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FY 2011 Program and Budget Guide: Africa


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Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
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Africa Regional (TSCTP)

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
3,000 2,500 4,500

Program Overview

The Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership (TSCTP) is a multi-faceted, multi-year strategy aimed at defeating terrorist organizations by strengthening regional counterterrorism capabilities, enhancing and institutionalizing cooperation among the region’s security forces. INCLE funds will assist in the development of the capacities of law enforcement organizations in the pan-Sahel (Chad, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, and Senegal) to confront the challenge posed by terrorist organizations in the region, such as al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM).

Program Goals and Objectives

The Africa Regional program supports Countering Terrorism and Peace and Security objectives in the FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plans of the regional countries. It also supports INL’s Bureau Strategic Plan goal of Combating Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: To provide training, technical assistance and equipment support to civilian law enforcement organizations to build their capacity to prevent and respond to terrorist events.

FY 2011 Program

Security Sector Reform

Mali Police Project: Funding will deploy a police advisor to Mali to facilitate police training and technical assistance planning and implementation. This is an ongoing project.

Mauritania Police Project: Funding will deploy a police advisor to Mauritania to facilitate police training and technical assistance planning and implementation. This is an ongoing project.

Chad Police Project: Funding will support training and technical assistance to professionalize Chadian law enforcement organizations and strengthen border control capacity. This is a new project. If able, a Niger program may be considered in addition to or in lieu of this program.

Africa Regional

INL BUDGET

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism
Partnership (TSCTP)

Security Sector Reform 2,200 2,170 4,050
Sub-Total 2,200 2,170 4,050
Trafficking in Persons 475 - -
Program Development and Support

U.S. Personnel 200 230 230

Non-U.S. Personnel - - 100

ICASS Costs - - 20

Program Support 125 100 100

Sub-Total 325 330 450
Total 3,000 2,500 4,500

Benin

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- - 850

Program Overview

Benin is a transit zone for South American cocaine en route to Europe. Drug trafficking in West Africa is threat to regional security, good governance, and public health. The Government of Benin (GOB) has the potential to become a valuable partner in regional counternarcotics efforts. Given the importance of Benin as a West Africa regional partner, USG funding to support improved internal security, accompanied by respect for civil liberties and human rights, and to combat regional organized crime are of paramount importance to U.S. interests.

USG support of improved internal security also includes strengthening the capacity of the Beninese criminal justice sector to address crimes of sexual and gender based violence (SGBV). Benin’s criminal justice sector severely lacks the skills needed to adequately protect women from SGBV. Rape, defilement and domestic violence crimes are often met with impunity.

Program Goals and Objectives

Both Benin programs support Embassy Cotonou’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan and the President’s FY 2011 Drug Control Program, which identify combating SGBV and counternarcotics as major priorities.

Objective 1: To assist law enforcement to conduct criminal investigations that will result in arrests and prosecutions of mid and senior level members of trafficking organizations.

Objective 2: To enhance judges’ understanding of complex crimes, including narco-trafficking and money laundering, so they can adjudicate such cases.

Objective 3: Increase capacity of the Beninese law enforcement sector to successfully investigate cases of SGBV, and of the judiciary, to competently adjudicate such cases.

FY 2011 Program

Counternarcotics

This program will support the development of effective, professional, and accountable criminal justice institution able to contribute regional West Africa counternarcotics efforts. The project will likely focus on the Judicial Police and judges. This is a new program.

Sexual and Gender Based Violence

Previously funded through the Women’s Justice and Empowerment Initiative, this bilateral program will increase the capacity of criminal justice sector to respond professionally to instances of SGBV and domestic violence in Benin. This is an ongoing program.

Benin

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Sexual and Gender Based Violence - - 475
Counternarcotics - - 335
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - - 40
SubTotal - - 40
Total - - 850

Cape Verde

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
500 603 1,000

Program Overview

Cape Verde is a transit zone for South American cocaine en route to Europe. Drug trafficking in West Africa is threat to regional security, good governance, and public health. The proceeds of the cocaine trafficked through Cape Verde flow back to the same organizations that move cocaine to the United States, reinforcing their financial strength. The Government of Cape Verde (GOCV) is a valuable partner and plays a leading role in regional counternarcotics efforts. The U.S. government should continue partnering with like-minded West African governments to address the transnational threats posed by narco-trafficking.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Cape Verde program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan, which identifies combating transnational crime as its first priority.

Objective 1: To assist law enforcement to conduct criminal investigations that will result in arrests and prosecutions of mid and senior level members of trafficking organizations.

Objective 2: To assist the GOCV and civil society with drug awareness education and other demand reduction efforts.

Objective 3: To enhance the capacity of the GOCV justice system in order to combat corruption and strengthen effectiveness in order to promote the rule of law in compliance with international standards.

FY 2011 Program

Peace and Security

Law enforcement support will enhance the development of effective, professional, and accountable security sector institutions able to contribute to Cape Verde’s counternarcotics efforts.

Governing Justly and Democratically

Funds will improve the capabilities of the criminal justice system to fight corruption, and promote rule of law and human rights in order to support transparency and good governance. This is a new project.

Cape Verde

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate
FY 2011
Request
Peace and Security 475 553 500

Governing Justly and
Democratically

- - 450

Program Development
& Support

U.S. Personnel - - -

Non-U.S. Personnel - - -

ICASS Costs - - -

Program Support 25 50 50

SubTotal 25 50 50
Total 500 603 1,000

Democratic Republic of Congo

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
1,500 1,700 6,000

Program Overview

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), despite a resurgence of violence in the eastern provinces in 2009, continues to emerge from a brutal and complex conflict. However, the security situation remains precarious, and the DRC government has been unable to agree to a coherent plan for security sector reform. A continuing priority, as cooperation increases amongst countries in the region, is assistance to the Congolese National Police and customs authorities on border controls. U.S. assistance supports Congolese and international donors’ efforts to reform Congo’s security sector and reinforce central African regional stability.

