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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Near East


International Narcotics and Law Enforcement: FY 2008 Program and Budget Guide
Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
September 2007
Report
September 18, 2007

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Algeria

Budget Summary ($000)

 

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

200


Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Deny funds to terrorist organizations and other international criminal organizations.

The number of successful investigations and prosecutions of terrorist financing and money laundering cases; the number of jurisdictions in compliance with international anti-money laundering standards.

Transformational Diplomacy

Denying funds to international criminal organizations advances the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by developing robust anti-money laundering systems that contain the legislative, enforcement and regulatory tools to deny criminals and terrorists access to financial institutions and markets. Algeria is prepared to take its place in North Africa as a regional powerhouse and is strengthening ties with Europe, the Arab League, and Africa, while it develops new relationships in Asia, Latin America, and with the United States. Increased funding requests at the program element level are indicative of a significant realignment of our assistance, one that increases support for democracy and governance and economic growth while maintaining our strong security relationship.

Program Justification

Fighting a fundamentalist insurgency in the 1990s gave Algeria's military and security services vast experience combating terrorism and extremism. U.S. goals in Algeria include helping free that country from terrorism and strengthening our partnership with the Algerian government in fighting global terrorism. Algeria is a significant counter-terrorism partner in northwest Africa. INL programs will support our efforts in working with the Government of Algeria to combat financial crimes, terrorist financing, and money laundering. These activities have the power to corrupt officials, distort economies, skew currency markets, undermine the integrity of financial systems, and destabilize governments. Criminals seek to access the financial systems of countries to fund their operations and launder funds stemming from a variety of illegal activities, including drug trafficking, corruption, arms trafficking, theft of state assets, and a variety of other financial crimes, such as trade-based money laundering, that until very recently has frequently eluded law enforcement. Experts estimate that global money laundering exceeds 3-5 percent of Global Domestic Product - or $1.5-$1.8 trillion per year -- and continues to grow through a variety of new innovative schemes only limited by the imagination of criminals and their organizations.

After over a decade spent protecting state institutions against its civil insurgency, Algeria is now re-building its political and economic systems and is in need of targeted technical assistance that targets financial crimes.

Program Accomplishments

Country-specific funding for Algeria is requested for the first time in FY 2008.

FY 2008 Program

Promote and develop activities and programs that will strengthen cooperation against financial crimes and terrorist financing. Work with Algeria to establish or update enforcement and regulatory tools and to implement international anti-money laundering/anti-terrorist financing standards. Encourage and assist in the formation of financial intelligence units (FIUs), and enhance their ability to share critical financial intelligence by providing technical assistance to those countries that have adequate and appropriate anti-money laundering laws and regulations in place.

Program Development and Support funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. 

Algeria
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Financial Crimes - - - - 200
Trafficking in Persons - - - - -
Total - - - - 200

Egypt

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

3,000

 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Modernized approaches to policing instituted and police-public relations improved through institutional reforms, strategic planning, personnel and other management reforms, and updated curricula and training methods implemented at training academies.

Reduction in incidents of excessive use of force by police, particularly with respect to peaceful demonstrations or other events relating to the exercise of democratic freedoms by civil society or expressions of judicial independence. Indications of improved police-public trust and cooperation, such as increased police responsiveness to public requests for assistance and decreased public complaints of abuses of authority.

Transformational Diplomacy

By assisting the Government of Egypt in modernizing the management of its national police force, the U.S. would support two major goals of the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy strategy. Improved technical skills to investigate criminal and terrorist threats will advance the Peace and Security goal. Promoting an institutional shift in Egypt's police force towards public service will advance Good Governance and Democracy. The criminal activities that arise out of long and porous borders pose real threats to Egypt's security. The illicit trade of drugs and weapons, and the smuggling of humans are destabilizing factors which can be exploited by terrorists and other criminals. The huge illicit proceeds increase the likelihood of corruption which can undermine the rule of law and weaken national institutions that are not only responsible for public safety but are also partners to the U.S. in the war on terrorism. Measures to combat these threats will assist Egypt in enhancing peace and security. In parallel, assisting Egyptian police entities to establish a more positive relationship with Egyptian society - through professionalism, improved responsiveness and organizational transparency - is critical to promote democracy, rule of law and protection of civil and human rights.

Program Justification

Egypt is a democratizing, and moderate Muslim state that is not only a victim of terrorism, but also a committed partner in the global war on terrorism. Egypt has long coastal and land borders, including an extensive border in the desert of the Sinai Peninsula that is easily exploited by terrorists, drug traffickers, alien smugglers, and other transnational criminals. Egypt has substantial problems with illegal migration, human smuggling, the movement of transnational terrorists through its territory, drug trafficking, and smuggling of weapons and other contraband. Law enforcement personnel lack many of the sophisticated tools and training required to combat these threats. In addition, the profits from these illicit enterprises could provide revenue sources to terrorists. These criminal activities lead to corruption of public officials, and could weaken Egyptian institutions, undermining the rule of law in Egypt.

Democracy and good governance are top USG priorities in Egypt, and we have supported a broad range of programs to strengthen civil society and to promote judicial independence. Policing reform efforts will likewise focus on the key roles that law enforcement plays in support of the rule of law, notably ensuring public safety and bringing criminals to justice. Egypt's traditional military-style approach to policing has provided a high level of security - important given both domestic and external terrorist threats, but it has impeded its ability to build a strong, positive relationship with the Egyptian public or to respond appropriately to situations that reflect growing public demands for a more open society.

With FY 2006 Economic Support Funds (ESF), the Department initiated a pilot project to assist the Egyptian National Police and Ministry of Interior to develop curricula to improve administrative and management capabilities of top law enforcement personnel in order to support development of the values, knowledge and skills necessary for police to confront contemporary challenges. The initiative also included training and technical assistance in human rights, the rule of law, strategic planning and fostering police support of democratic governance.

