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FY 2011 Program and Budget Guide: Near East


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Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
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Algeria

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
870

Program Overview

The merger of Algeria’s domestic terrorist group with Al-Qaeda at the end of 2006 and the subsequent adaptation of suicide bombings and similar tactics in Algeria gives impetus to the U.S. Government to continue to expand its partnership with Algeria in fighting global terrorism. The April 7, 2010 signing of a Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty with Algeria will significantly increase opportunities for expanded judicial and law enforcement cooperation. Programming will focus on partnering with Algeria to develop capabilities in investigating transnational crimes, tackling corruption, and countering illicit trafficking.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Algeria program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority of Peace and Security, and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goal of Building Criminal Justice Systems.

Objective 1: Increase judicial and law enforcement capacity to investigate and adjudicate organized crime, money laundering, corruption, terrorism and trafficking cases.

FY 2011 Program

Law Enforcement Support

Law Enforcement Support Projects will build capacity for police investigators to investigate and work with justice sector actors to prosecute and adjudicate complex transnational crimes. This is a new project.

Justice Programs

Justice Projects will build capacity for judges and prosecutors to investigate, prosecute, and adjudicate complex transnational crimes in coordination with law enforcement officials. This is a new project.

Algeria

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Law Enforcement Support - - 430
Justice Programs - - 415
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - - 25
SubTotal - - 25
Total - - 870

Egypt

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
2,000 1,000 1,000

Program Overview

Egypt is a democratizing and moderate Muslim state that is not only a victim of terrorism, but also a committed partner in the global war on terrorism. Egypt has substantial problems with illegal migration, human smuggling, the movement of transnational terrorists through its territory, drug trafficking, and smuggling of weapons and other contraband. The Egyptian response to these issues is complicated by a lack of law enforcement personnel with the training required to combat these threats in the communities in which they are meant to serve.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Egypt program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority of Peace and Security, and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goal of Building Criminal Justice Systems.

Objective 1: Support the modernization of Egyptian National Police approaches to training police officers in principles of community policing.

FY 2011 Program

Police Modernization

Civilian Policing Project: Funding will support training and technical exchanges with senior Egyptian law enforcement officials on modern approaches to law enforcement training, and issues relating to improving cooperation between police forces and the public. This is an ongoing project.

Egypt

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Police Modernization 1,940 935 935
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -

Non-U.S. Personnel - - -

ICASS Costs 40 40 40

Program Support 20 25 25

SubTotal 60 65 65
Total 2,000 1,000 1,000

Iraq

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009
Base Actual

FY 2009
Supp Actual

FY 2010
Base Estimate

FY 2010
Supp Request

FY 2011
Request

- 20,000 52,000 517,440 314,560

Program Overview

The development of a fair and effective criminal justice system in Iraq (including civilian police, judicial, prosecutorial, and corrections functions) is essential to the establishment of a stable society in which Iraqi citizens trust in and turn to government institutions to provide for their security and resolve disputes. We seek to support twin goals through our programs: (1) to help the Iraqis develop the institutional and societal frameworks on which the rule of law rests; while (2) simultaneously addressing more immediate problems that impede the effective functioning of the justice system and thus undermine the confidence of the Iraqi people in their Government and their future.

Program Goals and Objectives

The objective of the Iraq Criminal Justice Program is to continue to develop the capacities of all elements of the Iraqi criminal justice system (police, justice, and corrections) to support fair, efficient, and legitimate Iraqi Government institutions to promote peace and security, resolve disputes, and promote respect for the rule of law.

As U.S. military forces begin their withdrawal from Iraq, the Department of State is continuing its preparations to accept responsibility for the police development program (currently operated by the Department of Defense). FY 2011 funds will support the vital work of experts who are planning the curriculum, operations, and other aspects of the program as well as security, communications, and transportation requirements that will enable State to assume responsibility for police development by October 1, 2011. The State-led program will provide senior leaders in the Iraqi police services and the Ministry of Interior with the necessary skills to more firmly establish police primacy and uphold the rule of law – protecting U.S. national security interests while promoting peace, security, justice and democratic governance.

The INCLE-funded justice programs in Iraq, as further described below, have been, and in FY 2011 remain, focused on (1) developing relationships at the Ministry/Higher Judicial Council (HJC) level as well as with courts and to a lesser extent other criminal justice institutions in the provincial capitals to help the Iraqis identify significant impediments to the effective and efficient functioning of their criminal justice process, particularly their courts, and propose, and/or help the Iraqis execute remedial actions; and (2) partnering primarily with the Higher Judicial Council to establish an Iraqi capacity to provide continuing legal education to judges and other court personnel, develop an enhanced GOI capacity to assess security threats and vulnerabilities to judicial facilities and personnel and address them, and modernize court administration processes to make them more transparent and efficient.

