralsk
01/14/2009 - Training Center in Uralsk
01/14/2009 - Training Center in Uralsk
06/20/2008 - Almaty Forensic Lab
08/04/2008 - Almaty Forensic Lab
05/26/2008 - Almaty Forensic Lab
10/17/2008 - Almaty Forensic Lab
09/24/2008 - Financial Police Academy

The number of donated items subject to inspection was 1,217. Forty-Eight (48) percent of the items were personally inspected.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

The INL Program manager was unable to perform on-site inspections of the equipment provided within the crime statistics program in 2008. Due to the vast size of the country and the cost of travel, it was not feasible to visit each office to which computers were transferred. However, post discussed the status of INL-funded resources with the Procurator General’s Office in Astana and received confirmation that all equipment was received and operational. The INL Program Manager collected a title transfer document from each confirming the receipt of equipment. Using secondary methods, 100% of the transferred property was inspected.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

In conjunction with the program to strengthen the capacity of the MVD CN Training Center in Almaty, post provided 17 computers, one notebook computer, one projector, one HP laser jet, and interpretation and conference equipment on October 16, 2008. The computer lab is being used for training in counter-narcotics techniques through the use of the software developed by the center and software developed by the Turkish Academy on Combating Drugs and Organized Crime (TADOC), provided and installed by UNDOC.

Upon completion of the renovation of the Saryagash Border Guard Training Classroom in October 2006, office equipment and furniture was delivered to the training class. The INL Program Manager monitored the classroom during the delivery of additional equipment on July 10, 2008. Fifteen computers provided for the classroom are operational and used for training of employees.

Twelve computers provided to the Border Guard Field Training Centre are used for practical exercises during Border Management Training, including imposter identification training and fraudulent document detection exercises.

Twenty-five desktop computers were donated to the Financial Police Academy in Astana in 2005. All computers are being used in computer-based training for examinations. All equipment is in good condition.

In 2004, post purchased 62 computers, 62 printers, two color printers, and four notebook computers for the Statistics Division of the Procurator General’s Office. In September 2005, 50 computers, 50 printers, and 50 USPs were provided to nine offices. In August 2007, 146 computers were provided to PGO office in remote villages and towns.

As part of the crime statistics program, post provided a total of 258 computers, 112 printers, 112 UPS, 2 color printers, 4 notebook computers, and one scanner to the Office of the Criminal Statistics Division of the Procurator General’s Office (PGO) throughout the country.

Vehicles

Post verified that a 4WD minivan provided to the Border Guard Service of the Committee for National Security (BGS) on the Kazakhstani-Uzbec border in October 2008 was in operation. The minivan was observed being used to transport inspectors to a training event on July 10. The other three minivans are used at the Kazygurt, Tolebi and B Konysbayev border checkpoints.

Two additional 4WD UAZ minivans delivered to the Kazakhstani-Turkmen border in March 2007 are used to respond to border incidents, to transport staff during shift changes, and to transport potable water to checkpoints. The minivans are located in the desert area at the Temirbaba and Tazhen checkpoints.

Border Guard Service  
Minivan  6  


Laboratory Equipment

Post purchased an infrared spectrometer, gas chromatograph, liquid chromatograph, scales, and a digital camera. All of the equipment is in place and being effectively used by the staff. The gas chromotogaph delivered in 1998 was repaired and is back in service.

In October 2008, INL transferred a digital language laboratory to the KNB Military Institute. The lab includes an instructor’s terminal, 15 terminals for students, an instructor’s computer, one multimedia centralized control system. The instructors of foreign languages received training on use of lab.

In September 2007, INL transferred a digitial laboratory to the Financial Police Academy. The lab was tested at the FPA at the end of September 2008 and is being fully used by students in the English language program.

Canines

In September 2005, INL and the Canine Enforcement Program of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) co-sponsored an exchange of puppies between the U.S. Canine Training Center and the Kazakhstani Customs Canine Center with the goal of more effectively interdicting the flow of narcotics. Post monitored the dogs at a seminar at the Canine Center.

In April 2008, post provided a total of three dogs to the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD), the Border Guard Service of the Committee for National Security (BGS), and the KNB Military Institute. The dogs were used in instructor training in Bad Kreuzen, Austria and were transported to Kazakhstan. Post inspected the dogs in August. They are at their agencies and their care meets the standards of the Austrian Ministry of Interior’s Canine Centre. The dogs are used in training sessions and will be used for breeding.

Miscellaneous Equipment

On July 17, 2008, post transferred a SABRE-4000 hand-held drug detector with extra batteries and air purification cartridges to Merks on the Kazakhstani-Kygyz border. On August 11, a DEA expert conducted training seminars on the use of the equipment and found that the equipment was defective. Post will send it back to the company for repairs.

Status-Services

Construction Projects

Within the enhancing Immigration and Border Control on the land Border of Kazakhstan project implemented by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), INL funded the renovation and provision of equipment for a training center in the Uralsk Border Control Division in 2008. IOM hired a local construction company to do all necessary renovation work, which included installation of doorways and replacement of flooring. The INL office and Program Manager attended the opening of the center on November 3. The center is complete and fully equipped for training events

IOM renovated the kitchen and veterinary premises of the Canine Center of the KNB Military Institute. The INL program manager inspected the premises on January 12, 2009, and found the renovations complete and up to standards. Post plans to purchase veterinary equipment for the Canine Center.

Program Impact

Vehicles

The use of the vehicles enables the BGS to get potable water to the field and for border patrols to transport offices during shift changes to

Canine Centers

The recipients of technical assistance are happy with the quality of dogs they received and the knowledge acquired at the Austrian Canine Center in 2008. Upon his return, an instructor from the KNB Military Institute trained one cadet and two instructors. The Military Institute is changing its canine curriculum. In the previous curriculum, searching for drugs made up only 5% of the curriculum and was covered in a theoretical manner. Seventy percent of the new curriculum will be devoted to searching for drugs and will include practical exercises.

Laboratory Equipment

The Forensics Lab in Almaty conducted 12 training sessions in the INL-furnished computer classroom. The infrared spectrometer produced 680 chromatograms since 2005. The gas chromatograph was used for 500 analyses over the nine months since it was repaired. Methods for the use of the liquid chromatograph are being developed, but it has been used to produce 50 chromatograms.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Repair and Maintenance

The defective SABRE 34000 hand-held drug detector has not been returned to Germany for repair. Because of a radioactive element to the equipment, special handling is required and post is unable to use the diplomatic pouch or hand carry the equipment during the travel through Germany. Post is contracting a specialized shipping company to return the equipment for repair.

ASHGABAT

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Inger Tanghorn 993-312-350045 ext. 2257: tangbornia@state.gov

Inventory System

Post does not use a spreadsheet to track and record INL-funded resources, because post has donated very little in the way of non-expendable equipment. Post files copies of the end user certificates and uses those to track resources when post conducts its inspections/inventories.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Post’s INL Assistant is responsible for communicating with end-users on the equipment’s condition, transmitting information to donors, arranging service maintenance and repairs, conducting on-site inventories and inspections, and performing audits.

The new INL Assistant was hired in August 2008 to replace the previous INL Assistant, who resigned in June 2008. Post has no dedicated INL Officer.

Counterpart Agencies

State Forensic Service (SFS)
Criminal Research Center (CRC)

The only recipient of the INL donated equipment thus far is the State Forensic Service (SFS) of the Ministry of Justice. That office was dismantled in June 2006, and the functions were transferred to the Criminal Research Center (CRC) of the Ministry of Internal Affairs. The USG donated equipment was transferred to CRC at that time.

Receipt

The recipient signs the End User Certificate for the received items, which certifies that the recipient will not use the items for other than their intended purpose; resell, pass or otherwise dispose of any of the articles/data to a different agency inside or outside the country or to any other person.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

One on-site inspection was performed on February 25, 2008 at the CRC facility. Two gas chromatographs and a mass spectrometer, as well as two light vehicles, were inspected. All donated items were personally inspected and accounted for.

No unscheduled on-site inspections were performed because access to the facility required permission from the Ministry of Internal Affairs.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

The INL Assistant conversed with host government officials on the status on INL-funded resources.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

During 2004-2006, INL provided computer equipment, including desktop computers, printers, digital cameras, video recorders, scanners, a copy machine, fax machine, laptop computer, and a projector to the Criminal Research Center (CRC) of the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the State Forensic Service (SFS) of the Ministry of Justice. In 2006, the latter agency was dismantled and its functions and INL equipment were transferred to CRC. All equipment is in good working condition and used for the purpose intended.

Vehicles

In January 2005, the State Forensic Service (SFS) of the Ministry of Justice received two-Russian-made, light VAZ 21102 model vehicles. In June 2006, SFS was dismantled and its functions were transferred to the Criminal Research Center (CRC) of the Ministry of Internal Affairs. SFS transferred these two vehicles to the CRC. The vehicles are used for daily office needs and operations as well as for travel to crime scenes. All vehicles were accounted for and in operating condition.

Criminal Research Center  
VAZ 211002 LADA   2  


Laboratory Equipment

The Ministry of Internal Affairs CRC laboratory is equipped with Agilent Technologies gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer systems, gas chromatograph, an infrared spectrophotometer system, hydrogen generators, a de-ioned water system, drug air cleaner, air compressor, eye wash stations, module and battery packs for laboratory equipment, drug and precursors kits, electronic scales, and compound and stereo microscopes. This equipment, donated during 2004-2007, is in excellent condition, except for the gas chromatographer, which is functional, but requires an AC power board replacement. This lab equipment will support the growing capacity of Turkemistan law enforcement agencies to carry out counternarcotics activities and help resolve criminal investigations through scientific and forensic analysis of evidence.