Program Goals and Objectives

The DRC program supports the Embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority of Peace and Security: The DRC achieves peace in the east and regional stability and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals of Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR) and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: To improve Democratic Republic of Congo capacities in border control, customs, and related policing efforts.

Objective 2: To build the capacity of law enforcement services in the Democratic Republic of Congo to detect, investigate and prosecute crimes.

Objective 3: To increase coordination amongst international donors to ensure assistance efforts are reinforcing and complementary.

FY 2011 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Border Security Program funds will develop the capability of the Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo to control point of entry-based immigration, identify and track illegal immigration and trafficking of drugs, weapons, contraband, and persons. This is an on-going program.

Police Development and Reform Program funds will improve law enforcement capabilities through the modernization and professionalization of law enforcement organizations. The Narcotics and Law Enforcement Advisor will establish law enforcement initiatives such as providing training in basic policing skills to help increase Congolese capacity. This is a new program.


Democratic Republic of Congo

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate
FY 2011
Request
Crime Control/Civilian Police 1,450 - -

Stabilization Operations and
Security Sector Reform

- 1,600 5,425
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - 400

Non-U.S. Personnel - - -

ICASS Costs - - 75

Program Support 50 100 100

SubTotal 50 100 575
Total 1,500 1,700 6,000

Djibouti

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
300 - 750

Program Overview

Djibouti is a critical partner for stability in the Horn of Africa region, especially given potential threats from extremists operating in neighboring Somalia, Yemen, and the Ogaden region of Ethiopia, as well as the hostile government in Eritrea. Given the military’s shift of emphasis to defending the northern frontier against Eritrea, the development of the police as the institution responsible for internal security is vital. This new program would assist the Djiboutian criminal justice system, especially law enforcement agencies, to address regional threats such as piracy and terrorism. The U.S. assistance is vital given the relevance of each of these types of threats to U.S. interests, and the general U.S. interest in a stable Horn of Africa.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Djibouti program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan peace and security priority, and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals for criminal justice sector capacity building, and transnational crime.

Objective 1: Assist the Djiboutian criminal justice sector to better provide internal security, such that Djibouti is both responsive to the security needs of its public and remains a key partner for stability within the Horn of Africa region. This could include police training to respond to threats of terrorism, or other extremists operating in the region.

Objective 2: Increase the capacity of Djibouti to contribute to a regional criminal justice system to counter piracy and other related threats to international security. This could include increasing the capacity of the Djiboutian coast guard, corrections facilities, or maritime training center, or other related law enforcement and security measures.

FY 2011 Program

Criminal Justice Sector Support

Internal Security: This program will evaluate the role of the police and other criminal justice sector actors in providing internal security for the public of Djibouti while facing regional threats. After an initial assessment by Embassy Djibouti staff, with support from INL, specific and timely programmatic goals will be developed and executed to develop and maintain Djibouti’s capacity as a regional partner for stability in the Horn of Africa. This is a new project.

Counter-Piracy: To support ongoing review of the dynamic counter-piracy criminal justice efforts in the Horn of Africa, funds will be used to support those sectors of the criminal justice sector in Djibouti that are deemed useful to combating piracy, and other related threats to regional stability. This is a new project.


Djibouti

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Trafficking in Persons 285 - -
Criminal Justice Sector Support - - 712
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support 15 - 38
SubTotal 15 - 38
Total 300 - 750

Ethiopia

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- - 500

Program Overview

The Ethiopia program will support criminal justice sector and police reform to build capacity to address regional and organized crime. It is especially important that the Ethiopian criminal justice sector be able to adequately address regional threats, especially given the nexus of organized criminal networks, violent extremism, and regional instability. Patterns of child-trafficking also represent a disturbing pattern of organized crime in the region. This program is especially important to U.S. interests given the importance of the stability of Ethiopia to the stability of the Horn of Africa as a whole.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Ethiopia program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan peace and security priority toward assisting Ethiopia to address regional threats and internal security, and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals for criminal justice sector development, and transnational crime.

Objective 1: Develop the capacity of Ethiopian criminal justice sector to address regional organized crime such as trafficking and violent extremism. This will likely focus on national law enforcement agencies. These efforts will also take into consideration the overall professionalism and responsiveness of internal security forces relative to the Ethiopian public.

FY 2011 Program

Criminal Justice Sector Support

Regional and Organized Crime: This program will evaluate the role of the police and other criminal justice sector actors in providing internal security while facing regional threats. The thematic emphasis of these efforts may include both counter-terrorism and anti-trafficking. After an initial assessment by Embassy Addis Ababa staff, with support from INL, specific and timely programmatic goals will be developed and executed to develop and maintain Ethiopia’s capacity as a regional partner for stability in the Horn of Africa. This is a new program.

Ethiopia

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011 Request
Criminal Justice Sector Support - - 475
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - - 25
SubTotal - - 25
Total - - 500

Ghana

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
500 500 1,700

Program Overview

Ghana is a transit country for South American cocaine en route to Europe. Drug trafficking in West Africa is threat to regional security, good governance, and public health. The proceeds of the cocaine trafficked through Ghana flow back to the same organizations that move cocaine to the United States, reinforcing their financial strength. The Government of Ghana (GOG) and the U.S. government cooperate on valuable counternarcotics operations. The U.S. government should continue partnering with governments in the region that are dedicated to addressing the threat of narco-trafficking.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Ghana program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan, which identifies enhancing the security environment as a key goal. Specifically, the embassy seeks to increase the capability and will to fight domestic and transnational crime.

Objective 1: To expand Ghana’s counternarcotics efforts by building the justice system’s capacity to fight corruption and prosecute and adjudicate respective cases against mid and senior level members of trafficking organizations.

Objective 2: To bolster judicial cooperation between the United States and Ghana.

FY 2011 Program

Rule of Law and Human Rights

The Justice Sector Support Project will develop capacity and accountability structures within Ghana’s justice system, and address corruption.

