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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Latin America


International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2008 Program and Budget Guide
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 2007
Report
September 18, 2007

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Argentina

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

305

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance existing law enforcement and judicial capabilities to successfully investigate and prosecute criminal cases.

Improved interoperability between federal law enforcement agencies

Strengthen the Government of Argentina (GOA) judicial branch's capacity to prosecute human trafficking cases and provide victim assistance.

Increased human trafficking cases are brought to trial.

Increased prosecutions of individuals and government officials involved in human trafficking.

Increased number of trafficking victims are reintegrated into society.

Improve coordination among NGOs dedicated to fighting human trafficking.

Increased number of joint activities sponsored by NGOs working on anti-TIP programming.

Transformational Diplomacy

The USG's counternarcotics efforts in Argentina advances the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding counternarcotics projects designed increase the capacity of Argentine federal and provincial law enforcement agencies to reduce the trafficking of illicit narcotics through Argentina via land, commercial air and maritime routes. There are indications that there is more cocaine passing through Argentina than previously believed, particularly in containerized cargo. Although most of these drugs remain in Argentina or are trans-shipped to Europe, some make their way to the United States. Drug trafficking and related transnational crimes are a direct threat to democratic institutions and regional stability.

Program Justification

Argentina is not a major drug producing country. However, because of its advanced chemical production facilities, it is one of South America's largest producers of precursor chemicals. Law enforcement authorities believe that the amount of cocaine passing through Argentina continued to increase in 2006. The law enforcement authorities believe that the amount of cocaine passing through Argentina continued to increase in 2006. Marijuana remains the most commonly smuggled and consumed drug, with cocaine (HCl) and inhalants ranked second and third, respectively. Focused analytical and technical training will enhance the institutions, capabilities and interoperability of the Argentine law enforcement agencies to enable them to more effectively act against narcotics trafficking, other trans-border crime, and to counter possible spillover of cultivation and/or processing operations from Bolivia.

Program Accomplishments

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) reports that it assisted the Argentine authorities in the seizure of 2,532 kg of cocaine in 2006. DEA also assisted the GOA in the seizure of 9.12 kg of heroin, and 77 kg of marijuana. In June 2006 the Gendarmeria seized a truck with approximately 1,105 kg of coca leaf. Although coca leaf is consumed by the local indigenous population in a number of Argentina's northern provinces, seizures of this size are unusual. From January 2006 to September 2006, the USG-funded Northern Border Task Force (NBTF) seized approximately 684,220 kgs of illicit chemicals, a significant increase over the amount seized during the same periods in 2005 and 2004. The NBTF also seized 9.12 kilograms of heroin at the La Quiaca international port of entry in the Province of Jujuy.

FY 2008 Program

Northern Border Task Force (NBTF)

The NBTF, which operates in Argentina's Northeastern province of Salta, along the sensitive Bolivian border, is the primary focus of USG counternarcotics assistance. Funding will continue to support this inter-agency operation involving federal and provincial law enforcement through training and upgrading of equipment. The 85 law enforcement personnel associated with the NBTF put approximately 150,000 kms/year on their five vehicles, covering the Bolivia borders in the provinces of Salta and Jujuy. The USG will purchase one additional vehicle to supplement this overtaxed fleet.

North East Border Task Force

Embassy agencies are anxious to duplicate the success of the inter-agency NBTF model in the Northeastern province of Missiones, which forms the Argentine portion of the sensitive Tri-border Area comprised of the Argentina, Paraguay, and Brazil. Working with the Gendarmeria, Prefectura and Missiones Provincial police, funding will be used to purchase a vehicle and provide office equipment including computers, a printer, internet server and secure communications equipment. Training for the new Task Force would include basic narcotics investigation school and tactical training for as many as 70 federal and provincial law enforcement officers.

Law Enforcement Support

Support will focus on providing intelligence-based training, equipment and software to improve GOA law enforcement agencies' capacity to conduct complex investigations and support successful prosecutions. This would include training on computer-based intelligence analysis software and charting software that will allow law enforcement to chart organizations, money flow and communications. USG funding will provide training in the use of Real-Time Analytical Intelligence Database (RAID) software, a data base that allows for the systematic study and exploitation of massive evidence data from large narcotics-related arrests.

Trafficking in Persons

The GOA has spent considerable efforts to raise public awareness of human trafficking and has made anti-trafficking education a regular part of training for law enforcement and judicial officials through its Office of Assistance to Victims of Crime. IOM has also conducted a good portion of the law enforcement training on trafficking. In recent months a number of bills seeking to criminalize trafficking in persons have been introduced in the Argentine Congress, and many are optimistic that anti-TIP legislation will pass in 2007. Funding TIP-related training to judges and law enforcement officials will help build on this positive momentum, and strengthen institutional capacity to effectively prosecute human trafficking.

Argentina
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Interdiction
Northern Border Task Force - - 40
North East Border Task Force - - 40
Law Enforcement Support - - 25
Sub-Total - - 105
Trafficking in Persons/Migrant Smuggling - - 200
Total - - 305

Bahamas

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

495

500

500

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Operation Bahamas and Turks and Caicos (OPBAT) significantly disrupts the movement of illicit drugs through Bahamian territory to the United States.

The number and amount of seizures of cocaine and marijuana will increase, along with the number of arrests of narcotics traffickers.

Bahamian law enforcement, with U.S. assistance, conducts sophisticated criminal and financial investigations and effective maritime interdiction operations that will result in a reduction in narcotics trafficking activity.

Cooperation and coordination with U.S. law enforcement will increase and several major Bahamian drug trafficking organizations will be dismantled.

The number of narcotics trafficking and money laundering cases successfully prosecuted will increase.

Judicial institutions are modernized so that drug traffickers and money launderers are successfully prosecuted in an expeditious manner and their assets seized and forfeited.

The value of assets seized and forfeited will increase significantly and the government will respond expeditiously to U.S. extradition requests.

Transformational Diplomacy

The Bahamas, an archipelago the size of California strategically situated only 50 miles from U.S. shores offers the U.S. vital opportunities to disrupt the movement of illicit drugs and illegal migrants, combat international financial crime, and protect our shores from terrorism. U.S. investment will continue to focus on interdiction efforts. The Bahamas remains a major an entry point for illegal drugs, illegal migrants and contraband from Haiti, Cuba and other countries. OPBAT, a multi-national, multi-agency drug interdiction effort, that brings together personnel from the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Department of Homeland Security (including the U.S. Coast Guard and U.S. Customs), the Defense Department, the Department of State, the Royal Bahamas Police Force, and the Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police, will continue to spearhead U.S. efforts to protect our South East border from international drug trafficking into and through The Bahamas.

Program Justification

Cocaine from South America arrives in The Bahamas via go-fast boats, small commercial freighters, or small aircraft from Jamaica, Hispaniola and Venezuela. During the 1980s, it was estimated that 70 percent of the drug flow from South America transited the islands, whereas in recent years, the estimated flow has declined to less than 10 percent. In 2006, the U.S. Joint Interagency Task Force reported that multi-ton cocaine shipments took place to the Turks and Caicos Islands and The Bahamas from Venezuela. Although none of these shipments were successfully interdicted, they could indicate yet another shift in the drug flow through the islands. OPBAT is the largest, most effective, and longest-existing interdiction effort in the Caribbean. One of the dividends of this long history of cooperation is that the Bahamian drug police are among the best in the Caribbean. No other drug unit has had better success in dismantling trafficking organizations.

Program Accomplishments

The Bahamian Police Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU) continued its unparalleled record of success in taking down drug trafficking organizations in 2006. Following an eight-month long joint DEU/DEA investigation into narcotics smuggling at the airport, five baggage handlers were arrested in the U.S. and four others were arrested in The Bahamas. Total cocaine seizures by OPBAT and Bahamian police increased to 1.6 mts, from 1 mt in 2005. At the same time, marijuana seizures increased from 13 mts to 140 mts. The DEU arrested 1,399 persons on drug-related offenses and seized drug-related assets valued at nearly $2.5 million.

FY 2008 Program

INL will cease funding its direct hire position in the Narcotics Affairs Section to increase the resources available to support ongoing projects

Law Enforcement Investigations

This project will focus on improving the ability of the Royal Bahamian Police Force to detect, investigate, and prosecute drug smugglers through training and technical assistance.

Operation Bahamas Turks and Caicos (OPBAT)

This project will support the maintenance of OPBAT bases and provide equipment for interdiction operations.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

The Bahamas
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement
Law Enforcement Investigations 35 - 35 - 200
OPBAT 85 - 85 - 240
Fast Response Boats - - - - -
Sub-Total 120 - 120 - 440
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction - - - - -
Program Development and Support
U.S. Personnel 275 - 280 - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - - - -
ICASS Costs 100 - 100 - 60
Program Support - - - - -
Sub-Total 375 - 380 - 60
Total 495 - 500 - 500

Chile

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

100

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Deepen and expand cooperation among law enforcement entities within Chile, and between Chile and regional partners.

Conclude an extradition treaty between Chile and the United States.

Reduce Chile's role as a transshipment country for narcotics from the Andean region to the U.S. by improving the interdiction, investigative and prosecutorial capabilities of Chilean law enforcement officials.

Increase by eight percent the quantity of cocaine and heroin seized.

Increase by ten percent the number of drug cases prosecuted by the Chilean counternarcotics unit

Deepen judicial reform in Chile by expanding citizens' understanding of their legal rights, strengthening prosecutorial and investigative capabilities of criminal justice officials, and encouraging alternative resolution methods to support the new system.

Increase by ten percent the number of judicial personnel in Santiago and other regions trained using U.S. speakers and the international visitor program.

Transformational Diplomacy

The counternarcotics program in Chile advances the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding counternarcotics projects designed to bolster its ability to combat narcotrafficking, transborder crime, and international terrorism.
A proactive Chilean law enforcement and judicial system where its components cooperate in apprehending and bringing criminals to justice will enhance Chilean and regional counternarcotics efforts.

Program Justification

Chile is a transshipment point for illegal narcotics, including Andean cocaine and heroin destined for the United States and Europe. Chile has a growing internal cocaine and marijuana consumption problem, with Ecstasy becoming increasingly popular. Chile is also a source of essential chemicals for use in cocaine processing in Peru, Colombia, and Bolivia. There is evidence that trafficking in people into and through Chile for labor and sexual exploitation is increasing. Within a modern but secretive banking system, terrorist financing and money laundering activity continues to increase. Chile faces significant challenges in implementing judicial reform that transformed the country's criminal justice system from inquisitorial to adversarial, and in investigating and prosecuting certain crimes such as money laundering, terrorist finance, intellectual property right violations, and trafficking in people.