Miscellaneous Equipment

In September 2008, INL organized a two-week Port Physical Security/Port vulnerability course for 22 law enforcement officers from the Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Ministry of National Security, Customs Service, State Counter-Narcotics Service and Maritime Administration. At the completion of the course, basic containers in specter equipment and tools (search mirrors, flashlights, and straps) were given to participants. The equipment and tools will help Customs and police officers conduct safe and thorough container inspections.

Status-Services

Demand Reduction Services

INL funded Drug Demand Reduction Program (DDRP) was launched on September 2008, implemented by the Red Crescent Society of Turkmenistan. The DDRP has opened its branches in five provinces of Turkmenistan with headquarters in Ashgabat. For the past five months, they have conducted public outreach campaigns, published anti-drug brochures and leaflets, conducted seminars and recruited volunteers for peer-to-peer trainings.

Other Professional Services

In October 2008, twenty law enforcement officials graduated from the second round of a ten-month English Language Training Program funded by INL. The third round started in December with 32 law enforcement officers from eight different law enforcement agencies.

Program Impact

Vehicles

The two light VAZ LADA vehicles are used by the CRC for daily office needs and operations as well as travel to crime scene.

Computer Equipment

The equipment is used for office’s daily needs and operations as well as for training sessions. DOJ/ICITAP experts also used this equipment during the training they conducted here for CRC personnel in June 2008.

Laboratory Equipment

One article was analyzed following the September 2008 shootings in the “Hitrovka” suburb of Ashgabat, an incident that received international press coverage.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

Maintenance of the gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer continues to be a problem because the CRC lacks resources and technicians with skills needed to conduct repairs. The nearest Agilent Regional Service Center is located Tashkent. which is causing problems in arranging immediate service calls. The CRC lacks basic chemical solvents like methanol, chloroform and pump oil, which are not available at the local markets. The gas chromatographer, which should ideally be left on at all times is in fact switched on only when needed, because the CRC’s limited supply of helium gas needed to operate the chromatographer.

DOJ/ICITAP has contracted Agilent to replace the broken AC power board on the gas chromatographer and provide basic technical training to the lab personnel. This is scheduled for April 2009. Although ICITAP has several times provided chemical solvents, its regular provision is not envisaged by the program. ICITAP experts plan to connect the gas chromatographer to a hydrogen generator during their next regional visit on May, which will eliminate the need for helium gas.

BEIRUT

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Virginia Sher Ramadan, +961-04/542600 ext. 4368, ramadanvs@state.gov

Inventory System

Post records the distribution of donated equipment with an Excel Spreadsheet.

Staff Member Responsibilities

The INL Coordinator, Aline Chamichian, maintains equipment database and prepares the DSP 83s for signing by the INL Director and Security Agency recipient. The U.S. INL Management Officer in Lebanon, Brent Pfundheller, inspects and monitors the donated equipment for the ISF and the INL Lebanon Police Program.

Counterpart Agencies

The Internal Security Forces (ISF) and the Lebanese Directorate of General Security (DGS) are the recipients of INL-donated resources.

Receipt

A letter of receipt is in place between the host government agencies and the USG; donated equipment is documented with a DSP-83 and an End Use Agreement, signed by an agent from the receiving agency and the INL Director.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

INL Beirut personally inspected 98% of vehicles, 80 % of police gear, and 100% of the remainder of the donated items subject to inspection. INL Beirutaku conducted 11 on-site inspections as follows:

12/11/2008 - ISF Helou Station
12/12/2008 - ISF Helou Station
12/24/2008 - ISF Helou Station
12/11/2008 - ISF Dbaye Station
12/12/2008 - ISF Dbaye Station
12/22/2008 - ISF Dbaye Station
12/15/2008 - ISF Saida HQ
12/16/2008 - ISF Saida HQ
12/17/2008 - ISF Tripoli HQ
12/18/2008 - ISF Tripoli HQ
12/22/2008 - ISF Warehouses: Verdun/Achraqfish
12/22/2008 - ISF ISF Mobile Forces HQ
12/23/2008 - ISF Judicial Police HQ
12/23/2008 - ISF Security of Embassy HQ
12/29/2008 - Achrafish
12/30/2008 - Achrafish
12/30/2008 - Jounich
12/30/2008 - ISF Byblos
01/05/2009 - ISF Baabda Main
01/05/2009 - ISF Baabda Emergency
01/08/2009 - Zahle HQ
01/09/2009 - Zahle HQ
01/13/2009 - Mt. Lebanon HQ
01/14/2009 - Mt. Labanon HQ
01/15/2009 - Mt. Lebanon HQ 

Status-Commodities

Vehicles

Three hundred (300) Dodge Chargers, 60 Ford Exployers, and 14 APC were donated to the Internal Security Forces (ISF). The Chargers are used throughout Lebanon; the Explorers are used in Beirut for all of ISF Police functions, traffic patrol, etc.; the APC’s are used with the ISF Mobile Forces for high risk movement of police personnel. A small percentage of the vehicles were damaged due to vehicle collisions. The ISF has a good maintenance program for their vehicles and has learned the value of following the manufacturer’s recommendations. All of the vehicles are in excellent condition.


Internal Security Forces  
Dodge Charger  300 
Ford Exployer  60 
Refurbished APC’s  14  


Computer Equipment

Two hundred ten (210) pieces of software were donated to the Director of General Security (DGS) for its analysis investigations. Twenty (20) computers and monitors were donated to the DGS for staff databases and analytical investigations for the security of Lebanon,

Communications Equipment

Thirty-four (34) Vertex standard encrypted portable radios were donated to the ISF. They are used by the ISF Mobile Forces in Beirut for high risk police response.

Miscellaneous Equipment

One Kohler automatic generator is located at the Warwar Training Academy. It is used to provide backup electricity for the classrooms. Eleven pieces of fitness equipment were donated to the ISF. It is used by the ISF Mobile Forces in Beirut to maintain their personal physical fitness. 

Status-Services

Construction Services

The following construction projects completed in 2008 were inspected:

Warwar electrical renovation
Firing range renovation
Warwar classroom renovation
Warwar pre-fab classrooms

Program Impact

Unmonitored Resources

There were 14 Dodge vehicles that were not inspected. Seven of the vehicles were assigned to the security detail of the Prime Minister, President, or Speaker of Parliament and were not available for inspection. The others were either called to an assignment when they were scheduled to be inspected or were disabled in the outlying regions of Lebanon.

Vehicles

The vehicles, branded with the ISF emblem, are equipped with the police package of lights and sirens. They allow the ISF to perform its missions in a more reliable and professional manner, reaching a broader spectrum of the populace throughout the country.

Communications Equipment

The radios allow the ISF Forces to more efficiently conduct tactical operations safely and securely.

Construction Projects

These projects allow for an expanded, more efficient and more effective teaching environment for the ISF cadets and the American instructors.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

ISF had some initial difficulty in establishing a repair and maintenance plan for the Ford Explorers. However, INL Beirut and its police team worked with the local Ford dealership and Ford Motor representatives and, with their assistance, the ISF has overcome these difficulties. However, ISF’s mechanical personnel do not have the appropriate training to maintain American vehicles once they are no longer under new car warranty. They also lack the specific equipment and/or parts for this maintenance and the ability to monitor and track their total fleet, or document vehicle history, except manually which proves cumbersome and inefficient.

INL Beirut plans to establish a training program for ISF mechanics and provide parts and accessories needed to repair the vehicles and track their inventory and repair history.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

The majority of Level II and Level III ballistic vests and pepper spray have not been issued to ISF personnel. Most of the equipment is still in ISF main warehouses in Beirut. Many commanders were not issuing pepper spray because the police personnel under their command had no training on the proper use of the spray.

INL has met with ISF Administrative staff to ensure that these resources are properly distributed and to arrange U.S. training in the use of pepper spray.

DUSHANBE

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

John McCann, INL Projects “engineer, x992 907 521025, mccannjx@state.gov

Khurshed Musoev, x992 907 000700, musoevk@state.gov

Inventory System

INL Dushanbe uses an Excel spreadsheet to maintain inventory. Post hopes to have a server-based inventory downloaded to post’s stand-alone computer in 2009. Pending action from post’s IRM office, INL Dushanbe will download and use the program material inventory software from NAS Lima which will provide electronic record keeping capability.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Three local INL Program Managers, one DOJ/RLA Program Manager, and one INL Project Manager are responsible for monitoring the equipment donated to the projects. Program managers maintain an internal record of donated goods and periodically request detailed inventories from the receiving agencies. Regular monitoring of INL-supported projects provides an on-going opportunity for specific End Use Monitoring, program evaluation, and identification of additional ways to increase program effectiveness.

Counterpart Agencies

Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD), including Counternarcotics Department
(CN Department),
Trafficking-in-Persons Unit (TIP Unit)
Forensic Laboratory,
Analytical Center, and Police Academy
Drug Control Agency under the President of the Republic of Tajikistan (DCA),
including SCNS headquarters,
SCNS Training Academy
SCNS Analytical Center
BG Headquarters
BG Training Academy
BG Zastqvas (Border outposts)
BG Ports of Entry, and Airport Security Department
State Committee for National Security (SCNS) and Main Department of Border
Guards Forces (BG) including SCNS headquarters
SCNS Training Academy,
SCNS Analytical Center,
BG Headquarters,
BG Training Academy,
BG Zastavas (Border Outposts)
BG Ports of Entry
Airport Security Department
Ministry of Justice, including the Judicial Training Center

Receipt

INL Dushanbe procedures for equipment transfers require the GOTI end-user agency to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for all INL-provided equipment. The MOU specifies the item donated, the quantity, description, intended use, and its location.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

INL Dushanbe inspected 100% of over 400 items subject to inspection. They performed on-site inspections as follow;

09/15/2008 - Khudjand, Pendjikent, Shurabad, GBAO
10/15/2008 - Khudjand, Pendjikent, Shurabad, GBAO
11/15/2008 - Khudjand, Pendjikent, Shurabad, GBAO

The percentage of personally inspected donated items was 100 percent.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Post used comparison of records as a secondary method of assessing resource status. Post had discussions with the head of International Department of Border Guards, the head of Mobile Teams of Drug Control Agency and the head of the Logistics Department of the Ministry of Interior. Ten (10) percent of donated items were monitored using secondary methods.