Ghana

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Counternarcotics 500 - -

Stabilization Operations
and Security Sector Reform

450 -
Rule of Law and Human Rights - - 1,615
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -

Non-U.S. Personnel - - -

ICASS Costs - - -

Program Support - 50 85

SubTotal - 50 85
Total 500 500 1,700

Guinea

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
100 - 500

Program Overview

Guinea is in a period of transition. A key element in consolidating the transition to democracy is security sector reform. The security sector forces have contributed to instability, which affects Guinea and the larger region, and have been involved in narco-trafficking and other transnational crimes. In order for the military to remove itself from daily involvement in internal security, civilian law enforcement capacity needs to be strengthened.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Guinea program supports two of the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan goals: returning the security forces to their constitutional roles while increasing professionalism and strengthening their capacity to counter transnational threats.

Objective 1: To assist law enforcement to assume greater responsibility for internal security, including enforcing laws against transnational crime.

FY 2011 Program

Counternarcotics/Transnational Crime

The Law Enforcement Support Project will bolster the operational effectiveness of Guinean law enforcement. In addition, the project will address targeted sections of law enforcement management and administration for institutional development. This is a new project.


Guinea

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Transnational Crime/Counternarcotics 100 - 475
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -

Non-U.S. Personnel - - -

ICASS Costs - - -

Program Support - - 25

SubTotal - - 25
Total 100 - 500

Guinea-Bissau

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
100 1,500 3,000

Program Overview

Guinea-Bissau is a transit zone for South American cocaine en route to Europe. Drug trafficking in West Africa is threat to regional security, good governance, and public health. The proceeds of the cocaine trafficked through Guinea-Bissau flow back to the same organizations that move cocaine to the United States, reinforcing their financial strength. When global cocaine markets shifted and cocaine started transiting West Africa in significant quantities, Guinea-Bissau was one of the initial trafficking hubs. Narco-trafficking affects Guinea-Bissau’s efforts to conduct security sector reform and must be addressed to support the international community’s investments in peace-building in Guinea-Bissau.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Guinea-Bissau program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan, which identifies combating narco-trafficking as its second highest priority.

Objective 1: To assist law enforcement to conduct criminal investigations that support successful prosecutions of mid and senior level members of trafficking organizations.

Objective 2: To assist prosecutors and judges to prosecute and adjudicate cases against mid and senior level members of trafficking organizations.

Objective 3: To enhance the effectiveness of the entire criminal justice system by developing a functioning corrections system.

FY 2011 Program

Counternarcotics

The Law Enforcement Support Project will continue the development of the Judicial Police as an effective, professional, and accountable institution able to contribute to Guinea-Bissau’s counternarcotics efforts. This is an ongoing project.

The Judicial Support Project will develop skills, particularly among prosecutors, and build on accountability structures within the judicial sector. This is an ongoing project.

Guinea-Bissau

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Counternarcotics - - 2,850
Transnational Crime 50 - -

Stabilization Operations
and Security Sector Reform

- 1,400 -
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -

Non-U.S. Personnel - - -

ICASS Costs - - -

Program Support 50 100 150

SubTotal - 100 150
Total 100 1,500 3,000

Kenya

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
2,000

Program Overview

The violence that swept Kenya from December 2007 to February 2008 highlighted longstanding institutional, electoral and socio-economic factors that had been undermining Kenya's democracy and prospects for long-term stability. For Kenya to continue to be the important strategic partner it has been for decades, it must undertake significant reforms. Among the key areas requiring reform is the Kenyan criminal justice sector. The capacity of the Kenyan system to address crimes such as sexual and gender based violence (SGBV) and regional piracy is increasing due to ongoing efforts by INL and other partners but much more is needed. For example, Kenya’s law enforcement sector severely lacks the skills needed to adequately protect women from SGBV. In addition, Kenya has borne the brunt of prosecutions of pirates attacking ships from all over the world, but struggles with limited personnel and institutional weaknesses in the judicial sector. Given the importance of Kenya as a regional partner, USG funding to support improved internal security, accompanied by respect for civil liberties and human rights, and to combat regional organized crime is of paramount importance to U.S. interests.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Kenya program supports the Embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan peace and security priorities toward continuing the development of the criminal justice sector in Kenya. The Kenya program supports INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals for criminal justice systems, security sector reform and transnational crime.

Objective 1: Support Kenyan efforts for national police reform. INL will support the ongoing Kenyan-led efforts to transform the Kenyan police forces into publicly responsive and professional services.

Objective 2: Increase capacity of Kenyan law enforcement to investigate and successfully prosecute cases of SGBV and of the Kenyan judiciary to competently adjudicate such cases.

Objective 3: Assist the Kenyan law enforcement and judicial sectors in their efforts to improve criminal prosecution, including piracy cases.

FY 2011 Program

Criminal Justice Sector Reform

National Police Reform: Previously funded through 1207 funds provided after the post-election violence in 2007 and 2008, this project will support Kenyan–led efforts toward national police reform. This is an ongoing program.

Sexual and Gender Based Violence: Previously funded through the Women’s Justice and Empowerment Initiative, this bilateral program will increase the capacity of the police to respond professionally to instances of SGBV and domestic violence in Kenya. This is an ongoing program.

Counter-Piracy and Judicial Reform: Previously supported through the nexus with counterterrorism and anti-money laundering, this program will support a Resident Legal Advisor to focus on improving Kenya's ability to effectively and efficiently prosecute crime, with a significant focus on piracy cases. This RLA will continue efforts to assist Kenya's Department of Public Prosecution and judiciary. This is an ongoing program.

Kenya

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Criminal Justice Sector Reform - - 1,880
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - 70
Program Support - - 50
SubTotal - - 120
Total - - 2,000

Liberia

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
4,130 9,000 17,000

Program Overview

Decades of instability and conflict have weakened many of the countries in West Africa, and problems frequently have spilled over borders and undermined already troubled states. This state of affairs has the potential to undermine West Africa’s general stability, good governance and development, and threatens U.S. strategic objectives in the region. These same conditions have also resulted in West Africa becoming a significant transshipment point for narcotics, further exacerbating the potential for regional instability.

