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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

2009 End-Use Monitoring Report: South and Central Asia


Report
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 1, 2010

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ASTANA

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Anthony T. Beaver, 7 7172 70-2296; beaverat@state.gov

Inventory System

Post does not have an automated inventory system. Each program manager maintains inventory lists by program. The list is used to record and track distribution of all resources provided to the host government.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Each of the three INL Program Managers inspects provided equipment and renovated premises during program-related travel.

Counterpart Agencies

Border Guard Service of the Committee for National Security (BGS)
The Military Institute of the Committee for National Security (KNBMI)
The Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD)
The Study Center for Combating Illegal Migration and Trafficking in Persons of the Karaganda Law Institute of the Ministry of Internal Affairs (Anti-TIP Center)
The Counternarcotics Scientific Analytical Training Against Drug Trafficking of the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD CN Center)
The Statistics Committee of the Procurator General’s Office (PCO Statistics Committee)
The National Laboratory of Forensics Control of the Ministry of Justice (MOJ Forensics Lab)
The Agency on Combating Economic and Corruption Crimes (Financial Police), the Financial Police Academy (FPA) and Customs Control Committee of the Ministry of Finance (CCC)

Receipt

Posts uses letters of transfers as well as transfer and acceptance acts to document the provisions of the items to counterpart agencies.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Over the course of the year, post conducted End Use Monitoring of the equipment delivered in prior years in conjunction with separate programs, including meetings, training events, site visits and follow up trips. On-site inspections, provided equipment, and other requested information is detailed below by program. The INL Program Manager for the border security and counternarcotics programs conducted the following on-site inspections:

01/14/2009 - KNB Military Institute
02/24/2000 - Anti-TIP Center
09/10/2009 - KNB Military Institute
09/08/2009 - Saryagash Border Control Training Center
03/31/2009 - CCC Canine Center in Almaty
05/18/2009 - Anti-TIP Center
06/23/2009 - CCC Canine Center in Almaty
09/11/2009 - CCC Canine Center in Almaty
09/15/2009 - Anti-TIP C
10/01/2009 - Kazakhani-Kyrgyz border
10/02/2009 - Kazakhani-Kyrgyz border
10/03/2009 - Kazakhani-Kyrgyz border
11/10/2009 - Aul and Zhezkent border
11/11/2009 - Aul and Zhezkent border
09/08/2009 - MVD’s internal post Kyzyitu
12/09/2009 - MVD CN Center
12/22/2009 - BGS Aviation Training center
11/02/2009 - FPA language lab
10/26/2009 - DEA regional lab
10/27/2009 - DEA regional lab
10/28/2009 - DEA regional lab
10/29/2009 - DEA regional lab
10/30/2009 - DEA regional lab

Fifty–three percent (53%) of all items were inspected.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

It was not possible to physically inspect all sites due to the vast size of Kazakhstan, but post often discussed the status of INL-funded resources with host government officials.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

In 2009, 30 computers were transferred to the Anti-TIP Center. All equipment provided in the TIP project in previous years was provided to the anti-TIP center in Karaganda. Equipment was provided for classroom, offices and the dormitory.

A total of 258 computers with uninterruptable power supplies (UPS), 112 printers, two color printers, one scanner, and four laptop computers were transferred to the PGO and subject to on-site inspections within the crime statistics project. Since the computers were provided to every PGO office throughout the country, on-site inspection has been difficult to perform. In September 2009, a server was provided to the head office of the PDO Statistics Committee in Astana.

In conjunction with the program to strengthen the capacity of the MVD CN Training Center in Almaty, post provided 17 computers, one notebook computer, one projector, one HP laser jet, and interpretation and conference equipment on October 16, 2008. In 2009, the MVD CN Training Center moved all equipment to a new building, where it was properly installed and will be used for computer-based training for law-enforcement officers. In September, 2009 post provided four additional computers to the CN Training Center. The Center used the conference and interpretation equipment in April 2007 for counter-narcotics training seminar and will use it for a seminar on February 8- 12, 2010. The MVD CN Training Center has been approached by several international organizations with proposals to arrange international training and the existing equipment will be used during these events.

Upon completion of the renovation of the Saryagash Border Guard Training Classroom in October 2006, office equipment and furniture was delivered to the training class. During an INL visit on September 9, 2008, the Administrator informed the Program Manager that 15 computers provided for the classroom were operational and used to train employees.

INL provided 12 computers to the Border Guard Field Training Center in Uralsk in 2008. The administrator informed INL via telephone that the computers are being used in border control training exercises. In addition to computer equipment, INL provided one copier, one scanner, one projector one fax machine and a digital camera. Post purchased and transferred an interactive board which is used by instructors.

In November 2009, INL provided a server to MVD’s committee to combat drugs for secure data storage and analysis of drug crimes.

Twenty-five desktop computers were donated to the Financial Police Academy in Astana in 2005. All computers are being used in computer-based training for examinations. All equipment is in good condition.

In 2004, post purchased 62 computers, 62 printers, two color printers, and four notebook computers for the Statistics Division of the Procurator General’s Office. In September 2005, 50 computers, 50 printers, and 50 USPs were provided to nine offices. In 2009, one server was provided to the Statistics Committee in Astana.

In 2005, INL provided 16 computers to the forensics lab in Almaty to improve its capacity. The computers are used both in training and to complete forensic analysis reports. Six computer and one monitor were damaged beyond repair by a power surge. The remaining nine computers are in good condition.

In 2007, INL transferred a digital language laboratory to the FPS, which includes an instructor’s computer, 15 student computers, one centralized multimedia control system, 15 tables with dividers, 16 pairs of headphones and accessories. All equipment in the lab is in working condition except for six monitors and all mice. The malfunctioning monitors have not yet been repaired and the mice are being replaced. INL funded and English language Fellow at the FPS, who is teaching the FPA instructors how to better utilize the language lab. Software for six English-Language programs has been provided since March 2009.

In October 2008, INL transferred a digital language laboratory to the KNB Military Institute. The lab includes an instructor’s computer, 15 student computers, one centralized multimedia control system, 16 tables, 16 pairs of headphones and accessories. Foreign language instructors received training on the use of the lab. According to manager of the language lab and the Head of the English Language Department, the language lab has been in use by the English language Department since November 2008.

As part of the crime statistics program, post provided a total of 258 computers, 112 printers, 112 UPS, 2 color printers, 4 notebook computers, and one scanner to the Office of the Criminal Statistics Division of the Procurator General’s Office (PGO) throughout the country. Since the computes were provided throughout the country, on-site inspections have been very difficult to perform. In September 2009, a server was provided to the office of the PGO Statistics committee in Astana.

Vehicles

In October 2006, post provided four, four-wheel drive UAZ minivans to the BGS for use on the border with Uzbekistan. The minivans are currently in use at the Saryagash, Kazygurt, Tole bi, and B Konysbayev border checkpoints.

Two additional four-wheel drive UAZ minivans provided in March 2007 are used at the Temirbaba and Tazhen board checkpoints on the border with Turkmenstan. Post was unable to personally inspect vehicles, but was informed by the BGS that the vehicles were still in use and are used to respond to border incidents, to transport staff during shift changes, and to transport potable water to remote checkpoints.

In November 2009, post provided four four-wheel drive UAZ vehicles and 17 GAZEL mini-vans to the MVD for use counter-narcotics divisions throughout the country. Two additional GAZEL mini-vans will be provided to the MVD in February 2010.

Border Guard Service
Minivan 6

MVD
UAZ 4
Mini-vans 17

Laboratory Equipment

Post purchased an infrared spectrometer, gas chromatograph, liquid chromatograph, scales, and a digital camera. All of the equipment is in place and being effectively used by the staff. The gas chromatograph delivered in 1998 was repaired and is back in service. All laboratory equipment was monitored in 2009 and was found to be in working condition and effectively used by the lab.

In July 2008, INL transferred a SABRE 4000 hand-held drug detector with extra batteries and air purification cartridges to the Merke rail checkpoint on the border with Kyrgystan. On August 11, 2009, a DEA agent expert conducting training seminars found that it was defective. The equipment was repaired later that year by a company representative who also provided training.

Canines

In April 2008, post provided a total of three dogs to the Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD), the Border Guard Service of the Committee for National Security (BGS), and the KNB Military Institute. Five more we provided in 2009. The dogs were used in instructor training in Bad Kreuzen, Austria and were transported to Kazakhstan. Post inspected the dogs in August. They are at their agencies and their care meets the standards of the Austrian Ministry of Interior’s Canine Centre. Post purchased two female German shepherds to improve the breeding program of the Border Guard Service. The dogs are used in training sessions and will also be used for breeding. All dogs are in good condition.

Miscellaneous Equipment

A CT-30 toolkit to the KNB Military Institute for training purposes. During a Counternarcotics Canine Training Seminar at the Military Institute, INL Program Manager was shown the training classroom. The CT-30 toolkit and other equipment provided in 2006 and 2008 were in display cases in the classroom and are used for training.

Anti-TIP Center – Phase one - Classrooms, office, and a student dormitory were provided. One video projector, two computers, two laptop computers, one printer, one copier, one scanner, one television, one VCR, one air-conditioner and two split system air-conditioners, six bookcases, four tables, three wardrobes, 30 desks, 60 chairs, two lecterns, one television stand, and one white board with projector screen were provided for the classroom and offices. Visual aids and information posters were also produced for use in the classrooms. Phase two – nine apartments were furnished to house 30 students in a dormitory. The dormitory was furnished with nine desks, nine bookshelves, nine wardrobes, nine dining tables, nine sets of hall way furniture, nine sets of kitchen furniture, nine sofas, nine armchairs, nine television stands, 30 beds with bedside tables, 36 stools, 19 chairs, nine electric stoves, nine refrigerators, nine televisions, and other furnishings, all equipment was accounted for and is in good condition.

On July 17, 2008, post transferred a SABRE-4000 hand-held drug detector with extra batteries and air purification cartridges to Merks on the Kazakhstani-Kygyz border. On August 11, a DEA expert conducted training seminars on the use of the equipment and found that the equipment was defective. Post will send it back to the company for repairs.

Status-Services

Construction Projects

Renovations to the training center in the Uralsk Border Control Division on the Russian border were completed. The renovation included installation of new doorways and replacement of the floor. The Center is fully equipped and used for training events.

INL also funded the IOM renovation of a food preparation area and veterinary clinic at the Canine Center of the KNB Military Institute. INL Program Manger inspected the premises in January 2009 and found the renovations satisfactorily completed. Post plans to purchase veterinary equipment for the clinic.

Demand Reduction Services

INL co-funded two anti-TIP information campaigns in 2009: Night Stars and InfoTrain. The target of “Night Stars” was students. The play ran for 10 performances over a five-day-period. Each performance included a discussion of the risks of being trafficked when seeking employment abroad and in the country and the exhibition of anti-trafficking posters designed by children. As part of the campaign, anti-trafficking information booklets and DVD’s were produced and disseminated to schools. The project reached more than 9,000 students.

InfoTrain was more broadly targeted and included a 10-day information campaign conducted jointly with police anti-trafficking operations. At the beginning of the campaign, a press conference was held at the MVD Press Center. Informational materials were disseminated in cities and on trains. The campaign reached more than 80,000 people in 13 cities.

Under the drug demand reduction project, INL commissioned a survey of drug use among youth and is creating a Drug Demand reduction committee to review grant proposals from local NGOs. INL officer and Program manager have participated in local anti-drug campaigns and working with the government to provide support to such campaigns.

Program Impact

Vehicles

The use of the vehicles enables the BGS to get potable water to the field and for border patrols to transport offices during shift changes to.

Canine Centers

The recipients of technical assistance are pleased with the training provided at the Austrian Canine Center and in Kazakhstan in 2009. Upon their return, instructors from the KNB Military Institute, Border Guard Service, Customs Control committee, and Ministry of Interior trained groups of canine specialists in their services. Approximately 60 canine officers from the Ministry of Interior and the Border Guard Service have been trained by these trainers. During 2009, INL sponsored five canine training events, including train-the-trainer programs, with 61 participants. Post has also sponsored the participation of 15 canine instructors and heads of canine services in one study tour and four international conferences.

Counternarcotics and Border Security

A total of 106 officers participated in Post’s counternarcotics and border security training events in 2009. In January, 2009, 16 MVD counternarcotics officers received operational tactics training. Five instructors from various training centers participated in a study tour and train the trainer course at TADOC.

Forensic Equipment

Five training sessions have been held using the INL-provided computer classroom and equipment. The gas chromatograph produced 788 analysis and the liquid chromagraph has analyzed 35 samples.

Anti-TIP Center

Since the establishment of the Center, INL has conducted one anti-TIP conference and 15 training sessions, in which 312 officers have been trained. The dormitory at the Center is used for all trainings, saving post and government money.

FPA

Examinations in 39 subjects were conducted in the computer classroom in January 2009 and examinations in 45 subjects were conducted in May 2009.

Crime Statistics

When the PGO Criminal Statistics Division was established in March 2003, subdivisions in isolated regions had no means of communication between each other and with the central office. Statistical data was provided via mail or fax. Due to the INL project, crime statistics can now be transferred directly to regional subdivisions and the central office quickly and efficiently.

BGS

The renovated and equipped classrooms provide an opportunity for increased in-service training events and seminars conducted by international organizations. The equipment helps border guards to detect drugs and other contraband. Post provided trained 10 BGS officers in the use of the ASABRE-4000 drug detector in Merke October 1-2.

KNB Military Institute

Post began working with the Military Institute in Mach 2006. In June 2006, post provided samples of equipment transferred to the border for use in training cadets. Post has a good working relationship with the Military Institute, which is appreciative of the assistance provided.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Unmonitored Resources

The host government cooperated with post on equipment monitoring. Due to the vast size of Kazakhstan and the high cost of travel, post does not have sufficient staffing or a large enough travel budget to allow for the inspection of each piece of equipment provided to different agencies throughout the country.

Repair and Maintenance

The defective SABRE 34000 hand-held drug detector has been repaired by the manufacturer.

The Almaty Forensics Lab has been renovated and proves that power fluctuations are no longer a problem. USP was provided for high-value lab equipment.


ASHGABAT

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Inger Tangborn, 993-312-350045 ext. 2257, tangbornia@state.gov

Inventory System

INL Ashgabat has a spreadsheet with all the equipment listed that has been donated to the Government of Turkmenistan. The spreadsheet contains details on recipients; dates of donation, description of the items donated, and its quantity.

Additionally, INL Ashgabat has filed all the end-user certificates that are signed by the donor and recipient during handovers.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Post’s INL Assistant is responsible for communicating with end-users on the equipment’s condition; transmitting information to donors; arranging service maintenance and repairs; conducting on-site inventories and inspections; and performing audits. Post does not have a dedicated INL Officer.

The INL Assistant was hired in August 2008. Post has no dedicated INL Officer.

Other USG Agency Assistance

No other USG agency conducts regular reviews to account for and verify the condition and use of INL-provided resources

Counterpart Agencies

Criminal Research Center (CRC)

Receipt

The recipient signs the End User Certificate for the received items, which certifies that the recipient will not use the items for other than their intended purpose; resell, pass or otherwise dispose of any of the articles/data to a different agency inside or outside the country or to any other person.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

One on-site inspection was performed at the CRC facility. Two gas chromatographs and a mass spectrometer, as well as two light vehicles, were inspected. All donated items were personally inspected and accounted for.

One scheduled on-site inspection was performed at the SCNS facility. Two light vehicles were personally inspected and accounted for. Inspection dates are as follows:

12/28/2009 - CRC
12/23/2009 - SCNS

No unscheduled on-site inspections were performed. No counterpart sites or cities were visited by INL personnel during the reporting period.

Fifty four (54) items were subject to inspection. One hundred percent of the items were inspected.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

The INL Assistant conversed with host government officials on the status on INL-funded resources.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

During 2004-2006, INL provided computer equipment, including desktop computers, printers, digital cameras, video recorders, scanners, a copy machine, fax machine, laptop computer, and a projector to the Criminal Research Center (CRC) of the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the State Forensic Service (SFS) of the Ministry of Justice. In 2006, the latter agency was dismantled and its functions and INL equipment were transferred to CRC. All equipment is in good working condition and used for the purpose intended.

