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FY 2010 Program and Budget Guide: Near East


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Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
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Algeria

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008 Actual

FY 2009 Estimate

FY 2010 Request

198

---

970

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Increased capacity to investigate and adjudicate organized crime, money laundering, corruption, terrorism, cybercrime and trafficking cases. Encourage implementation of legislation specifically designed to combat Organized Crime, Money Laundering, Corruption and Terrorism. Elaborate and implement a plan to fight fiscal fraud, strengthen internal security and use appropriate techniques to minimize corruption.

Best practices bench marks are developed; Organized Crime, Money Laundering, Corruption and Terrorism legislation is being enforced as determined by an increase in prosecutions for offenses under the new laws; improved corruption index ratings through assistance to support internal controls and internal security capability that keep corruption at bay.

Program Justification

The merger of Algeria’s domestic terrorist group with Al-Qaeda at the end of 2006 and the subsequent adaptation of suicide bombings and similar tactics in Algeria gave additional impetus to the U.S. Government to continue to expand its partnership with Algeria in fighting global terrorism. Programming will continue to be focused on those areas where Algeria’s capabilities are less fully developed, such as developing the capabilities to investigate international crimes, corruption controls, and stopping the flow of terrorism financing.

Program Accomplishments

FY 2008 was the first year of funding for Algeria. Implementation has begun to build capacity to combat financial crimes and fraud through improved fiscal enforcement programs. A program to train law enforcement and judicial officers in investigations of complex crimes such as organized crime and terrorism is pending the conclusion of a formal agreement with the Government of Algeria.

FY 2010 Program

Law Enforcement Support

Funds will support an anti-corruption program will strengthen the observance of codes of conduct including the organizational ability to detect and redress violations.

Justice Sector

The program will assist Algerian judicial officials to investigate, prosecute, and adjudicate corruption, organized crime, money laundering and terrorism offenses through such methods as structured training, on the job advice and informal mentoring.

Program Development and Support

Funds will pay for administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. Funds will also be reserved for Washington-based program officers to effectively monitor the program.


Algeria

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009

FY 2010

Law Enforcement Support

-

-

-

490

Security Sector Reform

180

-

-

-

Justice Programs

-

-

-

400

Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel

-

-

-

-

Non-U.S. Personnel

-

-

-

-

ICASS Costs

-

-

-

-

Program Support

18

-

-

80

SubTotal

18

-

-

80

Total

198

-

-

970


Near Eastern Affairs Regional

Trans-Sahara Counter Terrorism Partnership (TSCTP)

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008 Actual

FY 2009 Actual

FY 2010 Request

---

---

2,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Our strategic vision is to build the capacity of Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership (TSCTP) member governments to prevent and respond to terrorism through strategic interventions with select law enforcement organizations.

INCLE funds will assist in the development of the capacities of governments in the Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya) to confront the challenge posed by terrorist organizations in the region and to facilitate cooperation between those countries and other Pan-Sahel state partners in combating terrorism. Assistance will provide training, technical assistance and equipment to TSCTP member law enforcement institutions to develop their capacity in civilian law enforcement.

Sustainable improvements in law enforcement capabilities in TSCTP member states will be achieved through the modernization and professionalization of select law enforcement units.

Performance will be measured by the numbers of law enforcement officials trained; the development, implementation and integration of modern police curricula and adult teaching methodologies in select training facilities; and the increased capacity of law enforcement officials to detect, investigate and dismantle terrorist groups and other crimes.

Program Justification

The Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership is a multi-faceted, multi-year strategy aimed at defeating terrorist organizations by strengthening regional counterterrorism capabilities, enhancing and institutionalizing cooperation among the region's security forces, promoting democratic governance, discrediting terrorist ideology, and reinforcing bilateral military ties with the United States.

The FY 2010 program would provide INCLE funds to focus on developing the capabilities of partner law enforcement institutions through training, equipment and technical assistance with the aim to help build strong foundations for ongoing and planned law enforcement training activities in counterterrorism under the TSCTP. Programming will focus on counterterrorism and seek to build a base for other TSCTP programs.

Program Accomplishments

FY 2010 funds represent the first year for INL assistance in TSCTP. All activities will be closely coordinated with interagency partners, host governments and other international donors. Implementation will be coordinated with the Department of State, Office of Antiterrorism Assistance (DS/ATA) activities and training already underway as part of TSCTP which enhance counterterrorism focused law enforcement capabilities in the region.

FY 2010 Program

Funds will provide training, technical assistance and/or equipment to select TSCTP law enforcement institutions to develop their capacity in civilian law enforcement based on comprehensive needs assessments. Programs will be designed in coordination with Posts, interagency implementers, and host governments. Assistance may include training and technical advising on investigatory techniques, surveillance, crime scene management and evidence collection. Other options include police equipment support, train and equip programs for specialized police units, police academy development, technical assistance in border control and advanced policing skills, such as anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing.

Near East Regional (TSCTP)

INL BUDGET

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008

Supp

FY 2009

FY 2010

Counterterrorism

Building government capabilities

-

-

-

2,000

Total

-

-

-

2,000


Egypt

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008 Actual

FY 2009 Estimate

FY 2010 Request

1,984

2,000

1,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Modernized approaches to policing will be instituted and police-public relations will be improved through institutional reforms, strategic planning, personnel and other management reforms, and updated curricula and training methods implemented at training academies.

Reduction in incidents of excessive use of force by police, particularly with respect to peaceful demonstrations or other events relating to the exercise of democratic freedoms by civil society or expressions of judicial independence. Indications of improved police-public trust and cooperation, such as increased police responsiveness to public requests for assistance and decreased public complaints of abuses of authority.