Program Accomplishments

In 2006, Chilean authorities seized 15,295 kg of cocaine HCl (more than five times that reportedly seized in 2005), 2,388 kg of cocaine base, 147 kg of crack cocaine, 3,639 dosage units of ecstasy, 2,700 kg of marijuana (about half that seized in 2005), and 118,762 marijuana plants. They also seized 220 liters of acetone, and 27,400 kg of sulfuric acid. Law enforcement agencies arrested 27,343 persons for drug-related offenses, more than twice the 12,878 who were arrested on similar charges in 2005. Chilean authorities are also undertaking proactive enforcement initiatives to address the domestic distribution sources of cocaine, marijuana, and ecstasy. One joint investigation in 2006 conducted by DEA and the Carabineros, led to the seizure of more than 400 kg of cocaine and the disruption of a major Colombian transportation cell. Chile, in coordination with the USG, conducted a successful highway drug interdiction program called Operation Pipeline and established a joint multi-Chilean law enforcement agency narcotics task force in Arica, which is the primary point of entry of Peruvian cocaine.

2006 was the first year of Chile's newly-instituted adversarial judicial system; based on oral trials rather than documents. Chile also initiated an "informal" drug court pilot program. These and related programs have led to greater public trust in the new system, and cases are being resolved faster.

FY 2008 Program

Interdiction and Chemical Control

Funding in FY 2008 will help the Government of Chile (GOC) to establish a counter-drug task force comprised of the Investigative Police, Coast Guard, Chilean Customs, and the Prison System Administrators in Chile's northern region. Provision of training and equipment will enable the task force to conduct maritime and overland trafficking operations.

Justice System Reform

Funding will provide training for lawyers, judges, and law enforcement to enable them to more effectively investigate and prosecute narcotics cases, as well as cases involving money laundering, trafficking in people, and intellectual property rights.

Program, Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds will be used to pay for field travel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Service (ICASS) costs, and general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Chile
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Interdiction
Interdiction - - - - 80
Justice System Reform - - - - 15
PD&S - - - - 5
Total - - - - 100

Dominican Republic

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

*

*

1,150

* In FY 2006 and FY 2007, some funding from the Latin America Regional and Caribbean and Central America Regional budgets, respectively, were used for programs in the Dominican Republic.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance existing law enforcement targeting of narco-trafficking organizations.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs seized.

Improve the ability of the Dominican Government (GODR) law enforcement officials to successfully investigate and prosecute criminal cases.

Increased number of arrests and successful prosecutions of drug traffickers.

Transformational Diplomacy

Counternarcotics assistance advances the Peace and Security objective of strengthening the rule of law by enhancing the ability of law enforcement to dismantle international narco-rafficking organizations. Dominican police will receive training and technical assistance aimed at improving their capacity to intercept drug shipments and to conduct investigations that lead to the arrest and prosecution of traffickers.

Program Justification

The Dominican Republic is a major drug transit country in the Caribbean and Dominicans operate major trafficking organizations in the United States - particularly on the East Coast. According to the U.S. Joint Interagency Task Force - South (JIATF-S) there were 75 suspect drug flights from Venezuela, a 167percent increase from 2005 to 2006. The U.S. Marshals Service receives excellent cooperation from the GODR National Drug Control Directorate (DNCD) Fugitive Surveillance/Apprehension Unit and other relevant Dominican authorities in arresting fugitives and returning them to the United States to face justice. The DNCD, houses DEA's Center for Drug Information (CDI), which serves as a clearinghouse for intelligence within the Caribbean and plays an important role in interdiction efforts.

Program Accomplishments

In 2006 Dominican authorities seized 5 metric tons of cocaine, 236.8 kilograms (kgs) of heroin, 363,433.6 units of ecstasy (MDMA), and 362.4 kgs of marijuana. One single seizure in September netted a record 2.5 metric tons of cocaine. The DNCD made 8,809 drug-related arrests in 2006. Of these, 8,563 were Dominican nationals and 246 were foreigners. The GODR extradited 26 Dominicans, including the head of an international drug trafficking organization responsible for transporting thousands of kgs to the United States.

FY 2008 Program

Interdiction

This project will focus on improving the ability of the DNCD to gather intelligence on, investigate, and prosecute drug smugglers through training and technical assistance. Support will be provided to the DNCD vetted unit and the canine unit. Funds will be used to improve data collection and analysis by the Port police and to provide surveillance equipment for port security. Training and mentoring in the development and prosecution of financial investigations will be provided to police investigators and prosecutors.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Dominican Republic
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement
     Port Security - - - 200
      Border Security (canine) - - - 100
      Trafficking in Persons - - - -
      Airport Security - - - -
      Intelligence Fusion and Analysis - - - 150
      Vetted Unit - - - 300
Sub Total - - - 750
Program Development and Support
      U.S. Personnel - - - 200
      Non-U.S. Personnel - - - 50
      ICASS Costs - - - 150
      Program Support - - - -
Sub-Total - - - 400
Total - - - 1,150

Eastern Caribbean

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

*

---

500

* In FY 2006, some funding from the Latin America Regional budget was used for Eastern Caribbean programs.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Augment ability of responsible agencies to investigate, prosecute, seize criminal assets, interdict illicit drug and chemical shipments and control money laundering.

Performance indicators include:

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized.

Increased number of arrests and successful prosecutions of drug traffickers and money launderers.

Increased amount and value of illicit assets seized and forfeited.

Transformational Diplomacy

In the area of interdiction, INL funding contributes to the Peace and Security objective by enhancing the capacity of Eastern Caribbean law enforcement to counter drug trafficking and related crimes such as money laundering, arms trafficking and corruption. The Eastern Caribbean remains a vulnerable platform from which transnational criminals can threaten the security interests of the United States. INL funds will provide specialized training and technical assistance for criminal and money laundering investigations. INL funds would also support the maritime drug interdiction operations of the Regional Security System (RSS) defense and police forces.

Program Justification

The principal U.S. interests in the seven countries of the Eastern Caribbean - Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines - are preventing and combating transnational criminal activity against the United States, including terrorism, narcotics trafficking, alien smuggling, and financial crimes. These Eastern Caribbean countries make up a significant portion of the "third border" of the United States which is a transit zone for drugs -- mostly cocaine and marijuana products, going from South America to U.S., Europe and other markets. Drug trafficking and related crimes, such as money laundering, drug use, arms trafficking, official corruption, violent crime, and intimidation, have the potential to threaten the stability of the small, democratic countries of the Eastern Caribbean and, to varying degrees, have damaged civil society in some of these countries.

Program Accomplishments

Overall drug seizures declined in 2006 while the number of arrests for drug-related offenses in the individual islands varied widely. In Barbados, the authorities reported seizing 92.6 kgs of cocaine and 4,698 kgs of marijuana. Barbados authorities arrested 623 persons -five of whom were major traffickers - as compared with 2,551 arrests in 2005. Grenadan authorities arrested 407 persons on drug charges, an increase over 2005 when they arrested 285 persons. Through October 2006, Antigua and Barbuda forces seized eight kilograms (kgs) of cocaine and 75 kgs of marijuana, arrested 112 persons on drug-related charges, and prosecuted five traffickers. Eradication efforts increased significantly from the previous year, from 500 marijuana plants in 2005 to more than 25,000 marijuana plants in 2006. From January through October 2006, Dominican law enforcement agencies reported seizing 50.85 kgs of cocaine and 583.5 kgs of marijuana. Most of the more than 92,000 marijuana plants under cultivation were eradicated. Dominican police arrested 287 persons on drug-related charges, double that of the previous year, and prosecuted eight major drug traffickers. The Government of St. Kitts and Nevis officials reported seizing 21.4 kgs of cocaine, representing a 50 percent reduction in seizures from the previous year, and approximately 57.5 kgs of marijuana from January through October 2006. However, 67 arrests were made in the same period, almost double the number of arrests in 2005, and eradication of marijuana plants increased from approximately 6,243 in 2005 to over 31,000 in 2006. The Government of St. Lucia reported seizing 50.7 kgs of cocaine and 515.8 kgs of marijuana from January through October, 2006 - down nearly 50 percent from 2005, but also reported arresting 300 persons on drug charges and prosecuting two major drug traffickers.

FY 2008 Program

The program focuses on combating trans-national criminal activities, primarily maritime drug trafficking, money laundering and financial crimes.

Narcotics Law Enforcement/Interdiction

The DEA-led Operation Reef Shark targets trafficking organizations using specially selected and vetted law enforcement personnel from the islands to conduct investigations aimed dismantling their operations. In FY 2008, funding will provide technical assistance and training to the police participating in Reef Shark.

From 1999 to 2006, INL funded the operational and maintenance costs (approximately $1.5m annually) of two C-26 maritime surveillance aircraft. In cooperation with the RSS marine law enforcement units and the UK, the aircraft conducted interdiction operations. The program also provided boats, training andother technical assistance to the maritime law enforcement units. FY 2008 funding will support the maintenance of the boats and training for the maritime interdiction units.

Money Laundering

Funding will be used for the mentoring of financial investigators and prosecutors involved in developing and prosecuting money laundering cases. Treasury Office of Technical Assistance financial mentors will make periodic visits to the seven Financial Investigative Units in the Eastern Caribbean.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds will be used to pay salaries, allowances, and benefits of foreign national direct hire employees in the Narcotics Affairs Section. In addition, funds pay for International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Eastern Caribbean
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement
Law Enforcement/Interdiction - - - - 300
Money Laundering - - - - 100
Sub-Total - - - - 400
Program Development and Support
U.S. Personnel - - - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - - - 40
ICASS Costs - - - - 60
Program Support - - - - -
Sub-Total - - - - 100
Total - - - - 500

El Salvador

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

*

*

800

* In FY 2006 and FY 2007, some funding from the Latin America Regional and Caribbean and Central America Regional budgets, respectively, were used for programs in El Salvador.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

El Salvador is a transit point for drugs en route to the United States by land and sea. It is also one of three Central American countries most affected by the transnational gang crime that also impacts the United States. El Salvador suffers from extremely high rates of violent crime. The homicide rate is 58 per 100,000 people, most of which are unsolved.

The program will enhance the abilities of the Government of El Salvador (GOES) law enforcement agencies to better detect and intercept shipments and detain traffickers.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized.

Government forces able to respond to growing number of suspect movements.

Broadened and more effective exchanges of information with USG and among regional partners.

Improved intelligence and law enforcement capacity will result in more convictions for crimes and lower crime rates.

Increased arrests and convictions for violent crime.

The program will reduce gang-related crime by strengthening an integrated law enforcement and prevention program complementing the regional gangs program.

Number of arrests and convictions for gang related crime in USG assisted areas will increase.

Number of information-based activities to improve collection, analysis and sharing of gang-related data will increase.