Vehicles

In January 2005, the State Forensic Service (SFS) of the Ministry of Justice received two-Russian-made, light VAZ 21102 model vehicles. In June 2006, SFS was dismantled and its functions were transferred to the Criminal Research Center (CRC) of the Ministry of Internal Affairs. SFS transferred these two vehicles to the CRC. The vehicles are used for daily office needs and operations as well as for travel to crime scenes. In August 2009, INL donated two Toyota Corollas to the newly established SCNS to support its operational, as well as its day-to-day needs. All vehicles were accounted for and in operating condition.

Criminal Research Center
VAZ 211002 LADA 2

SCNS
Toyota Corolla 2

Laboratory Equipment

The Ministry of Internal Affairs CRC laboratory is equipped with Agilent Technologies gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer systems, gas chromatograph, an infrared spectrophotometer system, hydrogen generators, a de-ioned water system, drug air cleaner, air compressor, eye wash stations, module and battery packs for laboratory equipment, drug and precursors kits, electronic scales, and compound and stereo microscopes. This equipment, donated during 2004-2007, is in excellent condition.

Miscellaneous Equipment

In August 2009, INL donated 20 Narcotics Identification Master Kits (NIK) to the SCNS. Following the donation, post’s TDY U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Special Agent conducted training for SCSN officers on the use of narcotics field testing systems. The training included demonstrations of various tasks included in the kits. Fifteen SCNS field offices, including five for the headquarters in Ashgabat and two from each of five provincial branches attended the training and were provided with a narcotics identification kits, rubber gloves, and a Russian translation of the user’s manual.

Status-Services

Demand Reduction Services

INL funded Drug Demand Reduction Program (DDRP) was launched on September 2008, implemented by the Red Crescent Society of Turkmenistan. The DDRP has opened its branches in five provinces of Turkmenistan with headquarters in Ashgabat. For the past five months, they have conducted public outreach campaigns, published anti-drug brochures and leaflets, conducted seminars and recruited volunteers for peer-to-peer trainings.

Other Professional Services

In November, seventeen law enforcement officials graduated from the third round of a ten-month English Language Training Program funded by INL. The fourth round starts in January 2010, with 45 law enforcement officers from eight different law enforcement agencies.

Program Impact

Vehicles

The two light VAZ LADA vehicles are used by the CRC for daily office needs and operations, as well as travel to crime scenes. The two Toyota Corollas donated in August to the SCNS are used for daily office needs and operations, for undercover operations, travel to the crime scene, and to transport drug seizures and evidence.

Computer Equipment.

The equipment is used for office’s daily needs and operations as well as for training sessions. DOJ/ICITAP experts also used this equipment during the training they conducted for CRC personnel in June 2008.

Laboratory Equipment

Laboratory equipment is widely used in testing drugs and other evidence seized by police and counternarcotics officers. Although the newly created SCNS developed its own laboratories, CRC is still responsible for conducting advanced tests and providing technical and training support to the SCNS lab personnel. A total of 1009 kg 28,064 gr of drugs were seized in the first six months of 2009 by all law enforcement agencies in Turkmenistan.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

Gas Chromatograph and Mass Spectrometer - Maintenance of the gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer continues to be a problem because the CRC lacks resources and technicians with skills needed to conduct repairs. The nearest Agilent Regional Service Center is located in Tashkent, which causes problems in arranging immediate service calls. DOJ/ICITAP contacted Agilent in Tashkent to replace the broken AC power board on the gas chromatograph and to provide basic technical training to the personnel in April. The gas chromatographer, which should ideally be left on at all times, is in fact switched on only when needed, because of CRC’s limited supply of helium gas needed to operate the chromatographer.

Depending on funds availability, INL Ashgabat will continue assisting CRC in contacting Agilent for maintenance and repair. CRC has established contact with Agilent representation in Tashkent, but CRC doesn’t have financial resources to contract Agilent’s technicians for maintenance and repairs. Thus, CRC is highly dependent on INL’s support.

INL Ashgabat plans to meet Ministry of Interior’s management to explain that its CRC’s responsibility to maintain and repair the donated equipment and the Ministry of Interior has to budget adequate resources annually for equipment maintenance/repair.

Lack of Chemical Solvents - The CRC lacks basic chemical solvents like methanol, chloroform and pump oil which are not available on the local market. Post donated 45kg of these chemical solvents to the CRC in October in the framework of the INL-funded ICITAP Forensic Development Project. Although ICITAP has so far several times provided chemical solvents, its regular provision is not envisaged by the program.

INL Ashgabat will meet Ministry of Interior management to explain that they should organize the constant supply of chemical solvents to the CRC as INL cannot and will not provide the chemical supplies to the CRC. If needed, INL Ashgabat will provide U.S. vendor information to the Ministry officials to contact them directly for the supplies.

Staff Turnover

Frequent staff turnover within the CRC laboratory’s management has created some difficulties in maintaining a consistent and proper inventory list of INL-funded equipment provided to the CRC. In addition, staff turnover has created some uncertainty among CRC staff about who should be responsible for maintaining the laboratory’s inventory records.


BEIRUT

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Ted Kontek, 961-04/542600 ext. 4368, kontektl@state.gov

Inventory System

Post records the distribution of donated equipment with the DSP-83 and a computer data base of the distributed equipment.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Aline Champichian maintains the data base of equipment; assists in preparation and signing DSP with ISF representatives.

Counterpart Agencies

The Internal Security Forces (ISF)

Receipt

The individual items are received using a DSP-83 signed by an agent from the receiving agency and an INL representative.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

Twenty-three (23) scheduled and nine (9) unscheduled on-site inspections were performed at nine locations in 2009. The dates and location of the on-site inspections are as follows:

12/07/2009 - ISF Helou Station
12/08/2009 - ISF Helou Station
12/23/2009 - ISF Helou Station
12/07/2009 - Dbaye Station
12/08/2009 - Dbaye Station
12/22/2009 - Dbaye Station
12/11/2009 - Saida HQ
12/14/2009 - Saida HQ
12/17/2009 - Saida HQ
12/09/2009 - Tripoli HQ
12/10/2009 - Tripoli HQ:
12/30/2009 - Terdun/Achraqfish
12/31/2009 - Verdun/Achraqfish
01/04/2010 - Verdun/Achraqfish
01/07/2010 - Mobile Forces HQ
01/12/2010 - Mobile Forces HQ
12/21/2009 - Beirut Area
12/21/2009 - General Security
12/28/2009 - Security of Embassy HQ
12/15/2009 - Zahle HQs
01/12/2010 - General Security HQ
01/13/2010 - General Security

The number of items subject to inspection was 578. The percentage of items personally inspected was 98%.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Five vehicles were available for inspection. ISF Colonel Bounasreddine, ISF commander responsible for all vehicles, submitted documentation explaining the unavailability of these five vehicles and assuring their presence and continued appropriate use. The parentage of items inspected using this method was 1%.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles

Four hundred twenty (420) Dodge Chargers, 60 Ford Explorers, and 17 APC were donated to the Internal Security Forces (ISF). There were 14 Dodge vehicles that were not inspected. Seven of the vehicles were assigned to the security detail of the Prime Minister, President, or Speaker of Parliament and were not available for inspection. The others were either called to an assignment when they were scheduled to be inspected or were disable in the outlying regions of Lebanon.

Internal Security Forces
Dodge Charger 420
Ford Explorer 60
Refurbished APC’s 17

Computer Equipment

Two hundred ten (210) pieces of software were donated to the Director of General Security (DGS) for its analysis investigations. Twenty (20) computers and monitors were donated to the DGS for staff databases and analytical investigations for the security of Lebanon,

Communications Equipment

Thirty-five (35) Vertex standard encrypted portable radios were donated to the ISF. They are used by the ISF Mobile Forces in Beirut for high risk police response.

Miscellaneous Equipment

One Kohler automatic generator is located at the Warwar Training Academy. It is used to provide backup electricity for the classrooms. Four pieces of fitness equipment were donated to the ISF. It is used by the ISF Mobile Forces in Beirut to maintain their personal physical fitness.

Status-Services

Construction Services

The Warwar Academy Phase I is 90% completed It is scheduled to be completed on March 7, 2010. Two pre-fabricated concrete structures provided to ISF for use as a temporary police station in the area adjacent to Nahr el-Bared Palestinian Camp is 100% complete.

Program Impact

Unmonitored Resources

There were 14 Dodge vehicles that were not inspected. Seven of the vehicles were assigned to the security detail of the Prime Minister, President, or Speaker of Parliament and were not available for inspection. The others were either called to an assignment when they were scheduled to be inspected or were disabled in the outlying regions of Lebanon.

Vehicles

The vehicles donated to the ISF facilitate performance of their mission by providing a reliable and very recognizable police vehicle. Having new, safe distinctively marked police vehicles increases the reliability of the fleet used by the ISF for responding to calls for service. The distinctive markings and appearance of a modern police vehicle in the ISF also serves to elevate the visibility of the ISF in the eyes of the public. These factors are critical in increasing the citizen’s perception of safety, particularly as the ISF moves toward a more open, community policing operational philosophy.

The combination of a more highly trained police force responding to calls for service in a professional appearing and performing police vehicle and interacting on a regular basis with the citizens to solve community problems cannot help but improve the public image of the ISF.

Colonel Bounasreddine is responsible for the vehicle maintenance of all ISF vehicles. He commented: “Overall, I must say that the program has been largely a success.” The new police vehicles have allowed us to perform our police duties quicker, safer and with more confidence.”

Colonel Bounassreddine also related that from a maintenance standpoint, the new police vehicles were considerably better than what they had been using. He clarified saying that their old vehicles were made for civil use and were not suited mechanically or operationally for police patrol. Receiving “police patrol vehicles” make a big difference in not only the maintenance issues but also increased the confidence of the police officers who work patrol. He indicated that the ABS brake systems, heavy suspension, better maneuverability, all added up to a superior level of performance when compared with their old civilian models used for patrol.

Colonel Bounasreddine stated that adding the new vehicles to their fleet increased their presence on the street by about 20%. He related that adding the additional vehicles, increased their patrol time plus lowered their critical or major maintenance issues. Additionally, the frequency of police initiated collisions had been reduced drastically and that better braking and overall maneuverability has made the difference.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

Basic maintenance appears to be occurring to support the use of donated vehicles. However, the ISF technical personnel, responsible for vehicle maintenance and repairs do not have the needed training, diagnostic equipment or facilities to conduct more than just the basic repairs and maintenance, e.g. oil changes, brake pad replacement. Therefore, that work is done by outside vendors.

The Ford Explorers purchased for the ISF came with a three-year warranty. The warranty is contingent on regular maintenance. According to the Beirut Ford Dealer’s service manager, the vehicles are being serviced and maintained according to manufacturer recommendations. This dealership has a maintenance contract with ISF and also do all warranty work (warranties have recently expired). The regular maintenance is helping to keep these vehicles in operation. However, they have had issues with some vehicles overheating and some requiring transmission overhaul.

Similarly, the local Dodge dealer (only one in Lebanon) provided a maintenance plan to the ISF for Dodge charger vehicles. The Dodge vehicles had only a year warranty which has expired for all but 120 vehicles. The dealership conducts some of the service and maintenance, but because of obvious logical issues and cost, minor maintenance and repairs also are conducted by ISF maintenance staff and by local repair facilities located through the country.

The ISF tries to avoid using the vehicle dealership for regular maintenance to save money. The ISF regularly sends vehicles to the dealership for diagnosis of mechanical problems, receive a written diagnosis, and then attempts to repair the vehicle themselves using aftermarket parts rather than factory parts. This has created some issues with performance of the aftermarket parts failing prematurely.

The Dodge dealership is contemplating building a separate facility specifically for repair of the ISF vehicles. However, they will first require a strong commitment for the ISF to use the services of this new shop. The ISF also lacks the ability and resources to effectively monitor and track and collect data on their total fleet. They document some vehicles use information manually, but have found this method cumbersome and inefficient.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

Exercise equipment was provided to the ISF/Mobile forces in March 2008. The equipment was found to be still packed in shipping crates during the 2009 End Use Monitoring visit in December 2009. Major Saad Keirouz, Black Panthers Commander, informed the inspector that the ISF lacks a facility to set up the equipment. Their current exercise facility is a tent-type garage. The equipment purchased would not be compatible with what would essentially be an outdoor facility. The ISF is currently developing a room for the Mobile Forces/Black Panther that will be used for this purpose. Major Keiruz anticipates completion within 60 days. The inspector will conduct a spot check at that time to verify use of the equipment.

DUSHANBE

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Nigora Safarova, INL Supervisory Program Manager, Tel: 992 907 521025, nigoras@state.gov

Inventory System

INL Dushanbe uses an Excel spreadsheet to maintain inventory. Post hopes to have a server-based inventory downloaded to post’s stand-alone computer in 2009. Pending action from post’s IRM office, INL Dushanbe will download and use the program material inventory software from NAS Lima which will provide electronic record keeping capability.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Three local INL Program Managers, one DOJ/RLA Program Manager, and one INL Project Manager is responsible for monitoring the equipment donated to the projects. Program managers maintain an internal record of donated goods and periodically request detailed inventories from the receiving agencies. Regular monitoring of INL-supported projects provides an on-going opportunity for specific End Use Monitoring, program evaluation, and identification of additional ways to increase program effectiveness.

Counterpart Agencies

Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD), including Counternarcotics Department (CN Department)
Trafficking-in-Persons Unit (TIP)
Forensic Laboratory
Analytical Center and Police Academy
Drug Control Agency under the President of the Republic of Tajikistan (DCA), including SCNS headquarters
SCNS Training Academy
SCNS Analytical Center
BG Headquarters
BG Training Academy
BG Zastqvas (Border outposts)
BG Ports of Entry and Airport Security Department
State Committee for National Security (SCNS) and Main Department of Border
Guards Forces (BG) including SCNS headquarters
Airport Security Department
Ministry of Justice, including the Judicial Training Center

Receipt

INL Dushanbe procedures for equipment transfers require the GOTI end-user agency to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for all INL-provided equipment. The MOU specifies the item donated, the quantity, description, intended use, and its location.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

INL Dushanbe inspected 100% of over 400 items subject to inspection. The percentage of personally inspected donated items was 100 percent.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Post used comparison of records as a secondary method of assessing resource status. Post had discussions with the head of the International Department of Border Guards, the head of Mobile Teams of Drug Control Agency and the head of the Logistics Department of the Ministry of Interior. Ten (10) percent of donated items were monitored using secondary methods.

Status-Commodities

Since 2005, post has provided equipment to host government institutions located throughout Tajikistan. These institutions include the Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Drug Control Agency, and the State Committee for National Security with separate provisions to the Border Guards, which is a sub-unit of the Committee for National Security.

Gym Equipment

INL provided the following gym equipment to the Drug Control Agency so that Mobile Teams could maintain physical conditioning: plates 45 lb, Hex dumbbells with Ergo grip 101 lbs; Star track bicycle, Landice running track, Kettler Delta 300 Power Station, U.S. Strength Olympic 4 in 1 Bench, U.S. Strength Olympic incline bench, U.S. Strength Adjustable decline bench, U.S. Strength Arm curl bench, U.S Strength 45-dgree hyperextension, chin Dip Vertical Knee Raise. The checks show that the equipment is being property maintained.

Uniforms

INL procured 10,000 uniforms for Border Guard troops serving on the Tajik-Afghan border, including one thousand sets designed specifically for the severe winter conditions of the GBAO area. The checks showed that the equipment is being property used and maintained.

Miscellaneous Equipment

During 2009, INL-provided the Counternarcotics Department ten ballistic vests, eleven voice recorders, one Dual tube binocular, five digital voice recorders, one Dual tube binocular, five digital voice recorders, five sound amplification devices, two Trunk tracker scanners, two detection devices, one Mobile phone, one Scrambled synthesized Audio Receiver with flash Memory Digital & Audio Transmitter, one 1000-1W Cig. Pack Audio TX cigarette pack, one15m Wrist Transmitter, two Telephone Pickups, one disguised coat hanger antenna, 2W Scrambles Tactical repeater channel receiver, signal channel transmits.