Status-Commodities

Since 2005, post has provided equipment to host government institutions located throughout Tajikistan. These institutions include the Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Drug Control Agency, and the State Committee for National Security with separate provisions to the Border Guards which are a sub-unit of the Committee for National Security.

Gym Equipment

INL provided the following gym equipment to the Drug Control Agency so that Mobile Teams could maintain physical conditioning: plates 45 lb, Hex dumbbells with Ergo grip 101 lb; Star track bicycle, Landice running track, Kettler Delta 300 Power Station, U.S. Strength Olympic 4 in 1 Bench, U.S. Strength Olympic incline Bench, U.S. Strength Adjustable Decline, U.S. Strength Arm curl Bench, U.S Strength 45-dgree hyperextension, chin Dip Vertical Knee Raise. The checks show that the equipment is being property maintained.

Uniforms

The INL procured 10,000 uniforms for Border Guard troops serving on the Tajik-Afghan border, including one thousand sets designed specifically for the severe winter conditions of the GBAO area. The checks showed that the equipment is being property used and maintained.

Miscellaneous Equipment

INL provided the counternarcotics Department two video cameras, three photo cameras, three CT-30 kits, three NVB8 Gen IIIA Night Shadow binoculars, three Steiner binoculars, ten Galls 16MB digital voice recorders w/wireless microphones, two “Command Bar” sound amplifiers, three Olympus digital voice recorders WS-310M with earplugs SME-TP3CX, three Parabolic dishes “Detect Ear”, two UNIDEN “Bearcat” scanners BC350C, five UNIDEN trunk tracker radio scanners, three Garmin 72 GPS units, three inspection mirrors, one Panasonic KX-FC233RU fax machine, one Samsung air-conditioner, three HP LaserJet printers, one Canon LV 5220 projector, one projector screen, five WP wide angle 10X50 binoculars, ten Garrett hand-held super scanners, fifteen RBR combat MKII ballistic helmets, one T600 safe, and four T700 safes. The checks showed that the equipment is being property used and maintained.

INL provided the Drug Control Agency three video cameras, four photo cameras, three CT-30 kits, fifteen WP wide angle 10x50 binoculars, ten Garrett handheld super scanners, five D221 generation II binoculars, three “Detect Ear” snap-together parabolic dishes, nine RBR combat MKII ballistic helmets, five Gall’s 16 MB Digital voice recorders with wireless microphones, four “Command Ear” sound amplifiers, two Steiner 15X80 Military binoculars, five inspection mirrors, five T700 safes, seven NVB-8 Gen III 64LP/MN 5d Night Vision binoculars, four portable held GPS’, eleven Motorola professional two-way UHF radios, three Bearcat 350A scanners, one refrigerator, and one air-conditioner. The checks showed that the equipment is being properly used and maintained.

INL provided to the Border Guard headquarters fifteen Garrett hand-held super scanners, sixty RBR combat MKII ballistic helmets, and five safes. The checks showed that the equipment is being property used and maintained.

INL provided one hundred and sixty pieces of furniture for the Khirmanjo border outpost. Until the reconstruction works are completed, all the furniture is stored at the sealed Department of the Border Guards warehouse.

INL provided the following equipment to “Bog” border outpost; one Steiner binocular, one NVD 221 Generation 2 binocular, and one night shadow Generation 3 binocular.

INL provided the following equipment to Shurabad Otryad number 8: one Steiner binocular, one NVD 221 Generation 2 binocular, and one night shadow Generation 3 binocular.

INL provided the following equipment to “Sarigor” border outpost: one Steiner binocular, one NVD 221 Generation 2 binocular, and one Night Shadow Generation 3 binocular.

INL provided the following furniture and equipment to the Nizhnily Pyandj Port of Entry (Border Guards and Customs); 13 armchairs, 11 folding couches, 48 desks, 73 tables for meals, ten file cabinets, two coffee tables, eight bookcases, 18 wardrobes, 220 chairs with folding pads, 48 office chairs, three ironing boards, three irons, 11 iron safes, ten radiators, 40 iron beds, 35 foot lockers, 40 mattresses, 36 stools, four examination desks, 30 soft chairs. The checks showed that the equipment is being properly used and maintained.

INL provided the following equipment to the State Committee on National Security headquarters: one Night Shadow NVB8 Gen, 3 Night Vision goggles, three Olympus digital voice recorder WS-310M with earplugs SME-TP3CX, two Garmin GPS 72, one UNIDEN scanner bearcat BC350C, one D221 BN-079 Generation 2 binocular, two inspection mirrors, two “Detect Ear” AP330 parabolic dishes, two Steiner binoculars item number 415, ten Galls 16MB digital voice recorder w/wireless microphones AP424, eight “Command Ear”sound amplifiers, ten UNIDEN trunk tracker radio scanners. The equipment is being properly used and maintained.

INL provided an electrical transformer to insure continuous electricity support for the equipment provided. The equipment is being property used and maintained.

INL provided the Trafficking-in-Persons Unit (TIP) with ten WP wide angle 10x50 binoculars, ten Garret hand-held super scanners, and ten combat ballistic helmets, all of which were accounted for and are in good working condition.

INL provided the Forensic Lab with the following equipment: Millipore water purifier, “Atlas Copco” air compressor, Nexus 670 Nicolet FTIR Spectrometer, Parker Model 75045-12 FTIR Purge Gas Generator, HP 4050 LaserJet printer, Epson Stylus color 100 printer APC Power UPS, Parker Balston FIO Gas generator, Parker Balston Nitrogen Generator, Agilent 6890 Series GC system, Economy Starter kit, 5000 VA voltage regulator, 7000 VA voltage regulator, 110x220 VA voltage two Canon LBP sensus printers. The equipment is being properly used and maintained.

INL provided the fingerprint Lab with the following equipment: five HP Scan Jet 4370 scanners, one HP Laser jet 1320 printer, and nine WV-1000 voltage regulators. The checks shows that the equipment is being properly used and maintained.

Vehicles

TIP Organized Crime Department 
Toyota Prada  
Gazelle   
VAZ  10 
Chevrolet Niva   2  


Counternarcotics Department 
Gazel Gaz  
Toyota Camry Grande SPL   
WAZ “Niva”  
WAZ sedan   6  


Status-Services

Construction Projects

The following construction projects completed in 2008 were inspected:

MVD Analytical Center, Dushanbe
CN Department Training room
MVD Forensic Lab, including training room
Drug Control Agency Mobile Teams facility
Drug Control Agency Mobile Teams Gym, including the room
State Committee on National Security Training Academy fifth floor
MVD Police Academy third floor including the roof

The following constructions were started in 2008:

MVD Police Academy first and second floor renovation (10%)
MVD Police Academy window replacement (5 %)

Demand Reduction Services

INL Dushanbe funded and organized the Drug Demand Reduction Program through sport. This program aims to stopping drug addiction at its source by bringing drug demand reduction information to young people in their school. This program complemented other U.S. counternarcotics initiatives aimed at improvements in traditional narcotics interdiction and law enforcement institution-building. This project targets high school students in the country to promote a healthy and drug-free lifestyle through peer-to-peer interaction. Karate champions speak at select schools on the negative aspects of drug use and serve as positive role-models for leading a drug-free lifestyle. INL donated a tatami mat to Karate Federation for drug free life style as part of drug demand reduction program.

Program Impact

The Government of Tajikistan uses all resources provided in an effective manner. Regular arrests of drug traffickers and the seizure of kilos of drugs over several months are excellent examples of how the GOTI law enforcement agencies are making progress in their fight against drug trafficking and related crime. Overall, law enforcement and security ministries contributing to management of border smuggling and organized crime have demonstrated greater capacity and willingness to be proactive in comparison to previous year.

Laboratory Equipment

The Equipment donated to the MVD Forensic Lab helped MVD to better investigate and analyze evidence of drugs and other crimes providing a better legal basis for prosecution of alleged criminal.

Vehicles

Vehicles were used in drug related operations, including resupply of outposts, which provides mobile capability to respond to narco-trafficker incursions from Afghanistan.

Night Vision Goggles

Night Vision Goggles helped all law enforcement agencies, especially those on the Tajik-Afghan border, to control the border and to prevent drug traffickers from going through the border.

Computers

Computers helped officers develop computer skills for communication and research, to find professional information, and to use intelligence software.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Unmonitored Resources

Some of the equipment donated is distributed among Zastavas/border posts along the Tajik Afghan border. In the winter, it is difficult to travel to some of the border posts due to inclement weather conditions (temperatures reach minus 40 or more and snow falls of a meter are not uncommon). During the previous EUM period, there were some items that INL could not inspect. During the 2008 reporting period, INL reached all previously unmonitored equipment and included it in the current EUM report.

ISLAMABAD

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Muhammad Faisal, LES EUM Coordinator. Tel: 0092-51-2278675, ext. 234; faisalma@state.gov

Inventory System

The NAS uses an inventory database that was created by the information technology section of Embassy Islamabad for use with Microsoft Access. This system allows NAS to record and track the distribution of all resources provided to host government agencies and to maintain and retrieve End Use Monitoring information.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Ellen Hays, Management Officer, is responsible for overseeing the overall End Use Monitoring (EUM) process and the submission of the EUM report. Muhammed Faisal, LES Coordinator, heads EUM activities and coordination of assistance funded by NAS’ programs, and for verifying the accuracy of the EUM data. Asif Rahat, LES Inventory Office, is responsible for recording and tracking the distribution of all commodities provided to Pakistan’s governmental agencies, physical inspection of commodities, updating lists after EUM inspections, preparing, receiving and disposal reports and providing inventory lists to EUM team. Nasir Iqbal, LES Communications Expert, has primary responsibility for communications equipment. Muhammed Naqi, LES Communications Technician, assists and reports to the Communications Expert. Raza Ishaq, LES Administrative Assistant, NAS Peshawar, is responsible for EUM activities for the North West Frontier Province (NWFP) and the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA); the NAS Peshwar agricultural staff and engineers, who work under the NAS Senior Development Adviser (SDA), monitor agricultural and construction projects such as roads and outposts in the NWFP and FATA.