As Liberia continues to emerge from a14-year civil war, which ended in 2003, the Government of Liberia (GOL) requires significant external donor support in order to provide for its own peace, security and rule of law. Since 2003, the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL) has had the lead in supporting the GOL with reforming and developing the Liberia National Police (LNP). With the planned drawdown of UNMIL in 2012 after the presidential elections, the ability of the GOL to contribute to the country’s peace and security becomes critical.

Program Goals and Objectives

INL programs support the international community and the GOL’s goals to strengthen, develop and reform its police and other criminal justice institutions. These programs are part of the increased USG policy focus on these issues enunciated by the Secretary of State and the Bureau of African Affairs in 2009 and 2010. They support the Embassy’s FY 2012 Mission Strategic Resource Plan priorities of peace and security and rule of law, and INL’s FY 2012 Bureau Strategic Plan goals of counternarcotics and criminal justice development. The programs will also implement the recommendations of the INL-led interagency 2010 counternarcotics assessment of West Africa.

Objective 1: To further strengthen law enforcement’s ability to contribute to Liberia’s peace and security and increased adherence to laws and international standards.

Objective 2: To increase the capacity of criminal justice institutions to provide rule of law in Liberia and increased adherence to laws and international standards.

Objective 3: To strengthen law enforcement and criminal justice institutions’ capacity to combat narcotics trafficking in the region.

FY 2011 Program

Stability Operations and Security Sector Reform

The Civilian Police (CivPol) Program consists of U.S. advisors and the provision of equipment and infrastructure development. The advisors include police officers and related experts who either are seconded to UNMIL or work directly with the LNP. The CivPol program will continue to support the development of the LNP and its Emergency Response Unit (ERU) and Police Support Unit (PSU). Increased numbers of U.S. police officers, primarily seconded to UNMIL, will continue to work with the LNP as trainers, mentors and advisors. Significant assistance will begin outside of the capital. This is an on-going program.

The Senior Advisor Team will increase in and continue to support the LNP leadership in institutional reform and capacity building, including foci on personnel policies, internal affairs, general management and administration of the LNP and a civilian oversight mechanism.

Continued assistance for the PSU, which is responsible for low-grade civil disorder management, will be provided. Training and mentoring will include the areas of crowd and riot control and election security.

Additional ERU advisors will continue and expand upon field mentoring for the Unit within and outside of the capital. The ERU is responsible for supporting the PSU as necessary and responding to situations requiring high levels skill and experience.

Within the LNP, the training of civilians will be provided to take on certain administrative and logistical functions, such as maintenance, human resource management and budgeting. Additional in-service training will be provided for officers in general and advanced policing skills such as evidence collection, crime scene preservation, problem solving, community policing, interviewing techniques and complex investigations.

Assistance will also provide essential non-lethal equipment and infrastructure support such as construction and/or renovations in select locations throughout Liberia.

Governing Justly and Democratically

The Justice Sector Support Liberia (JSSL) Program, consisting of rule of law advisors and the provision of equipment and infrastructure support, will continue to strengthen criminal justice institutions. JSSL legal experts will work with judicial, justice and corrections institutions. JSSL program activities will begin to expand outside of Monrovia, building on FY 2010 activities and successes. Particular emphasis will be given to increasing the reach of these institutions outside of the capital, furthering the capacity of personnel and infrastructure development. This is an on-going program.

The number of JSSL advisers will increase from approximately five to 10. Through mentoring, training and advising activities, they will foster institutional reform, build capacity and encourage a more consistent and effective justice process among the criminal justice institutions.

Both technical and material assistance will be provided to begin working with all responsible criminal justice institutions to develop a functioning national corrections system.

Building on past activities, attention will be given to implementing a case management system for all affected justice sector institutions.

Technical assistance will be provided to further strengthen police-prosecutor cooperation.

Continued training of prosecutors will be provided through the creation of permanent local training mechanisms.

Technical assistance will be provided in reviewing and updating the criminal procedure code.

Sustained JSSL activities will expand outside of the capital area, including technical assistance, training, equipping and physical infrastructure development.

Transnational Crime

Funds will strengthen the capacity of the LNP to respond to the growing threat posed by narcotics trafficking in West Africa. The program will begin implementing the recommendations of the INL interagency counternarcotics assessment to assist in reform of outdated legislation and to provide other assistance to strengthen the GOL’s counternarcotics capabilities. These are new activities.

Liberia

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Stabilization Ops & Security
Sector Reform

3,730 8,550 9,300
Governing Justly and Democratically

6,200
Transnational Crime

1,000
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel 150 200 200
Non-U.S. Personnel 50 50 75
ICASS Costs 150 150 150
Program Support 50 50 75
SubTotal 400 450 500
Total 4,130 9,000 17,000

Mauritania

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- - 330

Program Overview

As an area of operation for Al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) and the site of numerous recent terrorist attacks against Western targets, Mauritania is critically important for U.S. counterterrorism goals in the Sahel region. The Government of Mauritania’s (GOM’s) capacity for action remains limited and it is in U.S. interests to strengthen the GOM’s ability to counter the terrorist threat in Mauritania and the Sahel region.

Program Goals and Objectives

The program supports Countering the Terrorist Threat objective in the FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan. It also supports INL’s Bureau Strategic Plan goal Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: To provide training, technical assistance and equipment support to civilian law enforcement organizations to build their capacity to prevent and respond to terrorist events.

FY 2011 Program

Law Enforcement Support

The Mauritania Law Enforcement Project will support training and technical assistance to law enforcement organizations to build capacity to prevent and respond to terrorist activity. This is an ongoing program.