Program Justification

Egypt is a democratizing and moderate Muslim state that is not only a victim of terrorism, but also a committed partner in the global war on terrorism. Egypt has long coastal and land borders, including an extensive border in the desert of the Sinai Peninsula that is easily exploited by terrorists, drug traffickers, alien smugglers, and other transnational criminals. Egypt has substantial problems with illegal migration, human smuggling, the movement of transnational terrorists through its territory, drug trafficking, and smuggling of weapons and other contraband. In addition, the profits from these illicit enterprises could provide revenue sources to terrorists. These criminal activities lead to corruption of public officials, and could weaken Egyptian institutions, undermining the rule of law in Egypt. The Egyptian response to these issues is complicated by a lack of law enforcement personnel with the training required to combat these threats in the communities in which they are meant to serve. Through community police training, Egyptian police will be better able to protect human rights and provide critical services to the Egyptian people. This will also provide the police with greater access to the population and to information needed to deter crime and dismantle terrorist and criminal groups.

Democracy and good governance are top USG priorities in Egypt, and we have supported a broad range of programs to strengthen civil society and to promote judicial independence. Policing reform efforts will likewise focus on the key roles that law enforcement plays in support of the rule of law, notably ensuring public safety and bringing criminals to justice. Egypt’s traditional military-style approach to policing has provided a high level of security – important given both domestic and external terrorist threats, but has impeded its ability to build a strong, positive relationship with the Egyptian public or to respond appropriately to situations that reflect growing public demands for a more open society.

Program Accomplishments

Through a new pilot program initiated in 2007 and continuing through 2009, INL coordinated a series of technical exchanges with senior Egyptian law enforcement officials on strategic planning, modern approaches to law enforcement training, and issues relating to improving cooperation between police forces and the public.

The project implemented a series of senior leadership workshops aimed at select leaders of the Egyptian Police. The first of these workshops discussed and presented a number of contemporary leadership and supervisory issues in an open, transparent and non-judgmental manner.

FY 2010 Program

Police Modernization

Funds will build Egypt’s law enforcement capacity through training and technical assistance. Projects will have a central focus on community policing and may also include assistance to enhance the management and administrative skills of its officers, to expand capacity for strategic planning, and to promote organizational transparency. Funds will also continue the workshop series focusing on police best practices that support the transformation of the Egyptian National Police (ENP) to more democratic organization. Workshops will build on the Community Policing concepts and initiatives discussed and presented in earlier workshops.

Program Development and Support

Funds will pay for administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. Funds will also be reserved for Washington based program officers to effectively monitor the program.

Egypt

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009

FY 2010

Police Modernization

1,800

-

1,940

950

Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel

-

-

-

-

Non-U.S. Personnel

50

-

-

-

ICASS Costs

50

-

40

40

Program Support

84

-

20

10

SubTotal

184

-

60

50

Total

1,984

-

2,000

1,000

Iraq

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008
Actual

FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009
Estimate

FY 2009 Supp
Request

FY 2010
Request

---

85,000

---

20,000

52,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

The objective of the Iraq Criminal Justice Program is to continue to develop the capacities of all elements of the Iraqi criminal justice system (police, justice, and corrections) to support fair, efficient, and legitimate Iraqi Government institutions to promote peace and security, resolve disputes, and promote respect for the rule of law.

National Security Presidential Directive (NSPD) 36 assigned the mission of developing all of Iraq’s security forces (including police) to U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) until such time as the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Defense agree the mission should be transferred to the Department of State. INL, with Department of Defense (DOD) funding, has supported Multi National Forces – Iraq (MNF-I) in this mission by providing hundreds of contracted International Police Advisors to mentor, advise, and train police and border control forces. Factors such as the improving security situation in most of Iraq, the ongoing transfer of security responsibilities to Iraqi forces, and a likely shift in emphasis for the police from a counterinsurgency focus to the rule of law and a traditional democratic policing approach make it clear that it will be reasonable to transfer responsibility for the police training mission to State in the foreseeable future. FY 2010 funds will support the next phase (Phase I is requested in the FY 2009 Supplemental request) of hiring dedicated subject matter experts and the necessary support structures (both in Washington and in Baghdad) to work on police transition planning, and to begin transitioning the program towards greater civilian involvement in future years.

The INCLE-funded justice programs in Iraq, as further described below, have been, and in FY 2010 remain, focused on (1) developing relationships at the Ministry/Higher Judicial Council (HJC) level as well as with courts and to a lesser extent other criminal justice institutions in the provincial capitals to help the Iraqis identify significant impediments to the effective and efficient functioning of their criminal justice process, particularly their courts, and propose, and/or help the Iraqis execute, remedial actions; (2) partnering primarily with the Higher Judicial Council to establish an Iraqi capacity to provide continuing legal education to judges and other court personnel, develop an enhanced GOI capacity to assess security threats and vulnerabilities to judicial facilities and personnel and address them, and modernize court administration processes to make them more transparent and efficient; (3) enhancing the capacity of Iraq’s Commission on Integrity (COI), one of the three GOI anti-corruption entities, to uncover and investigate public corruption; (4) developing, training, and mentoring a vetted unit of Iraqi law enforcement personnel – the Major Crimes Task Force (MCTF) – to conduct investigations of particularly sensitive, serious and high profile crimes.

Finally, INCLE funds will provide advisors to help the Iraqi Ministry of Justice further professionalize and develop the Iraqi Corrections Service to promote the humane and secure incarceration of criminals in accordance with international standards.

Specifically, the FY 2010 programs to be implemented with INCLE funds will address:

Police: FY 2010 INCLE will fund existing (hired/funded initially with FY 2009 Supplemental) and additional USG personnel and contracted experts to work in INL-Washington and INL-Baghdad, as well as in the current Multi-National Forces-Iraq (MNF-I) police development mission as appropriate, to position INL to seamlessly assume responsibilities for the police development mission in Iraq from MNF-I. Their work will include developing plans and requirements for the future program, training curricula, statements of work, position descriptions, comprehensive work plans, transition mechanisms, and oversight and administrative processes. Members of this group will also liaise very closely with the Ministry of Interior and other GOI entities, with the Coalition military forces, international partners, and other Embassy elements.