Program Accomplishments

Through a new pilot program, the U.S. Embassy initiated in 2007 a series of technical exchanges with senior Egyptian law enforcement officials on strategic planning, modern approaches to law enforcement training, and issues relating to improving cooperation between police forces and the public.

FY 2008 Program

FY 2008 funding will seek to assist Egypt's law enforcement agencies to improve the management and administrative skills of its officers, to expand capacity for strategic planning, and to promote organizational transparency. The management-related activities would introduce junior and mid-level officers to the values, knowledge and skills necessary to manage their agencies and personnel effectively as they confront contemporary challenges. Activities would include such things as introducing the concepts of organizational development, changing management, personnel evaluation, and internal discipline procedures - essential to ensuring adherence to the rule of law - and prevention of abuse of authority and corruption. The strategic planning activities would enhance the capacity of the Egyptian police to provide training in strategic planning, including institutional development toward more democratic policing. This would include such things as curriculum development and train-the-trainer activities to assist academy personnel deliver effective strategic planning training as part of basic officer training. The organizational transparency project will improve administrative and management capabilities, and foster civilian police roles that support democratic governance, e.g., by enhancing the Egyptian police's capacity to respond to public concerns or complaints and thereby both improve organizational efficiency and integrity and increase public support for the institution. A technical advisor will assist in arranging leadership seminars, workshops, international visits, training in strategic planning, provide advice on curriculum development and the adoption of modern teaching techniques and methodologies, including approaches to combating complex or emerging threats such as trafficking in persons. Most training and technical assistance envisioned under this program plan will be directed at mid-level Egyptian police and security agency officials, strategic planning officers and training academy personnel.

Program Development and Support

Funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Egypt
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Border Control - - - - -
Law Enforcement Support Police - - - -
Professionalization - - - - 2400
Trafficking in Persons - - - - 500
Sub Total - - - - 2,900
Program Development and Support
U.S. Personnel - - - - 44
Non-U.S. Personnel - - - - -
ICASS Costs - - - - 17
Program Support - - - - 39
Sub-Total - - - - 100
Total - - - - 3,000

Iraq

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006
Actual

FY 2006
Supp.

FY 2007
Estimate

FY 2007
Supp.

FY 2008
Request

FY 2008
Emergency

---

91,400

20,048

150,000

75,800

159,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

The objective of the Iraq Criminal Justice Program is to continue to develop the capacities of all elements of the Iraqi criminal justice system (police, justice, corrections) to support fair, efficient, and legitimate Iraqi Government institutions to promote peace and security, resolve disputes, and promote respect for the rule of law. National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD) 36 gave the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) primary responsibility for development of Iraq's security forces, including the police. The mission has been tasked to CENTCOM's subordinate command - Multi National Security Transition Command - Iraq (MNSTC-I) and its Civilian Police Assistance Training Team (CPATT). INL, with DOD funding, supports MNSTC-I's efforts by providing a foreign service officer embedded in the CPATT senior staff; 690 International Police Liaison Officers (IPLOs) through a contract with DynCorp International to provide field assessment, training, and mentoring; and 191 International Police Trainers (IPTs) through an interagency agreement with the Justice Department's International Criminal Investigative Training Assistance Program (ICITAP), which in turn employs contractors from MPRI. Through DynCorp, INL also provides required logistical and security support for the trainers and advisors. Since 2004, INL has received Iraq Relief and Reconstruction Funds (IRRF) directly transferred from the Iraq Reconstruction Management Office (IRMO) to support justice and corrections programs in Iraq. Beginning with $91.4 million in the FY 2006 Supplemental, INL has assumed funding for these programs from the International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement budget (INCLE).

The FY 2008 Program assumes continued funding for the police development program from Iraq Security Sector Funds (ISSF) via DOD. These funds will support the continued deployment of U.S. police personnel who are providing training and mentoring to Iraqi counterparts throughout Iraq, under the direction of MNSTC-I.

The FY 2007 Supplemental and FY 2008 Programs to be implemented with INCLE funds will address:

Human Rights: Build capacity within the Iraqi justice system by incorporating into each of the programs described below segments on the promotion and protection of human rights, including, where appropriate, effective mechanisms for redress.

Justice Integration: Build upon current efforts to strengthen Iraqi capacity to integrate and improve coordination between police, courts, and prisons, by:

Expanding implementation of the pilot criminal defendant tracking system in Baghdad and some of the provinces to several additional strategically located provincial police stations, courts, and prisons throughout Iraq;

Conducting training sessions for provincial police, judges, and corrections officials on benefits and requirements for integration, information sharing, and improved methods of coordination, including both policy and IT-related aspects of integration;

Advising and providing technical assistance to ministries and senior officials responsible for criminal justice system components to support refinement of the policies and procedures necessary to successful justice integration, in order that justice institutions coordinate and share information on the movement of criminal defendants through the system, respect the human rights of accused persons at every stage of proceedings, and otherwise comply with policies and procedures developed with prior years' funding.

Public Integrity: Build onexistingefforts to promote institutional transparency and accountability, instill public confidence, and overcome corruption by:

Providing ongoing technical assistance, training, and mentoring to Government of Iraq entities responsible for investigating allegations of corruption;

Providing physical security for the residences and headquarters, and protective details for, key Iraqi anticorruption officials.

Rule of Law Outreach: Enhance the transparency of the justice system, and Iraqi citizens' access to it, by:

Continuing and expanding the scope of judicial development in the criminal justice sector by funding Department of Justice Resident Legal Advisors (RLAs) in Baghdad and at the Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs) to mentor and advise, and train prosecutors, judges, and court officials;

Continuing and expanding the scope of broader court and justice sector development, advising and mentoring as to coordination among justice sector actors, and providing oversight for USG-funded rule of law programs in the provinces by funding INL Rule of Law Advisors at PRTs.