During 2009, post provided the DCA two Night Vision binoculars NVS, three GPS devices, four photo cameras, one laptop and one digital Hancy cm video camera. In previous years, INL provided the Drug Control Agency three video cameras, four photo cameras, three CT-30 kits, fifteen WP wide angle 10x50 binoculars, ten Garrett handheld super scanners, five D221 generation II binoculars, three “Detect Ear” snap-together parabolic dishes, nine RBR combat MKII ballistic helmets, five Gall’s 16 MB Digital voice recorders with wireless microphones, four “Command Ear” sound amplifiers, two Steiner 15X80 Military binoculars, five inspection mirrors, five T700 safes, seven NVB-8 Gen III 64LP/MN 5d Night Vision binoculars, four portable held GPS’, eleven Motorola professional two-way UHF radios, three Bearcat 350A scanners, one refrigerator, and one air-conditioner. The checks showed that the equipment is being properly used and maintained.

During 2009, INL provided the Police Academy gymnasium with the following gym equipment: three gym workout Benches, one station workout machine, one weight bench, two free weights storage racks, two bench presses, three Treadmills, two stationary bicycles, one table, one ceiling mounted pull-up bar, one seated row machine, one shoulder, one sit up bench, one weight bench.

In previous years, INL-provided an electrical transformer to ensure continuous electricity support for the equipment provided. All equipment is being properly used and maintained.

In 2009, post provided the Analytical Center of the SCNS Academy ten computers, a local area network, a projector, two printers, a scanner, special analytical software TAS ONTOS and office furniture for its operation. The learning facility consisting of instructors room, computer and language lab for teaching, are equipped with 37 computer, four printers, one copy machine, satellite TV set, two interactive digital boards and four projectors. Part of the learning facility conference room with simultaneous interpretation equipment and furniture was established for State Committee of National Security to conduct different trainings, conferences, and workshops. The checks show that the equipment is being property used and maintained.

Computer Equipment

In previous years, post provided eight Samsung desktops, five HP Scan Jet 4370 scanners, one HP Laser jet 1320 printer, and nine WV-1000 voltage regulators.

Forensic Equipment

Post provided the forensic Lab with the following equipment: Millipore water purifier; “atlas copco” air compressor, Nexus 670 Nicolet FTIR Spectrometer, Parker Model 75045-12 FTIR Purge Gas Generator, HP 4050 LaserJet printer, Epson stylus Color 100 printer, AC Power UPS, Parker Balston FIO Gas generator, Parker Balston Nitrogen Generator, Agilent 6890 Series GC system, economy starter kit, 5000 VA voltage regulator, 7000 VA voltage regulator, 110x220 VA voltage regulator, two Canon LBP 2900 i-sesus printers. The equipment is being properly used and maintained.

Border Guard Headquarters - Fifteen Garrett hand-held super scanners, sixty RBR combat MKII ballistic helmets, and five safes. The checks showed that the equipment is being property used and maintained.

Khirmanjo border Outpost - one hundred and sixty pieces of furniture. Until the reconstruction works are completed, all the furniture is stored at the sealed Department of the Border Guards warehouse.

“Bog” Border Outpost - one Steiner binocular, one NVD 221 Generation 2 binocular, and one night shadow Generation 3 binocular.

Shurabad Otryad number 8 - one Steiner binocular, one NVD 221 Generation 2 binocular, and one night shadow Generation 3 binocular.

“Sarigor” Border Outpost - one Steiner binocular, one NVD 221 Generation 2 binocular, and one Night Shadow Generation 3 binocular.

Nizhnily Pyandj Port of Entry (Border Guards and Customs) - 13 armchairs, 11 folding couches, 48 desks, 73 tables for meals, ten file cabinets, two coffee tables, eight bookcases, 18 wardrobes, 220 chairs with folding pads, 48 office chairs, three ironing boards, three irons, 11 iron safes, ten radiators, 40 iron beds, 35 foot lockers, 40 mattresses, 36 stools, four examination desks, 30 soft chairs. The checks showed that the equipment is being properly used and maintained.

State Committee on National Security Headquarters - one Night Shadow NVB8 Gen, three Night Vision goggles, three Olympus digital voice recorder WS-310M with earplugs SME-TP3CX, two Garmin GPS 72, one UNIDEN scanner bearcat BC350C, one D221 BN-079 Generation 2 binocular, two inspection mirrors, two “Detect Ear” AP330 parabolic dishes, two Steiner binoculars item number 415, ten Galls 16MB digital voice recorder w/wireless microphones AP424, eight “Command Ear” sound amplifiers, ten UNIDEN trunk tracker radio scanners. The equipment is being properly used and maintained.

INL provided an electrical transformer to insure continuous electricity support for the equipment provided. The equipment is being property used and maintained.

Trafficking-in-Persons Unit (TIP) - ten WP wide angle 10x50 binoculars, ten Garret hand-held super scanners, and ten combat ballistic helmets, all of which were accounted for and are in good working condition.

Forensic Lab - Millipore water purifier, “Atlas Copco” air compressor, Nexus 670 Nicolet FTIR Spectrometer, Parker Model 75045-12 FTIR Purge Gas Generator, HP 4050 LaserJet printer, Epson Stylus color 100 printer APC Power UPS, Parker Balston FIO Gas generator, Parker Balston Nitrogen Generator, Agilent 6890 Series GC system, Economy Starter kit, 5000 VA voltage regulator, 7000 VA voltage regulator, 110x220 VA voltage two Canon LBP sensus printers. The equipment is being properly used and maintained.

Fingerprint Lab - five HP Scan Jet 4370 scanners, one HP Laser jet 1320 printer, and nine WV-1000 voltage regulators. The checks shows that the equipment is being properly used and maintained.

Vehicles

Ministry of Internal Affairs
Toyota Prada 2

TIP Organized Crime Department
Toyota Prada 2
Gazelle 2
VAZ 10
Chevrolet Niva 2

Counternarcotics Department
Gazel Gaz 3
Toyota Camry Grande SPL 1
WAZ “Niva” 1
WAZ Sedan 6
Chevrolet Niva 2

MVD Headquarters
Toyota Land Cruiser 2

Border Guards/State Committee on National Security
Toyota Prada 2
Kamaz truck 7
UAZ 5
Ambulance 8
Toyota Camry Grande 1
Volga 5

Drug Control Agency
Toyota Prada 1
Gazel GAZ 3
Chevrolet Niva 4
VAZ Sedan 6
VAZ Niva 2
ATV 2

Status-Services

Construction Projects

The following construction projects completed in 2008 were inspected:

MVD Analytical Center, Dushanbe (100%)
CN Department Training room (100%)
MIAD Forensic Lab, including training room (100%)
Drug Control Agency Mobile Teams facility (100%)
Drug Control Agency Mobile Teams Gym, including the room (100%)
State Committee on National Security Training Academy fifth floor (100%)
MIA Police Academy third floor including the roof (100%)
MVD Police Academy first and second floor renovation (95%)
MVD Police Academy window replacement (100 %)
Border Guards Academy renovation (60%)
Kulma and Kizil-Art border posts renovation (40%)
Murgah Detachment renovation (10%)
Drug Control Agency Ishkashin facilities renovation (5 %)
Khirmanjo Border outpost renovation (70%)
MIA dormitory renovation (1%)
Drug Control Agency Murgah Mobile Teams (5%)
Prosecutorial Training Center (40%)

Demand Reduction Services

In October 2009, the U.S. Embassy International Narcotics Enforcement office jointly with the Body Building and Fitness Federal of Tajikistan, organized the Bodybuilding championship dedicated to drug demand reduction and promoting a healthy lifestyle among young people in Tajikistan. The championship was conducted by the Body Building and Fitness Federation of Tajikistan and sponsored by the Drug Demand Reduction Project of the International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Section of the United States Embassy in Tajikistan. Contestants, ages 20-38 participated in the 3-day tournament in Dushanbe and over 1,000 young people attended it. The third day of the tournament marked the completion of the competition, and twelve winners were awarded prizes. The final day of the competition featured musical performances by local artists and demonstrational spot activities by the winners of the competition. The program complements other U.S. counternarcotics initiatives aimed at improvements in traditional narcotics interdiction and law enforcement institution building. The project targets high school students in the county, to promote a healthy and drug-free lifestyle.

Program Impact

The Government of Tajikistan uses all resources provided in an effective manner. Regular arrests of drug traffickers and the seizure of kilos of drugs over several months are excellent examples of how the GOT law enforcement agencies are making progress in their fight against drug trafficking and related crime. Overall, law enforcement and security ministries contributing to management of border smuggling and organized crime have demonstrated greater capacity and willingness to be proactive in comparison to previous years.

The data below shows the narcotics seizures

Ministry of Internal Affairs

Heroin (kg) 2008: 751 2009: 402
Opium (kg) 2008: 411 2009: 272
Cannibis (kg) 2008: 821 2009: 1236
Total MVD (kg) 2008: 1983 2009: 1910

Drug Control Agency

Heroin (kg) 2008: 751 2009: 402
Opium (kg) 2008: 411 2009: 272
Cannabis (kg) 2008: 821 2009: 1236
Total MVD (kg) 2008: 1983 2009: 1910


Laboratory Equipment

The Equipment donated to the MVD Forensic Lab helped MVD better investigate and analyze evidence of drugs and other crimes providing a better legal basis for prosecution of alleged criminals.

Vehicles

Vehicles were used in drug related operations, including resupply of outposts, which provide mobile capability to respond to narco-trafficker incursions from Afghanistan.

Night Vision Goggles

Night Vision Goggles helped all law enforcement agencies, especially those on the Tajik-Afghan border, to control the border and to prevent drug traffickers from going through the border.

Computers

Computers and other office equipment helped officers develop computer skills for communication and research, internet use to find professional information and to use intelligene software. During 2009, reporting period, INL paid more attention to the computer equipment donated to law enforcement agencies than verifying effective and proper use. INL Program Managers checked on the location of computers, their condition, reasons for use, policies for use, maintenance possibilities, operations, etc.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Unmonitored Resources

Some of the equipment donated is distributed among Zastavas/border posts along the Tajik Afghan border. In the winter, it is difficult to travel to some of the border posts due to inclement weather conditions (temperatures reach minus 40 or more and snow falls of a meter are not uncommon). During the previous EUM period, there were some items that INL could not inspect. During the 2008 reporting period, INL reached all previously unmonitored equipment and included it in the current EUM report.

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

Maintenance of technical equipment continues to be a problem because law enforcement agencies lack resources and technicians with advanced knowledge to do such repairs. Post will provide apppropiate maintenance support and work with host government technicians to enhance their capabilities in maintaining equipment.

During the checks, post program mangers revealed some problems with provided technical equipment. It is mostly air-conditioners and office equipment. INL will provide assistance in repair of this equipment. Post will also refine its policies concerning providing computer training along with computer hardware.


ISLAMABAD

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Muhammad Faisal, LES EUM Coordinator, Telephone Number (office): 92-51-2278675 Ext. 234, Mobile Number: 0092-300-8567091, email: KhattakMF@state.gov

Inventory System

NAS uses an inventory database that was created by the IRM section of Embassy Islamabad for use with Microsoft Access. This system allows us to record and track the distribution of all resources provided to host government agencies, and to maintain and retrieve End Use Monitoring information.

Staff Members with EUM Responsibilities

The Director, Narcotics Affairs Section, has ultimate responsibility for end-use-monitoring in Islamabad. Ellen J. Hays, Management Officer, is responsible for overseeing the End Use Monitoring (EUM) process and submission of the EUM report. Muhammad Faisal Khattak, LES EUM Coordinator, heads activities, coordinates assistance funded by NAS programs and verifying the accuracy of the EUM data. Asif Rahat, LEA Inventory Officer is responsible for recording and tracking the distribution of all commodities provided to Pakistan’s governmental agencies, physically inspecting commodities, updating lists after EUM inspections, preparing receiving and disposal reports, and providing inventory lists to the EUM team. Nasir Iqbal, LES Communications Technician, is responsible for all communications equipment. Muhammad Naqi, LES Communication Technician, assists the NAS Communication Technician. Raza Ishaq, LES administrative assistant, NAS Peshawar, conducts EUM activities for the North West Frontier Province (NWSP) and Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).

Counterpart Agencies

Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF)
Pakistan Coast Guard (PCG)
Customs Intelligence (CI) and Customs Preventive Collectorate (PC)
Frontier Corps Baluchistan (FC-B)
Frontier Corps North West Frontier Province (FC-NWFP)
Frontier Constabulary
Helipad (Emergency Relief Cell, 6th Squadron)
Home Department NWFP and Governors FATA Secretariat (including Narcotics Control Cells (NCC)
Home Department Baluchistan, including Baluchistan Levies (BLF)
Intelligence Bureau (IB)
Maritime Security Agency (MSA)
Ministry of Interior (MOI)
Ministry of Narcotics Control (MNC)
National Police Academy (NPA)
Islamabad Police
Frontier Police
Baluchistan Police
New Horizon Care Centre (NHCC)
Development in Literacy (DIL)

Receipt

Commodities are provided to agencies only after a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is signed between NAS and the End User agency. The MOU includes a description of the commodities and is signed by the appropriate GOP official.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Eighty-three (83) scheduled on-site inspections were performed. Eight (08) unscheduled on-site inspections were performed. Ninety-one (91) counterpart sites and forty-four (44) cities were visited. Out of a total of 7,423 donated items, sixty-six percent (66%) of donated items were inspected.

03//03/09 - Sibi
03/04/09 - Beleli-Quetta
03/04/09 - Beleli-Quetta
03/30/09 - Hyderabad
03/31/09 - Karachi
04/01/09 - Karachi
04/01/09 - Karachi Seaport
04/01/09 - Karachi Airport
04/02/09 - Karachi
04/03/09 - Karachi
04/14/09 - Muslim Bagh
04/14/09 - M. Faqirzai
04/15/09 - Zhob
05/04/09 - Faisalabad
05/05/09 - Multan
05/06/09 - Lahore
05/07/09 - Lahore
05/08/09 - Lahore
05/09/09 - Gujranwala
05/18/09 - Dalbandin
05/19/09 - Nokkundi
05/20/09 - Taftan
05/20/09 - Saindak
05/21/09 - Ahmadwal
05/21/09 - Noshki
05/22/09 - Panjpai
06/23/09 - Mastung
06/23/09 - Khuzdar
06/23/09 - Kalat
06/24/09 - Nawab
06/24/09 - Baran Luk
06/24/09 - Wadh
06/25/09 - Bela
06/25/09 - Hub
07/27/09 - Rawalpindi
07/28/09 - Rawalpindi
08/04/09 - Loralai
08/05/09 - Duki
08/06/09 - Quetta
08/07/09 - Quetta
08/18/09 - Islamabad
08/19/09 - Islamabad
08/24/09 - Islamabad
12/08/09 - Shela Bagh
12/08/09 - Chaman
12/09/09 - Roghani Camp
12/09/09 - Dosti Gate
12/09/09 - Gulistan
12/10/09 - Pishin
12/21/09 - Quetta
12/22/09 - Quetta
12/23/09 - Quetta
01/05/10 - Islamabad
02/08/10 - Korangi
02/09/10 - Karachi
02/10/10 - Uthal
02/11/10 - Gwadar
02/12/10 - Pasni
02/12/10 - Gwadar
02/13/10 - Gwadar

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

The NAS Inventory Officer compares quarterly reports received from agencies receiving NAS assistance. This is particularly helpful where on-site inspections are not possible due to the remoteness of the site or security concerns. NAS performs End Use Monitoring in the course of day-to-day program management. The NAS Director, Deputy Director, and Management Officer routinely reinforce EUM objectives with counterparts in recipient agencies. As needed, NAS management raises the issue of commodity abuse or fraud with appropriate officials, recommends areas of improvement and follows up to ensure timely compliance. GOP agencies are generally cooperative and responsive to EUM requirements. Recipients of NAS assistance understand that NAS will not tolerate malfeasance. This is particularly helpful when on-site inspections are neither feasible nor safe.