Rule of Law Advisors: Rule of Law advisors, who serve both in the provinces and in Baghdad, identify the most critical impediments (local, provincial, and systemic) to the operation of Iraq’s criminal justice system, bring together GOI actors in that system to build relationships and help them craft solutions to those problems and opportunities for further improvements, coordinate with international donors as appropriate, and raise the most critical problems to senior USG officials in-country to address formally with Central Government Officials. We will continue to provide expert technical assistance and mentoring by:

Funding INL Justice Advisors to continue and expand the scope of criminal justice system development, advise and mentor the GOI on coordination among justice sector actors, and help conceive, design, implement, manage, and provide oversight for USG-funded rule of law programs in Baghdad and the provinces.

Funding Department of Justice Resident Legal Advisors (RLAs) in Baghdad and at select Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs). In FY 2010, INL and DOJ Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance, and Training (OPDAT) personnel will develop a new programmatic framework that will focus the program in preparation for the gradual draw down of the PRTs beginning in 2010.

Courts: Continue support begun in prior years to develop the capacity of Iraq’s judiciary to operate a strong, independent, and efficient criminal justice system that can function transparently and effectively without fear of intimidation through the activities described below. With the additional advisory assistance planned with FY 2009 Supplemental and FY 2010 funds, INL continues to project that the Iraqis will be able to sustain these programs with only very limited U.S. assistance after December 2010. Key areas of support through 2010 include:

Providing expert technical assistance to GOI judicial and court security entities; developing curriculum for and providing training of Iraqi trainers for the facility guard force; completing USG-GOI vulnerability assessments of courts; and training Iraqis to conduct their own vulnerability assessments without USG assistance;

Helping to enhance the skills of Iraqi judges, judicial investigators, and court personnel by developing a continuing legal education professional development program within the Higher Judicial Council. Specific efforts include helping to develop a curriculum for, and providing training, technical assistance, and mentoring at the Judicial Education and Development Institute (JEDI) in areas such as criminal investigations, substantive and procedural law, case management, and administration of judiciary including budgeting and strategic planning for the HJC;

Assisting the HJC to complete modernization of its policies and procedures for administering the courts based on model courts and administrative best practices; developing a national strategy to implement similar assistance in other courts in provinces; and helping the HJC IT department develop and implement its Three-Year Court Automation Plan.

Public Integrity: Continue to mentor and advise the Commission on Integrity (COI) command staff to build its management and investigative capacity so that the COI promotes transparency and the rule of law and is capable of deterring, uncovering, and investigating public corruption. U.S. experts will provide advice and assistance related to strategic planning, security, human resource development, fiscal responsibility, policy development, investigation management procedures, prioritization of organizational responsibilities, utilization of personnel, training enhancements through instructor and curriculum development, and work plans. With continued assistance until that time, we project that the COI will have in place and be capable of sustaining its basic training and investigative capacities as well as essential management systems and policies, by mid-2011.

Major Crimes Task Force (MCTF): Support advisors from USG federal law enforcement agencies who train and mentor a selected group of elite Iraqi investigators. GOI members of the task force investigate high-profile, complex crimes such as public corruption, kidnapping, and assassinations. MCTF not only fills the need for immediate responses to high consequence crimes, but it is also a long-term capacity building effort that will support stability in Iraq for years to come. FY 2010 INCLE funds will provide support (logistics, security, administrative support) for this critical training mission while the Department of Justice (DOJ) will cover the salaries of up to 12 trainers and mentors.

Working closely with the GOI and DOJ, INL is crafting a plan for a smooth transition of the task force to Iraqi leadership. We anticipate this process will be completed by the end of FY 2010. To prepare for this leadership transition, MCTF will continue building capacity by increasing specialized training for GOI’s counterterrorism unit and for public corruption investigators, emphasizing on-the-job mentoring and training a dedicated tactical team to support the task force’s need to serve high risk arrest and search warrants.

Counternarcotics: Provide advisory support to help enable the GOI to develop, and if resources allow begin to implement, a comprehensive counternarcotics strategy to address emerging problems related to drug trafficking and abuse before they become more serious (and more difficult/costly to fix).

Corrections: Continue to work with the Ministry of Justice and Iraqi Corrections Service (ICS) to help ensure that criminal suspects are detained and, if convicted, incarcerated in a safe and secure manner that meets basic human rights standards. The focus in FY 2010 will be on activation of USG-funded prison construction projects (that is, ensuring that the GOI is able to assume full responsibility for these facilities, including their staffing, operations, and maintenance) and transitioning prison operations to full ICS control. We will continue to deploy and provide security and life support for a decreasing number of advisors (approximately 15) assigned to work with the MoJ and ICS to support the Iraqi Corrections Service headquarters to further develop institutional capacities to manage the rapid growth in the size of the service (e.g., leadership/management development, strategic planning, personnel, logistics) and provide support to the new prisons that the Department of State has constructed to ensure they are being staffed, maintained, operated, and managed in accordance with international standards. In addition, a mobile training and audit team will travel to other prisons, including those that have hosted permanent advisors in the past, to monitor their performance and recommend remedial measures as required.

FY 2010 funds directed at Program Development and Support (PD&S) will enable INL to develop, implement and oversee effectively these myriad programs and their associated budgets, interagency agreements, and contractual arrangements.

Program Justification

The development of a fair and effective criminal justice system in Iraq (including civilian police, judicial, prosecutorial, and corrections functions) is essential to establishment of a stable society in which Iraqi citizens trust in and turn to government institutions to provide for their security and resolve disputes. We seek to support twin goals through our programs: (1) to help the Iraqis develop the institutional and societal frameworks on which the rule of law rests; while (2) simultaneously addressing more immediate problems that impede the effective functioning of the justice system and thus undermine the confidence of the Iraqi people in their Government and their future.

Program Accomplishments

Programs for which no additional FY 2010 funding has been requested because they have transitioned, or will transition without additional funding, to full Iraqi ownership:

In the past year, INL completed the three witness protection facilities at Rusafa, Basrah, and Al Karkh and turned them over to the GOI.

INL completed three courthouse security upgrades at Mosul, Kirkuk and Al Hillah.

In March 2009, the first of five prisons being constructed with FY 2006 Supplemental INCLE funds was turned over to the Government of Iraq. The remaining prisons will be completed over the course of the year.