Public Prosecutors and Courts: Continue support begun in prior years to judicial and court institutions, so that the judiciary and courts function as strong, independent institutions that process cases transparently and effectively and gain the confidence of Iraqi citizens in their courts, thereby decreasing the potential that citizens will turn to violent militias or other "alternative" means of justice, by:

Bolstering court and judicial security through court building improvements, security equipment, and training of facilities protection and personal security personnel throughout Iraq;

Providing assistance to court officials in effectively staffing, resourcing and organizing offices throughout Iraq including systems and techniques for enhancing victim/witness relationships, establishing prosecutorial priorities, case evaluation and effective case management;

Providing training, technical assistance and mentoring to judges, court investigators, and prosecutors in criminal investigations, substantive and procedural law, trial advocacy skills, relationships between police and judiciary, and human rights;

Educating prosecutors, judges, court administrative personnel regarding the necessity for close cooperation with civilian police, investigative judges, court administrators trial judges, and corrections officials;

Assisting court personnel with court administration practices, rules, and processes, administrative best practices, case flow and case management techniques, information technology, personnel management, and file storage and security, so as to accelerate and streamline the processing of criminal cases through the court system.

Legal Framework: Support the Government of Iraq in building a modern, democratic legal framework that strengthens the independence of the judiciary, respects human rights, gives effect to the Iraqi Constitution, reforms the penal and criminal procedure codes, and adequately addresses modern crimes such as corruption, transnational crime, terrorism (including its financing), human trafficking, and technology crimes, by:

Technical assistance to help identify remaining gaps, deficiencies, and unmet commitments in the substance of Iraqi law, and in compliance and enforcement and to draft appropriate legislation to address those gaps.

Major Crimes Task Force: Continue to build Iraqi capacity to investigate insurgent and other serious crime and bring transgressors to justice, and by doing so reduce the most significant threat to ability of the Government of Iraq to establish stability and engender trust on the part of Iraqi citizens in their government, by:

Continuing to support a cadre of advisors from eleven U.S. law enforcement agencies to train, mentor, and advise specially vetted Iraqi law enforcement team members and to conduct investigations of high-profile crimes (such as killings of government officials and their families and maintaining illegal detention facilities) that threaten Iraq's stability and undermine reconstruction efforts.

Corrections: Continue to work with the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) and Iraq Corrections Service (ICS) to help ensure that criminal suspects are detained and, if convicted, incarcerated in a safe and secure manner that meets basic human rights standards by:

Continuing to supply and support (security, life support) advisors to the ICS to: facilitate the expansion of the service to meet increasing demands (including assuming responsibility for Iraqi detainees from the Ministry of Interior); enhance the basic skills and effectiveness of ICS personnel; improve management capacities; support organizational development; and help the ICS and MOJ to identify and ameliorate problems that may threaten the effectiveness or integrity of the Iraqi corrections system.

Constructing and/or expanding additional jail/prison facilities in which to hold criminal suspects in a secure and humane manner.

Transformational Diplomacy

The Iraq Criminal Justice Program advances the Transformational Diplomacy objectives for peace and security and for governing justly and democratically. This program specifically works with the Iraqis to build Iraqi criminal justice institutions that are sufficiently fair and efficient that the Iraqi people will turn to them, instead of militias or other forms of street justice, to keep them safe and resolve their disputes. The requested funds will expand current efforts to enhance an individual's access to the justice system, to develop a modern and democratic legal framework, and to enhance the security of judges, courts, and those involved in the justice system, thereby limiting the extent to which they can be intimidated by individuals who seek to thwart the criminal justice process. These funds will support efforts to get all elements of the criminal justice system to work more cooperatively, effectively, and efficiently - e.g., to gather better evidence so that criminals can be legitimately charged with crimes and prosecuted, to accelerate judicial review of cases, to keep records of individuals who are detained as they move through the criminal justice system to better ensure that guilty persons remain incarcerated and the innocent are released, and to reinforce respect for human rights throughout the system. By enhancing Iraqi capacities to identify, investigate, and prosecute corruption, these funds will promote greater public confidence in the Iraqi Government and build greater Government accountability to the public.

Program Justification

The development of a fair and effective criminal justice system in Iraq (including civilian police, judicial, prosecutorial, and corrections functions) is essential to establishment of a stable society in which Iraqi citizens trust in and turn to their courts to resolve disputes, rather than to violent militias and other forms of "alternative" justice. We seek to support twin goals through our rule of law and corrections programs: to help the Iraqis develop the institutional and societal frameworks on which the rule of law rests while simultaneously addressing more immediate problems that impede the effective functioning of the justice system and thus undermine the confidence of the Iraqi people in their Government and their future.

Program Accomplishments

In the past year, justice integration advisors have helped launch an Iraqi Commission on Integrated Justice; completed a comprehensive assessment of the Iraqi justice sector; created a pilot database capable of tracking an accused individual from time of arrest or detention through adjudication to acquittal, conviction, incarceration and/or release; proved the database viable; trained Iraqi personnel from the police, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice sectors in integration/coordination policies and procedures and use of the automated database; generated a comprehensive policy and procedure guide identifying integration points and corresponding procedures for every step of the criminal justice system; and proposed an initial plan for deploying the approach to additional jurisdictions in Baghdad and/or the provinces.

The Iraqi Commission on Public Integrity (CPI) has undertaken over 3,500 investigations and referred over 1800 of them to Investigative Judges, leading to the issuance of about 1000 arrest warrants. CPI investigations have led to the arrest of 10 employees of the Ministry of Oil and the conviction and sentence of four officials from the Ministry of Planning. Iraqi trainers have been conducting safety and survival/defensive tactics training for the CPI, and six Iraqi CPI investigators have vetted 434 CPI employees through the use of Biometric Data Collection System.

The Iraqi Corrections Service has assumed responsibility for the basic training of its personnel, using training curricula developed with the assistance of U.S. advisors and with continued monitoring by these advisors (total of 7535 graduates as of February 2007). With assistance from U.S. advisors, the ICS has begun to take on responsibility for pre-trial detention facilities previously operated by the Ministry of Interior.