Other U.S. Agency Assistance

NAS/ICITAP tracks integration of the USG materials and modern law enforcement training techniques into the curriculum of the National Police Academy (NPA) and the four provincial police colleges. A database was developed to track attendance and assignments of participants of ICITAP courses.

Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) quality control measures are in effect to ensure the 10-print cards will be acceptable when AFIS goes online. Three levels of review are in place and the quality acceptance rate is over 98 percent, with a current hard-copy database of over 300,000 10-print cards.

ICITAP is working to help develop baseline quantitative and qualitative measures that can be used to help determine the effectiveness of the investigative training programs.

Counterpart Agencies & Non-Governmental Organizations

Anti Narcotics Force (ANF)
Pakistan Coast Guard (PCG)
Customs Preventive Collectorate (PC) and Customs Intelligence (CI)
DOST Welfare Foundation (DOST)
Excise Department Base
Federal Investigation Agency (FIA)
Frontier Crops Baluchistan (FC-B)
Frontier Corps North West Frontier Province (FC-NWFP)
Helipad (Emergency Relied cell, 6th squadron)
Home Department NWFP and Governors FATA Secretariat (including Narcotics
Control Cells (NCC))
Intelligence Bureau (IB)
Maritime Security Agency (MSA)
Ministry of Interior (MOI)
Ministry of Narcotics Control (MNC)
National Police Academy (NPA)
New Horizon Care Center (NHCC)
NWFP Frontier Police

Receipt

All of the commodities are provided to agencies after a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is signed between NAS and the End User Agency. The MOU includes serial numbers and descriptions of commodities, signed by the appropriate GOP official.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

Eighty-nine (89) scheduled inspections were performed at 101 counterpart sites in 57 cities. Of a total of 9,023 items subject to inspection, 72% of the items were personally inspected.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

The NAS inventory officer compared quarterly reports received from agencies with NAS records. This is helpful where on-site inspections are not feasible, due to the remoteness of the site or security concerns.

Two of Frontier Crops Baluchistan’s units, Miawand rifles and Bombor rifles, were not visited due to security concerns. A list of NAS-funded commodities provided to these units were obtained from the Frontier Crops Baluchistan Headquarters. These commodities include vehicles, communications equipment, surveillance equipment and field gear. These lists were compared to the NAS records. The inventory has been compared and updated.

Frontier Corps NWFP has been exclusively engaged in operations against militants and insurgents in the NWFP and particularly FATA which borders Afghanistan. Other than its headquarters in Peshwar, only one FC-NWFP unit was visited due to the ongoing operations against militants and insurgents in FATA and in part of NWFP. The Frontier Corps-NWFP regularly submits quarterly reports along with computerized lists of NAS commodities. These lists are being compared with NAS records and updated every three months.

NAS performs End Use Monitoring in the course of day-to-day program management and contact with GOP counterparts. The NAS Director, Deputy Director, and Management Officer routinely reinforce EUM objectives with counterparts in recipient agencies. As needed, NAS management raises issues of commodity abuse or fraud with appropriate officials; recommends areas of improvement; and follows up to ensure timely compliance. GOP agencies are generally cooperative and responsive to requirements. Recipients of NAS assistance are well aware that the NAS will not tolerate malfeasance. Again this is helpful when on-site inspections are neither feasible nor safe.

Status-Commodities

Aircraft

Pakistan Ministry of Interior Aviation Program  
UH-1H Huey II  
C-208 Caravan  3  


Weapons

Pakistan Ministry of Interior  
GAU-17  
M60D  8  

Vessels


Pakistan Custom s  
Boston Whaler 27 foot Challenger  1  

Vehicles


Aviation Program 
Single cab pickup  
Double cab pickup  5  
Toyota Landcruiser  
Toyota Corolla  
Mercedes  
Fuel Bowzer   
Motorcycles  33 
Van Hiace  1  

ANF 
Single cab pickup  74 
Double cab pickup Toyota  111 
Double Cab pickup Isuzu  12 
Single cab Nissan patrol  30 
Troop carrier truck 4x2  11 
Landcruiser  
Minibus Toyota Coaster  
Mototcycles  
Water Bowzer 4x2   
Motorcycles  232  

Frontier Corps Balochistan 
Single cab pickup-Isuzu  282 
Double cab pickup Isuzu  199 
Single cab pickup Toyota  51 
Double cab Pickup Toyota  34 
Landcruiser pickup  209 
Nissan Patrol  10 
Troop carrier 4x4  60 
Troop carrier 2x2 Isuzu  10 
Water Bowzer truck Himo   10 
Tractor  29 
Motorcycles  29 
Recovery vehicles on Hino  
Mitsubishi station wagon   
Station wagon-Isuzu Rover  
Station wagon-Land Cruiser  
Ambulance/Mercedes  15  

Frontier Corps NWFP 
Single cab pickup-Isuzu  11 
Single cab pickup Toyota  38 
Double cab Pickup Toyota  31 
Single cab pickup-Landcruiser  162 
Troop carrier truck 4x2 (hino dutro)  34 
Troop carrier 4x2(Isuzu)  160  
Station Wagon Isuzu-Rover   
Water Bowzer truck Isuzu 4x2   39 
Motorcycles  1  


Pakistan Coast Guards 
Single cab pickup-Isuzu  
Double cab pickup Isuzu  20 
Single cab pickup Toyota  11 
Double cab Pickup Toyota  18 
Troop carrier 4x2 Isuzu  
Troop carier 4x2 Hino Dutto  10 
Troop carrier 4x2-isuzu  15 
Tractor  
Water Bowzer truck 4x2 Isuzu   11 
Station Wagon Isuzu rover  
Toyota Landcruiser   
Hatchback Toyota starlet  
Ambulance/Mercedes  1  

Home Department (NWFP) 
Single cab pickup-Isuzu  56 
Double cab pickup Isuzu  15 
Single cab pickup Toyota  13 
Double cab Pickup Toyota  36 
Road Roller Sakai  
Minibus  
Troop carrier 4x2  
motorcycles  11 
Mitsubishi pickup/station wagon   17 
Toyota station wagon land cruiser  1  

Balochistan Levies Force 
Single cab pickup-Isuzu  24 
Troop carrier truck 4x2  12 
Intelligence Bureau 
Single cab pickup-Isuzu  
Double cab pickup Isuzu  
Motorcycles  41 
Nissan Sunny sedan  
Station wagon-Isuzu rover  17  

Frontier Police 
Single cabin pickup(Toyota)  
Troop Carrier 4x2 Hino dutro)  34 
Motorcycles  98  

Frontier Constabulary 
Troop carrier truck 2x2  15 
Water Bowzer truck (Hino)  
Single cab pickup Toyota  27 
Double cab Pickup Toyota  15 
Recovery vehicles on Hino  
Mobile workshop on Hino  
Motorcycles  20  

Customs 
Single cab pickup-Toyota  
Double cab pickup Toyota  54 
Motorcycles  54 
Mitsubishi pickup/station wagon  
Station wagon-Toyota Landcruiser suzu rover  
Toyota Starlet hatchback  2  

Special Investigative Cell 
Minibus  
Double cab pickup Toyota  
Motorcycles  21 
Mitsubishi pickup/station wagon  
Station wagon-Toyota land cruisers   
Toyota Corolla  
Hatchback Suzuki Alto  
Hatchback Suzuki Mehran  
Van Toyota Hiace  1  

Ministry of Narcotics Control 
Toyota Corolla  2  
Hatchback Suzuki Khyber  
Motorcycles  
Hatchback Hyundai Shehzore  2  

Ministry of Interior 
Toyota Corolla  2  

Islamabad Police  
Toyota Corolla  
Minibus  8  
Motorcycle  12  

Balochistan Police 
Minibus  1  
Station wagon Toyota Landcruiser  
Toyota Startlet hatchback  2  

New Horizon Care Center 
Toyota Van Hiace  3  
Motorcycle  4  


Status-Services

Construction Projects

For construction activities of roads and small water schemes, the NAS Engineering Section is involved from the planning and costing estimates to implementation to the final certification and payment. NAS Voucher Examiners monitor the invoices and expenses submitted. They make field visits to verify expenditures as necessary. Engineers monitor, both independently and with their counterparts, to assure contract compliance and assure the quality of construction. The roads funded through the Counternarcotics programs are monitored frequently to assure quality. For both road construction and small water schemes, NAS staff, along with the appropriate GOP department, oversee the construction and carry out a final inspection and certification at completion.

Completion reports are jointly signed by the executing technical agency, the NAS and the appropriate Political Agent to assure accountability. Similar procedures are in place for Border Security Program roads. The rise in insurgent activities in the FATA has made it increasingly difficult for NAS staff to oversee projects due to the inability to travel to the projects’ sites. This was especially true for areas where the Pakistan Army Corps of Engineers (COE) were building roads in the FATA. After several attempts to oversee construction remotely through detailed quality control reports and photographs, NAS continued to have concerns about COE implementation and decided to stop road-building projects by this organization.

Area Development/Agricultural and Construction Projects. In 2008, a total of 25 different road projects were under way in Mohmand, Bajaur and Kyber Agencies with a combined length of 100 km. Of that, 25 km were completed, in 2008 with the remaining 75 km still under construction. Counternarcotics Program activities were also underway in Kala Dhaka (Manshera District) and Kohistan district, where ten road projects with a total length of 55 km were initiated. Of that, 31 km were completed and 24 km are still under construction.