In the past two years, justice integration advisors have developed a data dictionary that will enable the MOI, MOJ, and HJC to share information, including data about an accused individual from time of arrest or detention through adjudication to acquittal, conviction, incarceration and/or release. These advisors also outlined a set of guidelines that, if followed, will allow for the integration of the various ministries’ separate database applications. The program also assisted the Criminal Records Board of the MOI to develop its database tracking application.

Ongoing programs for which FY 2010 funding has been requested:

The Department of Justice Resident Legal Advisors (RLAs) have continued to provide support to the Central Criminal Court of Iraq (CCCI) and the Major Crimes Courts (MCCs) in the Provinces, which have conducted trials resulting in a significant number of convictions; mentored Iraqi judges throughout the country and promoted the use of forensic evidence in criminal proceedings; instituted or continued regular meetings, known as "Criminal Justice Councils," where local judiciary, prosecutors, defense attorneys and law enforcement authorities can discuss issues and challenges together in order to improve their cooperation and coordination; assisted in the development of the criminal defense clinic at Rusafa, which provides legal representation free of charge to defendants; helped establish legal aid clinics, including separate legal clinics for women in both Kirkuk and Karbala Provinces; and assisted in the preparation of Province-wide judicial conferences to foster information sharing and coordination within the judicial community.

Though INL’s Public Integrity Program, U.S. advisors have formally trained and mentored Commission on Integrity (COI) investigators, Facilities Protection Service guards, and Personal Security Detail officers; procured equipment to enhance the investigative function of the COI; sponsored and delivered a 22-week polygraph training program; and assisted in the development of a Biometric Vetting Unit and of the Special Operations Group. To date, the Iraqi Commission on Integrity (COI) has undertaken over 9,000 investigations and referred over 2,500 of them to Investigative Judges, leading to the issuance of over 1,000 arrest warrants. COI investigations have led to the arrest of 10 employees of the Ministry of Oil and the conviction and sentencing of four officials from the Ministry of Planning.

With mentoring from U.S. federal agents, in 2008 the Major Crimes Task Force (MCTF) worked an average of 40 active investigations a month, obtained 131 arrest warrants, made 77 arrests, and interviewed 173 subjects and 140 sources/witnesses. In addition, MCTF obtained an electronic fingerprint station and the Iraqi members of the task force received training in its use. MCTF initiated an investigation regarding the theft, illegal possession and sale of ancient Iraqi artifacts, initiated an investigation regarding the production of counterfeit U.S. and Iraqi Currency, adopted a Ministry of Interior-initiated investigation regarding high-level militia members in the Ministry of Interior, and undertook investigations of other high-profile cases. MCTF represents not only an immediate response to high-profile, high consequence crimes, but it is also a long-term capacity building effort that will support stability in Iraq for years to come.

INL unveiled a courthouse vulnerability assessment program, working in close coordination with a Higher Judicial Council (HJC)-led Judicial Security Project Board, where courthouses will be assessed for security risks. INL has completed four vulnerability assessments and mentored HJC experts in the completion of 12 others.

In 2009, the Judicial Education and Development Institute (a joint US-Iraqi initiative) will open and begin to provide continuing legal education to Iraqi judges and court personnel. Already we have jointly conducted a review of the priority training needs and have begun to develop the training curricula and instructors to teach it.

The Higher Judicial Council’s various departments, advised and mentored by our advisors, have taken key steps to modernize court administration processes, including:

-- The Employee Affairs Department started developing its first-ever job descriptions and performance requirements for administrative and court staff;

-- The Judicial Affairs Department is reviewing its workflow systems to identify areas that require efficiency measures to meet the high level of demands placed on the Department as HJC continues to expand and professionalize the judiciary;

-- The Statistics and Planning Department is designing new forms for court statistics and is reviewing past quarterly and annual reports to identify better reporting techniques and standards;

-- The Statistics and Planning Department is also working with U.S. advisors to automate its data collection from around the country and train provincial staff;

-- The Budget Department is learning modern resource and budget planning methodologies;

-- The Prosecutors Office and the Statistics and Planning Department are working to publish a booklet of court and other judicial statistics for distribution and develop a system for updating it on a regular basis;

-- The IT Department, with U.S. advisory help, has developed its own case tracking application, which is being rolled out to the two criminal courts in Baghdad with some of the largest case flows in the country.

The Iraqi Corrections Service continues to conduct training for its corrections officers with little assistance from U.S. advisors and has successfully completed and activated a GOI funded prison renovation at the Baghdad Central Prison as well as the USG funded projects at Nasariyah, and is poised to activate Cham Chamal prison imminently. U.S. advisors continue to assist the ICS with developing budgets, staffing patterns, procuring and installing furniture, fixtures, and equipment in preparation for the activation of the additional USG funded prison construction projects scheduled to come on line in 2009 through early 2010.

FY 2010 Program

The FY 2010 programs will see a substantial reduction in the number of U.S. advisors assigned to work with the Iraqi Corrections Service. It will focus on building capacity at senior levels within the MoJ and ICS to activate USG funded prison construction projects and to manage an increasingly complex prison system that will contribute to the peace and security of Iraq. The FY 2010 Criminal Justice Program will continue the work being done to provide court/judicial security, bolster court/judicial capacity, and further the successful investigation and prosecution of the most serious crimes.

Iraq

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009

FY 2009 Supp

FY 2010

Corrections Services

-

39,300

-

-

17,000

Criminal Justice Development

Public Integrity

-

6,210

-

-

2,000

Rule of Law Outreach

-

5,210

-

3,000

4,000

Courts

-

27,090

-

9,000

11,700

Legal Framework

-

1,030

-

-

-

Major Crimes Task Force

-

-

-

-

1,300

SubTotal

-

39,540

-

12,000

19,000

Counternarcotics

-

-

-

-

1,000

Police

-

160

-

5,000

7,000

Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel

-

5,312

-

2,656

7,083

Non-U.S. Personnel

-

-

-

-

-

ICASS Costs

-

-

-

-

-

Program Support

-

688

-

344

917

SubTotal

-

6,000

-

3,000

8,000

Total

-

85,000

-

20,000

52,000

Jordan

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008 Actual

FY 2009 Estimate

FY 2010 Request

1,488

1,000

1,500

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

The U.S. is working with the Government of Jordan (GOJ) on initiatives to build the capacity of law enforcement institutions. Programs are particularly targeted at Anti-Money Laundering/Financial Intelligence Unit development, Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) enforcement, and gender-based violence reduction and worker exploitation.