The Department of Justice Resident Legal Advisors have continued to provide support to the Central Criminal Court of Iraq (CCCI), which has conducted over 1800 trials and gained over 1200 convictions to date; mentored dozens of Iraqi judges in Baghdad and the provinces; trained dozens of judicial investigators in criminal investigations and legal issues; and established active Criminal Justice Councils that promote coordination among judicial officers and law enforcement sectors in several of Iraq's provinces.

The United States Marshals Service has renovated five witness security and judicial housing compounds in the International Zone for judges and witnesses involved in the Sadaam Hussein and CCCI trials; trained and equipped guard forces and provided security upgrades to several courthouses in Baghdad and the provinces; and trained at least 3,000 Facilities Protective Service and Personal Security Detail personnel to protect courts and judges.

INL-funded programs have also provided for the training of 100 Judicial Investigators (court officials similar to magistrates in the US, who direct the police in criminal investigations) in criminal investigations procedures, including interrogations, crime scenes, evidence collection, forensics, bomb blasts, and legal issues.

Legislative advisors generated 15 detailed legislative drafting guides for the Iraqi Council of Representatives (CoR), mentored and advised CoR and Higher Juridical Council (HJC) officials on constitutional requirements and legislative drafting, and created a nationwide advisory network of Iraqi attorneys to serve as informal advisors on Iraqi law.

The Major Crimes Task Force uncovered illegal detention facilities where torture and human rights abuses were taking place, pursued the killers of government officials and their families, and undertook investigations of other high-profile cases that resulted in the issuance of over 90 arrest warrants of individuals, at least 33 of whom are incarcerated with trials scheduled.

FY 2007 Supplemental and FY 2008 Programs

The FY 2007 Supplemental and FY 2008 programs will sustain the number of U.S. advisors to the Iraqi Corrections Service, while providing more security support to better enable them to provide assistance at detention/prison facilities throughout Iraq. It will support the construction of additional jail/prison beds to help alleviate current and anticipated future shortfalls in capacity that can result in either inhumane overcrowding of facilities and/or potentially the release of some suspected offenders due to lack space to hold them. The FY 2008 Criminal Justice Program will continue and expand on the work being done to provide judicial security, bolster judicial capacity, combat corruption, and enhance cooperation among actors in the criminal justice system.

Iraq
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 Supp FY 2007 FY 2007 Supp FY 2008 FY 2008 Supp
Corrections Services 83,700 8,992 20,400 20,000 80,000
Judicial Security 7,700 - - -
Criminal Justice Development - 7,556 122,600 45,800 79,000
Justice - -
Human Rights - - 2,000 2,000
Justice Integration - 1,741 25,000 5,500 9,000
Public Integrity - 2,447 21,000 8,700 16,300
Rule of Law Outreach - 506 5,600 7,000
Public Prosecutors -
Courts - 1,174 58,000 15,600 44,700
Legal Framework - 520 2,000 2,000 1,000
Major Crimes Task Force - 1,168 11,000 5,000 6,000
Program Development and Support - 3,500 7,000 10,000
Total 91,400 20,048 150,000 75,800 159,000
Note 1: Beginning in FY07 Supp. we have folded judicial security, and public prosecutors into the "Courts" Project
Note 2: There may be some changes to the distribution of funds for projects within the FY07 Supp. criminal justice development program.
 

Israel

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

500

 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

To strengthen the capacity of the criminal justice sector within Israel to investigate and arrest criminals engaged in trafficking in persons crimes and assist victims of trafficking.

Establishment of skills-based training of police units focused on trafficking in persons.

Demonstrated collaborative efforts between criminal justice agencies and civil society programs serving trafficking victims.

Improved bilateral and/or regional coordination on trafficking law enforcement and repatriation activities.

Transformational Diplomacy

The FY 2008 TIP program in Israel will advance the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding TIP programs that protect the victims of human trafficking by prosecuting traffickers, protecting victims and preventing trafficking from recurring.

Program Justification

The U.S. Government estimates 600,000 to 800,000 men, women and children are trafficked across international borders every year into slavery, including 14,500 to 17,500 into our own country. Some estimate the global number of trafficking victims to be in the millions--in domestic servitude, sex slavery, forced labor, child soldiers, child camel jockeys, and other brutal schemes.

Because trafficking deprives people of freedom in every part of the world, it is a grave threat to human rights. It also threatens public health and the very safety and security of nations, as disease and organized crime flourish through trafficking.

Israel is a destination country for low-skilled workers from the P.R.C., Romania, Jordan, Turkey, Thailand, the Philippines, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and India who migrate voluntarily for contract labor in the construction, agriculture and health care industries. Some are subsequently subjected to conditions of involuntary servitude. Many labor recruitment agencies in source countries and in Israel require workers to pay up-front fees ranging from $1,000-10,000 - a practice that often leads to debt bondage and makes these workers highly vulnerable to forced labor once in Israel. Israel is also a destination country for women trafficked from Eastern Europe - primarily Ukraine, Moldova, Uzbekistan, Belarus, and Russia - for the purpose of sexual exploitation. NGOs estimate that in 2005 between 1,000 and 3,000 women were trafficked into Israel for sexual servitude and 16,000 to 20,000 foreign workers faced involuntary servitude, though NGOs do not provide evidence to support their claim.

Given the threat posed by trafficking in persons, training and technical assistance for law enforcement on how to identify and rescue victims, investigate cases, coordinate and prepare prosecutions, and collaborate with nongovernmental organizations are imperative.

Program Accomplishments

Country-specific funding for Israel is requested for the first time in FY 2008.

FY 2008 Program

The FY 2008 program will be designed to assist the Government of Israel to strengthen law enforcement and the rule of law to interrupt national and transnational TIP crime networks. Funding will be used to adopt anti-trafficking laws, improve the legal framework for addressing TIP, and strengthen the capacity of civil society to work effectively with justice systems to promote the rescue and protection of victims.

Program Development and Support funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Israel
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Trafficking in Persons - - - - 500
Total - - - - 500

Jordan

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

1,500

 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

U.S. advisors provide bilateral training, technical assistance and equipment to Jordanian security services to help them develop their capacity to combat terrorist and other transnational threats.