Increased number of law enforcement/justice system personnel trained in anti-gang techniques.

Vulnerable youth will avoid joining gangs.

Increased number of people enrolled in USG assisted gang prevention programs .

Youth enrolled in gang-prevention programs remain uninvolved in gangs.

Transformational Diplomacy

El Salvador is a Transforming Country, as it a low income country that meets the Millenium Challenge goals. The program in El Salvador supports the Peace and Security Goal, addressing Narcotics Interdiction (1.4.3) and Organized and Organized and Gang-Related Crime (1.5.4) by improving the ability of the Government of El Salvador (GOES) Law Enforcement capacity to combat narcotics trafficking and gangs.

Program Justification

El Salvador is a transit point for cocaine and heroin that flow through the Eastern Pacific and by land. El Salvador hosts a Forward Operating Location for trafficking detection and interception. Recent trends show increased drug flow though the Eastern Pacific. El Salvador is also plagued by criminal youth gangs that commit extortion, murder and other violent crimes. U.S. assistance primarily focuses upon developing El Salvador's law enforcement agencies and anti-gang capacity.

Program Accomplishments

El Salvador has intercepted or deterred both land and sea transit of drugs. El Salvador inspected over 14,000 vehicles at the significant north-bound border crossing El Amatillo, seizing 13 kg of marijuana, seven kg of cocaine, and 10 kg of heroin, and arrested 28 traffickers. In 2006, the National Police (PNC) seized a total of 445 kilograms (kgs) of marijuana, 100 kgs of cocaine, and 23 kgs of heroin. Law enforcement worked closely with U.S. authorities on priority targets of mutual interest to both the United States and the GOES. El Salvador is improving conviction rates by integrating police and prosecutors in investigations.

In a trinational operation with Guatemala and the United States, El Salvador disrupted trafficking operations in the Pacific off the littoral coasts of Central America. The operation resulted in the seizure of an additional eight kg of cocaine and the arrest of 22 individuals for trafficking offenses.

In 2007 the U.S. will support updating El Salvador's fingerprint system, providing information to U.S. and to regional authorities on transnational criminals, especially those with gang affiliation.

FY 2008 Program

Narcotics and Law Enforcement Project

Port and Airport Security, Border Security: The US will provide training and equipment, including trained canines, for port, airport and border inspections, including the key Pan American Highway unit at El Amatillo.

Intelligence Fusion and Analysis: Working in conjunction with the Department of Justice technical assistance, INL plans to support the modernization of GOES fingerprint and crime databases to improve investigations and increase arrests and convictions of criminals. This will support law enforcement against "common" crime as well as gang-related crime.

Criminal Gangs: Funding in FY 2008 will support a bilateral program to cover El Salvador-specific expenses for technical assistance and equipment. It will promote the expansion of law enforcement anti-gang units to include juvenile justice, prosecutors, prevention and community representatives. These units will oversee an integrated program that includes prevention as well as law enforcement. The USG is also providing regional training and technical assistance to gangs units through a separately funded program.

Program Development and Support

Funds will support salaries, benefits and allowances of one U.S. and one foreign national direct hire and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Service (ICASS) costs and general administrative and operational expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

El Salvador
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement
Port and Airport Security - - - - 50
Border Security - - - - 100
Intelligence Fusion and Analysis - - - - 150
Sub Total - - - - 300
Criminal Gangs - - - - 300
Program Development and Support - - - - 200
Total - - - - 800

Guatemala

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

2,475

2,200

5,320

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Guatemala is a major transit point for drugs en route to the United States It is also one of three Central American countries most affected by the transnational gang crime that also impacts the United States.

The Government of Guatemala (GOG) continues progress in the international arena to actively pursue narcotraffickers and combat money laundering.

The quantity of seized drugs will exceed 2005 levels.

The prosecution and investigation of money laundering cases will increase.

The GOG will continue anti-corruption initiatives, including zero tolerance of government corruption.

Legislation and/or procedures will be developed to effectively use seized assets.

Legislation on organized crime, passed in 2006, will be used by law enforcement authorities and lead to increased convictions.

Precursor chemical control system will begin to fully monitor chemicals and detect diversions.

The GOG maintains the capability to perform professional and effective investigations that lead to the successful prosecution and conviction of narcotraffickers.

Number of arrests and successful prosecutions will rise as cooperation between police and prosecutors increases and they become more proficient at investigation.

The GOG continues to facilitate pending extradition cases.

The GOG maintains an effective and well-publicized demand reduction program.

Surveys show a declining rate of drug use.

The GOG expands its integrated law enforcement, prevention and community involvement plan to combat gang crime, resulting in more effective prevention and law enforcement.

Number of arrests and convictions for gang-related crime will increase.

Increased/improved collection, analysis and sharing of gang-related data among law enforcement agencies.

Increased number of law enforcement/justice system personnel trained in anti-gang techniques.

Vulnerable youth will avoid joining gangs.

Increased number of people enrolled in gang prevention programs.

Youth enrolled in gang-prevention programs remain uninvolved in gangs.

Transformational Diplomacy

Guatemala falls in the developing country category-it is a low-income country not yet meeting Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) performance criteria. The goal for Peace and Security is to address key challenges to security and law enforcement. INL programs address two key challenges in Guatemala, both of which have a direct impact on the United States: interdiction of drugs flowing through Guatemala to the United States; and stopping transnational gang crime by improved law enforcement and prevention. For Governing Justly and Democratically, the goal is the adoption of policies and programs that accelerate the strengthening of public institutions. INL specifically supports legislative and judicial reforms leading to improved law enforcement and less corruption.

Program Justification

Guatemala sits at a crucial position on the transit corridor for drugs flowing from South America to the United States. Its long and sparsely inhabited border with Mexico makes it a transportation node for sea, air and land narcotics transshipment. The USG estimates indicate that 80-90 percent of drugs reaching the United States are shipped by land, air and sea through the Central American corridor to Mexico and the United States. The country suffers from severe crime, widespread poverty and malnutrition, economic inequality and, a decade after the peace agreements, continued gaps in indigenous inclusion. These factors complicate the fight against drug transshipment, alien smuggling and other transnational crimes, and the concomitant corruption. The growing problem of transnational youth gangs affects the region and the United States.

The current administration has taken a public stand against crime, drugs and corruption, and has pushed back against blatant transit in the Peten area bordering Mexico. But several alarming trends continue. Drug smugglers are paying for services in drugs rather than cash, contributing to increasing internal trafficking, use and crime. Drug money is rumored to be financing local election campaigns in smuggling areas. Youth gangs continue to spread beyond the capital to regional cities and rural areas, bringing extortion, crime and violence. It is believed that these transnational criminal organizations are involved in other aspects of organized international crime, especially trafficking in narcotics and alien smuggling.

The significant poppy cultivation of the 1980s was largely eliminated but there has been a resurgence of small plots in remote areas-accompanied by violent resistance to eradication. There is also some marijuana cultivation for domestic use. GOG narcotics control police carry out manual eradication, interdiction, port control operations, narcotics investigations, and road interdiction and inspection functions. INL funds help support all of these activities. In 2008 INL will fund increased activity by the recently restructured and vetted anti-drug. INL funding will also support two anti-gang efforts: a bilateral program extending the model precinct program outside of Guatemala City and a regional program integrating the efforts of law enforcement and prevention in the most affected countries.

The combination of drug-fueled corruption, drug and alien trafficking, crime, and gang-related violence has the potential to make areas of the country ungovernable and degrade regional stability, economic growth, and security of American citizens. Guatemala's commitment to a corruption-free democracy is being challenged. Already government control of some remote areas is fragile at best. The GOG is acutely aware of the impact of narcotrafficking and related corruption and crime. It is devoted to combat it but requires additional assistance.

Program Accomplishments

Seizures in 2006 were limited to 281 kgs of cocaine because of the purge and restructuring of the drug police in response to corruption. They eradicated 79 hectares of opium poppy, and took part in two multinational anti-drug operations. Guatemala also pledged to host a regional Counternarcotics Coordination Center at a regional meeting in January 2006. During 2006, the Ministry of Health inspected all drug manufacturers and distributors for compliance to rules related to potassium permanganate, a precursor chemical for cocaine processing, and the government began prosecution of traffickers in precursor chemicals. Guatemala passed organized crime legislation that gives new tools, such as wiretapping and undercover operations, to law enforcement.

FY 2008 Program

Narcotics and Law Enforcement

The overall goal for this project is to support the GOG's counternarcotics institutions to effectively disrupt drug trafficking and illicit crop production in Guatemala. This project focuses on enhancing the investigative and operational capacity of Guatemalan law enforcement agencies to disrupt the trafficking of drugs and other trans-border crime.

In 2006 the anti-drug police unit, the SAIA, was restructured as a screened investigative unit, with all participants undergoing vetting and polygraphing. Port inspections were assigned to a new separate unit, DIPA. In 2008, the USG will support the SAIA with training, technical assistance and equipment. It will also train police investigators, prosecutors and judges in modern techniques of gathering and analyzing data to increase evidence-based seizures, arrests and convictions. The USG will also provide training, technical assistance, equipment, and operational support to improve the GOG's interdiction, including ports.

Funding will also be used for bilateral and multi-lateral counternarcotics missions, such as "Mayan Jaguar," and Central Skies regional deployments. It will support Regional Aerial Reconnaissance and Eradication (RARE) missions to locate opium poppy and subsequent eradication missions.

This project also supports two full-time advisors, a U.S. police advisor and a U.S.customs advisor.

Demand Reduction and Public Awareness

Domestic drug use is a growing threat. Traffickers supply drugs as payment for services, increasing domestic supply, and gangs have become involved in retail drug sales. This program continues to work with the Executive Secretariat for the Commission Against Addiction and Drug Trafficking (SECCATID) to support school education projects, improvements to rehabilitation centers, and public information campaigns.

Narcotics Prosecutor Assistance

Guatemala urgently needs more successful prosecutions and convictions of narcotraffickers and corrupt officials, as many arrests do not result in convictions. The Prosecutor Assistance project assists the Public Ministry's (Attorney General) special prosecutors units (counternarcotics, anti-money laundering and anti-corruption units) with investigation case development and processing, improving effective and transparent cases that fully respect internationally recognized human rights. The program will improve the capabilities of special prosecutors in the, prosecution and management of cases. It will also provide specialized training for prosecutors dealing with high-profile drug trafficking and money laundering cases.

The Anti-Corruption Reform (Good Governance) project will focus on the anti-corruption and anti-money laundering prosecutors units of the Public Ministry. It will help them implement better interagency coordination, better resource allocation procedures and training. USG assistance will also be geared towards reducing impunity through the establishment of better operational procedures and enhanced administrative systems.