Mauritania

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Law Enforcement Support

310
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - - 20
SubTotal - - 20
Total - - 330

Mozambique

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- 300 600

Program Overview

Mozambique’s vast landmass, coupled with its limited capacity to patrol land and sea borders, raises counterterrorism and counternarcotics concerns. Mozambique operates as the southern Africa “middleman” for African and Asian criminal activities, including trafficking in narcotics, persons, and other contraband; alien smuggling; money laundering; and financial crime. The Government of Mozambique’s current leadership, anticipated to remain unchanged through 2014, views the U.S. government favorably and wishes to increase strategic military, economic, security, and political linkages with the United States. The U.S. assistance in Mozambique capitalizes on the opportunity to build a broader base of engagement and advance U.S. government goals for the southern African region.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Mozambique program supports the Embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority of Achieving Peace and Security and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals of Counternarcotics, Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building, Security Sector Reform (SSR), and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: To improve bonder control at land borders and seaports of entry.

Objective 2: To improve law enforcement capabilities in Mozambique through the modernization and professionalization of law enforcement organizations.

Objective 3: To improve the Government of Mozambique’s capacity to detect and address corruption.

FY 2011 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Border Security Program funds will develop the capability of the Government of Mozambique to control point of entry-based immigration, identify and track illegal immigration and trafficking of drugs, contraband and persons. This is an on-going program.

Police Development and Reform Program funds will improve law enforcement capabilities through the modernization and professionalization of law enforcement organizations. Funds will also help develop and implement modern curricula and adult teaching methodologies in select police training facilities. This is a new program.

Transnational Crime

Financial Crimes and Money Laundering Program funds will provide technical assistance, training and equipment to the Mozambican law enforcement sector for detecting, investigating, and prosecuting corruption. This is an on-going program.


Mozambique

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Stabilization Operations and
Security Sector Reform

- 275 275
Transnational Crime - - 275
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - 25 50
SubTotal - 25 50
Total - 300 600

Nigeria

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
720 500 2,500

Program Overview

Nigeria – an important West African oil producing nation with the largest population in sub-Saharan Africa – is a major drug transiting country and source of other major transnational crimes, including money laundering and financial fraud. Widespread corruption presents a serious threat to stable democratic development. Augmenting the capabilities of Nigerian law enforcement agencies can reduce the impact of these criminal activities on U.S. interests.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Nigeria program supports the host government’s anti-drug and other public programs to combat crime and corruption. The program also supports the U.S. Embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority of supporting Peace and Security and the INL FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals of Transnational Crime and Counternarcotics.

Objective 1: Significantly disrupt the movement of illicit drugs through Nigeria to the United States and Europe, particularly targeting the investigation, arrest and prosecution of key organized crime figures.

Objective 2: Assist law enforcement to conduct investigations resulting in arrests and prosecutions of key figures in transnational crimes.

Objective 3: Bolster Nigeria’s security sector capacity and build reform capabilities in order to counter narcotics trafficking and other transnational crimes.

FY 2011 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Narcotics Advisory Project will expand the capability of Nigeria’s counternarcotics agency to investigate, arrest and prosecute key drug traffickers and to cooperate with U.S. law enforcement. This is an ongoing project started with prior-year funding.

Ports and Border Security Project will support Nigerian customs agency efforts to augment ports and border security measures interdicting drug and other illegal cross-border activities. This is an ongoing project started with prior-year funding.

Counternarcotics

Funds will provide logistical, technical, legal, and policy assistance aimed toward the interception of trafficked drugs, apprehending traffickers. This is a new program.

Transnational Crime

This program will promote international cooperation and coordination by providing training and technical assistance to build institutional capacity for combating international activities to include but not limited to corruption and extradition. This is a new program.

Nigeria

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Stabilization Operations and
Security Sector Reform
120 - 1,000
Counternarcotics - - 400
Transnational Crime - - 400
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel 170 200 250

Non-U.S. Personnel 89 50 100

ICASS Costs 160 200 250

Program Support 181 50 100

SubTotal 600 500 700
Total 720 500 2,500

Senegal

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- - 1,500

Program Overview

Senegal is a transit zone for South American cocaine en route to Europe. Drug trafficking in West Africa is threat to regional security, good governance, and public health. The proceeds of the cocaine trafficked through Senegal flow back to the same organizations that move cocaine to the United States, reinforcing their financial strength. The Government of Senegal (GOS) is a regional leader. In 2010, for example, the GOS hosted a Ministerial conference on counternarcotics attended by representatives of West African, European, and U.S. governments. The U.S. embassy in Senegal is also responsible for our diplomatic relations, including foreign assistance, in Guinea-Bissau.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Senegal program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan, which includes a goal of countering transnational crime. The embassy specifically seeks the opening of a Narcotics Affairs Office within Mission Dakar.

Objective 1: Provide reform-based assistance to security sectors to build capacity to deter and prevent national and transnational security threats.

Objective 2: To increase accountability within the justice and law enforcement sectors.

FY 2011 Program

Rule of Law and Human Rights

The Justice Sector Accountability Project will focus on policies and procedures justice institutions. In response to growing concerns over corruption, this project will seek to minimize the opportunities for corrupt behavior within the criminal justice sector. This is a new project.

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

The Law Enforcement Reform Project will focus on reform based capacity building within Senegal’s law enforcement sector. This is a new project

Technical assistance, advice, and training on fundamental capacity and capacity building will be provided by developing a Narcotics Affairs Section (NAS). The NAS will support INL programming in Senegal, Guinea-Bissau, and the larger West Africa region.

Senegal

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Rule of Law and Human Rights - - 500
Stabilization Operations and
Security Sector Reform
- - 500
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - 400
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - 75
Program Support - - 25
SubTotal - - 500
Total - - 1,500

Sierra Leone

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
250 250 1,200

Program Overview

Sierra Leone is a transit zone for South American cocaine en route to Europe. Drug trafficking in West Africa is threat to regional security, good governance, and public health. The proceeds of the cocaine trafficked through Sierra Leone flow back to the same organizations that move cocaine to the United States, reinforcing their financial strength. The Government of Sierra Leone has been a key counternarcotics partner in the region. In 2008, a plane carrying over 700 kilograms of cocaine landed in Sierra Leone. The government arrested those involved, tried them, and then expelled three individuals into U.S. custody.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Sierra Leone program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan. The highest priority for the embassy is that Sierra Leone become a reliable partner in regional security, preventing crime, and terrorism.