During 2008, construction of 30 small schemes was completed with an additional 32 underway in Khyber, Mohmand, Bajaur and Kala Dhaka areas.

Border Security Roads - In 2008, 86 km of blacktop and 187 km shingle roads were completed by the Pakistan Army COE under the Border Security Program. Three pre-fabricated steel bridges were installed with an additional 15 under way. Ninety-six (96) small schemes were completed including open wells, irrigation channels, drinking water supply schemes and micro-hydroelectric power generation units.

Outposts - In 2008, ten FC-border outposts were completed in Baluchistan out of the 25 border posts started in 2006. In NWFP, three border outposts were completed for the FC-NWFP. Construction of 26 FC –NWFP outposts are underway in Chitral, Dir, Mohmand, Bajaur, Kurram and Thall. Re-construction of 36 outposts for the Frontier Constabulary was started in 2008 of which four outposts are completed with 32 under way.

Demand Reduction

The ANF organized USG-funded seminars for religious leaders in all four provincial capitals in 2008. The USG funded several NGO’s in their efforts aimed at drug awareness, treatment and rehabilitation. The NAS currently supports three local NGO’s in Karachi, Islamabad and Peshawar.

New Horizon Care Center (NHCC) - The NAS supported this Karachi-based NGO to set up and operate drug treatment/rehabilitation centers and organize awareness campaigns on drug abuse prevention in schools, youth industries/workplaces and communities. The NHCC has two treatment facilities with 60 beds. More than one thousand drug addicts were treated during 2008. The NHCC also organized 43 drug awareness campaigns during 2008.

DOST Welfare Foundation (DOST) - This Peshawar-based NGO has three drug treatment facilities with 210 beds. DOST also operates six “Darul Falah Centers” in FATA agencies and organizes drug awareness campaigns. Six hundred thirty seven (637) drug addicts were treated during 2008.

Developments in Literacy (DIL) -This Islamabad-based NGO provided education at the primary level on drug abuse and prevention. DIL provided training to 544 treatment counselors during 2008.

Agriculture Area Development and Construction Projects

During 2008, a total of 986 acres of demonstration plots were established in Khyber Agency, 961 acres in Kala Dhaka, 456 acres in Mohmand Agency and 454 acres in Bajaur Agency.

The NAS agricultural staff participates in all agriculture activities including planning to procurement and to end user distribution. This hands-on effort ensures the procurement of quality material and its distribution to the target groups. Evaluation as to the effectiveness of the demonstration plots are prepared as crops mature.

Program Impact

Communications Equipment

Radio equipment provided to various law enforcement agencies has greatly enhanced command and control capabilities in the border agencies, bringing large areas within communication range. This has been possible in part due to the provision of NAS-funded HF and VHF radio equipment and timely maintenance support by NAS radio engineers.

The interdiction of narcotics restricts suspected criminal movement. The MSA reported the seizure of 500 kg of Hashish, being smuggled by sea. The PCG Guard seized 2,740 kg of Hashish and 42 kg of Opium on the coastal best during 2008. NAS-funded communications equipment is one of the few resources for both of these agencies.

Aircraft

The impact of the aircraft M-60D defensive weapons was minimal. The impact of the GAU-17’s was minimal. These defensive systems were only employed during training in 2008.

Construction Projects

Construction of NAS-funded Outposts greatly increased law enforcement agencies capabilities to interdict narcotics trafficking, particularly in Baluchistan province. Recent major drug seizures demonstrate the positive impact of NAS-funded construction projects. FC reported seizures of 5,888 kg Hashish, 4,975 kg Opium, 4,586 kg Morphine/Heroin, 241,000 Morphine injections and 38 drug trafficker arrests during 2008. All the drugs were seized in border areas.

The FC-NWFP and Tribal Levies have greatly benefited from NAS-funded outposts in border areas. These outposts boosted the campaign to stop the illegal border-crossing of militants and insurgents and to maintain law and order. The high level of arrests demonstrated the impact of NAS assistance. In 2008, 444 criminals with suspected terrorist ties were apprehended by FC-NWFP.

With USG assistance, in 2008 the Government of Pakistan (GOP) conducted only selective aerial monitoring this past year in the NWFP, but extensive aerial monitoring was conducted in Baluchistan. In 2008, no ground monitoring was carried out in NWFP due to security problems. The aerial monitoring confirmed a 17.5 percent decrease in Pakistan’s poppy cultivation over the previous year, to 1909 hectares in 2008. There was a significant decrease in cultivation (162 hectares) in the Kala Dhaka area of NWFP and in Baluchistan (from 416 hectares to 59 hectares). USG-provided aircraft, vehicles, and communications equipment were used to investigate and monitor the 2007-2008 opium poppy crop. However, due to the security situation, the GOP did not conduct poppy eradication in 2008, resulting in a poppy crop of 1909 hectares.

Surveillance Equipment

Recipient agencies used surveillance equipment to plan, coordinate and conduct border security and counternarcotics operations. Equipment includes forward looking infrared (FLIRs), Night Vision Goggles (NVGs). Night Vision Binoculars, (NVBs), Night Vision Monoculars (NVMs), Boomerang repeater systems, Global Positioning Systems) data loggers, and tracking kits.

The FC-NWFP, FC, ANF, and PCG are equipped with NAS-funded surveillance equipment. All the agencies are using the equipment to maintain 24-hour observation of borders, highways, and the coastal belt.

Vessels

The Customs Drug Enforcement Cell uses a NAS-provided boat which assisted in seizing 81 kg heroin and 5,470 kg Hashish in 2008. Fifty-seven traffickers were arrested and 63 cases were registered by Customs Preventive in 2008.

Aircraft

Nine (9) UH-1H-II (Huey-II) helicopters flew a total of 1850.1 hours in 997 sorties from January to December 2008. The helicopter fleet’s operational readiness rate for the year was 59.2 percent. Three (3) fixed-wing Cessna C-208 Caravan aircraft were flown a total of 1103.6 hours in 462 sorties and were maintained at an operational readiness rate of 76.4 percent.

The Air Wing’s nine Huey II’s conducted numerous missions including MOI support, Embassy support, poppy surveys, MEDEVAC, general logistics support and border surveillance.

The three fixed-wing Cessna caravans, equipped with FLIR surveillance equipment, conducted numerous missions including MOI support, embassy support, surveillance, MEDEVAC, and general logistics support.

The most significant impact of the program was focused to the FC-NWFP. The NWFP Commander called the aviation support to the MOI a “force multiplier”, and requested more support for his border security and counternarcotics programs. He especially lauded the surveillance role of the C-208’s, noting that it has positively changed and how his staff does multiple missions.

Vehicles

Pakistan has made progress towards sealing its porous border with Afghanistan against in filtration and illegal passage by militants, insurgents, traffickers, and other miscreants, in part by using INL-funded vehicles. These vehicles included 4x4 troop carriers, double and single cabin pickups, station wagons, mini vans, ambulances, war bowzers, tractors, and motorcycles. Law enforcement agencies reported appropriate use of INL-funded vehicles for counternacotics and border security operations. These vehicles allow law enforcement staff to conduct surveillance, patrol border areas, pursue, apprehend and transport suspected miscreants and drug smuggles, conduct background investigations, and search for hideouts and drug storage areas.

The ANF seized 514 kg heroin, 93,668 kg hashish, 324 kg Opium, 4,145 kg Morphine base, arrested 31,660 smugglers and registered 31,217 cases during 2008. To conduct operations, the ANF mainly relies on the 462 vehicles and 235 motorcycles funded by INL.

Customs reported seizures of 184 kg heroin, 14,489 kg Hashish, 11 km Opium, 5,500 kg poppy straw and arrests of 113 traffickers. This agency used 64 INL-funded vehicles and 54 motorcycles during2008 operations.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Aircraft Maintenance

During the first half of the year, the fleet’s maintenance program was not properly supervised which resulted in unacceptably low operational readiness rates for Huey-II aircraft. INL/A undertook an aggressive maintenance program and within five months had fleet readiness rates back up above contract requirements. This aggressive maintenance partially accounts for the low readiness rate of the Huey-II’s in 2008. The INL/A contractor also instituted a maintenance sustainment plan to prevent future decreases in readiness. The sustainment plan includes greater emphasis on contractor manning and increased training of host nation personnel.

Significant issues of aircraft misuse by ministry officials were noted during the first half of the year. A policy clarification was issued requiring all aircraft flights to receive NAS approval prior to execution which substantially reduced the number of abuses and resulted in a significant improvement in the usage of assets. There are still infrequent minor infractions, most often because of imperfect communications systems in Pakistan and pressures placed on lower level ministry officials to provide aviation support outside the scope of the agreement, but misuse has been reduced to acceptable levels.

A new plan is being implemented to use a GA-17 equipped Huey-II as escort aircraft, relieving MOI aircrews of the requirement to coordinate escorts with Pakistan Army Aviation units.

The number of M-60D machine guns on hand was insufficient to man all of the helicopters. Additionally, the systems are old and had high failure rates making them undependable. A request to purchase 20 new M-2400 machine guns as a defensive weapon system for INL helicopters in Pakistan has been placed.

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

Analyses of the pattern of requests for repair/replacement suggest that communication equipment delivered to the GOP has had short useful life. This can be partially attributed to the lack of expertise and training required to maintain equipment by GOP technicians. The NAS will continue to increase the training provided to end-user agencies. Through Congressional supplemental aid, the NAS has provided thousands of pieces of communications equipment to Pakistani end-user agencies since 2002.