Under the secondary method, sixty percent (60%) of vehicles, seventy-seven percent (77%) of communications equipment, forty-four percent (44%) of office and other equipment, eighty-five percent (85%) of surveillance equipment, and ninety-four (94%) of field gear were monitored. These commodities were compared to distribution lists obtained from GOP agencies during the EUM visits and from their quarterly reports.

Status of Commodities

NAS has provided commodity support to Pakistani law enforcement agencies under the Counternarcotics Program since 1982. The following are details of commodities, broken down by agency.

Aircraft

Pakistan Ministry of Interior Aviation Program
UH-1H Huey-II 14
C-208 Caravan 3

Weapons

Pakistan Ministry of Interior
GAU-17 4
M60D 8
M240 20

INL/A Contractors
M-4 20
M-9 25

Vessels

Pakistan Customs
Boston Whaler 27 Foot Challenger 1

Vehicles

Anti Narcotics Force (ANF)
Isuzu Double Cab Pickup 12
Isuzu Troop Carrier Truck 2
Isuzu Mini Truck 10
Isuzu Station Wagon 5
Isuzu Water Bowzer Truck 5
Nissan Patrol S/cab Pickup 30
Nissan Sunny Sedan 42
Suzuki Alto VXR CNG 50
Suzuki Rav Pickup 6
Toyota Coaster Minibus 6
Toyota Corolla Sedan 4
Toyota Hiace Van 22
Ambulance Mercedes 3
Hyundai Shehzor Truck 3
Toyota Hilux S/cab Pickup 71
Toyota Hilux D/cab Pickup 87
Toyota Land Cruiser Station Wagon 1
Honda CG-125 Motorcycle 183
Yamaha Motorcycle 23

Frontier Corps Baluchistan
Ambulance Mercedes 14
Hino Dutro Troop Carrier Truck 10
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 276
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 78
Isuzu Trooper Station Wagon 6
Isuzu Water Bowzer Truck 25
Isuzu Troop Carrier Truck 105
Nissan Patrol S/cab Pickup 10
Recovery Vehicle 3
Toyota Hilux D/cab Pickup 30
Toyota Hilux S/cab Pickup 46
Toyota Land Cruiser Pickup 190
Tractor Fiat 34
Hino Water Bowzer Truck 10
Honda CG-125 Motorcycle 30

Frontier Corps NWFP
Isuzu Troop Carrier Truck 195
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 84
Isuzu Trooper Station Wagon 25
Isuzu Water Bowzer Truck 38
Toyota Hilux D/cab Pickup 25
Toyota Hilux S/cab Pickup 38
Toyota Land Cruiser (FAV) 2
Toyota Land Cruiser Pickup 152
Tractor Fiat 50

Home Department-Baluchistan (Levies)
Isuzu Troop Carrier Truck 12
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 24

Pakistan Coast Guards
Hino Troop Carrier Trucks 8
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 25
Isuzu Troop Carrier Trucks 21
Isuzu S/cab Pickups 9
Isuzu Trooper Station Wagon 1
Isuzu Water Bowzer Trucks 11
Toyota Hilux D/cab Pickup 14
Toyota Hilux S/cab Pickup 10
Tractor Fiat 8

Intelligence Bureau
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 6
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 2
Isuzu Trooper S/Wagons 17
Nissan Sunny Sedan 9
Honda CG-125 Motorcycles 46

Ministry of Narcotics Control
Isuzu Trooper S/Wagon 1

Ministry of Interior
Toyota Corolla Sedan 2

Bajaur Agency (Home Department NWFP)
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 6

Frontier Constabulary (Home Department-NWFP)
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 1
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 5

Mohmand Agency (Home Department-NWFP)
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 6
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 1

North Waziristan Agency (Home Department-NWFP)
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 9
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 3

Orakzai Agency (Home Department-NWFP)
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 4
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 2

South Waziristan Agency (Home Department-NWFP)
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 8
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 3

Peshawar (Home Department-NWFP)
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 1

Khyber Agency (Home Department-NWFP)
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 10
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 2

Kurram Agency (Home Department-NWFP)
Isuzu D/cab Pickup 2
Isuzu S/cab Pickup 8

Status of Services 

Construction Projects

Counternarcotics Projects – The US Government has committed US $45.4 million for Mohmand, Bajaur and Khyber area development projects in FATA out of which US $37.24 million has been spent. Construction projects of US $2.89 million are underway, with US $5.27 million still pending to complete Counternarcotics construction projects in FATA. The US Government has also committed US $24 million for Kala Dhaka and Kohistan area development projects in NWFP, out of which US $6.5 million has been spent. Several construction projects of US $2.5 million are in process with US $15 million still pending for Counternarcotics construction projects. In FY 2009, USG assistance continued to focus on area development and crop substitution activities in the poppy growing areas. During FY2009, NAS completed 37 kilometers of road construction and 40 small schemes, including drinking water supply/irrigation/micro hydro power stations. Since the start of the CN project, a total of 586 kilometers of roads and 873 small drinking water supply/irrigation schemes have been completed. Construction of 73 kilometers of roads, and 16 small schemes are in process.

Border Security Projects – Border Outposts in NWFP: The construction of six (06) border outposts was completed in 2009. Three (03) are still in process. The total cost of this Phase-II program is US $1.958 million.

Defense Works under FC NWFP Phase II - Construction of Outposts under Phase II started in April 2007. Due to security problems, some outposts were abandoned in July 2008. On September 7, 2009 the Inspector General FC-NWFP held a meeting and proposed utilizing the residual funds of US $.88 million for defense works. Twenty-five defense works will permit forces to resist and improve sustainability, in case of siege from militants. Defense works include construction of boundary walls, underground bunkers, underground water storage facilities, watch towers and improvement of existing facilities etc. All defense work is expected to be completed by December 2010.

Border Outposts in Baluchistan - Twenty-five (25) border outposts costing US $1.458 million were completed in 2009 under its Phase II plan.

Repair and reconstruction of Outposts for Frontier Constabulary - USG is supporting the Frontier constabulary by providing US $1.2 million for the repairs (first phase) and reconstruction of outposts (second phase) in FR areas of NWFP. The estimated cost of this program is US $1.0 million. Twenty-seven (27) out of thirty-seven (37) Border Outpost have been completed under this program and ten (10) are in process.

Training and Support of Levy Forces in FATA - This project will provide essential infrastructure to law enforcement agencies (Khasadar, levies and FC) at strategic locations in FR Kohat, FR Peshawar and Khyber Agency. Besides the above, levy lines have been proposed in this scheme each for 64 persons at Bajaur, Mohmand, Khyber, Aurakzai and Kurram Agencies to augment the local administration’s efforts to establish the writ of the government, improve law and order and improve delivery to the general population. The total cost is US $7.0 million. The following projects are underway:

Levy Lines Mohmand: Completed up to roof level and work in process.
Levy Lines Bajaur: Completed up to roof level and work is in process.
Levy Lines Jamrud, Khyber Agency: Completed up to roof level and work is in process.
Levy Lines Spina Thana (FR Kohat): In process.
Levy Lines Aurakzai: In process.
Levy Lines Kurram: In process.
HESCO Type barriers for NWFP-Police

The US Government has committed US $5.0 million for the procurement and installation of earth-filled security barriers (HESCO-type barriers) for use by the NWFP Police. The barriers will be used to strengthen the security of police stations in the NWFP. Police stations in all twenty-five (25) districts of NWFP were proposed. NWFP-Police reported that 8,212 barriers have been installed to date. However, NAS representatives could only visit and verify 194 barriers in five (05) districts. The remainder of the districts could not be visited due to security concerns.

Demand Reduction Services

New Horizon Care Center (NHCC) is a Karachi based NGO that provides treatment and rehabilitation services to 1,400 patients including men, women and children. NHCC conducted forty-three (43) programs in which 8,500 youth were trained in life skills through drug abuse prevention programs. NHCC also conducted nine (9) community awareness programs that assisted 3,200 people. A drug demand reduction program for teachers trained 241 teachers in six (6) areas, including a drug demand reduction program for parents. An additional program trained 30 parents on “how to raise children drug free”. Five hundred (500) people were trained in five (05) medical awareness programs. NAS provided the following commodity support to NHCC: 15 vans, one ambulance, four motorcycles, one laptop, one computer, one multimedia projector, one nebulizer machine, one mobile suction machine, one oxygen cylinder and one wheel chair.Development in Literacy (DIL) is an NGO, based in Islamabad that conducts training and student activities in 53 schools. Eight hundred fifty adults (84 teachers and 766 adult community members, mainly parents and care givers) received training in 2009. NAS has provided one Mini Van to DIL. DOST Welfare Foundation is a Peshawar based NGO that has three (3) drug treatment facilities with 210 beds. DOST also operates six (6) “Darul Fala Centers” in FATA agencies and organizes drug awareness campaigns. Five hundred and seventeen (517) drug addicts were treated during 2009.

Program Impact

Communications Equipment

Recipient GOP agencies report using communications equipment to plan, coordinate and conduct counterterrorism and counternarcotics operations. INL-funded HF and VHF radio equipment to enhance control of the border areas, through improved band width nationwide. The Coast Guards noted that communication equipment has given them a 24-hour link to all their posts allowing them to relay information related to smuggling in a timely way. In remote areas, radio equipment is crucial to operational success, and is a primary source of communication between outposts. NAS has provided solar panels and power generators to various agencies, providing uninterrupted service to non-electrified areas.

Weapons

The utilization of GAU-17 equipped Huey IIs as escort aircraft, relieved MOI aircrews of the requirement to coordinate gunship escort with Pak Mil Army Aviation units. This allowed the MOI crews to operate independently of Pak Mil escorts.

NAS has taken possession of 20 new M-240D Machineguns as a defensive weapons system for use on INL aircraft. The new weapons will provide the MOI aircrews with a significant defensive weapons capability upgrade. Aerial gunnery qualifications will have to be scheduled and completed prior to the employment of the new weapons system on the aircraft.

Construction Projects

USG provided funds to GOP for the construction of the Border Outposts to enhance the security of Pakistan Borders with Afghanistan against the threat of cross border terrorism. It will strengthen the writ of the government on the western borders of Pakistan. NAS has been involved in supporting this aim by constructing numerous projects with different security and line departments.

Surveillance Equipment

Recipient GOP agencies operate surveillance equipment for counterterrorism and counternarcotics operations. FC-NWFP and FC-B are taking advantage of this equipment along the Pak-Afghan and Iranian borders.

The Anti-Narcotics Force (ANF) - using NAS-provided surveillance equipment, seized 66 metric tons of hashish, 7.1 metric tons of opium and 0.5 metric tons of morphine/heroin.

Frontier Corps-Baluchistan (FC-B) - use FLIRs, night-vision goggles, monoculars and binoculars along the Pak-Afghan and Iranian borders for drug interdiction and to stop illegal human trafficking. FC-B reported seizing 5.8 metric tons of hashish, 5.2 metric tons of opium and 1.9 metric tons of morphine/heroin.

Frontier Corps-NWFP - uses surveillance equipment along the porous Pak-Afghan border and in FATA and other parts of NWFP. They reported 560 militants arrested and 1,236 killed in FATA and along the Pak-Afghan border. Thirty eight (38) vehicles were destroyed and 28 seized. Ten explosive laden vehicles, ten arms depots, 58 weapons, 16 IEDs and 50 rockets were also seized. FC-NWFP also reported seizing 1.5 kilograms of hashish in the Khyber Agency of FATA.

The Pakistan Coast Guards – using surveillance equipment, seized 2.4 metric tons of hashish.

Vessels

Pakistan Customs, using a NAS-provided vessel, reported seizing 5.92 metric tons of hashish, 208 kilograms of heroin and 75 kilograms of opium.

Laboratory Equipment

N/A

Aircraft

The impact of the GAU-17s was critical. The systems were employed in training and defensive operations supporting law enforcement operations in the FATA and NWFP.

Fourteen (14) UH-1H-II (Huey II) helicopters flew a total of 2,265.6 hours in 2,333 sorties hours from January to December 2009. The helicopter’s operational readiness rate for the year was 77.3 percent. Three (3) fixed-wing Cessna C-208 Caravan aircraft flew 1,445.0 hours in 845 sorties and were maintained at an Operational Readiness rate of 80.7 percent.

The Air Wing’s fourteen (14) Huey IIs conducted numerous missions including MOI support, Embassy support, poppy surveys, MEDEVAC support, general logistical support and border reconnaissance.

The three (3) fixed-wing Cessna Caravan aircrafts, equipped with FLIR surveillance equipment, conducted numerous missions including MOI support, Embassy support, poppy surveys, MEDEVAC support and general logistics support.

The most significant impact of the US provided aircraft was the focused aviation support that they allowed us to provide to the Frontier Corps-NWFP. The FC-NWFP Commander called the MOI aviation support a force multiplier and requested more support for his border security, counternarcotics and anti-terrorism programs.

Missions supporting Frontier Corps-Baluchistan have also been effective in supporting border security operations along the Af-Pak border.

Vehicles

Pakistan has made progress towards sealing the border with Afghanistan against penetration and illegal passage by militants, drug traffickers and other criminals by using INL-funded vehicles. These vehicles include 4x4 troop carriers, recovery vehicles, double and single cabin pickups, stations wagons, min vans, ambulances, water bowzers, tractors and motorcycles. Law Enforcement agencies reported appropriate use of INL-funded vehicles for counternarcotics and border security operations. These vehicles allow law enforcement staff to conduct surveillance; patrol border areas; pursue, apprehend and transport suspected miscreants and drug smugglers; conduct background investigations and search for hideouts and drug storage areas.

The overall narcotics seizures by all Pakistani agencies in 2009 were: Heroin (including morphine base); 3.69 metric tons, Opium: 8.46 metric tons, Hashish: 163 metric tons, Illicit Labs Destroyed: No labs have been destroyed to date, Arrests: 43,036 persons.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Currently, there is insufficient infrastructure to support operating more than four aircraft in NWFP at a time. NAS is working with MOI and the NWFP Home Department to acquire sufficient land to establish a Forward Operating Location near Peshawar. A parcel of land has been offered by NWFP Home Department, but is insufficient in size to accommodate the planned eight (8) helicopters and one (1) Cessna C-208. Fifteen (15) acres of land are necessary before NAS can begin assisting GOP with facility construction. MOI continues to work with NWFP Home Department to acquire the requisite land.

Additionally, the GOP continues to face flight crew (especially R/W pilot) shortages. As Pak Army demands increase, with no corresponding increase in basic flight training capacity, MOI offers qualified pilots to fill the shortage. INL has discussed providing pilot training to MOI civilian law enforcement personnel, but thus far has not received any indication that MOI is seriously considering the offer. The GOP, over the next year, needs to evaluate its capacity to absorb and employ any additional aviation assets. INL/A representatives have offered to assist MOI officials identify resource requirements and available USG assistance, but the GOP has not received the suggestion with any sense of urgency.

During the course of EUM, it was discovered that the ratio of lost/stolen commodities to ANF is increasing. This matter was raised by the NAS management through a letter to the Director General ANF. The following commodities were reported lost or stolen during 2008 and 2009: one Toyota Double Cabin Pickup, 5 motorcycles, 1 computer system, and one multimedia projector.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

Six (6) Nissan Single Cabin pickups with ANF Peshawar were not in use, due their heavy engines and high fuel costs. NAS has raised the matter with the concerned authorities to return these pickups so they can be handed over to some other law enforcement agency, where they could be utilized.

Other Problems

Twenty-one (21) out of thirty-one (31) planned EUM visits in NWFP could not be carried out because of the security situation in parts of FATA and other parts of NWFP.

Three (3) out of nine (9) planned EUM field visits to FC-Baluchistan could not be carried out, because of the difficult law and order situation.