Objective 1: To assist law enforcement to conduct criminal investigations that support successful prosecutions of mid- and senior-level members of trafficking organizations.

Objective 2: To assist prosecutors and judges to prosecute and adjudicate cases against mid and senior-level members of trafficking organizations.

FY 2011 Program

Counternarcotics

The Law Enforcement Support Project will continue to support the United Nation’s West Africa Coastal Initiative (WACI). As a member of WACI, Sierra Leone is partnering with the international community to establish a Transnational Crime Unit. The Law Enforcement Support Project will enable WACI to address not only operational capacity, but also further develop institutional capacity, with a focus on strategic planning. This is an ongoing project.

The Judicial Support Project will develop skills, particularly among prosecutors, and accountability structures within the judicial sector. This is a new project.

Sierra Leone

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Counternarcotics 200

1,140
Stabilization Operations and
Security Sector Reform

225 -
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -

Non-U.S. Personnel - - -

ICASS Costs - - -

Program Support 50 25 60

SubTotal 50 25 60
Total 250 250 1,200

Somalia

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
2,000

Program Overview

The FY 2011 program will build upon the existing 1207 funding and will focus on developing the skills of the criminal justice sector. The inability of Somali institutions to provide internal security and to combat organized crime and violent extremism damages U.S. interests both regionally in the Horn of Africa and more globally. It is vital to U.S. interests that criminal justice sector development efforts in Somalia receive support.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Somalia program supports the FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan peace and security priority toward strengthening the security sector to enable Somali authorities to provide security for their people, and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals for criminal justice sector development, security sector reform, and transnational crime.

Objective 1: Promote areas of stability within Somalia, with the aim of promoting stability within Somalia as a whole. This will increase not only the stability of Somalia, but also of the entire Horn of Africa.

FY 2011 Program

Criminal Justice Sector Development

Initially supported through 1207 funds, this program will support the development of a sustainable and independent criminal justice sector in Somalia. INL will support law enforcement initiatives including criminal justice, community security and policing, and civilian police training. The specific activities will be determined by the Bureau of African Affairs and INL to be timely and relevant to advancing the objectives outlined above. This is an ongoing program.

Somalia

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Criminal Justice Sector Development - - 1,900
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - - 100
SubTotal - - 100
Total - - 2,000

South Africa

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- - 3,000

Program Overview

South Africa is an anchor of stability and prosperity for the southern African region. However, South Africa has one of the most critical crime problems in the world and is an attractive operating environment for organized crime and terrorist groups. Porous borders and inadequate controls expose South Africa to an influx of illegal goods, including weapons. The Government of South Africa has been reluctant to seek U.S. government assistance, but recent law enforcement cooperation has been increasing in depth and range. The South Africa program will capitalize on these overtures to increase South African law enforcement capacity and reinforce regional southern African stability.

Program Goals and Objectives

The South Africa program supports the Embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority of Peace and Security: Increase Capacity to Fight Crime and Terrorism, and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals of Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR) and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: To improve the Government of South Africa’s capacity to detect, deter and prosecute complex crime.

Objective 2: To train the South African police to effectively operate against national and transnational crime.

FY 2011 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Police Development and Reform Program funds will improve law enforcement capabilities through the modernization and professionalization of law enforcement organizations. The Narcotics and Law Enforcement Advisor will establish law enforcement initiatives such as providing training in basic policing skills and forensics to help increase South African capacity. This is a new program.

Border Security Program funds will develop the capability of the Government of South Africa to control point of entry-based immigration, identify and track illegal immigration and trafficking of drugs, contraband and persons. This is a new program.

Financial Crimes and Money Laundering Program funds will provide technical assistance, training and equipment to the South African law enforcement sector for detecting, investigating, and prosecuting complex transnational and organized crime. This is an on-going program.


South Africa

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Stabilization Operations and
Security Sector Reform
- - 2,250
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - 450
Non-U.S. Personnel - - 100
ICASS Costs - - 150
Program Support - - 50
SubTotal - - 750
Total - - 3,000


Sudan

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
15,400 16,000 53,950

Program Overview

The 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) ended the twenty-two year civil war between the Khartoum-based Government of Sudan (GOS) and the southern rebel group, the Sudanese People’s Liberation Movement/Army (SPLM/A), and created the semi-autonomous Government of Southern Sudan (GOSS). The CPA also established a federal system in which the GOSS exercises substantial authority for the internal affairs and security of the ten states in the South, included agreements on disputed areas, granted semi-autonomy on internal affairs to the GOSS, established a timeline for withdrawals of Northern troops from the South, provided for revenue sharing and called for elections to be held in 2009 (though these were completed in 2010), and referenda on Southern independence and the status of Abyei to take place in 2011.

Established in 2005, the INL program in Sudan focuses on two main components. The first is the development of a Southern Sudanese criminal justice sector to better support the CPA, maintain security, enhance governance and ensure a peaceful referendum through effective civilian policing. This component consists of three mutually dependent pillars that support a functioning criminal justice sector in the South: assistance to the police, to the judiciary, and to corrections. The second component consists of support to two distinct United Nations (UN) missions in their efforts to provide security and stability in Darfur and Sudan through civilian policing.

Irrespective of the outcome of the referendum in 2011, the Southern Sudan Police Services (SSPS) will require significant donor assistance for strategic planning, training, and infrastructure development in order to accommodate the necessary and projected increase of competent police officers within the SSPS. Maintaining security and stability in the Darfur region also will be a concern during these uncertain times. Funds will provide technical assistance and training for Southern Sudan’s criminal justice sector and law enforcement institutions, as well as for civilian police support to the UN Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) and UN-AU Mission in Darfur. These activities will be managed by the State Department.