U.S. advisors conduct courses on specialized topics and supervise Jordanian security services personnel as they attend and complete courses. Basic equipment for training purposes is procured and donated to the Jordanian security services.

Transformational Diplomacy

The FY 2008 INL program in Jordan will advance the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding security service professionalization projects designed to enhance the security of the Jordanian people and the region. The need for enhanced law enforcement capabilities is evidenced by the various terror attacks and terrorist threats that have occurred in Jordan over the last several years.

Program Justification

Jordan is a key U.S. ally, committed to progressive democratic reform, and in lockstep with the United States in the war on terrorism. However, Jordan's progress implementing reform is constrained by external threats and domestic economic and political challenges. Jordan suffered two serious terrorist attacks in 2005, and disrupted numerous other plots. Jordan is buffeted by conflicts and instability on most of its borders, and faces a critical terrorism threat. A deterioration of the security environment would damage the tourism sector and prompt foreign investors to retreat from Jordan's markets, devastating the economy, and creating political instability. Our programs aim to assist Jordan's efforts to maintain its security.

Program Accomplishments

Country-specific funding for Jordan is requested for the first time in FY 2008.

FY 2008 Program

The FY 2008 program will be designed to enhance the capabilities of the Jordanian security services. INL has not had a program in Jordan in the past, but we will use our vast experience initiating programs elsewhere to develop an initiative that addresses Jordan's most immediate security needs, while taking into account especially the security challenges of working in Jordan.

Program Development and Support funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Jordan
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Rule of Law/ Justice Systems - - - - 1,000
Trafficking in Persons - - - - 500
Total - - - - 1,500

Lebanon

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2007 Supp.

FY 2008 Request

---

---

60,000

1,800

 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

U.S. police advisors provide bilateral training and technical assistance to the Lebanese Internal Security Forces (ISF) to help continue their development as a competent, professional police force capable of protecting the Lebanese people and territory.

U.S. police advisors conduct courses on specialized topics and supervise ISF personnel as they attend and complete courses. Basic equipment for training purposes is procured and donated to the ISF.

Transformational Diplomacy

The FY 2008 police program in Lebanon will advance the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding police professionalization projects designed to enhance the security of the Lebanese people and assist the democratically elected Government of Lebanon in implementing UNSCR 1701. U.S. assistance remains vital to counter or blunt the remaining Syrian interference in Lebanon and to help build the capacity of the ISF to protect Lebanon's sovereignty, dignity and security.

Program Justification

In the wake of the July-August, 2006 Hizballah-Israel war, much of Lebanon lies in ruins, especially in the south. Lebanon had just recovered from decades of war and outside occupation and had seemed headed for unprecedented economic growth and democratic development following the April 2005 withdrawal of Syrian military forces and the election of the first "made in Lebanon" government in nearly 30 years. Lebanon's democracy remains fragile due to sectarian tensions and continuing Syrian interference using local proxies, Hizballah, and heavily armed Palestinian rejectionist (terrorist) groups. Despite the war, Hizballah retains its arms and its dangerous state-within-a-state status. Lebanon's massive reconstruction program and the UN-supported deployment of Lebanese security forces into hitherto-Hizballah-controlled southern Lebanon provide the opportunity not only to restore Lebanon's economy but to rebalance its political system and help restore Lebanon's full sovereignty.

Supporting the democratic government of Lebanon, and the people of Lebanon, is an urgent priority of the United States. We are working to see the rapid and full implementation of UNSCR 1701; to see established the full sovereignty of a Lebanese Government representing all its people, and Lebanese security forces capable of protecting Lebanon's borders, sovereignty and dignity. U.S. support for the ISF will help them meet this challenge.

As a result of the movement of 15,000 Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) to the south of Lebanon as part of the cease fire agreement with Israel, the LAF has had to abandon its policing functions in many parts of rural Lebanon. This situation has resulted in the ISF backfilling very quickly, and as a result, the ISF needs equipment and training to build their capacity. The Government of Lebanon (GOL) continues to advance its political and economic agenda as it moves towards full sovereignty. U.S. support for Lebanon is consistent with our National Security Strategy, strikes at the root causes of terrorism, and improves America's credibility in Lebanon as well as the region.

Program Accomplishments

To address Lebanon's immediate needs following a spate of terrorist assassinations, the FY 2006 program facilitated the Lebanon Evidence Response Team Training Initiative. This proved to be a very successful training program for the Lebanese judges and police officers who attended. Since their return to Lebanon, at least one of the graduates of this program has been praised for his professionalism in a recent bomb investigation. In addition, INL funded the purchase of 60 unarmored SUVs with police packages to enhance the ISF's mobility and patrol capabilities. In addition, INL funded the procurement and distribution of 2000 sets of civil disorder management equipment to the ISF to assist them in responding to civil disturbances. INL will also be instituting a train and equip program using FY 2007 Supplemental funding.

FY 2008 Program

The FY 2008 program will be designed to enhance the capabilities of the ISF. INL will use our vast experience with training and equipping civilian police forces to develop an initiative that builds on the equipment we have provided the ISF in the past, as well as the training and technical assistance they receive from the FY 2007 Supplemental program, while taking into account especially the security challenges of working in Lebanon.

Program Development and Support funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Lebanon
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Law Enforcement Support - - - 58,000 1,500
Training - - - 34,000 -
Equipment - - - 20,000 -
Facilities - - - 4,000 -
Trafficking in Persons - - - - 300
Program Development and Support - - - 2,000 -
Total - - - 60,000 1,800

Morocco

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

990

1,000

1,000

 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Improved border control at land and sea ports of entry.

Reduction in illegal migrants and contraband leaving Morocco; increased seizures of drugs and other contraband; increased customs revenue collection; and reduced processing time for international travelers and commercial shipments.