Combating Criminal Gangs

The Law Enforcement Development Program (previously funded under a separate mechanism) works with a model precinct to develop better policing to combat crime, especially gang-based crime and violence. Funding will replicate the program, which is designed to institute modern methods of policing that rely on community input to combat crime, in additional municipalities. The program improves police and prosecutor skills and coordination, involves communities in crime monitoring and reporting, and strengthens police accountability and transparency.

Program Development and Support

Funds will support salaries, benefits and allowances of U.S. and foreign national direct hire and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Service (ICASS) costs and general administrative and operational expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

Guatemala
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement
      Narcotics Interdiction 150 - 300 - 700
      Eradication 100 - 100 - 250
      Institutional Development 810 - 590 - 1,320
Sub Total 1,060 - 990 - 2,270
Transnational Crime
      Financial Crime - - - - 50
      Organized/Gang Related Crime - - - - 2,000
Sub Total - - - - 2,050
Administration of Justice 495 - 350 - 250
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction 220 - 130 - 100
Program Development and Support
      U.S. Personnel 280 - *320 - 150
      Non-U.S. Personnel 107 - 110 - 200
      ICASS Costs 267 - 270 - 270
      Program Support 46 - 30 - 30
Sub-Total 700 - 730 - 650
Total 2,475 - 2,200 - 5,320
* Transfer Cost of Incoming Director included. 

Guyana

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

100

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhance the abilities of Guyana's law enforcement agencies to detect and intercept shipments and detain traffickers.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized.

Increased number of arrests and successful prosecutions of drug traffickers and money launderers.

Transformational Diplomacy

The Caribbean accounts for an estimated nine percent of the drug flow to the United States. Guyana's vast, ungoverned hinterland is available as an operating platform for transnational traffickers in cocaine, weapons, and people. Political stability is threatened by ethnic and social divisions and by the corrosive financial power of narcotics-traffickers. U.S. assistance will help improve the capabilities of Guyana's police and military to deny transnational criminals the use of Guyanese territory for transshipment of illegal drugs to the United States U.S. assistance will help improve the extremely limited capabilities of Guyana's police and military through training and equipment, including helping an investigative unit get under way and furthering the Guyanese military's ability to deny transnational criminals the use of Guyanese territory.

Program Justification

Guyana is a transshipment point for cocaine destined for North America, Europe and the Caribbean. The Government of Guyana's (GOG) inability to control its borders, a lack of strong law enforcement presence and aircraft or boat patrol allow traffickers to move drug shipments via sea, river, and air with little resistance. The economic, political and social conditions in Guyana make it a prime target for narcotics traffickers to exploit as a transit point for cocaine. The country's remote geographic location and limited law enforcement capabilities, as well as high levels of corruption, make the country a prime location for use by drug traffickers.

Program Accomplishments

In 2006, Guyanese top drug trafficker Shaheed "Roger" Khan was indicted by a federal court in New York for conspiracy to import cocaine into the United States. To augment this important arrest and extradition, the Guyana Police Force (GPF) Narcotics Branch and the Customs Anti-Narcotics Unit (CANU) arrested dozens of drug couriers at Guyana's international airport en route to the Caribbean, North America, and Europe. Guyana authorities discovered and destroyed more than 6,500 kgs of marijuana in 2006. The Guyana Defense Force Coast Guard (GDFCG) has the lead for maritime counternarcotics operations. The GDFCG conducts patrols with the interceptor boat donated by the USG in 2005, but has not yet interdicted any narcotics shipments.

FY 2008 Program

Narcotics Law Enforcement

In FY 2008, funding will go towards initiatives that demonstrate success in interdicting drug flows. U.S. assistance will help improve the extremely limited capabilities of Guyana's police and military through training and equipment, targeting the GPF Narcotics Branch. Funding will also assist CANU, which tasked with conducting law enforcement activities mainly at ports of entry, by providing more support and equipment at the main five transit points. Funding will be used to support the DEA-lead vetted intelligence unit within the GPF.

Guyana
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement 100
Total - - - - 100

Haiti

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

14,850

14,850

9,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Effective law enforcement and public order in Haiti significantly reduces the attractiveness of illegal migration and the ability of criminals to traffic drugs into the United States, while promoting economic development and long-term stability.

Existing and 1,000 newly recruited Haitian National Police will continue to be vetted and trained to democratic policing standards to form the core of a credible, competent police force. Haitian police will be able to respond to reports of crime in a timely manner, conduct effective patrols, direct traffic, communicate effectively, and conduct internal and criminal investigations, with crime reducing over time. Incidences of human rights abuses by police will decrease.

U.S. police officers continue to serve in Haiti under the auspices of the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), helping to maintain law and order, and advising, training, vetting, restructuring, and monitoring the Haitian National Police.

As citizens begin to have confidence in the police as an institution, reporting of crime will increase, as will police capability to respond. Security on the streets will improve, as measured by a return to normal business and reduction of daily gunfire.

The Haitian National Police counterdrug unit investigates and makes arrests of drug traffickers in cases that lead to prosecutions.

Drug seizures and drug trafficking arrests increase. The flow of drugs through Haiti declines.

Financial Investigative Unit (FIU) investigations lead to prosecutions and convictions, of money launderers, corrupt individuals and government officials.

The volume and the value of assets seized.

Transformational Diplomacy

Improved security is critical to strengthening democracy, providing stability, establishing an environment for economic growth and investment, improving respect for human rights, and reducing drug trafficking, illegal immigration, and other transnational crime. The INL police reform and counternarcotics assistance program supports the Peace and Security objective by focusing on the development of an honest, professional and effective police force. INL funds 20 of the 50 police officers to the UN Mission who train, mentor and provide operational support for the Haitian National Police (HNP). To stem the drug flow through Haiti, we have partnerships with Haitian authorities and are creating institutions to fight both drug trafficking and related money laundering. We will continue to support DEA's vetted counterdrug units and the development of the Haitian Coast Guard's interdiction capability, as well as the efforts of the government's Financial Investigative Unit to combat money laundering and corruption. The criminal justice program supports the Governing Justly and Democratically objective by improving the infrastructure and management of the prison system.

Program Justification

Strengthening Haiti's law enforcement capacity is a key U.S. priority. The HNP has little real capacity to investigate or respond to crimes, patrol, keep public order or even communicate internally. These basic prerequisites for enforcing the law are lacking throughout Haiti, but particularly in Port au Prince slums which are the epicenter of anti-government and criminal activity. It is estimated that a minimum of eight metric tons of cocaine from South America transits Haiti on its way to U.S. markets. Cocaine arrives in Haiti by go-fast boats, other vessels and by small aircraft. It is then shipped onward by sea in vessels or containers or by land through the Dominican Republic. In addition to posing problems for the United States, the drug trade in Haiti undermines the rule of law in that fragile country by fostering corruption and fomenting armed violence perpetrated by criminal gangs and political opposition groups.

Stability in Haiti will contribute to its economic growth, enhancing security in the region and diminishing the attractiveness of illegal migration to the United States. To help achieve stability, INL will continue to support peacekeeping operations, including by providing U.S. police to the civilian police component of MINUSTAH, the lead player in HNP reform and retraining. U.S. support for MINUSTAH is pivotal to the mission's success.

Haiti is hampered in its ability to implement police and corrections reform by a tremendous lack of resources, and to some extent, lack of expertise. INL programs will continue to support the enhancement of institutional capacity, police development and reform, and anti-corruption measures.

Program Accomplishments

To become a credible and competent police force, the HNP requires extensive training, mentoring and vetting. The U.S. assisted MINUSTAH in providing training and vetting support for over 1,500 new recruits and 1,000 additional officers in FY 2006. We made the police academy operational and began an in-service training program for existing HNP officers, which trained all police in the regions in basic police techniques and human rights by the end of FY 2006. The U.S. provided forensics training and equipment, as well as training on, and provision of, appropriate non-lethal means of responding to crisis situations.

The U.S. also greatly enhanced the operational capacity of the HNP, with the provision of communications links at individual police stations throughout Haiti to enable officers in stations to communicate with officers in the field, along with motorcycles and trucks for officers to patrol and respond to crisis situations. The U.S. joined other donors in supporting the UN model police station concept which involves rehabilitating a police station while the officers in that station are vetted and trained by the UN. The U.S. will have completed a minimum of thirteen model stations throughout Haiti by the end of FY 2007.

This assistance enabled the HNP, despite a chronic lack of resources, to achieve some success in the counternarcotics area. During 2006, DEA vetted and trained the HNP counter drug unit (BLTS), conducted limited drug interdiction operations, and selected the members of a Sensitive Investigative Unit that will become operational in 2007. The Haitian Coast Guard conducted patrols and participated in a drug interdiction operation from its Killick base in Port au Prince. It also reestablished operations at its renovated based in Cap Haitien. The Financial Investigative Unit continued to take actions against money laundering and corruption and seized $17.6 million in assets of a convicted Haitian trafficker.

FY 2008 Program

The FY 2008 program focuses on police reform (crime control assistance), corrections (criminal justice assistance), and counternarcotics. These programs began in 2004 and are proceeding in cooperation with the Haitian Government, MINUSTAH, and other donors.

Crime Control

Civilian Police: INL will support up to 20 of the 50 police officers the U.S. is contributing to the MINUSTAH stabilization mission. U.S. officers will continue providing expertise in the areas of academy training, field training, patrols, community policing, investigations, traffic, crime analysis, forensics, police management, supervisory skills, police administration, and other specialized skills. U.S. CIVPOL officers will continue to monitor the HNP to discourage and report human rights violations. They will also continue to co-locate with Haitian officers in their stations and engage in joint patrols, to increase public confidence in the police.

Training and Equipment: We and our donor partners estimate that 8,000-12,000 HNP are needed to provide public order in Haiti and believe a force this size is sustainable over the long term. Funds will be used to continue assisting the HNP to recruit, select and train a minimum of 1,200 qualified officers. Specialized units, including forensics, SWAT, and traffic will be strengthened and trained. HNP supervisory, management, and human rights training will be provided as well as periodic in-service training for existing HNP officers. Together with that training, we will provide appropriate equipment, communications and mobility.

Police Accountability and Reform: Corruption is a major problem within the HNP. Targeted assistance will be given to the Inspector General's office to enhance HNP capacity to perform internal police investigations, exercise effective command and control over the police force, and ensure adherence to policies and procedures.

Crime Control/Forensics: Upgrades to police infrastructure combined with targeted training and vetting will continue. Up to 8 stations will be repaired under the model station program and training will be provided on the operation of police stations and on the basics of community policing. The U.S. will continue to assist in forensic training and the development of HNP capacities for crime analysis. The U.S. will also help the HNP to be able to respond to civil disturbances in a manner that takes advantage of non-lethal police tactics.