KABUL

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

The designated INL/NAS-Kabul End Use Monitoring (EUM) Coordinator is NAS Management Officer Charles Bullington (land line: 93 (700) 108-001, Cell: 07-000-39-722, email: BullingtonCE@state.gov

Inventory System

For the first time ever, post has developed a comprehensive Excel database for EUM purposes. The catalyst for this database was the termination of the Poppy Eradication Force (PEF) program, which required a 100% contractor-conducted inventory of non-expendable project equipment. This database incorporates all EUM equipment; aircraft, vehicles, computers, weapons and radios. It also enabled post to reconcile several 2008 EUM report discrepancies and to significantly increase the accuracy of the 2009 EUM report. For instance, numerous items that ought to have been reported in the 2008 report are now being reported in the 2009 report (Air Wing vehicles, computers & weapons and Grant equipment as well as GPI construction. Although far removed from a web-based inventory system, the existing comprehensive EUM database is a significant improvement over what previously existed.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Pertinent ICORS and a two-person Locally Engaged Staff (LES) inventory team have lead day-to-day responsibility for inventory tracking and EUM coordination. In addition, a two person LES procurement team (one of which comes on board in March 2010), along with post engineering staff, will have oversight on significant GPI construction projects. Post recently hired an inventory clerk to assist in EUM activities; including sight visits to conduct significantly more spot checks/random samplings of EUM equipment as well as GPI project and grant project site visits and equipment monitoring. This additional staffing also supports a major post goal of increased oversight of EUM assets to prevent/minimize fraud, waste and abuse. Post has also proposed adding a Compliance Officer as part of Mission Kabul’s Civilian Uplift staffing increase request that has been approved by the Chief of Mission. This officer will be directly responsible for the extensive coordination required with various oversight agencies.

Post has used its Foreign Assistance funded equipment well. Over 7,200 aircraft sorties were flown that equates to 7,555 flight hours, transporting 38,495 passengers and moving over 2,150,000 pounds of cargo (over 1,000 tons). Its 560 vehicles were driven over 3,500,000 miles, averaging 8,400 miles per vehicle. Also, all of its 4,225 weapons were accounted for –none were lost or stolen. Construction projects were a high priority focus for post; the following projects were initiated or were monitored (in-progress projects) in 2009:

$14,427,000 Civilian Police (CIVPOL) construction projects
$ 8,940,000 Good Performers initiative (GPI) construction projects

Other USG Agency Assistance

The Drug Enforcement Administration assists in monitoring the use and condition of equipment purchased for the Counternarcotics Interdiction project.

Counterpart Agencies

Ministry of Interior - Afghanistan National Police and Counternarcotics Police of Afghanistan
Ministry of Justice – Attorney General’s Office and Central Prisons Directorate
Provincial Governors Offices

Receipt

All durable items and equipment turned over to the GIRoA are the subject of a signed Transfer Agreement that specifies the number and type of items being donated, their intended use and intended distribution or location.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site Inspections

Throughout the year, NAS staff is required to conduct random inventory samples of INL- procured items during visits to Regional Training Centers, counterpart offices and other program locations. However, due to serious ICOR under-staffing for at least a two-year period and inadequate LES staffing, an insufficient number of Scheduled Inspections and Unscheduled Inspections were conducted during 2009. This situation will be partially turned around in 2010 and fully turned around in 2011 because post’s seven NSDD-38 approved positions should be filled by the end of the second quarter 2010. During 2009, NAS staff inspected 13,601 items.

Status-Commodities

Vehicles

INL provided a total of 560 project vehicles under the Civilian Police contract task order to train and advise the Afghan National Police and other Afghan Government entities. The vehicles are located throughout the country in accordance with project requirements. They were driven a total of 3,590,645 miles during 2009, (an average of 8,429 miles per vehicle). The vehicles remain in the temporary custody of INL contractors, who base them in secure facilities in Kabul. Of the vehicles covered in this report, 503 are operational, 13 were destroyed by IED’s, 2 were damaged beyond economical repair and 24 are awaiting repair. For 2009, the distribution of vehicles, by project, is as follows:

ACAS (Afghan Civilian Advisory Support) – Afghan Civilian Advisory Support (ACAS) INL has a total of 388 project vehicles currently under ACAS (and Predecessor) task orders. None of these vehicles have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 376 remain in the temporary custody of the contractor. Of this total, 352 are operational and 24 are waiting repair. Twelve were destroyed by IED’s, have been dropped from inventory and are not reflected in the vehicle count since they were properly documented as having been destroyed.

Afghan Civilian Advisory Support (ACAS)
Ford Excursion 52
Toyota Land Cruiser 31
Jeep Liberty 5
Ford Phoenix 8
Ford F-250 Truck 131
Chevrolet HD Truck 59
Ford F-350 Cargo Truck 82
Ford F-450 Cargo Truck 2
Ford F-550 Cargo Truck 1
Small Vehicles 5


CNAT (Counternarcotics Advisory Team) – INL has purchased a total of 16 project vehicles under the CNAT task order. INL has not yet transferred these vehicles to Afghan Government agencies. All 16 remain in the temporary custody of the contractor. Of this total, 14 are operational and 2 are waiting repair. CNAT project vehicles logged 96,506 miles during 2009.

Counternarcotics Advisory Team (CNAT)
Toyota Land Cruiser 14
Ford F-250 Pickup Truck 2

Counternarcotics Interdiction (NIU and SIU) – INL has purchased a total of 14 project vehicles under the Narcotics Interdiction Unit (NIU) and Sensitive Investigation Unit (SIU) task orders. All vehicles remain in the temporary custody of the project-support contractor. All 14 vehicles are operational. A total of 116,662 miles were driven during 2009.

Counternarcotics Interdiction (NIU and SIU)
Toyota Land Cruiser 3
Ford F-250 Pickup Truck 6
Small Utility Vehicles 5

Justice Sector Support Program (JSSP) – A total of 15 project vehicles were procured under the JSSP task order. JSSP has not transferred control of any of these vehicles to the Afghan Government agencies and all vehicles are in the temporary custody of the contractor. All vehicles are operational. JSSP vehicles logged a total of 275,000 miles during 2009.

Justice Sector Support Program (JSSP)
Toyota Land Cruiser 10
Ford F-250 Truck 1
Ford Excursion 4

Corrections System Support Program (CSSP) – INL has purchased a total of 20 project vehicles under the CSSP task order but a 2005 Ford Excursion was destroyed by an IED. All are sport utility vehicles. INL has not transferred any of these vehicles to the Government of Afghanistan. All 19 of the vehicles remain in the custody of the project- supported contractor. A total of 59,868 miles were driven during 2009.

Corrections Systems Support Program (CSSP)
Ford Excursion 11
Toyota Land Cruiser 8

INL Air wing – INL has a total of 40 project vehicles under Air Wing task orders. None of these vehicles have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 40 remain in the temporary custody of the contractor, and all are operational.

INL Air Wing
Ford Excursion 6
Ford F-250 Truck 9
Ford F-550 Truck 2
Ford F-650 Truck 1
Ford F-750 Truck Water Truck 2
Ford Van E350 4
Toyota 1600 1
Fuel Truck Navistar 2
Volvo Fuel Truck 1
Small vehicles 12

Poppy Eradication Force (PEF) - INL has a total of 80 project vehicles under PEF task orders. None of these vehicles have been transferred to the Government of Afghanistan; all 80 remain in the temporary custody of the INL and all are operational.

Computer Equipment

To date, INL has procured a total of 1,843 project computer (both desktop and laptop) under contract task orders. Most of these computers remain in the temporary custody of INL contractors, with the exception of 48 computers that were transferred to the Government of Afghanistan. The computers are distributed to project sites around the country as required by project needs and the vast majority of computers remain in serviceable condition. Individual support contractors track the location of these items through internal inventory systems. For 2009, the overall distribution of computers by project is as follows:

Counternarcotics Advisory Team (CNAT) – The designated INL/post EnINL has purchased a total of 89 project computers under the CNAT task order. All computers remain in the custody of the INL contractor to support the project and all are operational.

Counternarcotics Interdiction (NIU, SIU, TIU) – A total of 191 project computers have been procured under the Interdiction task order which supports the Narcotics Interdiction Unit (NIU), the Sensitive Investigations Unit (SIU) and the Technical Investigation Unit (TIU). The 191 Counternarcotics Interdiction computers remain in the custody of the project-supported contractor, and all are operational.

Justice Sector Support Program (JSSP) – A total of 138 project computers have been procured under the JSSP task order: all are operational, 123 are in contractor custody and 15 have been donated to GORoA.

Correction Systems Support Program (CSSP) – INL has purchased 119 computers under the CSSP task order. Of these, 33 have been transferred to the GIRoA Central Prisons Directorate, while 86 remain in the custody of the INL Contractor.

INL Air Wing – A total of 253 project computers have been procured under the Air Wing task order: all are operational and all are in contractor custody.

Poppy Eradication Force (PEF) – A total of 79 PEF project computers have been procured under the Air Wing task order: 78 are operational and one is damaged/waiting repair.

Weapons

INL has provided 4,225 weapons for contract personnel helping to implement project activities in Afghanistan. The 2009 breakdown of weapons distribution by project appears below. All weapons are in the possession of contract personnel and all are in serviceable condition. No weapons were lost or stolen in 2009.

Justice Sector Support Program (JSSP) – The JSSP weapons that were in the 2008 EUM report have been removed, as they are not authorized under the task order. All of these weapons were transferred to the security contractor who is properly licensed with the Afghan Government to carry and use weapons.

Poppy Eradication Force (PEF) – Post demobilized the PEF – previously known as the Afghan Eradication Force and the Central Poppy Eradication Force during 2009. As part of this demobilization, INL undertook a comprehensive inventory of PEF equipment. This inventory identified a total of 8,889 durable commodities subject to EUM requirements. In anticipation of the termination of the PEF Project, NAS-Kabul developed a disposition plan for all project equipment.

This disposition plan took into account Standard Provisions of the bilateral Letters of Agreement (LOA) under which the equipment had been procured. Standard Provision 2 stipulates that “Title to all property procured through financing by the USG shall be to the GIRoA unless otherwise specified”. Standard Provision 3 further requires that “Property furnished to the GIRoA or supported through funds provided by the USG shall be devoted to the purpose of the project specified and shall be used to further the project’s objectives”.

In accordance with these provisions, post is transferring PEF project vehicles, radios and other equipment that remains functional to Afghan Government agencies and/or other INL-funded counternarcotics projects whose activities relate to the purpose of the PEF project and/or which further the broad counternarcotics objectives of that project.

At year’s end, reallocation of PEF project equipment continued. Post expects to complete reallocation of all PEF project equipment by the end of the first quarter of 2010. The overall equipment reallocation plan is summarized in the following tables. Note: DynCorp conducted a 100% Physical Inventory, and post conducted a 44.45% inventory sampling.

Communications Equipment

For 2009, INL procured a total of 2,649 project radios under contract task orders. All radios remain in the custody of INL contractors and/or Government of Afghanistan entities (44 radios were transferred to the Government of Afghanistan). Individual support contractors track the location of these items through internal inventory systems. Radio distribution for 2009, by project, is as follows:

Afghan Civilian Advisory Support (ACAS) – A total of 1,728 project radios have been procured under the ACAS task order and all remain in the custody of the INL contractor. A total of 1,640 radios are operational, while 88 are inoperative.

Counternarcotics Advisory Team (CNAT) – A total of 92 project radios have been procured under the CNAT task order. All remain in the custody of the INL project-support contractor and all are operational.

Interdiction (NIU, SIU, TIU) – A total of 10 project radios have been procured under the interdiction task order. Nine remain in the custody of the contractor and are operational. One is in LDD status (lost, damaged or destroyed) but the process has not yet been finalized.

Justice Sector Support Program (JSSP) – A total of 54 project radios have been procured under the JSSP task order. All remain in the custody of the INL contractor: 49 radios are serviceable and 5 are non-functional.

Correction Systems Support Program (CSSP) – A total of 64 project radios have been procured under the CSSP task order. Of this total, 44 have been transferred to Afghan Government agencies; 20 Motorola BPR40 portable radios were transferred to the Kabul Women’s Detention Center, and 14 Garmin GPS radios and 10 radios of undetermined nomenclature were transferred to the Pol-i-Charkhi National Penitentiary. Thirteen portable radios and 7 vehicle radios have remained in the custody of the INL contractor. All radios are operational.

INL Air Wing – A total of 363 project radios have been procured under the ACAS task order and all remain in the custody of the INL contractor. All 363 radios are operational.

Poppy Eradication Force (PEF) – A total of 338 project radios have been procured under the PEF task order and all remain in the custody of INL. All 338 radios are operational.

Aircraft

All program aircraft, both INL-titled and wet-leased are based either at Camp Alvarado, Kabul International Airport, Camp Valdes or Kandahar Airport.

INL aircraft of various types flew 7,664 sorties for a total of 7,551.17 flight hours during 2009. Flights went to all regions of Afghanistan, carrying 38,495 passengers and 2,155,556 pounds of cargo.

All Projects
UH-2 Helicopter 10
MI-8 Helicopter 2
AN-72/24/26 Airplane 1

Other Equipment

Post has GPI and Grant equipment at various locations throughout Afghanistan that has a total value of $4,404,000. As such, post recently established and staffed an LES position that will focus on conducting site visits to ensure this equipment is accounted for and is properly used.

GPI agricultural combines - 3
GPI tractor attachments - 45
GPI agricultural machinery - 124

Construction Projects

INL funds numerous construction projects, the majority of which use locally available subcontractors. Project purposes have included Regional Police Training classrooms, dormitories, and dining facilities. These construction projects have also included electrical generation facilities and/or hook-up to the national power grid. Similarly, waste-water treatment facilities such as biochemical treatment plants and/or septic-tank systems with associated leach fields have been part of construction projects.

During 2009, post embarked on a large, very high profile renovation construction project at Pol-i-Charkhi (PiC) prison near Kabul. The project began in July 2009. The original 24-month contract issued by the Department of State’s Regional Procurement Support Office (RPSO) in Frankfurt was subsequently amended to provide incentive ‘acceleration’ payments that the contractor could earn by completing the renovation work in a 16-month time frame. As of January 20, PiC is 33% complete although the contractor has fallen behind the acceleration schedule. Currently, the winter weather has slowed construction but it is expected to pick up when the weather gets better. One significant factor that has slowed the project is the delay in the contractor moving to a night shift; as such, a Cure Notice is being sent to the contractor. The contractor has recently taken steps to transition to a night shift.

Critical paths for this major and high profile construction project are; CPD moving, in a timely manner, prisoners from three current wings to three newly constructed wings when they are available for occupancy. CPD taking over Operations and Maintenance, the contractor is only responsible for O&M for the first sixty days – major milestone in this path is O&M training for Pol-i-Charhki/CPD staff.

During 2009, a number of additional and significant INL-funded construction projects were initiated and/or monitored (in-progress): $228,000 K-Span PiC construction project (warehouse/storage space) to be completed by May 2010, $150,000 commercial power design project for PiC, CNJC and AMS to be completed by May 2010, $5,785,000 Wardak Prison Construction to be completed by May 2012, $6,889,000 Baghlan Prison Construction to be completed by May 2012, $75,000 Vehicle Maintenance facility for NIU/DEA to be completed by March 2010, $1,300,000 CNJC Waste Water Treatment System and Water Utility construction projects to be completed by March 2011.

Through FY 2009, INL has allotted $37,938,000 for its Good Performers Initiative program, with the majority of these funds being used for infrastructure construction projects, averaging approximately $675,000 per project (for projects that are either completed or that are in progress). These are generally localized projects designed to improve the economic infrastructure of provinces that have made progress in controlling opium poppy cultivation. Project types are schools, irrigation, hospitals, canal cleaning, generator rooms, clinics, etc. Completed projects to date are: $278,000 Irrigation project, $113,000 Wall Construction & Canal Cleaning project, $139,000 Asphalt Road Extension project.

There are an additional 11 projects, funded at $8,300,000, that are in-progress. Again, with a total of $12, 700,000 in funding for completed projects or projects underway, this speaks even more clearly toward justifying the establishment of a second LES position to assist in End Use Monitoring in this area. Post continues to refine its project review and oversight procedures and will use its additional LES staffing in this regard.

Grant Construction Projects - To-date, three GPI construction projects, totaling $110,000, have been completed. All of these projects relate to security upgrades for the Ministry of Counternarcotics and the Ministry of Justice.