NAS Communication Engineers provided installation, repair/maintenance and training services to the end-user agencies’ technicians throughout the year. One hundred technicians from six law enforcement agencies have been trained on HF and VHF installation; 316 pieces of communications equipment were repaired by NAS radio engineers during 2008.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

During inspection, some communications equipment provided to the District Coordination Officer (DCO) Kala Dhaka was found to be used or maintained improperly. NAS management discussed the issue with the concerned authorities. As a result, DCO Kala Dhaka independently hired a Communications Technician. The NAS radio engineer later visited the site and found that NAS-funded communications equipment was being properly used as intended.

During the EUM visit, one single cabin pickup provided to DCO Kala Dhaka in 2006 was found broken own and parked. The NAS raised the issue with the DCO, but upon the unsatisfactory explanation of the breakdown, the NAS withdrew the subject vehicle.

Unmonitored Resources

Twenty-eight percent of commodities could not be personally monitored during the course of 2008 EUM scheduled visits. Most of these commodities were deployed to remote advance post offices in remote and dangerous areas, or were in use at the time of the inspections.

KABUL

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Dan Fulwiler; FulwilerDO@state.gov

Inventory System

As the vast amount of the INL-procured equipment currently remains under the day-to-day control of INL’s CIVPOL contractors, each of the three private companies uses its own inventory system. INL’s CIVPOL contracts and task orders do not specify any particular inventory system.

Staff Member Responsibilities

NAS-Kabul manages eight project components, grouped under the three primary projects, detailed in the Letter of Agreement with the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. For each project component, a NAS Foreign Service Officer or PSC Project Adviser has been delegated primary EUM responsibility.

Counternarcotics Eradication- PSC adviser
Counternarcotics Interdiction-FSO
CN Advisory Team-FAS EUM lead
Counternarcotics Public Information-FSO
Criminal Justice Program-PSC Adviser
Law Enforcement, Police Training-FSO
Law Enforcement, Mentoring-FSO

Other U.S. Agency Assistance

The NAS requests assistance from DEA in monitoring the use and condition of all items and equipment procured for the Interdiction project. The NAS also requests assistance from CSTC-A in monitoring the use and condition of all items and conditions procured for the Afghan Police Program.

Counterpart Agencies

Afghan National Police (ANP)
Counternarcotics Police of Afghanistan (CNP-A)
Attorney General’s Office (AGO)
Ministry of Justice (MOJ)
Various Provincial Governors’ Offices
Central Prisons Directorate (CPD)

Receipt

All durable items and equipment turned over to the GOA shall be the subject of a signed Transfer Agreement, specifying the number and type of items being donated, their intended use, and intended distribution or location.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Throughout the year, NAS officers and advisors conducted inspections of random samples of INL-procured items during visits to Regional Training Centers, GOA counterpart offices and other program locations.

01/15/2009 - ACAS, CNAT, Interdiction, JSSP & CSSP
01/26/2009 - JSSP, PEF, Interdiction, CNAT & ACAS
02/12/2009 - JSSP, PEF, Interdiction, CNAT & ACAS
03/01/2009 - JSSP, CSSP, PEF, CNAT, ACAS, Air Wing

There were 7,474 items subject to inspection. Twenty (20) percent of the items were personally inspected.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles

INL provided a total of 419 project vehicles under its six CIVPOL contract task orders to advance program objectives to train and advise the Afghan National Police and other GOA entities. All of these vehicles remain in the temporary custody of the INL contractor and implementing partner. A total of 2,167, 842.1 miles were driven by INL project vehicles during CY-2008, an average of 5,174 miles per vehicle.

ACAS (Afghan Civilian Advisory Support)-A total of 351 project vehicles have been procured under the ACAS (previously known as the Afghan Police Program (APP)) and APP task orders. These include 74 sport utility vehicles: 55 Ford Excursions (42 armored and 13 unarmored), 4 Toyota Land Cruisers (all unarmored) 7 Jeep Liberties (all unarmored), 8 Ford Phoenix (armored vehicles built on a Ford 250 Chassis); 184 pickup trucks: 134 Ford F-250 trucks (130 armored and 4 unarmored) and 50 Chevrolet HD trucks (49 armored and 1 unarmored); 88 cargo trucks: 85 Ford 350 (81 armored and 4 unarmored), 2 Ford F-450 (both armored), and 1 Ford F-550 (armored); 5 small utility vehicles (all terrain vehicle, forklifts, etc). None of these vehicles have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 351 remain in the temporary custody of the contractor. Of the total, 305 remain operational, 5 were destroyed by IEDs, 9 were damaged beyond economical repair, and 32 were awaiting repair.

Afghan Contractor Adviser Support 
Ford Excursion  55 
Jeep Liberty  7  
Toyota Landcruiser  
Ford Phoenix (armored)  
Chevrolet Silverado  50 
Ford F-250  134 
Ford F-350  85 
Ford F-450  2  
Ford F-550  
Small utility vehicles  5  


CNAT (Counternarcotics Advisory Team)-A total of 18 project vehicles have been procured under the CNAT task order. These include 16 sport utility vehicles and two pickup trucks. None of these vehicles have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan. All 18 remain in the temporary custody of the contractor. Of the total, 17 remain operational and one was awaiting repair. A total of 114,544 miles were driven by CNAT project vehicles during 2008.

Counter narcotics Advisory Team 
Toyota Land Cruisers (armored)  16 
Ford F-250 (armored)  2  


Interdiction (NIU) - A total of 10 project vehicles have been procured under the National Interdiction Unit/Sensitive Investigative Unit (NIU/SIU) task order. None of these vehicles have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all ten vehicles remain in the temporary custody of the contract or to support the project. Of the total, 9 remain operational and 1 was awaiting repair. A total of 97,871 miles were driven with these vehicles during 2008.

Narcotics Interdiction Unit 
Toyota Land Cruisers (armored)  
Ford F-250 (armored)  
Utility vehicles  1  


JSSP (Justice Sector Support Program)-A total of 20 project vehicles have been procured under the JSSP task order. These include 8 sport utility vehicles (4 Toyota Land Cruisers, all armored and 4 Ford Excursions, all armored); 12 pick-up trucks (1 Ford F-250, armored and 11 Chevrolet Duramax cargo trucks, all armored). None of these vehicles have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 20 vehicles remain in the temporary custody of the contractor. All 20 vehicles are operational. A total of 71, 699 miles were driven by JSSP project vehicles in 2008.

Justice Sector Support Program 
Toyota Land Cruiser (armored)  
Ford Excursion  
Ford F-250  
Chevrolet Duramax cargo trucks  11  

CSSP (Corrections Systems Support Program)-A total of 20 project vehicles have been procured under the CSSP task order. All 20 vehicles are sport utility vehicles (12 Ford Excursions, 8 Toyota Land Cruisers), all of which are armored. None of these vehicles have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan. Nineteen vehicles remain in the custody of the contractor to support the project. One vehicle (a 2005 Ford Excursion) was destroyed by an IED. A total of 97,651 miles were driven by CSSP project vehicles during CY-2008.


Corrective Systems Support Program 
Ford Excursion  12 
Toyota Land Cruisers  8  


Computer Equipment

INL has procured a total of 1,140 project computers under six CIVPOL contract task orders to advance program objectives. Most of the computers remain in the temporary custody of INL contractors.

ACAS-A total of 591 project computers have been procured under the ACAS task order. These include 471 desktop and 120 laptop computers. All of the computers remain under the control of the INL contractor. All 591 computers remain operational.

Interdiction (support for the Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan (CNPA), including the NIU-Narcotics Interdiction Unit, SIU-Sensitive Investigations Unit, and TIU-Technical Intercept Unit)-A total of 179 project computers have been procured under the Interdiction task order. These include 123 desktops and 56 laptops. None of these computers has been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 179 computers remain in the custody of the contractor. All 179 computers remain operational.

JSSP (Justice Sector Support Program)-A total of 138 project computers have been procured under the JSSP task order. These include 70 Dell desktops, 5 Hewlett Packard desktops, 45 HP laptops, 6 Compaq laptops, 3 IBM laptops, 2 Dell laptops, 2 Toshiba laptops, 1 HP 530 notebook, and 4 unbranded computers. None of these computes were transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 138 remain in the temporary custody of the contractor. All 138 remain operational.

CSSP (Corrections System Support Program)-A total of 117 project computers have been procured under the CSSP task order. These include 67 desktop computers, and 50 laptops. Of the 117 computers, 32 have been turned over to the GOA Central Prisons Directorate. The remaining 85 computers remain in the custody of the INL contractor to support the program

CNAT (Counter Narcotics Advisory Team)-A total of 88 project computers have been procured under the CNAT task order. These include 28 Dell desktops, 23 HP desktops, 26 laptops, 5 Dell laptops 3 Toshiba laptops, 1 Toshiba Satellite, 1 Panasonic laptop, and 1 unbranded desktop. None of the computers have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan. All 88 remain in the custody of the INL contractor to support the project. All 88 remain operational.

PEF (Poppy Eradication Force, formerly AEF-Afghan Eradication Force; formerly CPEF-Central Poppy Eradication Force)-A total of 27 project computers have been procured under the PEF task order. These include 8 Dell Latitude laptops, 7 Panasonic tough book laptops, 7 Hewlett Packard desk tops, and 5 Dell Optiplex desktops. None of these computers were transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 27 remain in the custody of the INL contractor to support the project. All 27 computers remain operational.

Communications Equipment

INL procured a total of 2,055 project radios under its six CIVPOL contract task orders to advance program objectives. All radios remain in the custody of INL contractors and implementing partners.

JSSP (Justice Sector Support Program) - A total of 42 project radios have been procured under the JSSP task orders. These include 31 portable VHF’s, 9 vehicle VHF’s, and 2 base stations. None of the radios have been transferred to the GOA; all 42 remain in the custody of the INL contractor to support the project. All 42 radios are serviceable.