Criminal Justice

Corrections: These funds will be used to continue with the effort to renovate deteriorating structures that present security and disease threats to detainees, and to alleviate the serious human rights violations currently presented by jail conditions. The corrections effort also includes the development of a program to equip and train Haitian prison personnel to operate a pre-trial diversion program and to educate and rehabilitate some of the criminal population.

Counternarcotics

Special Counterdrug Unit: The HNP counterdrug unit (BLTS) currently has 45 vetted officers. Funds in FY 08 will be used to expand the unit and provide additional training and equipment - including radios and vehicles. Within the BLTS, DEA formed in 2006 a Sensitive Investigative Unit (SIU) of specially selected and trained officers who conduct special operations and collect intelligence against the major traffickers in Haiti. Funding will support the deployment of elements of both units throughout the country, as well as the intelligence collection and analysis center within the HNP.

Haitian Coast Guard: Funds will be used to support port security and maritime interdiction operations from HCG bases at Killick and Cap Haitien. In partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard, funding will continue the ongoing effort aimed at restoring and upgrading the logistical and maintenance capacity of the HCG. Additional vessels will be provided consistent with HCG capacity to maintain and operate them and a third base may be established on the south coast, a region known for narcotics trafficking. A key initiative will be co-locating other HNP units to increase GOH presence and improve operational results.

Financial Investigative Unit: Funding - on a shared basis with Treasury - will provide technical assistance and financial investigation mentors to support the expansion of the unit (UCREF) and the Financial Crimes Task Force within it. Located at the Central Bank, UCREF conducts money laundering and corruption investigations.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds are used for the salaries, benefits, allowances, and travel of direct hire and contract U.S. and foreign national personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs and other general administrative and operating expenses for counternarcotics and anticrime program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Haiti
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Civilian Police Program 6,500 - 6,500 - 3,500
Police Development and Reform
Training and Equipment 2,450 - 3,500 - 1,100
Police Accountability and Reform 1,500 - 800 - 600
Crime Prevention/Forensics 1,500 - 800 - 500
Sub Total 5,450 - 5,100 - 2,200
Criminal Justice Development
Corrections 1,000 - 1,000 - 920
Sub Total 1,000 - 1,000 - 920
Counterdrug Support
Marine Interdiction 600 - 650 - 600
Anti-Money Laundering 250 - 350 - 380
DEA Vetted Unit 375 - 500 - 700
Sub-Total 1,225 - 1,500 - 1,680
Program Development and Support
U.S. Personnel 490 - 510 - 500
Non-U.S. Personnel 45 - 60 - 60
ICASS Costs 130 - 145 - 135
Program Support 10 - 35 - 5
Sub-Total 675 - 750 - 700
Total 14,850 - 14,850 - 9,000

Honduras

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

*

*

750

* In FY 2006 and FY 2007, some funding from the Latin America Regional and Caribbean and Central America Regional budgets, respectively, were used for programs in Honduras.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Honduras is a transit point for drugs en route to the United States. It is also one of three Central American countries most affected by the transnational gang crime that also impacts the United States. Honduras was part of a regional funds account for the Central America and Caribbean account in FY 2007 and the Latin America Regional Account in FY 2006 and earlier.

The program will enhance the abilities of the Government of Honduras (GOH) law enforcement agencies to better detect and intercept shipments and detain traffickers.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized.

Government forces able to respond to growing number of suspect movements.

Broadened and more effective exchanges of information with USG and among regional partners.

Augmented ability of responsible agencies to investigate, prosecute, seize criminal assets, interdict illicit drug and chemical shipments and control money laundering.

Increased number of arrests and successful prosecutions of drug traffickers and money launderers.

Transformational Diplomacy

INL FY 2008 funds advance the Transformational Diplomacy goals of Peace and Security. Honduras falls in the Transforming Country category--it is a low-income country, but has met MCC performance criteria for policy reforms. The goal for Peace and Security is to address key challenges to security and law enforcement. The INL program addresses a key challenge that affects both Honduras and the United States: interdiction of drugs flowing through Honduras by air, sea or land. The USG estimates indicate that 90 percent of drugs reaching the United States are shipped by land, air and sea through the Central American corridor to Mexico and the United States.

Program Justification

Honduras faces serious social and economic challenges that limit its ability to effectively guarantee peace and security. A poorly educated, under-employed population, over half of which is under the age of 19, will double in size in 25 years further straining the country's limited capacity to provide education, employment, and social services. Honduras's geographic location makes it a transit point for narcotics trafficking, alien smuggling, trafficking in persons, and other organized crime activities that overwhelm law enforcement and judicial systems. Recent reports indicate that such transit is increasing, as narcotraffickers have been shifting their boat traffic from Guatemala to Honduras. The largely inaccessible Atlantic coast region is particularly vulnerable to trafficking activities.

Program Accomplishments

The new administration has made combating drug activities one of its major priorities. This includes the expansion of maritime interdiction, especially along the north coast where most of the drug trafficking occurs; strengthening international cooperation; and initiatives to weed out corrupt officials at the Ministry of Public Security. The GOH has developed a plan to reform and improve the National Police, including the addition of 2,300 officers in 2006 and 2,000 in 2007, reorganization of the police command, and a purge of cops who have committed crimes or are linked to drug traffickers. Drug-related arrests at Honduras' borders increased as a result of road interdiction operations. GOH maritime interdiction has been successful in apprehensions and arrests of persons and ships involved in drug trafficking in conjunction with USG assistance. GOH law enforcement agencies have also intercepted several major shipments of weapons for drugs conducted between Honduran gun runners and Colombian drug dealers.

FY 2008 Program

Narcotics Law Enforcement

The program will support the expansion and improvement of the GOH law enforcement efforts to stem drug flow through its territory, especially by land and sea. It will help strengthen law enforcement in vulnerable areas, such as the remote Atlantic coast, improve information gathering and analysis, and improve inspections as ports and border crossing points. The program will work closely with the GOH to support improvement of law enforcement through training, technical assistance, and anti-corruption measures, and will support limited equipment and operational expenses.

Program Development and Support

Funds will support salaries, benefits and allowances of one U.S. and one foreign national personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Service (ICASS) costs and general administrative and operational expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

Honduras
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement
Port Security - - - - 375
Border Security - - - - 375
Total - - - - 750

Jamaica

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

990

900

1,009

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

To improve the Government of Jamaica's (GOJ) ability to take incisive action to disrupt and deter drug trafficking and other transnational criminal activities, while maintaining strong and corrupt-free law enforcement institutions.

The GOJ will investigate, prosecute, and convict corrupt officials at all levels of government service to ensure the integrity of law enforcement institutions.

The GOJ will improve its capability to collect, analyze, and disseminate intelligence for effective coordinated law enforcement action.

The GOJ will continue to disrupt international trafficking organizations and will increase the amount of seizures of cocaine by taking concrete steps to ensure the operational readiness of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), the Jamaica Defense Force (JDF), and the Customs' Contraband Enforcement Team (CET).

Criminal justice in Jamaica will be strengthened and reformed, thereby improving the capacity for investigating and prosecuting drug traffickers and other criminals.

The GOJ will respond more quickly to U.S. requests under the bilateral extradition and mutual legal assistance treaties.

Transformational Diplomacy

Jamaica faces the pressures of narcotics trafficking, money laundering, corruption and crime that risk undermining the rule of law and democratic governance. Supporting Jamaica's transformation into a more secure, democratic, prosperous and stable partner represents a major U.S. policy goal. In FY 2008, the U.S. will focus its efforts in support of counter-drug, anti-crime and anti-corruption efforts among other obstacles and opportunities for advancing the transformational democracy goal.

Program Justification

Jamaica is a major transit point for cocaine enroute to the United States and is also a key source of marijuana and marijuana derivative products for the Americas. Jamaica's difficult to patrol coastline, over 100 unmonitored airstrips, busy commercial and cruise ports and convenient air connections make it a major transit country. Corruption has become a major barrier to effective law enforcement and judicial institutions, seriously undermining counternarcotics efforts and degrading the rule of law.

The Jamaican government is committed to combating all illegal drug-related criminal activity. They began 2006 with an ambitious legislative agenda that included financial crimes, port security, and the use of DNA in criminal cases. The GOJ has taken steps to protect itself against drug trafficking and other types of organized crime by intensifying its law enforcement efforts and enhancing international cooperation.

U.S. counternarcotics assistance seeks, through the provision of equipment, technical assistance and training, to help the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF), the Jamaica Defense Force (JDF), Jamaica Customs, and other GOJ agencies reduce the flow of illegal drugs from Jamaica to the United States; to enhance Jamaica's ability to disrupt and dismantle those international criminal organizations; and to identify, target and eliminate those threats that pose the greatest danger to US national security interest. The program also provides assistance to strengthen the GOJ's ability to counter public corruption and help facilitate the extradition of traffickers to the U.S.

Program Accomplishments

During 2006, the GOJ seized narcotics destined for the United States, arrested key traffickers and criminal gang leaders and dismantled their organizations. While operating under severe resource constraints, the GOJ assigned high priority to counternarcotics missions.

Through the continued implementation of its 2005-2008 Corporate Strategy for Reform, which includes a reorganization of police divisions, the JCF's efforts to control crime and improve community policing resulted in a 16 percent decrease in crime. In August 2006, two priority targets associated with major cocaine trafficking organizations were arrested for allegedly transporting cocaine shipments from Colombia to the United States, resulting in the seizure of five tons of cocaine, 11 vehicles and over USD 70,000 in cash.

Since its inception in October 2004, through December 2006, Operation Kingfish, a multinational task force (GOJ, U.S., U.K., and Canada), launched 1,378 operations resulting in the seizure of 56 vehicles, 57 boats, one aircraft, and two containers conveying drugs. Kingfish was also responsible for the seizure of 13 metric tons of cocaine and over 27,000 pounds of compressed marijuana.

In 2006, through cargo scanning, the Jamaican Customs Service seized over 3,000 pounds of marijuana, 10 kilograms of cocaine and approximately USD 500,000 at Jamaican air and sea-ports.

The JDF Air Wing and Coast Guard have also been actively involved in maritime interdiction efforts. The JDF, JCF, and the Financial Investigations Division worked closely with the USG to investigate significant narcotics trafficking and money laundering organizations.

In 2006, the GOJ seized 109 kilograms of cocaine, 59,770 kilograms of cannabis and destroyed 524 hectares of cannabis. Local law enforcement officers, together with international law enforcement officers, continued to aggressively target major drug trafficking organizations. The JCF arrested 6,793 persons on drug related charges, including 269 foreigners, in the first eleven months of 2006.