Program Goals and Objectives

The U.S. played a significant role in the CPA negotiation, and as a result, a guiding principle in USG policy in Southern Sudan has been support of the CPA, including building capacity of GOSS to provide governance and security in preparation for the 2011 referendum and beyond. INL programs are an integral component of the President’s strategy for Sudan announced in October of 2009, especially relative to two of the key objectives: a definitive end to conflict, gross human rights abuses, and genocide in Darfur; and implementation of the North-South CPA that results in a peaceful post-2011 Sudan, or an orderly path toward two separate and viable states at peace with each other.

Objective 1- Criminal Justice Sector Development as a vital component of security sector transformation in Southern Sudan: To enhance governance, rule of law, security and peace benefits for the Southern Sudanese people through comprehensive development and capacity building of legitimate criminal justice sector institutions in Southern Sudan. This includes the development of the enforcement, judicial, and corrections pillars of the civil security sector of Southern Sudan. Additionally, INL will explore means to improve the criminal justice sector capacity to deter, investigate and prosecute sexual and gender based violence.

Objective 2 – Support to UN Mission in Sudan (UNMIS): Support UNMIS mentoring and training of local police to help develop them into an effective, transparent, and legitimate police force to which the public will turn.

Objective 3 – Support to UN-AU Mission in Darfur (UNAMID): Support UNAMID’s civilian police mandate which includes helping to stand up a functioning local police force and helping to maintain peace and security through protection of civilians.

FY 2011 Program

Development of the Southern Sudan Police Service (Ongoing)

The number of advisors from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) will be increased to assign experienced law enforcement officers to SSPS headquarters and to provide training in various facilities, with primary training programs being conducted around Jonglei and Lakes states. These advisors will support the strategic planning capacity of the SSPS and the development of technical skills. INL will continue to expand training operations in Juba, Rumbek (Lakes state), and Bor (Jonglei state), as well as other states.

Illiteracy continues to be a major problem within the SSPS, and literacy programs for the police are extremely limited. As such, INL also will continue to plan programs that address this critical need.

INL will explore the possibility of adding a gender based violence component to SSPS training through the use of FY 2011 funds.

Development of the Southern Sudanese Judicial System (Ongoing)

Resident Legal Advisors will support judicial structures as they are determined through the implementation of the CPA and the national referendum. This will include support to legal education institutions, courts, liaisons from the police or corrections services to the judicial sector, legislative development, or assistance to the Ministry of Legal Affairs and Constitutional Development. Funds will support linkages between the formal judicial structure and the customary law system in Southern Sudan. This will follow on research previously funded by INL and implemented by the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Development of the Southern Sudanese Correctional Service (Ongoing)

Corrections advisors will improve the management of corrections systems in Southern Sudan. Activities to support corrections institutions in Southern Sudan will include training of key corrections personnel, critical health and sanitation projects, and improved corrections management techniques including the protection of vulnerable populations.

Support to UN Missions (Ongoing)

Parallel to the bilateral efforts, INL will continue to support UNMIS and UNAMID in assisting the local police to build enforcement capacity through training and mentoring. INL plans to increase the number of civilian police, judicial, and corrections advisors seconded to the UN who will train and mentor local police, as well as provide equipment and other training support. INL also plans to continue supporting Formed Police Units deploying to UNAMID through equipment and training.

Sudan

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Police Development and Reform

Development of the Southern
Sudan Police Service

6,100 7,750 18,350
Criminal Justice Development

Development of the Southern
Sudanese Judicial System

1,850 1,000 9,600

Development of the Southern
Sudanese Correctional Service

1,450 1,250 10,000
SubTotal 3,300 2,250 19,600
Crime Control/Civilian Police

Support to UN Missions 5,000 5,000 15,000
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel 300 300 300

Non-U.S. Personnel 200 200 200

ICASS Costs 100 100 100

Program Support 400 400 400

SubTotal 1,000 1,000 1,000
Total 15,400 16,000 53,950

Tanzania

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- 450 950

Program Overview

Tanzania, the site of one of two U.S. Embassy bombings in 1998, remains vulnerable to international crime and terrorism. The Government of Tanzania, recognizing this threat, continues to partner and coordinate their defense and law enforcement agencies with the U.S. government to detect and obstruct terrorist and other international criminal activities. However, capacity to combat illegal migration and trafficking is limited. Corruption reduces that capacity further. As a historically stable state, and integral member of both eastern and southern African regional associations, the U.S. assistance is critical in improving Tanzanian law enforcement capabilities and reinforcing regional stability.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Tanzania program supports the Embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority of Promoting Peace and Security and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goal of Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

Objective 1: To improve law enforcement capabilities in Tanzania through the continued modernization and professionalization of law enforcement organizations.

Objective 2: To increase Tanzania’s capacity to control its borders through trainings and technical assistance.

Objective 3: To increase Tanzanian capacity and willingness to detect, investigate and prosecute piracy along the east African coast.

FY 2011 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Police Development and Reform Program funds will improve law enforcement capabilities through the modernization and professionalization of law enforcement organizations. Funds will be used to expand programming at select police training facilities, and to develop and implement strategic plans for improving law enforcement training. This is an ongoing program.

The Border Security Program will develop the capability of the Government of Tanzania to control point of entry-based immigration, customs, and law enforcement units to interdict criminal elements, and to quickly and accurately share information with relevant agencies. This is a new program.

Anti-Piracy Program funds will improve Tanzanian law enforcement capacity to detect, arrest, and prosecute pirates along the east African coast through training and technical assistance. This is a new program.


Tanzania

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Stabilization Operations and
Security Sector Reform
- 425 900
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - 25 50
SubTotal - 25 50
Total - 450 950

The Gambia

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- - 500

Program Overview

The Gambia is a transit zone for South American cocaine en route to Europe. Drug trafficking in West Africa is a threat to regional security, good governance, and public health. The proceeds of the cocaine trafficked through The Gambia flow back to the same organizations that move cocaine to the United States, reinforcing their financial strength. Power in The Gambia is extremely centralized, including a judiciary with limited independence. Supporting effective checks and balances within The Gambian government is an essential component to a successful counternarcotics strategy.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Gambia program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan. The highest priority for the embassy is strengthening democratic institutions and practices in government and civil society.