Finally, INCLE funds will provide one or two advisors to help the Iraqi Ministry of Justice further professionalize and develop the Iraqi Corrections Service (ICS) to promote the humane and secure incarceration of criminals in accordance with international standards.

FY 2011 Program

Police: FY 2011 INCLE funds will support State as it prepares to assume responsibility for the Iraq police development program (currently managed by the Department of Defense) at the beginning of FY 2012. The new State-led program will work to develop higher-order skills (leadership, budgeting, strategic planning, etc.) in senior levels of the Ministry of Interior and the Iraqi Police Services instead of focusing on basic training and force generation as is currently the case. This skill set will help police leaders as they manage effective police operations to maintain internal security and support the rule of law. The State-led police program will use FY 2011 funds, which represent three months of operational costs, for USG advisors/managers, contract personnel, and support staff involved in the development and management of the program. In addition, funds will cover security, communications, and transportation requirements as military support for these functions withdraws. The police development program will include the highly-successful Major Crimes Task Force (MCTF), a team of USG federal law enforcement agencies who train and mentor a selected group of elite Iraqi investigators. The task force investigates high-profile, complex crimes such as public corruption and assassinations. FY 2011 funds will support MCTF by providing logistics, security, and administrative support.

Rule of Law Advisors: Resident Legal Advisors (RLAs), serving in the provinces and in Baghdad, will continue to identify the most critical impediments (local, provincial, and systemic) to the operation of Iraq’s criminal justice system, bring together GOI actors in that system to build relationships and help them craft solutions to those problems and opportunities for further improvements, and raise the most critical problems to senior USG officials in-country to address formally with Central Government Officials. INL will continue to provide this expert technical assistance by funding ten RLAs to expand the scope of criminal justice system development, advise and mentor the GOI on coordination among justice sector actors, and help conceive, design, implement, manage, and provide oversight for USG funded rule of law programs in Baghdad and the provinces. In FY 2011, INL and DOJ Office of Overseas Prosecutorial Development, Assistance, and Training (OPDAT) personnel will adapt the current programmatic framework as the PRTs begin to drawdown.

Courts: INL will continue to support and develop the capacity of the Iraqi judiciary to operate a strong, independent, and efficient criminal justice system that can function transparently and effectively without fear of intimidation. It is anticipated that by the end of FY 2010, the Iraqis will be sustaining previous years’ programs with only very limited U.S. assistance. Therefore, beginning FY 2011, INL will provide short term technical assistance experts committed to enhancing the skills of Iraqi judges, judicial investigators, and court personnel by further developing a continuing legal education professional development program within the HJC. Advisors will deliver focused curriculum, training, and/or mentoring on judicial security, court administration, investigative technique, case management, among other areas.

Drug Demand Reduction: FY 2011 funds will further develop programs to reduce the demand for drugs in Iraq. Working with GOI, implementers will build a nation-wide demand reduction strategy to coordinate the efforts of physicians and public health practitioners. The plan will draw on the influence of leaders in local religious, educational, and community institutions.

Corrections: Resources will be used to fund one to two Corrections subject matter expert personnel services contractors (PSCs) who will advise the GOI/ICS at the upper administrative level, in the areas of correctional management, human rights and inmate rehabilitation, and provide subject matter expertise to the Embassy. Where necessary they will help management by providing courses in correctional management, human rights, operation and maintenance of corrections facilities, strategic planning and inmate rehabilitation and reintegration.


Iraq

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2009
Supp

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2010 Supp
Request

FY 2011
Request

Corrections Services - - 17,000 - 1,000
Criminal Justice Development

Public Integrity - - 2,000 -

Rule of Law Outreach - 3,000 4,000 -

Courts - 9,000 11,700 -

Legal Framework - - - -

Major Crimes Task Force - - 1,300 -

SubTotal - 12,000 19,000 - 2,500
Counternarcotics - - 1,000 - 2,500
Police - 5,000 7,000 509,940 294,560
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - 2,656 7,083 - 12,395

Non-U.S. Personnel - - - - -

ICASS Costs - - - - -

Program Support - 344 917 7,500 1,605

SubTotal - 3,000 8,000 7,500 14,000
Total - 20,000 52,000 517,440 314,560

Jordan

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
1,000 1,500 1,500

Program Overview

The Government of Jordan is an important partner in advancing Middle East Peace and regional security and stability. However, Jordan lacks an anti-money laundering and counter terrorist financing (AML/CFT) regime that is fully compliant with international standards as expressed in the 40+9 Recommendations of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF). Most recently, Jordan was determined to be non-compliant in fourteen of sixteen key and core FATF recommendations, thereby qualifying prima facie for review and ongoing assessment until such time that it remedies those deficiencies. INCLE funds for Jordan support activities to develop the AML/CFT regime, including its legal framework and the technical capacity of key stakeholders. In addition, INL programs build law enforcement capacity to address gender-based violence and enforcement of intellectual property rights (IPR) laws.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Jordan program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priority for Counterterrorism and Security Sector Reform.