FY 2008 Program

Requested funding level for FY 2008 will permit the GOJ to undertake an integrated set of counter-drug, anti-money laundering and anti-corruption efforts:

Narcotics Law Enforcement

These projects are constructed to strengthen the GOJ's capability to identify, investigate and prosecute drug traffickers, money launderers and other international criminals and dismantle their criminal organizations; apprehend fugitives from justice; interdict shipments of illicit drugs; eradicate marijuana cultivation; and counter public corruption. Requested funding will be used to support fugitive apprehension, intelligence gathering, analysis and dissemination, tracing of illegal firearms, anti-corruption programs, police reorganization efforts, and financial crimes through counternarcotics sub-projects with limited equipment, training, operational support and replacement vehicles.

Border Control and Port Security

The project is designed to improve the GOJ's capability to disrupt the movement of drugs and other contraband via commercial cargo and conveyances at airports, seaports and free trade zones. Requested funding will be used to train and equip new U.S. Customs Enforcement Team (CET) personnel, purchase an additional vehicle to transport members of the expanded CET between duty stations at the airports and seaports, and support a multi-agency Airport Interdiction Task Force. Limited maintenance support for the newly installed border security system will also be provided.

Maritime Interdiction

This project supports the U.S.-Jamaica maritime counternarcotics cooperation agreement by strengthening the GOJ's ability to successfully interdict vessels transporting drugs. In the past, the USG has provided and refurbished several boats for the JDF/CG. Requested funding will be used for training and equipment to sustain a vessel maintenance program, and provide continued support for GOJ efforts to establish forward positioning sites that will enable the rapid deployment of boats for maritime drug interdiction operations.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds cover the cost of salaries, benefits, and allowances of U.S. and foreign national direct hire personnel, field travel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Jamaica
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement 210 - 300 - 309
Border Control and Port Security 70 - - - 50
Maritime Interdiction 250 - 200 - 250
Program Development and Support
U.S. Personnel 150 - 100 - 140
Non-U.S. Personnel 60 - 50 - 80
ICASS Costs 130 - 200 - 150
Program Support 120 - 50 - 30
Sub-Total 460 - 400 - 400
Total 990 - 900 - 1,009

Mexico

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

39,600

36,678

27,816

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Border and Port Security

Strengthen Mexico's ability to control its borders, ports of entry, and choke points within its national transportation system through the detection and interdiction of illicit narcotics, contraband items including explosives and weapons, trafficked/smuggled persons and individuals seeking to enter the United States to conduct terrorist activities.

More effective and rapid screening of vehicles and trains for contraband, illicit drugs and smuggled aliens, and reduced delays of legitimate traffic moving north towards our common border.

Interdiction

Continue bilateral cooperation targeting the disruption of the command and control of Mexico's drug trafficking organizations (DTOs). Enhance the capacity of Mexican law enforcement agencies (LEAs) to interdict trafficking in narcotics and precursors and the illicit proceeds that derive from them.

These efforts should result in a 10 percent increase in the volume of seized drugs and precursor chemicals; the number of drug production facilities discovered and destroyed; the amount of cash seizures; and, the number of drug-related arrests.

Establish interconnectivity between the respective command and control centers of Mexico's LEAs, to maximize coordination of joint operations and investigations.

Seamless use of information between the different databases supporting each of the operations centers will lead to more effective investigations and prosecutions.

Institution Building

Support the complete restructuring of the federal police force, by merging three separate entities into a new Federal Police Corps (CFP), and promote the professionalization and modernization of Mexico's law enforcement institutions and criminal justice sectors.

Improved GOM capacity to conduct credible investigations based on forensic evidence successfully prosecute criminal organizations.

Increased efficiency of the police academy structure will enhance flow-through by over 50 percent, and provide a full range of training (from courses for new recruits, to specialized investigative & technical training, to management training)

Advance the creation of a Unified System of Crime Reporting, a platform that links federal police and prosecutors with state police/prosecutors and municipal police, one that dovetails with our support for "digitalization" of cases within Office of the Attorney General (PGR)

Unified System is established across CFP and PGR; the process of extending it down into state police/prosecutors has been completed to at least three states.

Social Sector Support

Support demand reduction programs to educate the public about the harmful personal and societal effects of drug abuse and the growing gang problem.

Surveys identify those requiring assistance

Public awareness campaigns conducted on the rising threat of methamphetamines and gangs to Mexican society.

Transformational Diplomacy

The United States has enormous shared interests in Mexico -- politically, economically and with regard to our own national security. Mexico is also the principal transit route for cocaine and an important producer in its own right of the heroin, marijuana and methamphetamine consumed in the United States. Mexico's police and judicial institutions have been unable to curb the powerful narcotics cartels, whose activities have a direct impact across our shared border. Drug-related corruption and a pervasive lack of adequate resources within Mexico's law enforcement institutions encourages narcotrafficking, alien smuggling and other transnational crime; more importantly, it increases U.S. vulnerability to terrorism. Weaknesses in Mexico's institutions also affect its democratic stability and governability. Mexico's juridical system is undergoing significant reform as well, to diminish its opaqueness and increase its efficiency. All its public institutions are struggling to stem the endemic corruption that afflicts them. It is the highest priority for the United States to support Mexico's efforts to improve security along our shared border and to create a society that enjoys rule of law and encourages job-creating investment.

Positive, proactive collaboration between the governments in pursuit of our many common objectives will help Mexico evolve into a modern state that can be a successful partner across a wide range of mutually beneficial issues. U.S. assistance can help deepen democracy's roots and strengthen Mexico's institutions of governance. The Calderon Administration is eager to work closely with the U.S. to these ends.

Peace and Security: The extensive shared border, and the poverty that motivates millions to cross it illegally each year, places "peace and security" at the top of the list of U.S. transformational diplomacy priorities with regard to Mexico. Counternarcotics activities (including support for Mexico's interdiction and demand reduction activities, as well as Mexico's evolving anti-money laundering regime) are crucial, not only due to the damage that illegal drugs cause to the U.S. population, but also due to the threat that uncontrolled criminality poses to our broader pursuit of border security and to Mexico's own democratic stability. U.S. support for Mexico's restructuring of its police and judicial institutions is key to enhancing Mexico's ability to address the security issues of greatest concern to the United States, including international terrorism. U.S. assistance to Mexico's law enforcement entities will be used primarily to improve their infrastructure and to provide training.

Governing Justly and Democratically: Our pursuit of transformational diplomacy will focus resources on strengthening Mexico's ability to govern justly and democratically. The development of the judicial sector is key, not only for fighting crime and terrorism, but also for Mexico's economic modernization and competitiveness (and the creation of a level playing field for U.S. investors) through the introduction of an oral trial system and a general revamping of Mexico's legal codes.

U.S. support will also train and provide technical assistance to reform and professionalize federal, state and local police personnel. These efforts should help address the escalating drug-related violence across the country, especially in the border region.

Program Justification

The Calderon Administration has demonstrated an expanded commitment to attack the cartels and the illicit trade in drugs and precursors, in order to provide for greater public security. To accomplish this, it is undertaking a restructuring of its justice system and of its law enforcement institutions. Meanwhile, our respective LEAs have benefited greatly from an unprecedented level of cooperation. These initiatives will not change reality overnight, and Mexico will continue to require extensive assistance to confront Mexican DTOs, the principal producers of marijuana and methamphetamine bound for the United States. Mexico also remains a key transit zone for the vast majority of the South American cocaine consumed in the United States. The 2,000-mile shared border presents Mexican DTOs with ample opportunities to enter the U.S. market, where they have established extensive networks.

The inauguration of President Calderon in 2006 ushered in a period of increased cooperation on our common priorities in law enforcement. INL will continue current programs critical to both our interests, concluding the implementation of projects begun during the Fox Administration and undertaking new ones designed in concert with the Calderon Administration's own set of priorities.

Narco-violence along the Mexico/U.S. border has escalated in recent years, as Mexican DTOs fight over territory to fill the vacuums left by the recent imprisonment and death of prominent DTO leaders. The restructuring of the federal police force will help address this loss of prescriptive control.

Mexico also shares our concern over the rising tide of production and trade in methamphetamines in its territory, and INL will help it undertake activities that raise public awareness and target the movement of contraband precursors and finished drug. INL will also seek ways to help the GOM disrupt gang activities that are increasingly encroaching on Mexico along its borders.

Program Accomplishments

The unprecedented law enforcement support and cooperation provided by the Fox Administration during its six years in office presented INL with a unique opportunity to assist the GOM's efforts to improve its law enforcement capabilities. The Calderon Administration intends to build upon these first efforts to establish credible and transparent juridical and law enforcement institutions that merit the respect and confidence of the people of Mexico.

INL's prior assistance helped Mexico harden its northern border against the illegal trafficking of narcotics, cash, arms and other illegal contraband through improvements in its physical inspection infrastructure and through training. In CY 2006, an Non-Intrusive Inspection Equipment (NIIE) unit at the Mexico City International Airport helped intercept over $50 million of illegal drug money heading south. The Advanced Passenger Information System (APIS), another product of INL assistance, has provided U.S. law enforcement agencies with data on millions of travelers, identifying hundreds of individuals sought by law enforcement agencies. Six SENTRI (Secure Electronic Network for Travelers' Rapid Inspection) lanes were also established, expediting border crossing lanes for pre-cleared, low-risk commuters and allowing authorities to concentrate more inspection resources on high-risk travelers.

Every year Mexico expends significant resources on its interdiction and eradication efforts. Annually the GOM destroys thousands of hectares of illicit poppy and marijuana cultivation, seizes tons of drugs (heroin, cocaine, methamphetamines, synthetics and marijuana), intercepts millions of dollars of criminal proceeds, arrests and prosecutes thousands of criminals and extradites record numbers of criminals. The quality of these extraditions rose significantly in January 2007, when the Calderon Administration delivered narco-kingpin Osiel Cardenas into U.S. custody.

Mexico also made significant advances in meeting its long-term law enforcement goals. During the Fox Administration, the PGR invested significant resources in its units dedicated to investigation (AFI - Federal Investigative Agency), intelligence (CENAPI - Counternarcotics and Anti-Crime Intelligence Center) and prosecution (SIEDO - Deputy Attorney General's Office on Organized Crime). The Calderon Administration is already implementing plans to restructure the federal police force in its entirety, making it more efficient and responsive to the needs of preserving public security. It is also undertaking an historic juridical reform, which will modify the Constitution and code of criminal procedure to provide for oral trials under an accusatorial system. INL will complement these landmark changes by providing the support and coordination needed to bring USG law enforcement expertise to help Mexico accomplish these goals.