PEF (Poppy Eradication Force-formerly AEF (Afghan Eradication Force, formerly CPEF (Central Poppy Eradication Force)-A total of 403 project radios have been procured under the PEF task orders. These include 89 HF Codan radios (88 Vehicle HF Codan, and 1 Base Station HF Codan), 250 UHF and VHF Mototrola radios, 28 VHF Icom radios (27 portable and 1 Base Station) and 36 portable VHF Acer radios. None of these radios have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 403 radios are in the custody of the INL contractor to support the project. Of the total, 393 remain operational and 10 remain non-functional. Of the ten non-functional radios, any software chips will be removed and the radios will be destroyed.

CNAT- A total of 50 project radios have been procured under the CNAT task order. These include 50 portable VHF Motorola radios. None of these radios have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 50 remain in the custody of INL contractor to support the project. All 50 radios are operational and accounted for.

Interdiction - A total of 10 project radios have been procured under the interdiction task order. These include 10 Motorola portable VHF radios. None of these radios have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan. All ten remain in the custody of the contractor to support the project. All 10 radios are serviceable.

ACAS - A total of 1,486 project radios have been procured under the ACAS task order. These include 274 codan radios, 1212 UHF and VHF Motorola radios. One of these radios has been transferred to the GOA. All others remain in the custody of the INL contractor to support the project. Of the total 1,422 radios remain operational, 64 are inoperative.

CSSP (Corrections Systems Support Program)- A total of 64 project radios have been procured under the CSSP task order. These include 13 Motorola portable (hand-held), 7 vehicle-mounted, 20 Motorola BPR40 portable radios, 14 Garmin GPS radios, and 10 radios of undetermined nomenclature. Of the total, 44 have been transferred to the GOA: 20 Motorola BPR40 portable radios have been transferred to the Kabul Women’s Detention Center, 14 Garmin GPS radios and 10 radios of undetermined nomenclature have been transferred to the Pol-i-Charki National Penitentiary. Thirteen portable and 7 vehicular radios remain in the custody of the INL contractor to support the project. Of the total 64 radios remain operational.

Aircraft


All Projects 
UH-2 helicopter  10 
MI-8 helicopter  
AN-72/24/26 fixed wing  
DC-3 fixed wing  1  

The UH-2’s were flown 3,204.7 hours; the MI-8’s were flown 1190.1 hours; the AN-72/24/26 was flown 1004.1 hours; and the DC-3 was flown 165. 2 hours. The aircraft were flown by all projects: PEF, NIU/DEA, ACAS/APP, CNAT, JSSP/CSSP, Air Wing, NAS/EMB.

Weapons

Afghan Contractor Civilian Advisory Support 
M-4 bushmaster 5.56 rifle  1,733 
M-9 baretta 9mm pistol  1,551 
M-249 SAW 5.56mm machinegun  56 
M-240B 7.62 mm machine gun  47 
Barrett .50 ca. sniper rifle  20 
M-19 Glock 9mm pistol   13 
M-16 5.56mm rifle   11 
M-870 12-gal shotgun   11
 
MP-5 9mm machine gun   1  

Interdiction 
M-4 bushmaster 5.56 rifle  
M-9 baretta 9mm pistol  5  

Justice Sector Support Program 
AK-47 7.62mm assault rifle  24 
Helwan 9mm pistol  11 
Makarov 9mm pistol  8  


Poppy Eradication Force 
M-4 bushmaster 5.56mm rifle  193 
M-9 beretta 9mm pistol  145 
GL-1 40mm grenade launcher  17 
Barrett .50 cal sniper rifle  4  


Status-Services

Prosecutor Training

INL offers training courses for GOA prosecutors: the Police-Prosecutor Coordination Program (P/PCP, aka JSSP-R: seven-month curriculum), the Focused District Development Law Program (FDD-L a 30-day curriculum), and the Attorney General Office Stage program (nine-month classroom instruction followed by three months of practicum). Since 2007, INL has trained 547 prosecutors. Of these, 442 completed the seven-month JSSP-R course and 105 completed the nine-month AGO stage program. Tracking of JSSP-R confirms that 95% remained on the job at the end of 2008. Of the five percent who were no longer employed as GOA prosecutors at the end of 2008, 11 had moved into private practice; two had been suspended; two were killed in the line of duty; one had quit; and the status of eleven was unknown.

Corrections Officer Training

From 2006 through 2008, a total of 1,142 corrections officers were trained for the GOA Central Prisons Directorate (CPD). Of these, 744 have received specialist or advanced training. In addition to this number, INL has trained 669 exterior prison security guards who have been contracted by the CPD.

Police Training

The original goal of organizing and training a National Police Force of 62,000 officers was increased to 82,000 in 2007 and 96,800 in 2009. INL has constructed and operated eight police training centers in Kabul and around the country. Through December 2008, INL had trained and graduated a total of 110,000 police officers from the various basic patrolman courses, accounting for attrition.

Although there are a large number of specialty courses taught, qualifying basic training for which an Afghan Ministry Of Interior (MOI) Police Identity Card is issued upon graduation consists of any one of the following: Basic 8 week patrolman’s course, Focused District Development (FDD) Basic Patrolman’s course, Basic Border Patrolman’s course, Counternarcotics Course for the Poppy Eradication Force, and ANCOP 16 week course.

Through December 2008, INL had trained and graduated a total of 42,234 police officers for the various basic patrolman courses. No tracking data on the assignment of these officers since graduation is available.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

Eight 2008 year model fully armored vehicles for the Afghan Police Program suffered catastrophic engine failure after running on low sulfur diesel (LSD) fuel. Beginning in June 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandated an end to the sale of LSD fuel (which contained 500 ppm sulfur) for diesel highway vehicles in the United States. The new fuel, which replaced the LSD, was ultra-low sulfur diesel ULSD at just 15 ppm sulfur. Because of the new engineering specifications for diesel engines using ULSD, the EPA mandated warning labels on all LSD fuel pumps stating that LSD would damage 2007 and later diesel engines. Manufacturers of diesel engines put out identical warnings on their web sites. The eight 2008 model year diesel engine vehicles had odometer readings of between only 6,000 and 18,000 miles at the time of the engine failure. Upon inspection, it was discovered that the piston rods had softened and warped under the intense engine heat generated by burning LSD fuel in the post 2006 engines. The warped rods caused the pistons to impact against cylinder walls of the engine block, leading to their fracture and fragmentation.

Stolen Pistols

On December 4, 2008, a Beretta 9mm pistol and two magazines of ammo, which had been issued to an INL contractor employee (PAE) were reported stolen from the employee’s sleeping quarters. Based on this incident, weapons are not entered into the property accountability system. The monthly inventory is now tied to in-country pay, i.e., must show equipment to receive pay. Weapons in the arms room are also counted monthly. The arms room received upgrades and renovations including alarm, door and light improvements.

Disposal of Commodities

The NAS and the GSO have concluded discussions and developed plans to dispose of most project commodities via auctions, which are conducted twice annually by the GSO at the old USIS compound in Kabul. On a case-by-case basis, the NAS and the GSO may conclude to hold local auctions of INL-procured commodities at the Regional Training Centers or, alternatively, to invite scrap dealers to make offers on furniture, furnishings and appliances deemed to be of insufficient value to justify the effort and expense of a public auction.

Armored vehicle and ballistic glass will be turned over to the U.S. Army Explosives Ordinance Disposal Unit at Bagram Air Base for destruction in accordance with post RSO procedures.

KATHMANDU

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Senior Law Enforcement Adviser Denver Fleming, TEL: 977-400-7200 ext. 4366; flemingDHstate.gov

Inventory System

Post has a manual file system, including receiving documents and handover forms.

Staff Member Responsibilities

One Project Management Assistant compared handover forms to inventory records. Embassy officers visited Nepal Police headquarters, the Central Police Laboratory at the Police Academy, and the headquarters of the Nepal Drug Control and Law Enforcement Unit (NDCLEU). Post contacted a Supreme Court representative but did not visit the district courts.

Counterpart Agencies

The Supreme Court
Nepal Police Women’s Cell
Nepal Drug Control and Law Enforcement Unit (DNCLU)

Receipt

INL handover form

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

Post performed two scheduled and two unscheduled on-site inspections at Morang district and Kathmandu as follows:

07/15/2008 - Kathmandu
11/15/2008 - Katghmandu
12/15/2008 - Kathmandu
02/15/2008 - Morang

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Post manually compared records with those of the Supreme Court. In previous years, post also compared records with the National Drug Control and Law Enforcement Unit and Nepal Police. Post’s Senior Law Enforcement Adviser also conducted monthly discussions to monitor resource status.

Status-Commodities

In 2008, the Post donated 65 power transformers; 61 PC’s, 65 monitors, and 65 Uninterrupted Power Supply units to the Supreme Court and 15 district offices. They are all in good condition.

Program Impact

The power transformer-stabilizers facilitate the use of 110v YPS units that are incompatible with Nepal’s power grid. Workstations can operate for 20 minutes after a power surge, of which Kathmandu experienced up to 16 hours a day, enabling employees to save their work and complete the essential task of providing judicial service to the Nepal public.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Disposition of Unrepairable Items

Many items tracked in previous reports such as motorcycles and bicycles provided to the Nepal Police Women’s Cell and the Nepal Drug Control and Law enforcement Unit in 1996 were non-repairable. In 2008, at post’s request, the Government of Nepal disposed of all unrepairable items including bicycles and motorcycle used by the NDCLU and the Nepal Police Women’s Cell.

TASHKENT

Background

EUM Program Officer

Timothy Buckley, Tel: 998-71-120; buckleyTP@state.gov

Inventory System

In 2007, post created an INL equipment database containing records of all equipment provided to the GOU and records of previous inspections. The database includes all equipment-related information and supports dozens of different queries. INL equipment has been distributed throughout all 12 provinces of Usbekistan, although a majority has now exceeded its reasonable expected lifespan.