Objective 1: Provide training, equipment, and other technical assistance to AML/CFT stakeholders, to include in particular the Jordanian Financial Intelligence Unit (FIU) given its status as a new institution with a mandate specifically targeted at AML/CFT measures.

Objective 2: Provide training and equipment to support the Jordan Standards and Metrology Organization (JSMO) in order to promote the enforcement of IPR protection.

Objective 3: Provide assistance to law enforcement to eliminate conditions which are conducive to gender-based violence and increase police capacity to investigate cases of violence, while facilitating protection and services for victims.

FY 2011 Program

Police Modernization Program

The Anti-Money Laundering Program will continue to enhance the development of the AML/CFT regime. Recognizing that achieving full compliance with the FATF Recommendations is an exercise in prioritization, areas of non-compliance not fully addressed in FY 2010 will receive heightened emphasis in FY 2011. This is an ongoing project.

The IPR Enforcement Program will provide training, equipment and technical assistance to support the development of the JSMO to strengthen measures to better protect intellectual property rights. This is an ongoing project.

The Gender-Based Violence Reduction Program will provide training and equipment to Jordanian law enforcement to improve their ability to identify and respond to cases of gender-based violence through investigations, protection of victims, and coordination with government and community service providers to promote a comprehensive response to violence. This is an ongoing project.

Jordan

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Police Modernization Program 400 1,388 1,300
Trafficking in Persons Program 475 - -
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - 40 60

Non-U.S. Personnel 40 - -

ICASS Costs 10 20 20

Program Support 75 52 120

SubTotal 125 112 200
Total 1,000 1,500 1,500

Lebanon

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
6,000 20,000 30,000

Program Overview

The enhancement of the Lebanese Internal Security Forces (ISF) is a key component of U.S. support for the rapid and full implementation of UNSCR 1701 and efforts to strengthen the institutions of the Lebanese state, including its security services. By helping develop an ISF capable of protecting Lebanon’s people, borders, sovereignty and dignity, U.S. support in Lebanon will promote stability and security in both Lebanon and the region. With continued support and assistance, the ISF will further develop as an effective law enforcement institution throughout Lebanon and as a capable partner for U.S. law enforcement agencies.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Lebanon program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priorities for Counterterrorism and Regional Security.

Objective 1: Provide state of the art law enforcement training to ISF cadets, mid-level managers, trainers and in-service officers.

Objective 2: Facilitate the development of the ISF to a level capable of exercising the Lebanese government’s authority throughout Lebanon.

Objective 3: Support the deployment of civilian security agencies, including the ISF, into the Common Border Force (CBF), which will assist in securing Lebanon’s borders, as called for in UNSCR 1701.

FY 2011 Program

Law Enforcement Modernization

ISF Police Program will support the completion of the ISF and INL goal to train 8,000 ISF cadets. Funds will also support ongoing training for in-service ISF officers, trainers, and mid level managers in addition to executive leadership training. In addition, funding will provide equipment and facility support, which may include unarmored vehicles, facility upgrades to additional police substations throughout the country, particularly in the south. This is an ongoing project.

ISF Communications Network Project will support an ongoing program to establish a secure, nationwide communications network, a critical need in order to safeguard ISF command and control channels and modernize operations. This is an ongoing project.

Border Control

Funds will provide training and technical assistance to support the development of the CBF as an integrated and professional border security force able to stem the flow of arms, drugs, and criminal and terrorist elements across Lebanese borders. This is an ongoing project.

Corrections

FY 2011 funds would provide assistance to strengthen Lebanon’s corrections systems. INL will implement programs to develop Lebanese criminal justice capacity through training and infrastructure development for corrections institutions. This is an ongoing project.