FY 2008 Program

The FY 2008 project activity falls within two basic categories: Peace and Security, and Governing Justly and Democratically. These activities are designed to balance short-term operational objectives (which can yield immediate results in the form of improved seizures of illicit drugs) with long-term institutional development (which will strengthen the GOM's permanent capacity to fight DTOs and provide for a political-economic system based on rule of law).

Government Capabilities

INL will provide assistance that will expand the GOM's institutional capabilities to detect and interdict illicit narcotics, contraband items including explosives and weapons, trafficked/smuggled persons and individuals seeking to enter the United States to conduct terrorist activities. The support will focus principally on two sets of activities: the provision of Non-Intrusive Inspection Equipment (NIIE) and of mechanisms that improve data sharing. INL will provide NIIE equipment and help the GOM to create up to four Center for Imagery Sharing (CIS) command centers that will coordinate the operation of Portal VACIS devices throughout the country. The other activity will improve the institutional capacity of public security agencies to act effectively against terrorism, by establishing relevant data linkages.

Eradication

INL provision of computer hardware and software to assist in imagery analysis will enhance the GOM's ability to deploy its eradication assets most effectively. This effort will build upon our recent investment in an Operations Center and Air Services Section that coordinate eradication missions.

Interdiction

INL will assist the GOM's effort to disrupt international crime and narcotics trafficking, by improving its law enforcement infrastructure. Provision of computers and communications equipment that complement GOM-developed software will enable the GOM to establish the new Consolidated Crime Information System (CCIS).

INL will also provide special investigative equipment, vehicles, and computers to support the new Federal Police Corps and its Special Investigative Units. It will also work with DHS/CBP to assess security and to recommend corrective action at Mexico's largest maritime ports. INL will also procure additional clandestine laboratory vehicles, trailers and safety gear to assist the GOM in combating methamphetamine trafficking. INL will also provide equipment and specially trained canines for responding to drug-related crimes involving firearms and explosives.

Demand Control and Reduction

This project supports demand reduction activities and collaboration including the annual Bi-National Demand Reduction Conferences, collection and development of better epidemiological data relating to drug abuse in Mexico (carried out by CONADIC), and NGO involvement in prevention, treatment and rehabilitation, particularly along the northern border. Acquisition activities will consist mainly of grants, and computer hardware and software equipment.

Financial Crimes and Money Laundering

INL will help the GOM to disrupt money laundering by inter alia facilitating the provision of strategic and tactical information relating to ongoing joint investigations. This builds the capacity to combat criminal financing and engages Mexico in countering both domestic and transnational criminal financing efforts and complements on-going anti-money laundering initiatives of the Secretariat of Finance and Public Credit's Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU). Support will include consultancies, special investigative equipment, hardware/software packages and specialized training. The expected outcomes are (1) an enhanced Mexican ability to initiate investigations autonomously and to cooperate with those of USG agencies, and (2) an increase in asset seizures and forfeitures by the GOM.

Justice Systems

Law Enforcement Training: Will provide training and technical assistance to the Office of the Attorney General (PGR) and the newly restructured federal police force; and will also include specialized training courses for the Secretariat of Public Function (Mexico's version of the General Accounting Office) and various offices of State Attorneys General in partnership with the PGR. In these mixed classes, investigative and prosecutorial personnel of the PGR and PGJE undergo specialized training -- providing the side benefit of fostering increased interaction and teamwork among personnel at the federal and state levels. Specialized training will include such courses as: Ethics in Government; Supervision and Management; Criminal Investigative Techniques; Crime Scene Search and Preservation of Evidence; Anti-Corruption; and, Train-the-Trainer (which includes curriculum development for instructors).

Police and Justice System Restructuring: The Calderon Administration has launched changes that will improve Mexico's justice system and law enforcement capabilities. INL will support these initiatives by 1) providing computers and communications equipment as part of the establishment of a case-tracking system that will provide PGR officials access to a unified computer database for administrative, investigative and operational matters; 2) providing computer hardware and software, systems design and programming support for the Center for Analysis, Planning, and Intelligence Against Organized Crimes (CENAPI); and 3) providing equipment and technical assistance to modernize and sustain the capabilities of the PGR Forensic Laboratory, including in such areas as the Integrated Ballistics Identification System and DNA systems needed for identification of human remains.

Anti-Corruption Reform

Culture of Lawfulness: The Culture of Lawfulness Project partners with governmental and nongovernmental leaders to develop, evaluate and institutionalize sustainable rule of law education programs. INL assistance provides for consultancies and the production of materials for distribution through four channels:

  1. Schools: By influencing the attitudes and knowledge of the next generation of leaders, students become an important constituency for promoting the rule of law and preventing violence and illegality.

  2. Police: Through their daily interaction with the citizenry, the police play a critical role in shaping and reinforcing public perceptions and behavior, especially with respect to the rule of law. Proper police activity deeply influences the community and reinforces a culture of lawfulness.

  3. Mass media: In addition to exposing crime and corruption, the media can actively promote a culture of lawfulness through news programs, documentaries, and entertainment which reduce public fatalism and empower citizens.

  4. Centers of moral authority: Faith-based and secular NGOs are in daily contact with a significant percentage of the population in urban as well as rural areas. Many of these institutions have their own educational centers, professional training and media.

Support for GOM Anti-Corruption Initiatives: INL support will enable the Calderon Administration to identify and root out corruption within the federal bureaucracy. INL support will include equipment, training and technical assistance in such areas as ethics, anti-corruption and internal affairs for the CFP and the Office of Professional Development of the Secretariat of Public Function. This training will usually be given by U.S. law enforcement personnel.

Program Development and Support

INL funds will also be used for salaries, benefits, allowances and travel of direct hire and contract U.S. and foreign national personnel, residential leasing, ICASS funding and other administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. 

Mexico
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006
Enacted
FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007
Estimate
FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Request
Governments' Capabilities
Non-Intrusive Inspectional Equipment 12,600 - 6,653 - 5,072
Data sharing 1,000 - 1,000 - 500
Sub-Total 13,600 - 7,653 - 5,900
Defense, Military and Border Reconstruction
Border Support Infrastructure - - - - 4,000
Sub-Total 0 - 0 - 4,000
Eradication 200 - 200 - 200
Interdiction 14,540 - 12,916 - 11,672
Financial Crimes and Money Laundering 500 625 - 500
Justice Systems
Professionalization and Training 3,000 - 5,000 - 3,000
Police & Justice System Restructuring 5,000 - 7,112 - 645
Sub-Total 8,000 - 12,112 - 3,645
Anti-Corruption Reform 480 782
Total Sub-Operational Support 37,320 - 34,288 - 25,917
Demand Control and Demand Reduction 500 - 790 - 200
Program Development and Support
U.S. Personnel 455 450 449
Non-U.S. Personnel 260 220 800
ICASS 435 430 50
Program Support 630 500 400
Sub-Total 1,780 - 1,600 - 1,699
Total 39,600 - 36,678 - 27,816

Nicaragua

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

*

*

1,600

* In FY 2006 and FY 2007, some funding from the Latin America Regional and Caribbean and Central America Regional budgets, respectively, were used for programs in Nicaragua.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

The program will enhance the abilities of the Government of Nicaragua (GON) law enforcement agencies to better detect and intercept shipments and detain traffickers.

Increased number of interdictions and quantity of drugs and contraband seized. Government forces able to respond to growing number of suspect movements. Broadened and more effective exchanges of information with USG and among regional partners.

Augmented ability of responsible agencies to investigate, prosecute, seize criminal assets, interdict illicit drug and chemical shipments and control money laundering.

Increases in the number of arrests and successful prosecutions of drug traffickers and money launderers.

Transformational Diplomacy

Nicaragua is a "transforming country," a low income country that meets the MCC policy and democracy guidelines. The US policy objectives are strengthening democracy and governance, promoting economic growth, and improving security.

Program Justification

Nicaragua's geographic location makes it is a significant sea and land transshipment point for cocaine and heroin. In addition, its porous borders, weak state institutions and lack of rule of law, especially in the Atlantic Coast region, permit illicit activities. The Government of Nicaragua (GON) is making a determined effort to fight both domestic drug abuse and the international narcotics trade, and to prevent establishment of the criminal youth gangs. In FY 2007 INL programs began focusing on helping the Nicaraguan police improve their capacity to investigate trafficking and money laundering, in addition to supporting interdiction.

Program Accomplishments

In 2006, the GON carried out major seizures of transshipped South American cocaine and heroin headed for U.S. markets. The Nicaragua National Police (NNP) also conducted operations against local drug distribution centers and large shipments transiting the country, gathering intelligence on their locations and making arrests. The new Police Chief began her tenure in September 2006 by implementing immediate anti-corruption measures, including replacing some key personnel. The 850-man Nicaraguan Navy, with assistance from the USG, is developing a long-range patrol capability, using two donated patrol boats have been completely retrofitted as of 2006. The Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) program has expanded to secondary schools. During 2004-2006, 22,000 students received certificates

FY 2008 Program

In 2006 INL helped support the establishment of an Anti-Corruption Unit, a vetted police unit devoted to the linked crimes of trafficking and money laundering. In 2008 INL will continue support of the new unit and will also support interdiction efforts. Nicaragua will also coordinate with the new Regional Gangs Project, as community policing program is a recognized, an example of effective gang prevention.

Interdiction, Intelligence Fusion, and Money Laundering

The vetted unit will develop intelligence on money laundering and on drug trafficking that can be used for interdiction, arrests, and, most importantly, identifying and dismantling criminal organizations and seizing their assets.

Border Security

The U.S. will continue support to the crucial Pe´┐Żas Blancas crossing on the Pan American Highway, and will provide occasional equipment support to maritime patrols on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts.

Demand Remand Reduction

Drug consumption in Nicaragua is a growing problem, particularly on the Atlantic coast, where the increase in narcotics transshipment during recent years has generated a rise in local drug abuse. INL will continue to support the D.A.R.E. Program, which has grown to include secondary students since it was first established in elementary schools in 2001.

Trafficking in Persons

Support is provided to the Nicaraguan Police's Women's Unit to prevent Trafficking in Persons (TIP) crimes. INL will assist the Ministry of Government and National Police with prevention programs against TIP by providing the Ministry and the Police with brochures, teaching materials, anti-trafficking videos and other awareness raising materials that the Ministry and Police can use to reach secondary school students and other high risk audiences.

Program Development and Support

Funds will support salaries, benefits and allowances of U.S. and foreign national direct hire and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Service (ICASS) costs and general administrative and operational expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

Nicaragua
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement
Border Security - - - - 150
Trafficking in Persons - - - - 150
Intelligence Fusion and Analysis - - - - 700
Money Laundering - - - - 150
Sub Total - - - - 1,150
Gang Prevention and Law Enforcement - - - - 110
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction - - - - 150
Program Development and Support - - - - 190
Total - - - - 1,600

Paraguay

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

*

*

280


* In FY 2006 and FY 2007, some funding from the Latin America Regional and Southern Cone budgets, respectively, were used for programs in Paraguay.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enable the Government of Paraguay (GOP) to strengthen its technical and operational ability to interdict narcotics, conduct complex criminal investigations, and arrest traffickers.