Performance will be measured in terms of the number of criminal intelligence analysts trained in financial crimes; cases of money laundering and terrorist financing that reach prosecution; police officers and customs officers trained in financial investigative techniques and the subsequent investigations undertaken; judges and prosecutors trained in financial crime case management and the number of cases moved through the system; venues inspected for counterfeit goods and IPR infringement enforcement; customs officials trained in IPR enforcement and cases of IPR violations investigated; law enforcement and justice officials trained in domestic violence and the number of domestic violence cases successfully investigated.

Program Justification

Jordan is a key U.S. ally in the fight against terrorism and is committed to furthering democratic reform. Progress in implementing reform is constrained by external threats and domestic economic and political challenges. The need for enhanced law enforcement capabilities in the areas specified is evidenced by the fact that Jordan is the site of bulk cash smuggling relating to terrorist finance and trade-based money laundering.

Program Accomplishments

FY 2008 funds represent the first year of bilateral INL programming to Jordan, which is scheduled to begin in the spring of 2009. This program will, in the areas of anti-money laundering/counter-terrorism financing, intellectually property rights promotion, and gender-based violence, seek to modernize and strengthen Jordanian law enforcement institutions through technical assistance, equipment procurements, and specialized training.

FY 2010 Program

Law Enforcement Support

FY 2010 program funds will be used to continue USG initiatives to build capacity of the Jordanian criminal justice sector. Programs will focus on specialized training courses, equipment procurement, infrastructure development and technical assistance for the police and justice sectors.

Program Development and Support (PD&S)

Funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits and allowances of foreign national direct hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. INL funds will also be used to support Washington based personnel’s effective monitoring and implementation of the program.


Jordan

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009

FY 2010

Police Modernization Program

Anti-Money Laundering

900

-

275

900

Domestic Violence Reduction – Justice

200

-

50

200

Domestic Violence Reduction – Police

200

-

50

200

IPR Enforcement

88

-

25

88

Sub Total

1,388

-

400

1,388

Trafficking in Persons Program

-

-

475

-

Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel

-

-

-

-

Non-U.S. Personnel

40

-

40

40

ICASS Costs

10

-

10

10

Program Support

50

-

75

62

SubTotal

100

-

125

112

Total

1,488

-

1,000

1,500



Lebanon

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008 Actual

FY 2009 Estimate

FY 2010 Request

496

6,000

20,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Provide training and technical assistance to Lebanese security sector institutions such as the Internal Security Forces (ISF or national police), border protection agencies such as the Common Border Forces (CBF), and correction facilities to enhance their abilities to combat transnational criminal threats, terrorism and provide for the rule of law.

Increased number of ISF cadets trained; increased seizures of drugs and other contraband; increased number of border points with CBF presence meeting international standards, improved security and protection of human rights in prisons.

Program Justification

Supporting the democratic government of Lebanon, and the people of Lebanon, are urgent priorities of the United States. The USG is working toward the rapid and full implementation of UNSCR 1701 by helping establish the full sovereignty of a Lebanese Government representing its entire people, as well as an ISF capable of protecting Lebanon’s borders, sovereignty and dignity. U.S. support for the ISF will help them meet this challenge.

The reform and enhancement of an effective ISF is critical for Lebanon to maintain a society based on the rule of law and respect for human rights. In order to achieve positive results in Lebanon, USG support to enhance ISF capabilities is currently being undertaken through a comprehensive train and equip program that is being implemented with $60 million in FY 2007 Supplemental funds. This program is being followed up by a smaller budget in FY 2008 to fund specialized projects that will assist the ISF as they gain credibility, and an increased budget of $6 million will continue to build on the initial successes of the FY 2007 Supplemental program.

Program Accomplishments

In FY 2007, INL launched the Lebanon Police Program designed to build the capacity of the ISF to protect Lebanon’s people and territory through extensive training, equipment and vehicle donations, and refurbishment of academy and command and control facilities. The INL Lebanon Police Program provides training, equipment, and infrastructure upgrades to the ISF. The program has been a success in its first year, with over 1,900 ISF cadets and officers graduating from the ISF police academy. INL also provided over 420 police vehicles, 3,000 sets of riot gear and 4,000 sets of basic duty gear, and refurbished two training facilities, a firing range and 21 armored personnel carriers. In 2009, INL sponsored a visit for six command staff generals of the ISF to the U.S. for executive leadership training and meetings with senior members of the Federal law enforcement community.

Ongoing projects include further refurbishment of the ISF academy and 11 operational command centers, establishment of a secure ISF communications network, and development of community policing program in the Nahr al-Bared Palestinian Refugee camp, which was leveled in a May 2007 battle between Fatah al-Islam militants and the Lebanese Armed Forces.

FY 2010 Program

Counter-terrorism

Lebanon lies on the front lines in the fight on terrorism. To foster peace and security, INL intends to build upon welcome and unprecedented Lebanese calls to control the influx of weapons into Lebanon from Syria and elsewhere that support Hizballah and other terrorist and criminal groups. Hizballah maintains the ability to draw Lebanon into war with Israel without reference to Lebanon's Cabinet or Parliament and its subservience to policy and operational directives from Syria and Iran remain of great concern. Recent events, such as the end of the Syrian occupation of Lebanon, 2006 Israeli-Hizballah War, and 2007 battle against Fatah al-Islam militants in the Nahr al-Barid refugee camp, provide a historic opportunity to strike a blow at terrorist forces in Lebanon.