Demand Reduction Services

Post funds a variety of drug demand reduction projects. These range from treatment and counseling programs for persons already using illegal drugs, to prevention efforts designed to discourage people, especially young people, from using drugs in the first place. Public information programs that stress the physical, psychological, and economic dangers of drug production and use are an important theme of INL-funded demand reduction programs. Public information campaigns also stress the incompatibility of using illegal drugs and being a good Muslim. Finally, post collaborates with research efforts designed to assess the true extent and nature of drug abuse in Afghanistan.

Assessing the impact of drug demand reduction efforts is notoriously difficult. Illegal drug users go to great lengths to shield their drug use from public view. Even identifying the true incidence and prevalence of drug use trends must perforce rely on estimation techniques. While one can readily measure the delivery of drug demand reduction services, it is much more difficult to assess the impact.

Program Impact

Communication Equipment

In a country where public telecommunications infrastructure is relatively undeveloped, project support in the form of communications equipment is essential if project-support and Afghan counterpart personnel are to be able to talk to one another efficiently. In the case of those projects supported by civilian contractors hired by INL, the principal impact of such equipment to date has been to facilitate program management and implementation. Enhanced communications capabilities have been particularly important in ensuring that security personnel are able to pass information quickly and reliably. As project implementation proceeds and program responsibility transfers incrementally to Afghan counterparts, the impact of enhanced communications capabilities will be felt more in operational areas than in a management context. Ultimately, this is the more important payoff in terms of program impact. At the same time, transfer of responsibility for communication equipment to Afghan Government control will carry with it an increased requirement for operations, maintenance, and repair that will severely challenge Afghan Government resources. This sustainability challenge will be among the most serious of the issues facing the next phase of INL program implementation in Afghanistan.

Construction Projects

The program impact of INL-funded construction projects is double-edged. In a country where the national government is incapable of providing the real property needed for impact projects in narcotics control and the administration of justice, international donors (including INL, when appropriate) provide the majority of new construction. Post recognizes the need to provide this infrastructure, but remains concerned that the international community is funding the construction of more facilities than the GIRoA will be able to sustain, both from a budgeting capacity and a managerial capacity.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Inventory System

The vast majority of the INL-procured equipment subject to EUM is under the day-to-day control of INL’s CIVPOL program contractors. Each of these private contractors uses its own inventory system. The CIVPOL contracts and task orders do not mandate a standard inventory system; however, it ought to be mandated so as to eliminate significant inefficiencies, to preclude duplicative manual data entry and to optimize inventory control and accountability. A web-based system, accessible by all contractors, would create a real-time inventory system, which is especially crucial in an Afghanistan war zone environment that is in a constant state of flux. For instance, post recently had to obtain, in a very short timeframe, a 100% accurate vehicle inventory (replying to a Ministry of Interior mandate) involving over 500 vehicles. It was an extremely laborious exercise that should have taken only a few minutes. Because a real-time inventory system did not exist, all of the In-Country Contracting Officer’s Representatives (ICORs) had to drop everything they were doing and devote 100% of their time to this tasking. As it was, when all the data had been collected, thirteen percent of the database had significant missing information. Post can only hope that this discrepancy will not adversely affect our obtaining temporary tags that enable the vehicles to be driven on the roads of Afghanistan. A web-based system, that is easily available with today’s technology, would enable the creation of much faster, as-needed inventory reports, free up more staff time to devote to more critical tasks and significantly minimize the time it takes to create the EUM report itself. This web-based system would easily pay for itself in the first one to two years. It also would move INL and its CIVPOL contractors into the 21st century.

Unmonitored Resources

As documented in the foregoing inventory tables and as was made painfully clear during the close-out of the PEF project this year, the thousands and thousands of durable commodities that the NAS must track for EUM purposes overwhelm the ability of limited ICOR staff to check the condition of all trackable items each year. Post has, therefore, relied on random sampling in order to properly execute its EUM oversight responsibilities. However; even random sampling was essentially non-existent during 2009 because the average strength level was on two ICORs. As a result, the vast majority of items and services were not physically inspected or random sampled. Other constraining factors that affected proper EUM oversight include field security, major growth in certain programs and the termination of PEF.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

Stolen Pistols: On December 4, 2008, a Beretta 9mm pistol and two magazines of ammo, which had been issued to an INL contractor interdiction employee, were reported stolen from the employee’s sleeping quarters. Based on this incident, weapons are now entered into the property accountability system. Also, the monthly inventory is tied to in-country pay, i.e. contractors must show equipment to receive pay. Weapons in the arms room are also counted monthly. Arms rooms received upgrades and renovations, including alarm, door and light improvements. During 2009, no weapons were lost or stolen.

Disposal of Commodities

Auction: NAS and GSO have concluded discussions and developed plans to dispose of most project commodities via auctions, which are conducted twice annually by GSO. On a case-by-case basis, NAS and GSO may conclude to hold local auctions of INL-procured commodities at the Regional Training Centers or, alternatively, to invite scrap dealers to make offers on furniture, furnishings and appliances deemed to be of insufficient retail value to justify the effort and expense of a public auction.

Destruction of armored Vehicles: Armored vehicles and ballistic glass will be turned over to the U.S. Army Explosives Ordinance Disposal unit at Bagram Air Base, in accordance with Post RSO procedure.

Other Sensitive Items: Hard drives are removed from computers prior to sale or auction. For non-repairable radios, software chips are removed and the remainder of the radio is physically destroyed.

Other Problems

EUM Database: One of the most serious EUM problems facing the NAS was the lack of a fully populated database for tracking all INL-funded durable goods and services. A newly created database and the addition of an LEA Inventory Clerk will go a long way toward implementing a centralized, web-based EUM database that can provide real-time inventory status reporting. This database will also provide important EUM equipment and vehicle operational metrics.

ICOR Understaffing: The other serious EUM problem is the historical understaffing of ICOR positions-a 28% fill rate for the past two years. The debilitating affect on proper EUM implementation and monitoring is self-evident. The few ICORs on the ground can only focus on the most critical and urgent tasks. Post continues to urge that, at a minimum, all seven NSDD-38 approved ICOR positions be filled by the second quarter, 2010.

Insufficient EUM LES Institutionalization: This is an inherently weak area of EUM operations. For 2009, post only had one low-ranking LES devoted to End-Use-Monitoring. This is inherently illogical when an LES’ salary is so low compared to a PSC’s salary. Post not only will be upgrading the senior LES inventory position, it has brought on board another LES inventory clerk position. This provides for a quick and inexpensive way to increase the involvement of institutional LES in the EUM process, and it also minimizes the adverse impact of frequent American staff turnover. Hence, post make more efficient use of its monetary resources and also provides EUM personnel stability and continuity that is extremely valuable in ensuring that mistakes are not made and repeated. The LES also has a leg-up on communicating in the local language with his/her government of Afghanistan counterparts. In addition, a Procurement Clerk position (for GPI project monitoring) has been established. The Procurement Clerk will be coming on board in March 2010. The consequence of these actions is that more LES staff will be appropriately involved with the End-Use-Monitoring process, and increased EUM oversight will be achieved. These two teams LES inventory and LES procurement teams, have scheduled six site visits a quarter.

Summary: Post’s 2009 End Use Monitoring was challenged by ICOR understaffing and inadequate LES (Locally Engaged Staff) staffing; insufficient number of scheduled and unscheduled EUM inspections; and an inadequate EUM database. As such, it is not clear to what degree EUM equipment is properly accounted for & utilized and to what degree GPI construction projects are properly implemented and used. However, toward the tail end of 2009, post established a comprehensive and effective EUM database; has established two new LES positions to provide increased EUM oversight; is projected to have its seven authorized ICOR positions filled by the end of March 2010 (as opposed to having, for the last two years, an average of two ICORs on board).


KATHMANDU

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Denver Fleming, TEL: 977-400-7200 ext. 4366; flemingdh@state.gov

Inventory System

Standard INL-LOA handover forms and Sate Department automated inventory control system.

Staff Member Responsibilities

Post senior Law Enforcement Adviser and the INL-ICITAP Program Management Assistant, conduct regular scheduled and unscheduled inspections/visits at various police agency facilities throughout the fiscal year.

Counterpart Agencies

Nepal Supreme Court
Home Ministry of Nepal (HM)
Elections Commission (EC)
Nepal Police (NP)
Armed Police Force (APF)
Nepal Drug Control and Law Enforcement Unit (DNCLU)

Receipt

Letter of Agreement (LOA) between the government of Nepal and the United States government through Formal LOA handover form receipt process.

Monitoring Procedures

On-Site Inspections

Post performed six (6) scheduled and four (4) unscheduled on-site inspections at six (6) sites in 2009.

01/15/2009 - Elections Commission
02/20/2009 - NDCLEU
03/12/2009 - APF Center
05/14/2009 - Nepal Police National Academy Center
07/28/2009 - APF Training Center
08/12/2009 - Biratnagar, Damak, rani, Itahari and Regional Command Centers
09/17/2009 - Morang District
09/18/2009 - Morang district
11/24/2009 - Nepal Police command Center Kathmandu

The number of items subject to inspection was 488. The percentage of items personally inspected was 40%.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

There were meetings with NP and APF command staff at regional headquarters and district commands locations throughout Nepal annually. Copies of handover forms and procurement records were compared to counterpart’s agency records when available. Host government and counterpart agencies agreed to meet and discuss EM issues, when needed, without any problems or issues encountered.

Sixty percent (60%) of donated items were monitored by secondary methods.

Status-Commodities

The Supreme Court computers are in fair condition but still in use. The Nepal Police Command Center and operational equipment and national network are in good condition and still functions appropriately.

The Armed Forces Command and Control Center equipment including 3 desktop Lenovo, four LaserJet printers, and one Dell laptop is in good condition and still functioning appropriately.

The Elections Commission Joint Elections Operations Center related computer and camera equipment including 10 Dell Notebooks 10 LaserJet printers are still operational and functioning. The equipment is in fair condition.

The Nepal Police Command and Operational training support and computer and office equipment including two laser printers, Dell Notebook, 45 Dell desktops and 2 Dell laptops are in good condition and still functions appropriately.

Status-Services

Construction Projects

The renovation and establishment of the Elections Commission Joint Elections Operations Center facility, the Armed Police Force Command and Control Center and the Nepal Police Command Center for the April 2008 national elections, was successfully completed and continued in operational capacity through the April 2009 bi-elections. These facilities continue to operate in support of security forces and GON Ministries.

Program Impact

The provisions of the Joint Elections Operations Center, the Nepal Police Command Center and the Armed Police Command and Control Center, insured the immediate and direct communications link with nationwide Election Commission regional and district offices and polling stations for the 2008 and 2009 national elections process. The ability for three facilities to coordinate with 5 regions and 75 districts before, during and after these critical events cannot be understated in the overall success and virtually violence- free pre and post elections period in Nepal.

Problems and Corrective ActionPlan (CAP)

Unmonitored Resources

Access to some geographic areas of Nepal are still limited and/or restricted due to security concerns and Maoist strikes and road blocks. Ethnic unrest and civil disorder situations can occur without warning and throughout any given year, several trips to Police facilities, have to be cancelled. Cooperation with host government, Home Ministry and Law Enforcement agencies remains good for EUM activities.

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

The host government has budget shortfalls for repair and maintenance support for security agencies.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Disposition of Unrepairable Items

Many items tracked in previous reports such as motorcycles and bicycles provided to the Nepal Police Women’s Cell and the Nepal Drug Control and Law Enforcement Unit in 1996 were non-repairable. In 2008, at post’s request, the Government of Nepal disposed of all unrepairable items including bicycles and motorcycles used by the NDCLU and the Nepal Police Women’s Cell.

NEW DELHI

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Alice Pandys, 91-11-2419-8000, pandyaA2@state.gov

Staff Member Responsibilities

FSN Alice Pandys is responsible for conducting inventories and on-site inspections of donated material

Other U.S. Government Agencies

U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE)

Counterpart Agencies

Central Bureau of Narcotics (CBN)
Competent authority of India (CA)
Directorate of Revenue Intelligence (DRI)
Government Opium and Alkaloid Works (GOAW)
Indian Customs
Narcotics Control Bureau (NCB)
North East Excise Department

Receipt

Each Indian counterpart agency that received INL-funded commodities must provide a signed receipt in accordance with the Letter of Agreement

Monitoring Procedures

Physical inventory of all INL-funded commodities and vehicles is not feasible. In June 2008, INL closed its office at post and there is no American currently working full time on INL issues. In addition, the size of the country, the distances between locations, poor infrastructure, and budgetary constraints of domestic travel outside the metropolitan areas, combine to render complete physical inventory impossible.

In the past, INL-funded commodities were donated primarily to recipients in Northeast India (in the states of Assam, Mizoran and West Bengal) and in North Central India in the states of Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh. However, over the last three years, vehicles and commodities were delivered to other parts of India: Mumbai, Chennai, Ahmedadad, Varanasi, Tribandrum, Jodphur, and Chandighar, making the physical inventory of INP-donated items difficult. Post found that most of the commodities were well maintained and in excellent condition.

On-site Inspections

In September 2009, FSN Pandys conducted on-site inspection of most of the commodities and vehicles provided to the Central Bureau of Narcotics (CBN) office in Neemuch, Kota, and Lucknow as follows:

09/23/2009 - Neemuch
09/24/2009 - Kota
09/29/2009 - Lucknow

Approximately 75% of the items subject to inspection were monitored.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status

Throughout 2009, FSN Pandys monitored resources donated to other CBN offices, the Narcotics Control Bureau (NCB) and the competent Authority of India (CA) via telephone communication and meetings with relevant officials.

About 40% of the donated items were monitored using secondary methods.

Status-Commodities

Computer Equipment

In 2004, post purchased (18) IBM desk top computers and monitors, (18) HP desk jet printers, (18) webcams, (18) back up UPS’s and (16) copies of Analyst Notebook Software for donation to the NCB nationwide. The NCB New Delhi headquarters received (7) sets of computer equipment and the following NCB Zonal Offices received one complete set: Varanasi, Kolkata, Jammu, Chandigarh, Trivandrum, Mumbai, Delhi, Jodhpur, Ahmedabad, Chennai and Imphal. This equipment remains in good condition. In April 2005, post donated an HP ML570 with keyboard and monitor to the NCB headquarters in New Delhi. The server is also in good condition.

Four Compaq computers and printers were donated to the Excise Department in the Northeast. The computers can be found in the following locations: (2) Excise Headquarters Anti-Narcotics Squad; (1) Office of the Superintendent of Excise, Champai, and (1) Office of the Superintendent of Excise, Saiha. In 2005, INL replaced two defective printers.

All items are in good condition and used for intelligence gathering, record keeping and data exchange.

Nine HP laptop computers were donated to the CBN in July 2005. The computers were distributed to the following CBN offices: (4) CBN HQ Gwalier, (2) New Delhi, (1) Kota (1) Neemuch, and (1) in Lucknow. The computers are in good condition and are used primarily for storage of opium poppy cultivation data (JLOPS) and data related to the poppy crop. Four HP Laserjet printers and one HP Deskjet printer were donated to CBN in May and July 2006 respectively. All items are in good condition and are being used for intelligence gathering, record keeping, and data exchange.

One IBM laptop was donated to the Competent Authority (CA) in New Delhi in May 2005. The laptop is in excellent condition and is used to prepare materials and presentations for workshops on asset forfeiture from drug traffickers.

The following computer equipment was donated to the CBN in March 2006: 4 Dell cabinet assembly; four Dell short tacks; four servers; four analog switches; 40 CPU’s; 40 Dell 17” monitors; four 15” LCD monitors; 40 speakers; computer cables. All equipment has been accounted for and is in good condition.

In May 2006, the CBN received four APC 1000 VA backups and 40 APC 650 backups. In April 2006, 30 Dell laser printers and four IBM Power vault 110T LTO-2 external driver for servers along with four Norton anti-virus and 40 copies of Microsoft Office Pro 2003 were donated to CBN. All of the equipment is in good condition.

Two Dell computers and one HP Laser jet printer were donated to the Government Opium and Alkaloid Works in June 2006. One Compaq HP laptop and one Panasonic LCD projector were donated in November 2006.The equipment is being used for documentation. record keeping and data exchange.