Transformational Diplomacy

Improving the border control at land and sea ports of entry advances the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding training, technical assistance and equipment designed to strengthen border security. The criminal activities that arise out of porous borders serve to undermine the rule of law in Morocco, and weaken the Moroccan institutions that assist the U.S. in the war on terrorism. The continuation of the exchange of information and the provision of the requisite training and equipment needed for Morocco to secure its borders will lead to a more secure Morocco. The illicit trade of drugs and weapons, and the smuggling of humans are destabilizing factors which can be exploited by terrorists and other criminals. Measures to combat these threats will assist Morocco in enhancing peace and security.

Program Justification

Morocco is a liberalizing, democratizing, and moderate Muslim state that is not only a victim of terrorism, but also a committed partner in the global war on terrorism. Morocco has relatively weak border control systems that could be exploited by terrorists and other transnational criminals. Due to its long and poorly controlled borders, extensive coastline, and proximity to Europe, Morocco has substantial problems with illegal migration, human smuggling, the movement of transnational terrorists through its territory, drug production and trafficking, and commercial smuggling. The profits from these illicit enterprises could provide revenue sources to terrorists. These criminal activities serve to undermine the rule of law in Morocco, lead to corruption of public officials, and weaken Moroccan institutions.

Hundreds of thousands of illegal migrants from the Near East and Sub-Saharan Africa transit Morocco on their way to Europe. Most are simply seeking a better life, but some harbor criminal and terrorist intentions. Morocco also consistently ranks among the world's largest producers and exporters of cannabis. The value of this illegal trade is estimated at $1 billion per year.

The 2003 terrorist bombings - carried out by an indigenous group - and the arrests and prosecutions of a number of al-Qa'ida terrorists and their Moroccan accomplices are indicative of underlying social tensions throughout the region. In 2006, Moroccan authorities disrupted groups seeking to attack U.S. or Western-affiliated targets, making numerous arrests of individuals associated with international terrorist groups. Recent calls by Osama Bin Ladin to rename the terrorist groups in the Maghreb as "al-Qa'ida of the Maghreb" indicate a possible increase in terrorist activities there.

The Government of Morocco (GOM) continues to advance its political and economic reform agenda as it moves towards becoming a market-oriented democracy. In 2003, Morocco held free and fair local government council elections and concluded a Free Trade Agreement with the U.S., which was implemented in 2006. Morocco also distinguished itself as a solid partner in the fight against global terrorism. U.S. support for Morocco's political and economic transition and its continued development as a moderate, Muslim state is consistent with our National Security Strategy, strikes at the root causes of terrorism, and improves America's credibility, critical at a time when King Mohammed VI is providing significant support for the President's reform agenda.

Program Accomplishments

The U.S. has gained considerable credibility with Moroccan border enforcement agencies during the past couple of years through engagement with its Customs, Police and Gendarmerie. An initial assessment conducted by U.S. Customs and Border Protection in June 2003 led to the design and implementation of a four-phase Border Interdiction project, which was successfully completed in August 2004.

Phase I began with the delivery of four courses, including seaport, airport and land interdiction, at the ports of Casablanca, Nador, Tetuoan and Oujda. One hundred eight officers from Moroccan Customs, Police and the Gendarmerie received training in topics such as enforcement operations and narcotics identification and testing. The Phase II Mid-Management Seminar included an exchange visit in the U.S. with 12 Moroccan Customs officials representing the three border security agencies. Participants observed U.S. Customs and Border Protection activities at U.S. land, sea and airports along the U.S. southern border as well as key air and marine ports of entry. The participants were senior enough in their organizations to influence decisions and initiate procedural changes within their agencies.

In Phase III, forty-eight mid- to-high level officers from the border agencies participated in an Integrity Training and Internal Controls course. Phase IV consisted of the assignment of a U.S. Customs technical advisor in March 2004 to the ports of Casablanca, Tangier, Tetuoan, and Nador. The advisor worked with the inspectors at each port to reinforce training and broaden the perspective of the participants. This technical assistance was instrumental in the discovery of 36 kg of narcotics and other seizures. The technical advisor's observations also provided a more detailed understanding of Moroccan Customs and areas of needed improvement. A second U.S. Customs inspector conducted a 30-day technical advisory in July 2004 at the same four ports. Local officials were trained in the use of laser range finders, fiber optic scopes and Buster density readers. Three CT-30 kits, containing these tools - as well as probes and lighted inspection mirrors were procured and donated.

Prior to receiving INL assistance, Moroccans lacked the tools, technology, and training necessary to protect their borders. Since then Moroccans have demonstrated the ability to apply the training and equipment effectively. Shortly after the departure of the technical advisor and the donation of the equipment in 2004, for instance, officials at the port of Tangier made their first seizures involving concealments in gasoline tanks using INL-donated fiber-optic scopes. Following the first year of training and assistance, narcotics seizure rates at this port increased significantly. The first cocaine seizure was made in 2004; none was reported in 2003. Additionally, following an Integrity Reinforcement course, the Casablanca Gendarmerie wrote it into their local academy curriculum, and now offer a weekly 1-hour refresher training. A joint management team of Customs and Police in Tetuoan also offered the integrity seminar to their port personnel in April 2004, immediately following completion of INL-funded integrity training programs in Casablanca and Rabat.

When INL first provided funding in FY 2003, interagency cooperation was lacking among the Moroccan border security agencies and assistance was needed at the most basic level. Following three years of training and support, interagency cooperation is at an all time high and seizures have increased substantially. While the primary goal of Customs before the bombings in 2003 was revenue collection, which is still very important, revenue is now taking a back seat to anti-terrorism, enforcement, and facilitation to complement free trade agreements.

FY 2008 Program

FY 2008 funding will be used to improve Morocco's capacity to control its borders. A technical advisor will assist in the implementation of a strategic plan for improving border controls that addresses systemic problems, including corruption. Training and technical assistance will be directed at Moroccan customs and other law enforcement entities on border control and detection techniques at land and sea ports of entry.