Over the past three years, INL has worked to establish a professional ISF capable of protecting Lebanon’s sovereignty, dignity, and the Lebanese people. With a basic law enforcement infrastructure in place, in FY 2010 INL will intensify its work with Lebanese security forces to help them implement a comprehensive, multi-year border security strategy as an integral part of our counterterrorism effort. This effort includes support for the development of an integrated and unified security apparatus in which all Lebanese security services operate effectively as a unified, professionalized border security force to stem the flow of arms, drugs, and criminal and terrorist elements across the porous Lebanese borders with Syria and Israel. Cutting down on these cross-border operations will strike a blow at a significant funding source for Hizballah and other terrorist and criminal groups. A secure border will also hinder the flow of drugs, and therefore hurt the foreign terrorist organizations that are partially funded by narcotics trafficking, including Hizballah. Furthermore, a more secure border will prevent the illegal entry of persons who are tied to terrorist activities.

Law Enforcement Support

In FY 2010, enhanced INL programs to modernize and professionalize the ISF through basic and advanced training and operational upgrades will enable the ISF to re-assume its traditional policing functions and allow the Lebanese Armed Forces to focus on the threats posed by Hizballah and Palestinian rejectionist groups in the south of the country and in bases along the Syrian border. The pivotal issue for Lebanon in the region is government sovereignty over all Lebanese territory; however Hizballah and Palestinian rejectionist groups continue to act outside government authority. Hizballah’s incursion into Israel in the summer of 2006 provoked an Israeli military response that devastated Lebanon's infrastructure and raised tensions across the Middle East. INL’s current security assistance to the ISF will greatly enhance the government's ability to better address and deter the planned activities of terrorist and other criminal groups. Additional police training will bring the ISF up to international standards in crime investigation and crowd control, thus promoting internal stability and deterring destabilizing forces in Lebanon.

U.S. security assistance objectives in Lebanon are focused on promoting a stable, independent, democratic, and economically viable state at peace with all its neighbors. In FY 2010, advanced supervisor and command and management training programs will be instituted, basic training will be continued and police duty gear will provided for an additional 2,000 cadets. INL will provide an additional 100 unarmored vehicles, and support communications and facility upgrades to additional police substations throughout the country, particularly in the south. The ISF will continue to require high-payoff training and equipping with sustained effort over several years if the Government of Lebanon (GOL) is expected to meet its missions of securing Lebanon's borders and ensuring security in accordance with UNSCRs 1559 and 1701.

Corrections

The rule of law is crucial to establishing security in Lebanon. In FY 2010 INL will begin to provide assistance to strengthen Lebanon’s criminal justice and corrections systems through capacity-building of Lebanon's prison and judicial authorities. INL will implement programs to develop Lebanese criminal justice, prosecutorial and administrative capacity through training for criminal judges and prosecutors as well as infrastructure development, particularly with regard to corrections institutions. A needs assessment will be conducted to improve management and infrastructure of the overcrowded prison at Roumieh, which houses suspected terrorists alongside common criminals. Public diplomacy will multiply the impact of all these steps.

Counternarcotics

In FY 2010, INL will institute programs to counter a growing cannabis and opium problem in the Beqaa region. Better trained and equipped security services will operate effectively as a unified, professionalized security force to stem the production and flow of narcotics within Lebanon and across its porous borders with Syria and Israel; activity which funds the criminal and terrorist elements that are working to destabilize the country.

Program Development and Support

Program Development and Support funds will be used to pay for the salaries, benefits, and allowances of permanently assigned U.S. and foreign national direct-hires and contract personnel, International Cooperative Administrative Support Services (ICASS) costs, TDY assistance, and other general administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. Funding will also be used to support Washington-based personnel’s effective monitoring and implementation of the program.

Lebanon

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009

FY 2010

Counterterrorism/Border Control

-

-

-

3,000

Law Enforcement Support

Training

396

-

4,500

6,000

Equipment

-

-

1,000

6,000

SubTotal

396

-

5,500

12,000

Corrections

-

-

-

1,000

Counternarcotics

-

-

-

2,000

Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel

44

-

300

900

Non-U.S. Personnel

-

-

40

100

ICASS Costs

17

-

50

160

Program Support

39

-

110

840

SubTotal

100

-

500

2,000

Total

496

-

6,000

20,000


Morocco

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008 Actual

FY 2009 Estimate

FY 2010 Request

496

1,000

2,030

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Provide training and technical assistance to Moroccan security sector institutions such as border protection agencies and corrections agencies to enhance their abilities to combat transnational criminal threats, including narcotics trafficking. Assist Morocco to address corruption by possibly focusing on Moroccan anti-corruption laws, developing a training program on anti-corruption issues, and building capacity of legal and judicial sector professionals on anti-corruption measures.

Increased number of border posts and sea ports that meet international standards for identification of illegal migrant smuggling and interdiction of contraband leaving Morocco; increased seizures of drugs and other contraband; increased customs revenue collection; and reduced processing time for commercial shipments. Improved corruption index scores through strengthened internal affairs sections and judicial oversight.

Program Justification

Morocco is a liberalizing, democratizing, and moderate Muslim state that is not only a victim of terrorism, but also a committed partner in fighting terrorism. Morocco has relatively weak border control systems that could be exploited by terrorists and other transnational criminals. Due to its long and poorly controlled borders, extensive coastline, and proximity to Europe, Morocco has substantial problems with illegal migration, human smuggling, the movement of transnational terrorists through its territory, drug production and trafficking, and commercial smuggling. The profits from these illicit enterprises could provide revenue sources to terrorists. These criminal activities serve to undermine the rule of law in Morocco, lead to corruption of public officials, and weaken Moroccan institutions.

Program Accomplishments

An INL-funded FBI training program has dramatically improved investigatory capacity in Morocco. Through classroom instruction, and field exercises, the FBI trainers have increased the capabilities of Moroccan crime scene technicians. As a result of the training, there has been an increase in the number of suspects arrested and investigations begun using modern investigation techniques.