One HP Compaq laptop, two Acer Veritron desk top computers and two HP Laserjet printers were donated to the NCB Kolkaa office in February 2006. The equipment is being use for data and intelligence exchange.

Vehicles

One Maruta Van was donated in 2000 to the NCB headquarters in Imphal. The Eastern Zonal Unit in Calcutta has (1) Maruti Esteem and (1) Toyota Qualis. The Mizoran State Excise received (6) Maruti Gypay 4-wheel drive utility vehicles in 2001; three are at the Excise headquarters in Aizawl; and one each are in the office of the Superintendent of Excise at Champai, Koasib and Saiha.

Of the six Yamaha RX 135 motorcycles delivered in 2001, four are located in Aizwal headquarters and are used by the Anti-Narcotics Squad; one bike each is located at the district offices of Aizwal and Champai. All vehicles donated to the NCB in the Northeast and the Mizorem State Excise are in good condition with maintenance and necessary repairs done at the authorized workshops. The Units’ officers use the vehicles for preventive duty and easy, unidentifiable movement. CBN’s Preventive and Intelligence Cell, Guwahati, Assam has two Yamaha motorcycles that are in good condition and receive regular servicing and maintenance. These bikes are used primarily for intelligence gathering and for special operations.

Two Ford Endeavour (SUV) vehicles were donated to the Office of the Commissioner of Customs (Preventive), North Eastern Region in July 2006. One Tavera (SUV) was donated to the Indian Customs office in Kolkata in 2006. All vehicles are in good condition and are being used for special operations and surveillance.

Nine Mahindra Boleros (SUVs) were donated to North East Customs in June 2007.

In 1999, over 50 motorcycles were provided to the CBN and distributed to the following CBN offices throughout Uttar Pradesh, Mahya, Pradesh, and Rajasthan: six to Chittorgarh in Rajastban; two to Neemcuh in Rajastan; one to Gwallor; two in Delhi; two in Guwahati, Assam; five in Mandsaur; four in Jaora; three in Garoth; one in Ratlam, one in Indore; one in Singoli; one in Ujjain; five in Kota; one in Jahlawar; three in Bhilwara; three in Pratapgarh; three in Barabnaki; two in Bareilly; two in TilThar; and two in Faizabad. All are in excellent working order. The motorcycles are used to patrol the licit opium growing fields for enforcement operations; chase and apprehend criminals; search for drug laboratories; monitor field measurements; and test measurements for poppy harvest. The motorcycles have also been used for the detection and eradication of excess poppy crop, physical checks at weighment centers, and the carrying out of drug and chemical interdiction efforts. All motorcycles are in good working order.

CBN has been using these motorcycles to their utmost capacity as CBN officers have to cover great distances on unpaved roads to monitor the thousands of cultivators in the three poppy growing areas of Rajaqsthan, Uttar Prqdesh and Madhya Praddesh.

The three vehicles (Hero Honda motorcycle, Maruti Esteem, and Toyota Qualis) donated to the NCB South Zone in Chennai remain in good condition, receiving routine maintenance. Two Taveras SUV’s were donated to the Indian Customs Office in Chennai in 2006. All vehicles are used for surveillance, search, seizures and arrests.

The NCB Zonal Unit in Mumbai received two Qualis SUV’s and the one Hero Honda motorcycle in March 2003. These vehicles are routinely used for surveillance and operations. Two Taveras (SUVs) were donated to the Indian Customs in Munbai in 2006. All vehicles are used for surveillance, search, seizures, and arrests. All are in fine condition.

NCB New Delhi received one Toyota Quali, two Hero Honda motorcycles, one Mahindra Bolero, and two Maruti Esteems. The area that the New Delhi Zonal unit is responsible for includes four states as well as the national capital district of Delhi. The Qualis is the New Delhi Zonal Unit’s main operational vehicle used primarily for preventive work, searches, and seizures of illicit narcotics. The Maruti Esteems are used for surveillance as these vehicles blend into the urban traffic pattern of New Delhi. The Hero Hondas’ primary functions are to perform reconnaissance, issue subpoenas, and make deliveries. All of these vehicles are in good condition. Two Taveras’ (SUVs) were donated to the Indian Customs Office in Delhi in 2006. One Taveras (SUV) was donated to the Indian Customs Patna office in 2006. All vehicles are in good condition and are being used for surveillance and intelligence gathering work.

The Hero Honda motorcycle, the Maruti Esteem, and the Toyota Qualis donated to the NCB South Zone in February 2003, remain in good condition and receive routine maintenance. All three vehicles are used for surveillance, search, seizures and arrests.

The following vehicles located at the Zonal Units in Chandigarh, Varanasi, Jodhpur, and Ahmedabad remain in good condition and are used primarily for enforcement and surveillance work- Chandigarh: one Hero Honda motorcycle and one Qualis; Varanasi: one Bolero; Jodhpur: one Qualis and one Bolero: Ahmedabad: one Hero Honda motorcycle and one Bolero.

CBN

Tata sumo Victa GX Turbo

3

Tata Indigo Marina GLX

4

Maruti alto LXI

4

Toyota Innova diesel

1

Banja Motorcycles

40

NCB

Maruti van

1

Maruti Esteem

4

Toyota Qualis

7

Maruti Gypsy

6

Yamaha Motorcycles

50

Ford Endeavour

2

Tavera (SUV)

8

Cameras

Three Sony Digital cameras were donated to the Central Detective Training Schools (CDTS) in Chandigarh, Hyderabed, and Calcutta. These cameras were donated to each of the schools by the ICITAP training team when they conducted a training program in each of the cities in August 2004. All three cameras are in excellent condition and are used to enhance the CDTS’s training.

Four Sony digital cameras were delivered to the Superintendent of Excise in Saiha and, the Anti-Narcotics Squad in Champhai and two to the Excise Headquarters in Aizawl in 2001. All four cameras are reported to be inoperable and are unserviceable. Post will explore the option of replacing the cameras.

In 2003, NCB Headquarters New Delhi received a Hitachi camcorder that is used by the Investigative and Intelligence Branch in Delhi for surveillance and to record seizures. The camcorder is in good condition.

In 2007, eight digital cameras were purchased for the Central Bureau of Narcotics for use in their Joint Licit Opium Poppy Survey (JLOPS) in 2003. The cameras are used mainly to photograph and catalog the different stages of poppy growth in each field office and are used by inspectors visiting the fields. The cameras remain in good condition.

In September 2005, eighteen Cannon Powershot A400 digital cameras and four Canon Powershot A520 digital cameras were donated to the CNB in September 2005. They are in excellent condition. They are used for recording various stages of poppy cultivation as well as documenting seizures and arrests of diverted poppy/opium.

Two Sony camcorders, two Panasonic multimedia projectors and five Motorola two-way radios were donated to the NCB Kolkata in February 2006. Two Steiner binoculars, four night vision binoculars, and two Braun photo Technik projectors were donated to the NCB, New Delhi in May 2006. All of the equipment provided to the NCB is in good condition and is being used to enhance intelligence gathering and training.

In July 2006, twenty-two Garmin Etrex Personal Navigator GPS receivers were donated to the Department of Revenue Intelligence of the Indian Customs Service in July 2006. The equipment is in good condition and used for communications.

Laboratory Equipment

One Gas Chromatograph was donated to the Central Revenue Control Laboratory of the Central Board of Excise and Customs in October 2006.

The following laboratory equipment was donated to the Government Opium and Alkaloid Works (GOAW) in May 2006: moisture meter-one Ohaus moisture analyzer; AAS-one Perkin Elmer analyzer 200/400 Spectrophotometer; one flow injection analysis system for atomic Spectroscopy; one air compressor; GC- one Perkin Elmer Clarus 500 GC, one capillary injector starter kit with one syringe and one HP business inkjet 1000 printer. All equipment is in good condition.

The following equipment was purchased for the CNB for use in the JLOPS survey in 2003. The majority of commodities remain in good condition, except as noted below.

Mitutoyo digimatic calipers (11) – They are used for measuring the poppy capsules to determine the optimum yield at harvest time.

Hot air ovens (11) –They are used to dry the poppy crop.

Hygrothermeter (60) –They are used to record temperature and humidity, necessary statistics required for the JLOPS survey.

Mid-range weighing balances (10) – They are used in Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh for weighing poppy samples. Three damaged scales were repaired in 2005.

Sharp LCD projector (1) – Was donated to the Competent Authority, Northern Region in May 2005. The CA uses the projector with the laptopto give presentations and workshops on asset forfeiture from drug traffickers. The projector is in excellent condition.

Thales Mobile Mappers (GPS) (2) - They were donated to the CNB in September 2005. They are used to plot coordinates of all the licit poppy fields to pinpoint their exact locations. The CBN used the GPS units to determine the plot sizes to better estimate opium crop yields. They are in excellent condition.

Forty (40) Sensor Technology Radiation Pagers were donated to Indian Customs this year, and are in excellent condition. They have been distributed to various Indian Customs Offices for their use in determining whether shipments contain radioactive material. Often, drug traffickers will mark containers radioactive, concealing contraband, hoping that no one will verify
the contents.

Two GE Ion Track Itemizers were donated to Indian Customs for use in the airports in Mumbai and New Delhi. They will be used to scan suspicious luggage when they suspect contraband is being smuggled. They are in excellent condition.

Sixteen Steiner 7 x 50 binoculars that are used in various Indian Customs operations for surveillance are in excellent condition.

Six Nikon Tundra 10 x 50 binoculars were donated to the CBN in July 2005: four are in Gwalior, one in Kota, and one in Neemuch. They are used for surveillance and undercover operations. They are in excellent condition.

Computers

In 2004, post purchased (18) IBM desk top computers and monitors, (18) HP desk jet printers, (18) webcams, (18) back up UPS’s and (16) copies of Analyst Notebook Software for donation to the NCB nationwide. The NCB New Delhi headquarters received (7) sets of computer equipment and the following NCB Zonal Offices received one complete set: Varanasi, Kolkata, Jammu, Chandigarh, Trivandrum, Mumbai, Delhi, Jodhpur, Ahmedabad, Chennai and Imphal. This equipment remains in good condition. In April 2005, post donated an HP ML570 with keyboard and monitor to the NCB headquarters in New Delhi. The server is also in good condition.

Four Compaq Four Compaq computers and printers were donated to the Excise Department in the Northeast. The computers can be found in the following locations: two are at Excise Headquarters Anti-Narcotics Squad; one is at the Office of the Superintendent of Excise, Champai, and one is at the Office of the Superintendent of Excise, Saiha. In 2005, INL replaced two defective printers. All items are in good condition and used for intelligence gathering, record keeping and data exchange.

Nine HP laptop computers were donated to the CBN in July 2005. The computers were distributed to the following CBN offices: four to CBN HQ Gwalier, two New Delhi, one Kota one Neemuch, and one in Lucknow. The computers are in good condition and are used primarily for storage of opium poppy cultivation data (JLOPS) and data related to the poppy crop. Four HP Laserjet printers and one HP Deskjet printer were donated to CBN in May and July 2006 respectively. All items are in good condition and are being used for intelligence gathering, record keeping, and data exchange.

One IBM laptop was donated to the Competent Authority (CA) in New Delhi in May 2005. The laptop is in excellent condition and is used to prepare materials and presentations for workshops on asset forfeiture from drug traffickers.

The following computer equipment was donated to the CBN in March 2006: four Dell cabinet assembly; four Dell short tacks; four servers; four analog switches; 40 CPU’s; 40 Dell 17” monitors; four 15” LCD monitors; 40 speakers; computer cables. All equipment has been accounted for and is in good condition.

In May 2006, the CBN received four APC 1000 VA backups and 40 APC 650 backups. In April 2006, 30 Dell laser printers and four IBM Power vault 110T LTO-2 external driver for servers along with four Norton anti-virus and 40 copies of Microsoft Office Pro 2003 were donated to CBN. All of the equipment is in good condition.

Two Dell computers and one HP Laser jet printer were donated to the Government Opium and Alkaloid Works in June 2006. One Compaq HP laptop and one Panasonic LCD projector were donated in November 2006. The equipment is being used for documentation, record keeping and data exchange.

One HP Compaq laptop, two Acer Veritron desk top computers and two HP Laserjet printers were donated to the NCB Kolkaa office in February 2006. The equipment is being use for data and intelligence exchange.

Communications

Three Motorola headsets are in the headquarters at Aizawl and two each are with the Aizawl district office and the Anti-Narcotics Squad at Champhai. One each is at Saiha, Office of the Superintendent in Kolasib, and at Vairengte. All handsets, which were delivered in 2001, remain in good condition and are very useful for communication in this remote region.

Miscellaneous

The NCB’s Northeast Unit in Manipur received one digital recorder in 2003. It is used for taping statements and telephone conversations. It remains in good condition.

Two Buster contraband detector kits, one contraband team inspection kit, and two generational night vision binoculars were donated to the Office of the Commissioner of Customs Preventive, North Eastern Region, Shillong in August and November 2006 respectively and remain in good condition.

Uniforms and Field Gear

Galis Lite Extended Coverage Level II body armor (bullet proof vests) was donated to the Office of the Commissioner of Customs Preventive, North Eastern Region, Shillong in June 2006 and remains in good condition.

Program Impact

INL’s assistance to the Indian law enforcement agencies, namely the NCB, CBN, Indian Customs, North East Customs and North East Excise, through donated computers, software, communications and other miscellaneous has greatly enhanced the operational efficiency in conducting complex drug trafficking investigations. This has enabled Indian law enforcement agencies to target high level drug trafficking organizations rather than couriers and low level drug traffickers.

Communications Equipment

The communications equipment has greatly enhanced the operational efficiency of the assisted Indian law enforcement agencies. The equipment allows for easier communication in the remote areas of India’s North East. In addition, the computers and software has greatly enhanced the operational efficiency of these agencies in conducting complex drug trafficking investigations. This has enabled Indian law enforcement agencies to target high-level drug trafficking organizations, rather than the easier-to-identify couriers and low-level drug dealers.

Surveillance Equipment

Donations of binoculars and GPS units are used during surveillance and undercover operations to prevent diversion of the licit opium crop.

Laboratory Equipment

The equipment is used to measure and prepare the poppy crop for detailed lab analysis.

Vehicles

The vehicles donated to the various Indian law enforcement agency offices throughout India, have enhanced their ability to apprehend traffickers and make seizures, especially in outlying areas.

In January 2009, an INL- donated vehicle to CBN was used for seizure of 54,900 kgs of acetic anhydride. INL-donated vehicles are being used to carry out survey and destruction of illicit opium poppy crop in the states of Arunachal Pradesh and Jjammu and Kashmir. On March 25, the CBNN, while using an INL donated vehicles seized a capture of 372,000 kgs of poppy husk.

In April CBN seized 2.56 kegs of contraband opium. On May 28, CBN seized 1,500 kgs of contraband opium. On August 1, an additional 5,300 kgs of contraband opium was seized by CBN while using INL donated vehicles.

On July 12, CBN seized 2,050 kgs of heroin while using an INL-donated vehicle.

The CBN controls licit cultivation of opium poppy and the processes associated within the states of Uar Pradesh, Rajasthan, and Madhya Pradesh, an area of over 150,000 square kilometers. INL’s assistance to the CBN in the form of vehicles and equipment has made that job much easier by increasing mobility of CBN’s staff and helping CBN effectively monitor the harvest and processing of opium.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan (CAP)

Unmonitored Resources

INL-purchased commodities have been critical to extending the reach of Indian law enforcement agencies, ensuring they are able to cover remote parts of the Northeast and other border regions. This also means that it is difficult to conduct
inspections.


TASHKENT

Background

EUM Program Coordinator

Political Officer Katrisa Peffley is responsible for the INL Equipment Inventory Management program. She can be reached by telephone at: 998-71-120-5450; fax: 998-71-120-6335; or unclassified email: PeffleyKB@state.gov

INL Assistant Dmitriy Dogovorov can be reached by office telephone: 998-71-120-5450; fax: 998-71-120-5400; or unclassified email: DogovorovD@state.gov

Staff Member Responsibilities

Post has one full-time Locally Engaged Staff (LES) position to support INL initiative in Uzbekistan. The Embassy continues to improve procedures for INL equipment monitoring Inventory system. In 2007, we created an INL equipment database.