Border Control

Funding will be used to continue a border security program begun in 2004. Training and technical assistance will be directed at Moroccan customs and other law enforcement entities on border control and detection techniques at land and sea ports of entry. Funds will provide for train-the-trainer courses and seminars covering issues such as integrity, interdiction, and cargo and passenger processing. Assistance will also focus on improving the nascent access control/badging system. Funds will provide for necessary equipment such as metal-detecting wands, inspection tool kits, mobile detection vehicles, computers, surveillance equipment, and cargo inspection systems.

Program Development and Support

Funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. 

Morocco
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Border Control 890 - 900 - -
Law Enforcement Support Police
Professionalization - - - - 900
Sub Total 890 - 900 - 900
Program Development and Support
U.S. Personnel 44 - 44 - 44
Non-U.S. Personnel - - - - -
ICASS Costs 17 - 17 - 17
Program Support 39 - 39 - 39
Sub-Total 100 - 100 - 100
Total 990 - 1,000 - 1,000

Tunisia

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

200

 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

To strengthen the capacity of the criminal justice sector within Tunisia to investigate and arrest criminals engaged in trafficking in persons (TIP) crimes and assist victims of trafficking.

Establishment of skills-based training of police units focused on trafficking in persons.

Demonstrated collaborative efforts between criminal justice agencies and civil society programs serving trafficking victims.

Improved bilateral and/or regional coordination on trafficking law enforcement and repatriation activities.

Transformational Diplomacy

The FY 2008 TIP program in Tunisia will advance the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding TIP programs that protect the victims of human trafficking by prosecuting traffickers, protecting victims and preventing trafficking from recurring.

Program Justification

The U.S. Government estimates 600,000 to 800,000 men, women and children are trafficked across international borders every year into slavery, including 14,500 to 17,500 into our own country. Some estimate the global number of trafficking victims to be in the millions--in domestic servitude, sex slavery, forced labor, child soldiers, child camel jockeys, and other brutal schemes.

Because trafficking deprives people of freedom in every part of the world, it is a grave threat to human rights. It also threatens public health and the very safety and security of nations, as disease and organized crime flourish through trafficking.

Tunisia is a transit country for North and sub-Saharan African men and women migrating to Europe, some of whom may be trafficked for the purposes of involuntary servitude or sexual exploitation. The Government of Tunisia does not systematically differentiate trafficking victims from illegal migrants traveling through the country. Tunisia may also be a source country for internal trafficking of children for commercial sexual exploitation.

Given the threat posed by trafficking in persons, training and technical assistance for law enforcement on how to identify and rescue victims, investigate cases, coordinate and prepare prosecutions, and collaborate with nongovernmental organizations are imperative.

Program Accomplishments

Country-specific funding for Tunisia is requested for the first time in FY 2008.

FY 2008 Program

The FY 2008 program will be designed to assist the Government of Tunisia to strengthen law enforcement and the rule of law to interrupt national and transnational TIP crime networks. Funding will be used to adopt anti-trafficking laws, improve the legal framework for addressing TIP, and strengthen the capacity of civil society to work effectively with justice systems to promote the rescue and protection of victims.

Program Development and Support funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Tunisia
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Trafficking in Persons - - - - 200
Total - - - - 200

United Arab Emirates

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

300

 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Deny funds to terrorist organizations and other international criminal organizations.

The number of successful investigations and prosecutions of terrorist financing and money laundering cases; the number of jurisdictions in compliance with international anti-money laundering standards.

Transformational Diplomacy

Denying funds to international criminal organizations advances the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by developing robust anti-money laundering systems that contain the legislative, enforcement and regulatory tools to deny criminals and terrorists access to financial institutions and markets.

Program Justification

Financial crimes, terrorist financing, and money laundering pose a significant national security threat not only to the United States but also globally. These activities have the power to corrupt officials, distort economies, skew currency markets, undermine the integrity of financial systems, and destabilize governments. Criminals seek to access the financial systems of countries to fund their operations and launder funds stemming from a variety of illegal activities, including drug trafficking, corruption, arms trafficking, theft of state assets, and a variety of other financial crimes, such as trade-based money laundering, that until very recently has frequently eluded law enforcement. Experts estimate that global money laundering exceeds 3-5 percent of Global Domestic Product - or $1.5-$1.8 trillion per year -- and continues to grow through a variety of new innovative schemes only limited by the imagination of criminals and their organizations. Terrorists, on the other hand, appear to be relying less on the formal financial sector than on alternative remittance systems, such as hawala and cash couriers, that pose significant challenges to law enforcement. Our ability to conduct foreign policy, promote our economic security and prosperity, and safeguard our citizens is hindered by these threats to democracy and free markets.

Program Accomplishments

Country-specific funding for the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is requested for the first time in FY 2008.

FY 2008 Program

Promote and develop activities and programs that will strengthen cooperation against financial crimes and terrorist financing. Work with UAE to establish or update enforcement and regulatory tools and to implement international anti-money laundering/anti-terrorist financing standards. Encourage and assist in the formation of financial intelligence units (FIUs), and enhance their ability to share critical financial intelligence by providing technical assistance to those countries that have adequate and appropriate anti-money laundering laws and regulations in place.

Program Development and Support funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.  

United Arab Emirates
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Financial Crimes - - - - 300
Total - - - - 300

West Bank/Gaza

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

*

3,500


* In FY 2007, a total of $59.362M was transferred to the INCLE account from the Economic Support Fund for law enforcement programs and a Gaza/Israel border crossing project. The specific project implementation plans are being developed.
 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhanced effectiveness of the Palestinian Authority Presidential Guard.

Training for the Presidential Guard (PG) continues with a focus on border and crossing security and management, particularly the Rafah crossing with Egypt and the Karni/al-Mintar crossing with Israel, and other key PG security functions such as VIP protection. Improved security at critical Palestinian crossings leads to an increase in the flow of economic goods and services and overall PG effectiveness improves general law and order in the West Bank and Gaza.