In addition, INL provided training for Moroccan customs officials in a narcotics identification course to enhance their ability to identify and interdict illicit goods crossing the borders. Other courses include training on systematic approaches to vessel inspections and commodity examinations. The Moroccans also received a train-the-trainer course which provided participants with a relevant adult-learning education model and opportunities to practice lesson development and presentation skills in a supportive small-group environment. Equipment was also provided so that new techniques learned could be fully implemented. Equipment provided included: radiation pagers, multi-tools, tool cabinets, forensic drug test kits, loupes, and black lights.

FY 2010 Program

Security Sector

Funds will provide training and technical assistance to Moroccan security sector institutions such as the border protection agencies and corrections facilities to enhance their ability to combat transnational criminal threats, including narcotics trafficking, and enhance coordination. Funds will also support Morocco’s development of an effective, multi-unit law enforcement plan to execute nonproliferation and anti-smuggling missions.

Justice Sector

Following the development of the course module and implementation of the trainings in the previous year, funds will be used to develop the capacity of some of the previously trained legal professionals to serve as trainers and to implement anti-corruption and economic crimes training programs throughout the country. Funds will also launch a public awareness campaign on anti-corruption efforts, to include ethical standards of judges and court personnel, and appropriate citizen responses to corruption.

Program Development and Support

Funds will pay for the administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. Funds will also be used for Washington based personnel to effectively monitor the program.


Morocco

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008

Supp

FY 2009

FY 2010

Security and Judicial Sector

400

-

890

1,670

Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel

-

-

-

200

Non-U.S. Personnel

40

-

46

40

ICASS Costs

10

-

10

20

Program Support

46

-

54

100

SubTotal

96

-

110

360

Total

496

-

1,000

2,030


West Bank/Gaza

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008 Actual

FY 2008
Supp Actual

FY 2009 Bridge Supp Actual

FY 2009 Actual

FY 2009 Spring Supp

FY 2010 Request

---

25,000

50,000

25,000

109,000

100,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

Enhanced effectiveness of the Palestinian Authority (PA) National Security Forces (NSF):

The NSF serves as a "Gendarmerie-like" organization and a back-up for the Palestinian civilian police if the police encounter overwhelming forces with heavier weapons. The NSF is trained to function in platoon, company, or battalion-size formations, in a para-military fashion, to support civilian police to subdue civil disorders and address situations in which police SWAT teams would ordinarily be used. Training, provision of non-lethal equipment, and construction of training and operations bases for the National Security Forces (NSF) will increase its overall operational capabilities.

Program success will be measured by the following: trainees meeting academic performance standards, outlined in the Program of Instruction (POI); each NSF battalion having the ability to conduct tactical operations from squad to battalion sized elements in accordance with the POI; NSF unit leaders provide effective command and control of their respective elements commensurate with their appointed position; and other agreed-upon measures of performance.

Enhanced effectiveness of the Palestinian Authority Presidential Guard (PG):

Training and provision of non-lethal equipment for the PG to increase its overall operational capabilities to provide enhanced personal security for PA leaders, key installations, and foreign visitors in the pursuit of improved law and order in the West Bank.

Program success will be measured by increased PG operational capabilities.

Enhanced effectiveness of Justice, Civil Defense, and Civilian Police sectors:

Limited assistance provided for training, equipping, capacity building, and infrastructure development to selected justice institutions (courts, judges, prosecutors) and civil defense and civilian police forces to plug critical gaps in the security sector. Assistance will improve the ability of these entities to keep pace with the progress the NSF and PG are making. Effectiveness will be measured by faster and more efficiently handling of criminal prosecutions and improved working environments for civilian police and civil defense forces.

Program Justification

The Palestinian Authority has identified security as a national goal and key underpinning of a future Palestinian state living in peace with its neighbors. In the Palestinian Reform and Development Plan, the PA undertook to increase the professionalism of the security forces and upgrade the security organizations’ capacity and capability. USG assistance is focused on three of the PA’s six outlined objectives, specifically, ensuring that the NSF are capable of supporting the civil police and other security forces to ensure law and order and combat terrorism; ensuring that the PG is capable of protecting PA leaders, key installations, and foreign visitors; and improving the PA’s central security infrastructure and command and control facilities, primarily within the Ministry of Interior (MOI). USG security assistance to the PA is designed to assist in these goals through unit-level training programs, provision of non-lethal equipment, infrastructure development, support for command and control capabilities, and development of planning, operational and logistics capacities. The USG has also established productive relationships with PA security forces and their Israeli security counterparts to facilitate Palestinian efforts to enforce law and order and combat terrorism.

Program Accomplishments

Program implementation began in August 2007 with the signing of a “Framework Agreement” between the Secretary of State and PA Prime Minister Fayyad. Since then, the program has moved quickly. To date, three full NSF Special Battalions (1,630 personnel) and one PG battalion (420 personnel) have been trained in Jordan at the Jordanian International Police Training Center (JIPTC). Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers for a fourth NSF Special Battalion will begin one month of leaders’ training in Jordan in July 2009, followed by 19 weeks of basic training for the full 500-man battalion in August. Specialized training is occurring in Jordan and the West Bank in such courses as drivers’ training, first aid, tactical police operations, light weapons repair, vehicle maintenance, and more. Instructor development courses to eventually give the PA their own training capacity are also occurring in the West Bank. The first three iterations of an eight-week Senior Leaders Course, composed of mid- to senior-leaders from across the PA Security Forces, have been taught in the West Bank; a fourth course is scheduled for July 2009. Overall, approximately 3,500 members of the PA security forces have been identified and vetted for USG-provided training. The trained NSF and PG battalions are being fully equipped, and equipment is being purchased and delivered for the NSF battalions undergoing training. A state-of-the-art PG training college has been completed and dedicated in Jericho in March 2009, and the first NSF battalion to graduate from JIPTC has moved into its newly constructed base camp in Jericho. Ground has been broken for an NSF training complex in Jericho, and construction is scheduled to begin soon for another NSF base camp in Jenin. The PA has immediately deployed the battalions that have graduated from JIPTC on tactical operations. They have been instrumental in providing law and order in four different security campaigns in 2008 and 2009. The Jenin, Hebron, Bethlehem, and Qalqilyah security campaigns have been widely praised by the local population, the Palestinian Authority, and Israeli officials. The across-the-board performance of the PASF throughout the West Bank during the December 2008/January 2009 Gaza war is particularly noteworthy: they maintained peace and public order at a time of great tension and potential instability.