The INL program in Uzbekistan has been very modest in recent fiscal years and is administered by an officer in the political and economic section, who must divide work time between several portfolio items. Other than the one INL LES there are no other post positions with end-use monitoring responsibilities and there was no change in staffing from 2008. Due to post security concerns, the LES is only authorized to visit host government law enforcement sites to conduct end-year- monitoring when an American officer is present, which makes end use monitoring more resource intensive. Other pol/econ officers, the Regional Security Office, and the Export and Related Border Security (EXBA) and Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) offices also support end use monitoring involving INL-Donated equipment.

Other U.S. Government Agency Assistances

No other USG agencies represented at post conducted any end use monitoring of INL-provided resources. However, in late 2008 and early 2009 a Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Agent traveled with INL LES and conducted extensive end use monitoring of INL-donated equipment, which was an excellent opportunity to build contacts with the host government in anticipation of greater engagement on counternarcotics. The pol/off responsible for the INL portfolio performed end use monitoring tasks for a project implemented by the Department of Justice International Criminal Investigative and Training Assistance Program (DOJ/ICITAP).

Counterpart Agencies

The following Uzbek government entities have received INL-donated equipment:

Ministry of Internal Affairs (MVD)
State Customs Committee (GTK)
Ministry of Health (MOH)
National Security Service (SNB) (includes the Border Guards)
Office of the General Prosecutor

Cooperation on End Use Monitoring improved in 2009 as the bilateral relationship improved, yet there are still bureaucratic obstacles. The GOU continues to regard its law enforcement installations as very sensitive and like all post’s dealing with the government, any request for access must be submitted well in advance via a diplomatic note to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Waiting for approval of diplomatic notes can cause significant delays in conducting end use monitoring visits.

Receipt

Embassy Tashkent requires the Government of Uzbekistan to sign an End User Certificate upon receipt of all INL-funded equipment. This document requires relevant GOU agencies to provide the Embassy information regarding each donated item, including product description, serial number, and geographical location where the equipment is deployed. Post submitted a diplomatic note to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as required by the Government of Uzbekistan, to request access to specific equipment for monitoring purposes. With few exceptions, it is not possible to conduct random, surprise inspections at Uzbek law enforcement installations where our equipment is located.

Monitoring Procedures

On-site inspections

On-site inspections are the only reliable means of conducting required end use monitoring. Typically, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs provides us with a local contact from the appropriate ministry and we work with that contact to plan our visit. Random unscheduled visits are generally not possible and government officials at all levels throughout the country adhere to strict bureaucratic requirements to arrange permission for visits far in advance through formal channels.

There were 15 scheduled on-site inspections performed in 2009-2010 around the country. There were some opportunities for unscheduled inspections when embassy officers crossed land borders or visited checkpoints where some INL-donated equipment is located.

There is a large quantity of INL-donated items to be inspected, many dating from a previous era of stronger bilateral cooperation. For instance, INL funding was used to completely equip the Sensitive Investigative Unit (SIU) of the Ministry of Internal Affairs. Equipment at this facility alone includes everything from handcuffs to GPS units to computer workstations. In 2007, INL provided several hundred flashlights and Leatherman Utility tool kits for Customs Officers, particularly for those stationed in Surkhandarya Province near the Afghanistan and Tajikistan borders. It is therefore not practical to inspect all INL-donated equipment on an annual basis. This year we conducted field visits to check the status of key collections of INL-funded equipment or items which we did not inspect in 2007. Post prioritized major items such as vehicles, laboratory instruments, and the extensive collection of equipment provided to the counternarcotics-focused SIU.

Secondary Methods of Monitoring Resource Status Comparison of Records

Written and computerized government records in Uzbekistan are not well-developed and are not yet a reliable source of information. Frankly, it is unlikely that post would be granted regular access to such databases. Rather, post uses its own detailed databases to identify priority equipment to inspect each year and submit diplomatic notes to arrange permission to conduct physical on-site inspections.

Status – Commodities

Computer Equipment

SIU – In January 2004, the Embassy delivered 25 workstations to the counternarcotics-focused Sensitive Investigative Unit within the Ministry of Internal Affairs.

MOH Bureau – In August 2009, the Main Forensic Bureau of the Ministry of Health received computer network equipment.

SIU – DEA and INL LES visited the SIU facility in January 2009. The computer equipment is being actively used by law enforcement officers for the intended purpose of supporting counternarcotics investigations. Pol/Off and visiting DEA Agent determined on separate visits that the equipment is still in good condition. Extra equipment is carefully packaged and stored on the premises for end use monitoring inventory purposes. The computers are no longer state-of-the-art after several years of use.

Communications Equipment

SIU – In July 2003, 30 cellular telephones, 30 Motorola GP-360 handheld radios, and four Thuraya satellite phones were provided to the SIU within the Ministry of Internal Affairs. All equipment, including 30 cellular telephones, 30 Motorola GP-360 handheld radios, and four Thuraya satellite phones, is located at the main headquarters in Tashkent. DEA and INL LES inspected the equipment this year. The cell phones are now obsolete but some are still in use; in other cases officers have returned the phones for inventory purposes but prefer to use their personal phones with modern features. The satellite phones are not in use due to the high cost of the service, which the SIU could no longer afford when the Government of Uzbekistan suspended cooperation with the DEA in early 2007. As a whole, the array of equipment provided by the U.S. Government still makes the work of the SIU easier, but it is less pivotal with each passing year. An Uzbeck police officer has been designated as responsible for maintain and tracking the inventory, and all equipment is accounted for and in excellent condition given the time elapsed. Much of the equipment is old and the SIU will need updated equipment in order to keep pace with modern police entities.

Vehicles

Customs – In August 2000, the Uzbek State Customs Committee received nine 4-wheel-drive Jeep Cherokees and spare parts. The nine 4-wheel-drive Jeep Cherokees were dispersed throughout the country. Uzbek Customs assigned three vehicles to counter-smuggling units in Tashkent Province (which includes rugged mountain terrain in its territory) as well as one each to Bukhara, Navoi, Karakalpakstan and Fergana Provinces. The two remaining vehicles, which were commandeered by the National Security Service and the Office of the General Prosecutor, are located in Tashkent.

The seven vehicles remaining with the State Customs Committee are of limited utility since spare parts are unavailable. Several in Tashkent region are still actively used by Customs, while others in the provinces are inoperable. However, they are securely stored and officers were able to explain how they use the vehicles to support their operations.

The condition of the Jeep Cherokees is generally poor. Customs officers have clearly done the best they can to maintain the vehicles, although the government has not provided resources to make repairs. Jeeps are not common in Uzbekistan and spare parts must be imported from abroad; mechanics also are unfamiliar with the vehicles and have difficulty fixing them. The vehicles in Buhkara, Navoiy, and Nukus are inoperable and awaiting repairs. However, they are securely stored in garages. The two vehicles commandeered by other Uzbek government agencies are in top condition.

SIU – In December 2003, INL delivered 28 vehicles of various makes and models to the SIU to assist with counternarcotics investigations. They are based at the headquarters in Tashkent. INL Tashkent conducted a thorough check in early 2010 and found all 28 vehicles are actively used by police officers of the unit. A DEA Agent also inspected the vehicles and noted positively that the vehicles are being actively utilized and much of the other equipment is indeed utilized by law enforcement officers in the field.

A DEA representative, with the support of INL LES, conducted a thorough check in early 2009 and found almost all vehicles in good condition despite intensive use. The fleet is intentionally mixed, including several local models, to allow undercover units to blend in with their surroundings. The local models are much easier for the SIU to maintain since there is ready availability of spare parts and mechanical expertise. Two Opel Astras still require approximately USD 2,000 of repairs that the SIU has no funds to complete; however, the vehicles are kept in a secure garage and otherwise appear to be in good condition. The vehicles are approaching the end of their useful expected life span.

State Customs Committee

Jeep Cherokee Sport

7

State Customs Committee

Opel Astra sedan

3

Opel Vectra elegance

1

Toyota Land Cruiser 100GXr

2

Toyota Land Cruiser 100STD

1

Toyota Corolla

1

Daewoo Nexia GLE

11

Daewoo Matiz DLX

2

Daewoo Damus

2

VAZ NIVA 21310

2

VAZ LADA 21099

3

Laboratory Equipment

MVD – In July 2004, post delivered and finished installation of laboratory equipment to enhance the GOU’s capabilities to perform forensic analyses of explosive substances. Equipment donated to the explosives laboratory at the Ministry of Internal affairs included a Sabre-2000 portable explosive detector, five digital scales and an Agilent Electrophoresis system. A Nicolet IR Spectrometer system was previously delivered to the lab in 1999. It is located in Tashkent.

MOH Lab – The main Forensic Laboratory of the Ministry of Health received several sophisticated instruments, including an Agilent Gas Chromatograph and a Mass Spectrometer System that have greatly supported evidence processing in criminal cases. This is an active project (administered by INL/DOJ – ICITAP) for which we are continuing to purchase and transfer equipment. The main Forensic Laboratory at the Ministry of Health is where our most active INL project is proceeding. Post continues to donate a range of sophisticated laboratory instruments to the facility, which is located in the capital of Tashkent. Some equipment, including GCMS, microscopes and refrigerators, was donated to two regional laboratories in Fergana and Urgench.

The INL-funded project to upgrade the capabilities at the Main Forensic Laboratory of the Ministry of Health is still active, and numerous embassy officers—including the Ambassador, Deputy Chief of Mission, and Political chief on separate visits—were warmly welcomed for tours and demonstrations of the equipment during 2009. The laboratory staff is extremely grateful for U.S. assistance and participated in professional development and training events abroad to enhance the benefit of our equipment donation.

Laboratory Equipment – Several new, sophisticated instruments were donated to the forensic laboratory in 2009 and U.S. experts have conducted several visits to assist laboratory staff as they try to meet international accreditation standards. Equipment from previous years is also in excellent condition and is carefully cared for by qualified scientific staff.

Miscellaneous Equipment

Border Guards – In October 2001, INL provided the then Committee for State Border Protection document examination equipment to improve passport control activities at border checkpoints. Donated equipment included: 100 universal desktop magnifiers and spare lamps, 200 hand-held UV spot detectors and spare UV lamps, eight multifunctional passport readers, and one set of passport computer software with samples of more than 2,000 different passports and identification documents.

SIU – Basic investigative equipment was distributed to the Counter Drug Department of the Uzbek Ministry of Internal Affairs. The equipment transferred included 21 digital video cameras, 68 portable digital audio recorders, 36 digital cameras, and 19 TV sets and VCRs. Post was able to check a significant amount of this equipment during visits to provincial police stations last year.

Furniture for Border Checkpoints – INL supported a joint border project with the Embassy Export control and Related Border Security Program (EXBS), which provided modular shelters for Uzbek Border Guards. INL Tashkent purchased, delivered, and installed custom-made furniture for the shelters.

Border Guards – Document examination equipment to improve passport control activities at border checkpoints was distributed to more than 40 checkpoints around the country as well as the Border Guard Academy.

MVD – Basic investigative equipment was distributed to the Counter Drug Department of the Uzbeck Ministry of Internal Affairs. Much equipment is maintained at the SIU headquarters in Tashkent, while other communications equipment was distributed to various counter drug departments at provincial command posts throughout the county.

Furniture for Border Checkpoints – INL-provided furniture is located at four rural border checkpoints. Two of the checkpoints are on the border with Kyrgyzstan in the Fergana Valley, and two are on the border with Turkmenistan in Khorezm and Karakalpakstan Provinces in the far northwest.

SIU – Inspections by pol/offs and visiting DEA Agent confirmed the equipment is being properly utilized by officers with counternarcotics responsibilities. The creative unit has its own audio-visual technician who improvised modifications to use local handbags that make hidden cameras more discreet.

Furniture for Border Checkpoints – Post visited each of the four rural border checkpoints last year and found that the built-in furniture was still in use.

Miscellaneous Equipment to Border Guards – It is difficult to arrange access to border checkpoints, particularly since the Border Guards have been absorbed into the National Security Service. The equipment has been utilized for a reasonable time period and we will no longer specifically monitor its disposition; however, we will note when it is observed during routine entry or exit formalities.

MVD – As with other equipment provided to the SIU, INL LES and a DEA Agent found the camera and video equipment to be maintained in excellent condition. However, cameras are no longer state-of-the art, especially as newer-generation digital technology makes cameras from a half-decade ago seem clunky and obsolete.

Furniture for Border Checkpoints – Visits to each of the four remote border checkpoints during 2009 confirmed that the furniture (including refrigerator, oven, bookshelves, locker, beds, and desks) is being maintained in good condition.

Status – Services

The successful INL-funded River Port Improvement Project run by UNODC continued during 2009. Office equipment was delivered to the river port for Customs and Border Guards. Post expects arrival of two X-ray machines and basic search CT-30 equipment to be delivered during 2010. One training event was conducted during November-December 2009.

Program Impact

The INL program budget dropped considerably in recent years as the result of the strained bilateral relationship. Post’s End Use Monitoring is in many ways a vestige of a prior era and the program impact of some major investments diminish with each passing year. Since the second half of 2007, the Government of Uzbekistan has consistently expressed more willingness to engage with the United States on issues such as counternarcotics, trafficking in persons, and border security. There is now once again an increased demand for INL programs, and we will need budgetary allocations to reflect the heightened cooperation with the host government as well as the strategic importance of Uzbekistan in our broader goals in stemming the tide of narcotics from Afghanistan.

The Forensic Science program also stands out in its impact this year, as post has provided equipment and training opportunities to a previously forgotten cadre of scientists who play a central role in ensuring the integrity of evidence and investigations in the criminal justice system. Due to this program, scientist better understand their ole not only in prosecuting the guilty but also in exonerating the innocent. The investments have also contributed to more effective homicide investigations by establishing causes of death more reliably and quickly, and the skills and equipment have even been used to provide treatment to patients suffering from mysterious poisonings.

The most enduring legacy from numerous equipment donations in previous years is the goodwill among rank-and-file law enforcement officers toward the United States. They appreciate the equipment, even though it is now often dated, and express a hope that U.S. trainers and equipment will once again reach them on the front lines.

Problems and Corrective Action Plan

Repair and Maintenance of Commodities

A substantial amount of INL-donated equipment is aging after intensive use. The GOU typically does not provide adequate resources to local branches of law enforcement agencies for repairs and maintenance. Maintenance was made more difficult by the provision of foreign brands of vehicles and equipment for which it is difficult o find spare parts or expertise to make repairs. Due to the low quality of the fuel in the Uzbekistan retail market, the majority of vehicles also require replacement of the fuel systems. As a result, numerous Jeep Cherokees are broken down in Customs garages in remote corners of the country. They were used intensively for a reasonable timeframe, but a modest provision of spare parts would allow resourceful local commanders to continue to put the equipment go good use.

The Nicolet IR spectrometer and portable Saber-2000 explosive detector have long since broken and require replacement. RSO noted the staff at the lab are very professional and have taken excellent care of all equipment, but their effectiveness would be enhanced by the repair of these instruments.

Lack of Use and Misuse of Commodities

Emboffs, DEA and RSO were consistently impressed by the professionalism of Uzbek law enforcement agencies and how much they appreciated U.S. assistance in a resource-poor government. There is no problem with misuse of commodities other than the previously documented incident in which the National Security Service and Office of the General Prosecutor took two of the nine Jeep Cherokees intended for the State Customs Committee.

Disposal of Commodities

Many items in our inventory of previously donated INL equipment have reached the end of their useful life. During 2010, post will stop monitoring some stockpiles of equipment. If appropriate, post will contact the recipient agency to discuss disposition assistance. However, the equipment may be utilized and cared for over a longer period if post does not announce its intention to stop monitoring certain equipment from our inventory (such as vehicle search mirrors and laptops). Post will attempt to identify funds to repair ageing big-ticket items such as GCMS, vehicles, and the IR Spectrometer which are still capable of contributing to the effectiveness of law enforcement operations.



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