The development of a comprehensive viable national anti-money laundering regime, capable of thwarting the financing of terrorism and all-source money laundering would begin with training the Palestinian Authority on the basic and inter-related elements of a comprehensive regime that comports with international standards.

Prior to the enactment of comprehensive legislation, specific training to law enforcement on basic investigative skills as well as on border control to stop illicit financing and goods from flowing into Gaza and the West Bank could be undertaken.

Transformational Diplomacy

A critical component of bolstering peace and security within West Bank/Gaza is supporting law enforcement reform, including the Presidential Guard, and curtailing financial crimes and money laundering. Additionally, funds will support programs begun under the auspices of the U.S. Security Coordinator.

Activities under this program complement U.S. and international efforts by transforming and strengthening security capabilities of the President of the Palestinian Authority (PA), as called for the in Roadmap. Program elements fall under the peace and security category and are critical to supporting the Palestinian President's ability to implement the U.S.-brokered 2005 Agreement on Movement and Access.

Denying funds to international criminal and terrorist organizations advances the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by developing robust anti-money laundering systems that contain the legislative, enforcement and regulatory tools to deny criminals and terrorists access to financial institutions and markets.

Program Justification

The Karni/al-Mintar crossing is the primary commercial crossing between Gaza and Israel, in effect the economic lifeline of Gaza. The crossing has consistently operated at well below optimum levels due in part to inadequate security and physical infrastructure on the Palestinian side of the crossing. Under the U.S. brokered November 2005 Agreement on Movement and Access (AMA), Israel agreed to allow 400 trucks of Palestinian exports via Karni per day. Current throughput is approximately 30 to 40 export trucks per day, with the crossing frequently closed.

The U.S. Security Coordinator (USSC) mission, under LTG Keith Dayton, has helped the Palestinians develop a plan to bring the Palestinian side of Karni up to international standards in order to help meet the export objectives contained in the AMA, boost Palestinian economic development and improve the economic and humanitarian situation in Gaza.

Only recently did the PG take over security at the crossings. Therefore, the PG is in need of proper training and equipment to undertake these new duties. In addition, funds in FY 2008 will continue to support the PG's traditional duties of VIP protection and other key public order functions.

Financial crimes, terrorist financing, and money laundering pose a significant national security threat not only to the United States but also globally. These activities have the power to corrupt officials, distort economies, skew currency markets, undermine the integrity of financial systems, and destabilize governments. Criminals seek to access the financial systems of countries to fund their operations and launder funds stemming from a variety of illegal activities, including drug trafficking, corruption, arms trafficking, theft of state assets, and a variety of other financial crimes, such as trade-based money laundering, that until very recently has frequently eluded law enforcement. Terrorists, on the other hand, are relying less on the formal financial sector than on alternative remittance systems, such as hawala and cash couriers, that pose significant challenges to law enforcement. Our ability to conduct foreign policy, promote our economic security and prosperity, and safeguard our citizens is hindered by these threats to democracy and free markets.

Program Accomplishments

Country-specific funding for the West Bank/Gaza program is requested for the first time in FY 2008.

FY 2008 Program

The funds will support U.S activities which complement broader international efforts, as called for in the Roadmap and endorsed by the Quartet, to transform and strengthen security capabilities of the President of the PA. Our efforts will enhance current and future operational effectiveness with the goals of: ensuring adequate protection for PA President Mahmoud Abbas and other foreign VIPs (including visiting American officials) and improving the security and management of Palestinian crossing points with Egypt and Israel, and other key areas.

Training may include a range of courses such as border and crossing security, presidential and VIP protection, rapid response to law and order incidents, human rights, and other key tasks. Non-lethal equipment may also be procured, in addition to modest upgrades at the PG training center in Jericho.

Promote and develop activities and programs that will strengthen cooperation against financial crimes and terrorist financing. Work with the host government to establish or update enforcement and regulatory tools and to implement international anti-money laundering/anti-terrorist financing standards. Encourage and assist in the formation of financial intelligence units (FIUs), and enhance their ability to share critical financial intelligence by providing technical assistance to those countries that have adequate and appropriate anti-money laundering laws and regulations in place. 

West Bank & Gaza
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Law Enforcement Support - - - - 2,000
Financial Crimes/Money Laundering - - - - 1,500
Total - - - - 3,500

Yemen

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2006 Actual

FY 2007 Estimate

FY 2008 Request

---

---

500

 
Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

U.S. advisors provide bilateral training, technical assistance and equipment to Yemeni security services to help them develop their capacity to combat terrorist and other transnational threats.

U.S. advisors conduct courses on specialized topics and supervise Yemeni security services personnel as they attend and complete courses. Basic equipment for training purposes is procured and donated to the Yemeni security services.

Transformational Diplomacy

The FY 2008 police program in Yemen will advance the Secretary's Transformational Diplomacy Peace and Security objective by funding security service professionalization projects designed to enhance the security of the Yemeni people. The need for enhanced law enforcement capabilities is evidenced by the various terror attacks and terrorist threats that have occurred in Yemen over the past several years.

Program Justification

Given threats to peace and security in Yemen, particularly from terrorist and other transnational groups, INL assistance will be used to help enhance security by building the capacity of Yemeni law enforcement to combat these threats. Yemen has distinguished itself as a solid partner in the fight against global terrorism. In 2004, a Yemeni court sentenced two men to death for their roles in the bombing of the USS Cole. Four others were sentenced to prison terms of five to 10 years for their involvement.

Program Accomplishments

Country-specific funding for Yemen is requested for the first time in FY 2008.

FY 2008 Program

The FY 2008 program will be designed to enhance the capabilities of the Yemeni security services. INL has not had a program in Yemen in the past, but we will use our vast experience initiating programs elsewhere to develop an initiative that addresses Yemen's most immediate security needs, while taking into account especially the security challenges of working in Yemen.

Program Development and Support funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Yemen
INL Budget
($000)

FY 2006 FY 2006
Supp
FY 2007 FY 2007
Supp
FY 2008
Law Enforcement Support - - - - 500
Total - - - - 500



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