FY 2010 Program

The FY 2010 request reflects new security assistance requirements and opportunities owing to the progress the program has made since August 2007 and new challenges that are arising. Funding will continue to focus on training, equipping, and garrisoning the NSF and PG security forces and will begin to provide limited justice sector, civilian police, and civil defense assistance. The request seeks funds to train and equip two more NSF battalions, and to build two more NSF operations camps. It includes funds to sustain capacity-building efforts in the MOI’s Strategic Planning Department and to expand specialized, advanced, and refresher training for the security forces in the West Bank. This will include a continuation of the Senior Leaders Course for representatives of all of the security forces, as well as further development of Instructor Development training for the NSF and PG.

The JIPTC training program for the NSF battalions will continue to incorporate minor curriculum and organizational improvements based on lessons learned. Battalion officers and Non-Commissioned Officers will continue to receive one month of specialized leaders training before the start of the full battalion’s 19-week basic law enforcement and security training curriculum. That curriculum will continue to concentrate on such disciplines as tactical training, rapid reaction, crowd control, high-risk arrest, crime scene preparation, human rights/ethics, first aid, firearms, and other core law enforcement requirements. Training will be provided by instructors from the Jordanian Public Security Directorate. A U.S.-funded contractor-provided Mobile Training Team of up to 30 senior US and foreign police (and some military) training specialists will mentor, guide and oversee host nation training.

Each graduating NSF battalion will receive a full complement of non-lethal equipment to make it fully operational. The equipment package includes items such as uniforms, field gear (tents, tarps, canteens, etc), vehicles, surveillance equipment (scopes, binoculars, radio scanners), first aid/medical gear, riot control gear, computers and other standard items. The funds also provide for warehousing, inventory and other logistics and procurement support.

Each trained and equipped battalion is being provided an operations camp that can house the full battalion, store all of its equipment, and provide the full range of support services to allow it to operate out of its base or to deploy elsewhere as needed in the West Bank. Construction for these camps occurs following successful negotiations between the Government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority for a mutually acceptable site.

Requested funds will also provide modest support for assistance to the Justice Sector (criminal courts, prosecutors, and judges), civil defense, and the civilian police. These programs have acquired greater urgency as it has become apparent that other donors are not providing the necessary civilian policing, rule of law and other pledged assistance necessary to keep pace with the progress the U.S.-trained NSF and PG are achieving. Funds will specifically be used to provide technical assistance to help develop stronger ties among investigative police, prosecutors and judges so that stronger criminal cases are developed leading to faster and fairer judgments. Training, equipment, and infrastructure development support will also be provided to the civil police and civil defense to complement assistance they have been slowly receiving from the European Union and other donors.

Funding will continue to support the development of the MOI’s Strategic Planning Department with the goal of ensuring that the Palestinian Authority is fully capable of managing and accomplishing its own strategic planning for the PASF in the following areas: budgeting/financing; procurement/logistics; training; human resources; and strategic communications.

Program Development and Support funds will bolster INL’s administrative and program implementation resources in Jerusalem, Jordan, and Washington, to include funding to meet expanded personal security detail requirements.

West Bank-Gaza

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009

FY 2009
Bridge

FY 2009
Supp

FY 2010

Training

-

13,000

13,500

22,600

43,000

41,000

Non-Lethal Equipment

-

12,000

7,000

-

32,000

17,000

Capacity Building

-

-

3,500

4,000

2,000

6,500

Infrastructure Development

-

-

-

18,400

31,000

30,500

Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel

-

-

478

1,800

-

950

Non-U.S. Personnel

-

-

143

200

-

220

ICASS Costs

-

-

376

-

-

400

Program Support

-

-

3

3,000

1,000

3,430

SubTotal

-

-

1,000

5,000

1,000

5,000

Total

-

25,000

25,000

50,000

109,000

100,000


Yemen

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2008 Actual

FY 2009 Estimate

FY 2010 Request

496

---

1,000

Program Objectives and Performance Indicators

The program will enhance the capabilities of select Yemeni criminal justice sector institutions to combat transnational criminal threats through training, technical assistance and equipment procurements. INL programming will assist the Government of Yemen to strengthen its civilian law enforcement capabilities.

An increase in Yemeni law enforcement and security personnel receiving training from U.S. advisors. An increase in the number of trained law enforcement personnel with access to basic policing equipment provided by this program.

Program Justification

Given threats to peace and security in Yemen, particularly from terrorist and other transnational groups, INL assistance will be used to help enhance security by building the capacity of Yemeni law enforcement to combat these threats. Assistance will aim to assist Yemeni law enforcement to use democratic policing standards, protect its population and critical infrastructure from terrorist acts, conduct investigations and dismantle criminal and terrorist organizations that operate within its borders.

Program Accomplishments

Due to ordered and authorized departures in 2008, and current security threats, the program is moving at a slower pace than desired, and does not have program accomplishments to date.

FY 2010 Program

Law Enforcement Support

The FY 2010 program will enhance the capabilities of the Yemeni civilian security services. The program will develop initiatives that address Yemen’s most immediate security needs, while taking into account the security challenges of working in Yemen. Projects will likely include enhanced training initiatives, technical assistance in border control and policing and limited equipment support.

Program Development and Support

Funds will pay for the administrative and operating expenses for program planning, design, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation. Funds will also be used for Washington based personnel to effectively monitor the program.

Yemen

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2008

FY 2008
Supp

FY 2009

FY 2010

Security Sector

446

-

-

-

Law Enforcement Support

-

-

-

950

Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel

-

-

-

-

Non-U.S. Personnel

-

-

-

-

ICASS Costs

-

-

-

-

Program Support

50

-

-

50

SubTotal

50

-

-

50

Total

496

-

-

1,000



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