Increased quantity of cocaine seized by ten percent; increased presence of National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD) in areas where it previously had little or no presence; expanded SENAD operations.

Assist the GOP in reaching out to students, teachers and parents, to reduce and prevent the consumption of illegal drugs.

GOP updates its national study of the prevalence of risk factors, and tracks the effectiveness of its school-age demand reduction programs.

Transformational Diplomacy

The counternarcotics program in Paraguay advances the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by providing training, equipment and operational support designed to enhance the Government of Paraguay's ability to investigate narcotics-trafficking organizations and interdict drug shipments, as well as control demand for illicit drugs.

Program Justification

Paraguay is attractive to international narcotics traffickers due to its strategic position between Bolivia, Brazil, and Argentina. Cocaine from Bolivia is shipped overland into Paraguay and into Argentina and Brazil for transshipment to Europe, Africa and the Middle East. Traffickers also take advantage of the lack of law enforcement presence in much of Paraguay's national territory. A number of individuals and groups involved in financing terrorism in the Tri-Border Area (TBA) are also involved in drug trafficking. In 2006, as SENAD expanded its operations into Pedro Juan Caballero (PJC) and other areas, it arrested several major drug traffickers, and made three record-high weapons seizures. Although SENAD enjoys solid support from the highest levels of the GOP and the Paraguayan public, its operational effectiveness is hampered by the limited financial resources of the GOP. U. S. Government assistance is necessary for SENAD to continue achieving the kind of results it has repeatedly produced.

Paraguay is surrounded by countries (Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay) that all have serious problems with consumption of illicit drugs. Paraguay has an extremely low rate of cocaine consumption, but only a serious demand reduction effort will prevent cocaine consumption from increasing.

Program Accomplishments

During 2006, SENAD seized 493 kg of cocaine, 58,671 kg of marijuana, 39 vehicles, three boats, one farm, and three planes. SENAD also destroyed 1,202 hectares of marijuana, an increase of 202 hectares over 2005 (enough to produce three metric tons of marijuana) out of an estimated 5,500 hectares under cultivation. SENAD arrested several major Brazilian drug traffickers including Arnoldo Moreira de Macedo, Ubiratan Brescovich and Marcelinho Niteroi.

Since the opening of the new SENAD regional office in PJC, Paraguay has expanded its counternarcotics and investigative activities in the region, producing more arrests and seizures. In addition, SENAD opened two new regional offices in Salto la Guaira and Pilar. All these regional offices will enhance SENAD's presence as they are strategically located near Paraguay's borders with Brazil and Argentina.

FY 2008 Program

SENAD Equipment and Commodities Assistance

This project enhances SENAD's ability to conduct counternarcotics enforcement activities, by providing training and technical assistance for SENAD Agents. FY 2008 funds will be used to train SENAD agents in investigative methods, provide computers and software, and purchase equipment such as uniforms, GPS units, and bullet-proof vests.

SENAD Operational Support

This project provides funding to support SENAD investigations of major narcotics traffickers. Funds will be used to provide operational expenses, such as gasoline, helicopter fuel, vetting of investigators and prosecutors from the Public Ministry.

Narcotics Detection Canine Program

Support will enhance the GOP's narcotics enforcement activities through the use of narcotics detection canines. 2008 funding will purchase of additional canines and provide operational support to existing teams to facilitate drug inspections and interdiction as SENAD expands its operations into new areas of Paraguay.

Control Money Laundering and Financial Crime

Paraguay is in the process of strengthening its legislation governing money laundering and terrorism finance. Funds will be used to provide equipment and operational support to Paraguay's Anti-Money Laundering Secretariat (SEPPRELAD).

Demand Reduction Program

The goal of this project is to continue and expand the GOP's drug abuse awareness program and will build on the achievements of previous years. Funds will be used to assist SENAD with travel and administrative costs in conjunction with its demand reduction outreach program, and to enable the GOP to update its national study of the prevalence of risk factors in order to track the effectiveness of its demand reduction programs.

Program, Development and Support (PD&S)

PD&S funds will be used to pay the salary, allowances, and benefits for one part-time contract employee supporting the INL program. In addition, PD&S will support International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. 

Paraguay
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Interdiction
SENAD Equipment and Commodities Assistance - - - - 90
SENAD Operational Support - - - - 50
Narcotics Detection Canine Program - - - - 20
Control Money Laundering and Financial Crime - - - - 15
Strengthen Judicial System - - - - -
Intellectual Property Rights - - - - -
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction - - - - 20
Sub-Total 195
Program Support
Program Development and Support - - - - 85
Total - - - - 280

Trinidad and Tobago

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

*

*

500

* In FY 2006 and FY 2007, some funding from the Latin America Regional and Caribbean and Central America Regional budgets, respectively, were used for programs in Trinidad and Tobago.

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Improved mobility, communications and technical operations enable increased drug seizures by the Government of Trinidad and Tobago's (GOTT) law enforcement agencies.

Increase drug seizures by ten percent.

Transformational Diplomacy

Trinidad and Tobago, situated seven miles off the coast of Venezuela, is a convenient transshipment point for illicit drugs, primarily cocaine and marijuana, but also heroin. Increased law enforcement success in Colombia has led to greater amounts of illegal drugs transiting the Eastern Caribbean. U.S. programs strengthen Trinidad and Tobago's ability to detect and interdict drug shipments, bring traffickers to trial, and attack money laundering and counter-narcotics corruption. In addition, U.S. funds provide Trinidadian law enforcement organizations with training, technical assistance, equipment and vehicles in support of the counter-narcotics crime efforts. U.S. programs also improve education and employment possibilities for persons at risk for involvement in illegal drug use and criminal behavior.

Program Justification

The GOTT has faced a rapid escalation in violent crime over the last few years, including murders, kidnappings for ransom, and at least four bombings. The Colombian drugs-for-arms trade, for which Trinidad and Tobago serves as a transit point, has provided many of the weapons fueling this crime. Illicit drugs arrive from the South American mainland, particularly Venezuela, on fishing boats, pleasure craft and commercial aircraft. Smuggling through the use of drug swallowers continued to rise in 2006.

Program Accomplishments

The GOTT has cooperated with the U.S. on counterdrug issues and allocated significant resources of its own to the fight against illegal drugs. In 2006, The GOTT National Drug Council continued to implement counter-drug policy initiatives, including elements of the country's counter-drug master plan which addresses both supply and demand reduction. The GOTT enhanced the capabilities of the Special Anti-Narcotics Unit (SAUTT), which has the responsibility for both anti-drug and anti-kidnapping operations. This unit was provided with training in crime scene management, first responder responsibilities, investigation techniques, forensic evidence gathering, surveillance, interview techniques and also given technical support. In addition, a multi-purpose building was constructed to house the Crime Academy where the Police and SAUTT officers are taught anti-crime techniques.

As a result of joint operation between GOTT authorities and foreign law enforcement counterparts, there were 43 arrests from January to September 2006 and 2,500 kilograms (kgs) of cocaine were seized/intercepted in the Caribbean Sea, Barbados, United Kingdom and Spain, and 3,200 kgs of marijuana in Canada and the Netherlands. As of September 30, 2006, the GOTT seized approximately 1,000 kgs of cocaine, 162 kgs of heroin, and over 1,500 kgs of cannabis in various forms. The GOTT also eradicated over 192,550 cannabis plants, 47,400 seedlings, and 271,264 kgs of cured marijuana.

Also in 2006, an anti-crime and law enforcement bills were passed. The bills focused on streamlining the police service and holding it more accountable as well as increasing the penalties for certain crimes, including kidnapping. These laws significantly enhance the effectiveness of law enforcement in fighting narcotics and other criminal offenses. The GOTT continued to implement training recommendations made by an American criminal justice specialist to improve capacity to detect narcotics and appropriately manage crime scenes. In addition, the GOTT acquired two armed helicopters, an aerial surveillance system outfitted with radar and imaging systems, a forward-looking infrared camera and twenty-four mobile police radios, and upgraded its coastal radar assets.

FY 2008 Program

The key U.S. policy objective is to assist the GOTT to eliminate the flow of illegal drugs through Trinidad and Tobago to the United States. Joint efforts focus on strengthening the GOTT's ability to detect and interdict drug shipments, bring traffickers and other criminals to trial, attack money laundering, and counter drug-related corruption. U.S. funding will support the enhancement of the Special Anti-Narcotics Unit, by providing the necessary training and technical support to ensure the increased seizures of drugs. Funding to support operations of the Organized Crime Narcotics and Firearms Bureau (OCNFB) will help increase seizures of various types of illicit drugs and disruption of the drug trade.

Narcotics Law Enforcement

The U.S. will continue to work closely with the GOTT's law enforcement agencies to strengthen their counterdrug and crime capabilities by providing training and operational support to Special Anti-Crime Unit and the OCNFB. The U.S. will continue to support and assist the Criminal Investigation unit in fulfilling its five-year plan of integrating with other law enforcement agencies and conducting money laundering and illegal source of income investigations. Funding will also go towards supporting the Counter Drug and Crime Task Force (CDCTF) in implementing counter drug operations throughout Trinidad and Tobago.

Border Control and Port Security

The project is designed to improve the GOTT's capability to disrupt the movement of drugs and other contraband via commercial cargo and conveyances at airports, seaports and free trade zones. Requested funding will be used to train and equip SAUTT personnel, purchase an additional vehicle to transport members of SAUTT between duty stations at the main points of entries.

Demand Reduction

Funding will go towards supporting the demand reduction efforts by the GOTT through the sponsorship of schools, police youth clubs and public awareness campaigns.

Maritime Interdiction

This project supports the U.S.-GOTT maritime counternarcotics cooperation agreement by strengthening the GOTT's ability to successfully interdict vessels transporting drugs. Requested funding will be used for training and equipment to provide continued support for GOTT's Coast Guard efforts.

Program Development and Support

PD&S funds cover the cost of salaries, benefits, and allowances of U.S. and foreign national direct hire personnel, field travel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Trinidad and Tobago
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Narcotics Law Enforcement - - - - 200
Border Control and Port Security - - - - 100
Maritime Interdiction - - - - 30
Drug Awareness/Demand Reduction - - - - 50
Program Development and Support
U.S. Personnel - - - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - - - 69
ICASS Costs - - - - 51
Program Support - - - - -
Sub-Total - - - - 120
Total - - - - 500



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