EUM Staff Responsibilities

The INL program is administered by an officer in the political and economic section who must divide work time between several portfolio items. Post has one full-time Locally Engaged Staff (LES) position to support INL initiatives in Uzbekistan. There are no other positions with End Use Monitoring responsibilities and there was no change in staffing from 2007. Due to post’s security concerns, the LES is only authorized to visit host government law enforcement installations when an American officer is present, which makes End Use Monitoring more resource intensive. The Pol/Econ Officer, especially one who handles the export and related security (EXBS) portfolio, also occasionally visits facilities to conduct End Use Monitoring involving INL-donated equipment.

US Agency Assistance

No other USG agencies represented at post conducted any End Use Monitoring of INL-funded resources. However, in late 2008 and early 2009 a visiting Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) agency conducted some End Use Monitoring of INL-donated equipment, which was an excellent opportunity to build contacts in the host government in anticipation of greater engagement on counternarcotics.

Counterpart Agencies

Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD)
State Customs Committee
Ministry of Health (MOH)
National Security Service (NSS)
Office of the General Prosecutor

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

On-site inspections are the only reliable means of conducting required End Use Monitoring even though they must be arranged far in advance. Typically, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs then provides post with a local contact that represents the appropriate ministry and plans its visit details. Random, unscheduled visits are not possible and government officials at all levels throughout the country adhere to strict bureaucratic requirements to arrange permission in advance through formal channels.

There were 22 scheduled on-site inspections performed in 2008 around the country. There were some opportunities for unscheduled inspections when embassy offices crossed land borders or visited checkpoints where some INL-donated equipment is located. For instance, at an official visit to the border checkpoint (the main crossing between Uzbekistan and Afghanistan near Temez) in July 2008, the Ambassador observed Ozbek Customs officers using INL-donated flashlights, leatherman utility toolkits and search mirrors to conduct vehicle inspections even though it was not an End Use Monitoring trip. End use monitoring trips were as follows:

01/14/08 - Provincial Customs Office
01/15/08 - Provincial Customs Office
01/25/08 - MVD Sensitive Investigative Unit
04/25/08 - Main Forensic Laboratory
08/27/08 - Provincial Customs Office
12/18/08 - NSS Jeep
01/20/08 - Border Checkpoint
01/20/08 - Border Checkpoint
01/21/09 - MVD Counter Drug Dept
01/21/09 - Khorezm Forensic Laboratory
01/21/08 - MVD Counter Drug dept
01/21/09 - Border Checkpoint
01/22/09 - Border Checkpoint
01/23/09 - MVD Counter Drug Dept
01/26/09 - Main MOH Forensic Laboratory
01/30/09 - MVD Sensitive Investigative Unit
01/30/09 - MVD Counter Drug Unit
01/30/09 - MVD City Police Counter Drug Unit
01/31/09 - MVD Counter Drug Unit
02/02/09 - MVD SyrBarya Counter Drug Unit
02/02/09 - MVD Counter Drug Unit
02/03/09 - MVD Counter Drug Unit

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Written and computerized government records in Uzbekistan are not well-developed and are not yet a reliable source of information. Post would not likely be granted regular access to such databases. Post must use its own detailed databases to identify priority equipment to inspect each year and submit diplomatic notes to arrange permission to conduct physical on-site inspections.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

In January 2004, the Embassy delivered 25 workstations to the counternarcotics focused Sensitive Investigative Unit within the Ministry of Internal Affairs in Tashkent. The computer equipment is being actively used by law enforcement offices for its intended purpose of supporting counternarcotics investigations. The computers are in good condition but are no longer state-of-the-art.

Communications Equipment

In July 2004, 30 cellular telephones, 30 Motorola GP-360 handheld radios, and four Thuraya satellite phones were provided the SIU within the Ministry of Internal Affairs. All equipment is located at the main headquarters in Tashkent. The cell phones are now obsolete but still in use. The satellite phones are not in use due to the high cost of the service, which the SIU could no loner afford when the Government of Uzbekisan suspended cooperation with the DEA in early 2007. As a whole, the array of equipment provided by the U.S. Government still makes the work of the SIU easier but it is less pivotal with each passing year.

Laboratory Equipment

In July 2004, post delivered and finished installation of laboratory equipment to the MVD in Tashkent that enhanced the GOU’s capabilities to perform forensic analysis of explosive substances. Equipment donated to the Explosives Laboratory at the Ministry of Internal Affairs included a Sabre-200 portable explosive detector, five digital scales, and an Agilent Electrophoresis system. A Nicolet IR Spectrometer system was previously delivered to the lab in 1999. The equipment is in excellent condition.

Twenty-eight (28) vehicles were donated to the SIU at headquarters in Tashkent. All 28 vehicles are actively used by police officers of the current unit. A visiting DEA agent also inspected the vehicles and was positively impressed that not only the vehicles were being actively used, but much of the other support equipment that should be used in the field is indeed with the cops on the street. The fleet is intentionally mixed, including several local models to allow undercover units to blend in with their surrounding. The local models are much easier for the SIU to maintain since there is ready availability of spare parts and mechanical expertise. Two Opel Astras still require about $2,000 of repairs that the SIU has no funds to repair. However, the vehicles are kept in a secure garage and otherwise appear to be in good condition. The vehicles are approaching the end of their useful lifespan.

The main Forensic Laboratory at the Ministry of Health (which can analyze narcotics substances) received several sophisticated instruments funded by INL, including an Agilent Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer System, which greatly support evidence processing in criminal drug cases. This is the only active project for which post is continuing to purchase and transfer extensive quantities of equipment. Numerous embassy officers, including the Ambassador, Deputy Chief of Mission, and Political Chief on a separate visit, were warmly welcomed for tours and demonstrations of the equipment during 2008. The laboratory staff is extremely grateful for U.S. assistance and participated in professional development and training events abroad to enhance the benefit of post’s equipment donation.

Equipment from previous years is also in excellent condition and is carefully cared for by qualified scientific staff. The Uzbek Government, in response to INL efforts to upgrade the laboratory, is building a modern new building that will soon house the equipment.

In October 2001, INL provided the Committee for State Border Protection document examination equipment to improve passport control activities at border checkpoints. Donated equipment included: 100 Universal Desktop Magnifiers and spare lamps, 200 hand-held UV-spot detectors and spare UV lamps, 8 multifunctional passport readers, and one set of passport computer software with samples of more than 2,000 different passports and identification documents.

Document examination equipment to improve passport control activities at border checkpoints is distributed to more than 40 checkpoints around the country as well as to the Border Guard Academy.

Basic investigative equipment was distributed to the Counter Drug Department of the Uzbek Ministry of Internal Affairs. Some equipment is maintained at the SIU headquarters in Tashkent, while other communications equipment was distributed to various counter drug departments at provincial command posts throughout the country. As with other equipment provided to the SIU, post found the camera and video equipment to be maintained in excellent condition. The creative unit has its own audio-visual technician who provides modifications to use local handbags that make hidden cameras more discreet. However, cameras are no longer state-of-the-art, especially as new-generation digital technology makes cameras from a half-decade age seem obsolete. One political official in Ferghana Province said some of the TV, VCR, and camera equipment provided had since been lost or damaged; however, the responsible officer had to purchase replacements themselves which were provided for inspection.

Vehicles

State Customs Committee 
Jeep Cherokee Sport  7  


Special Investigative Unit (SIU) 
Opel Astra  
Opel Vectra Elegance  
Toyota Land Cruiser  
Toyota Corolla   
Daewood Nexia GLE  11 
Daewood Matiz DLX  
VAZ Niva   
VAZ LADA   3  


Status-Services

A successful INL-funded Anti-Trafficking-in-Persons Program continued during 2008. A total of 14 training events were held around the country reaching more than 500 law enforcement officers and other stakeholders; the host government credited the multi-year project with improving sensitively to victims among law enforcement officers; it helped key Anti-TIP NGO’s build lasting connections with local police. Uzbekistan was promoted from Tier 3 to the Tier 2 watchlist on the 2008 edition of the report, and post reported more substantial progress on the 2009 submission. The anti-TIP project will conclude during 2009.

Program Impact

Anti-TIP Program

The ongoing Anti-TIP program administered by an International Organization for Migration (IOM) affiliated NGO has had a big impact in this reporting period. In 2008, there were 14 events that provided training opportunities to more than 500 people, mostly in remote areas where awareness about the serious TIP problems was low. The Uzbek government openly credits the work of INL and the implementing partner in raising awareness and sensitivity among law enforcement officers. TIP is, undoubtedly, the most successful engagement post has seen of human rights in the country.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Unmonitored Resources

Many of the laptop computers delivered to the Border Guards are now broken after years of extensive use. The products have now exceeded there useful expected life span. It is also difficult to arrange access to border posts, especially now that the Border Guards have been incorporated into the National Security Service. No corrective action is required since post will discontinue monitoring the equipment.

Repair and Maintenance of Services

A substantial amount of INL-donated equipment is aging after intensive use. The GOU typically does not provide adequate resources to local branches of law enforcement agencies for repair and maintenance. This was made difficult by the provision of foreign brands of vehicles and equipment for which it is difficult to find spare parts or expertise to complete repairs. Due to the low quality of the fuel in the Uzbekistan retail market, the majority of vehicles also require replacement of the fuel systems. As a result, numerous Jeep Cherokees are broken down in Customs garages in remote corners of the country. They were used extensively for a reasonable timeframe, but the modest provisions of spare parts would not allow resourceful local commanders to continue to put the equipment to good use.

The Nicolet IB spectrometer and portable Sabre 2000 explosive detector have long since been broken and require replacement. The staff at the lab is very professional and has taken excellent care of all equipment, but their effectiveness would be enhanced by the repair of these instruments.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

Many items in post’s inventory of previously donated INL equipment have reached the end of their useful life. During 2009, post will stop monitoring stockpiles of equipment and provide disposition assistance to the recipient agencies. Post will also attempt to identify funds to repair big-ticket items such as vehicles which although aging, are still capable of contributing to the effectiveness of enforcement operations.



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