Objective 1: To assist The Gambian Bar Association and other members of civil society increase judicial independence in The Gambia.

Objective 2: To develop the capacity of The Gambia’s nascent Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU), to assist in the investigation and prosecution of suspected money launderers, and to facilitate The Gambia FIU’s certification by the Egmont Group.

FY 2011 Program

Counternarcotics

The Judicial Independence Project will engage members of The Gambian Bar Association and others. Through facilitating fora where Gambian jurisprudence is discussed, the project aims to both address concerns with the Drug Control Act and strengthen justice-focused sectors of civil society. This is a new project.

The Financial Intelligence Unit Project will provide assistance to The Gambia’s newly created FIU to build capacity in investigations and prosecutions of money laundering offenses. This is a new project.

The Gambia

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Counternarcotics - - 475
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - - 25
SubTotal - - 25
Total - - 500

Togo

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- - 400

Program Overview

Togo is a transit zone for South American cocaine en route to Europe. Drug trafficking in West Africa is threat to regional security, good governance, and public health. The proceeds of the cocaine trafficked through Togo flow back to the same organizations that move cocaine to the United States, reinforcing their financial strength. The Government of Togo has partnered with the U.S. government and expelled wanted traffickers into U.S. custody. Through an interagency counternarcotics assessment, engaging the judiciary emerged as a key need.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Togo program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan (MSP). One of the goals is to improve internal security, primarily by addressing narco-trafficking. A supporting MSP objective is that drug traffickers be arrested and prosecuted.

Objective 1: To assist Togo’s Justice sector to successfully prosecute and adjudicate transnational crime cases.

FY 2011 Program

Rule of Law and Human Rights

The justice development project will engage Togolese judges and address the role of the judiciary in a comprehensive counternarcotics strategy in order to strengthen the legal framework and justice system to prosecute transnational crime cases. By exposing Togolese judges to standards in other countries, the project will seek to identify and cultivate a group of judges to lead judicial reform efforts. This is a new program.

Togo

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Rule of Law and Human Rights - - 380
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - - 20
SubTotal - - 20
Total - - 400

Uganda

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- 235 1,535

Program Overview

Uganda continues to be a leader in East Africa and a strong partner to the U.S. in advancing wider regional peace and security goals in the Great Lakes region and its own northern region. Challenges stemming from the Lord’s Resistance Army withdrawal in 2006 and recurring civil disturbances highlight a need for re-strengthening civilian law and order institutions nationwide.

Among the key needs for promoting Uganda’s transition to a fully representative, multi-party democracy and restoring public confidence in Ugandan law enforcement institutions is the reform of the Ugandan criminal justice sector. Improving these institutions will enable Uganda to continue playing a strategic role in resolving regional transnational crime and terrorism threats.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Uganda program supports Embassy Kampala’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan regional peace and security priorities toward continuing the development of the criminal justice sector in Uganda.

Objective 1: Enhance the Ugandan Police Force’s capacity to promote community oriented policing by improving collaboration between the police force and the public.

Objective 2: Support the development of a regional law enforcement academy.

Objective 3: Assist the Ugandan Police in its efforts to combat corruption and enhance the accountability of police officers.

FY 2011 Program

Law Enforcement Support

Community Policing project will support Ugandan police efforts nationwide in establishing strong relationships with the communities they serve by effectively combating crime and addressing problems such as gender based violence, domestic violence, child abuse/neglect, human trafficking and other quality of life issues. INL’s senior policing advisor is currently implementing this project. This is an ongoing project.

Regional Police Academy Project will enhance the Ugandan Police Force by modernizing curricula, providing training materials, and teaching methodologies at both the academy and the in service levels. Uganda’s national academy has begun to train police officers from neighboring countries such as Sudan and Somalia, and this project would assist the police in restructuring the curricula and reinforcing the skills of law enforcement personnel in Uganda and surrounding countries. This is an ongoing project.

Criminal Investigative Division (CID) Project provides technical assistance to the Ugandan police to investigate transnational crimes and enhance their counter-terrorism capacity. This is an ongoing project.

Professional Standards Unit Project will continue the development of policies and procedures as well as provide training for internal affairs operations and investigations. This is a new project.

Uganda

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Trafficking in Persons - 210 -
Law Enforcement Support - - 1,435
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - 70
Program Support - 25 30
SubTotal - 25 100
Total - 235 1,535

Zambia

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
- - 900

Program Overview

Zambia has been a pillar of peace and stability in southern Africa. However, noting limited capacity within its security forces to monitor and control the borders, serve effectively in law enforcement operations, and fight terrorism, the Government of Zambia has requested U.S. government assistance in training and technical assistance to increase Zambian security sector capabilities. Building Zambian police forces’ professional law enforcement capacity through training supports U.S. regional stability goals and strengthens the U.S.-Zambia bilateral partnership.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Zambia program supports the Embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority of Peace and Security and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goal of Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform (SSR).

Objective 1: To develop Zambian police force law enforcement capacity through trainings and technical assistance.

Objective 2: To increase Zambia’s capacity to control its borders.

FY 2011 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Police Development and Reform Program funds will improve law enforcement capabilities through the modernization and professionalization of law enforcement organizations. Funds will also help develop and implement modern curricula and adult teaching methodologies in select police training facilities. This is a new project.

Border Security Program funds will develop the capability of the Government of Zambia to control point of entry-based immigration, customs, and law enforcement units to interdict criminal elements, and to quickly and accurately share information with relevant agencies. This is a new project.


Zambia

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Stabilization Operations and
Security Sector Reform
- - 855
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - - 45
SubTotal - - 45
Total - - 900




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