Lebanon

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Law Enforcement Modernization 5,500 12,000 24,000
Border Control - 3,000 3,000
Corrections - 1,000 1,000
Counternarcotics - 2,000 -
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel 300 900 900

Non-U.S. Personnel 40 100 100

ICASS Costs 50 160 160

Program Support 110 840 840

SubTotal 500 2,000 2,000
Total 6,000 20,000 30,000

Morocco

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
1,000 750 3,000

Program Overview

Morocco is a Major non-NATO ally and moderate Muslim state that is not only a victim of terrorism, but also a committed partner in fighting terrorism. Morocco faces substantial challenges with illegal migration, human smuggling and trafficking, drug production and trafficking, and commercial smuggling. In addition, Moroccan security services expend significant resources dismantling nascent terrorist cells, preventing the flow of Moroccans to serve in the foreign fighter pipeline going to Iraq and Afghanistan, and keeping al Qa’ida in the Lands of the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) from gaining a toehold inside Morocco’s borders. The Government of Morocco is an effective partner and has demonstrated the political will to tackle these challenges.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Morocco program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priorities of Countering Terrorism and Enhancing Democracy and Governance, and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goals of Building Criminal Justice Systems and Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: To help law enforcement and border control organizations build capacity to conduct criminal and financial investigations, and enhance training curricula.

Objective 2: To assist judicial reform efforts, and to provide alternative sentencing and pre-trial diversion mechanisms for juvenile offenders.

Objective 3: To support Morocco’s efforts to counter radicalization in prisons and among youth, through assistance and training.

FY 2011 Program

Security and Judicial Sector

Maritime Security Project: Funds will support training and technical assistance to help develop a layered maritime security approach with a focus on enhancing interagency cooperation. This is an ongoing project.

Forensics Project: Funds will improve the ability of law enforcement to collect and analyze fingerprint and DNA evidence; facilitate the collection of Known or Suspected Terrorist (KST) data; and post-blast investigation training. This is an ongoing project.

Border Security Project: Funds will support the modernization of border enforcement operations through training, curriculum development, and equipment support. This is an ongoing project.

Legal Advisors will provide technical assistance to institutionalize alternative sentencing and pre-trial diversion mechanisms in the legal system, especially focused on juvenile offenders. This is a new project.

Corrections Advisors will provide technical assistance to disrupt radical groups within the prison system and identify youth at the greatest risk for recruitment by extremist groups. This is a new project.

Judicial Reform Project will support efforts to reform the legal system and address corruption by strengthening justice sector integrity; improving access to justice for the public, especially for juveniles; and increasing the capacity to apply currently existing legislation. This is an ongoing project.

Morocco

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Security and Judicial Sector 890 450 2,675
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - 120 130

Non-U.S. Personnel 46 60 60

ICASS Costs 10 60 65

Program Support 54 60 70

SubTotal 110 300 325
Total 1,000 750 3,000


Near East Regional (TSCTP)

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
2,000 1,030

Program Overview

The Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership (TSCTP) is a multi-faceted, multi-year strategy aimed at defeating terrorist organizations by strengthening regional counterterrorism capabilities, and enhancing and institutionalizing cooperation among the region’s security forces. INCLE funds will assist in the development of the capacities of law enforcement organizations in the Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya) to confront the challenges posed by terrorist organizations in the region, at the forefront of which is al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM).

Program Goals and Objectives

This NEA Regional program supports the relevant embassies’ FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priorities of Countering Terrorism and Peace and Security and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goal of Transnational Crime.

Objective 1: To provide training, technical assistance and equipment support to civilian law enforcement and border security organizations to build their capacity to prevent and respond to terrorist events.

Objective 2: To provide training and technical assistance to build criminal justice system capacity to prosecute and incarcerate terrorists.

FY 2011 Program

Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership

Law Enforcement and Border Control Projects: Funding will support training and technical assistance to build capacity to intercept illegal cross-border activities. Funding will facilitate cooperation between TSCTP member states through joint border patrol efforts and coordinated counter-terrorism activities. These are ongoing projects.

Judicial Reform Projects: Funding will support training and technical assistance to better equip the current system for prosecuting, trying, and handling captured terrorists. These are ongoing projects.

Anti-corruption Projects: Funding will improve anti-corruption laws in Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia and build the capacity of legal and judicial sector professionals. These are ongoing projects.

Near East Regional (TSCTP)

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Trans-Sahara Counterterrorism Partnership - 1,900 980
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - -
Non-U.S. Personnel - - -
ICASS Costs - - -
Program Support - 100 50
SubTotal - 100 50
Total - 2,000 1,030

West Bank/Gaza

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009
Actual

FY 2009 Bridge
Supp

FY 2009 Spring
Supp

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

25,000 50,000 109,000 100,000 150,000

Program Overview

The Palestinian Authority (PA) Security Sector Reform Program (SSRP) is helping to create professional and competent Palestinian security forces that can provide rule of law and combat terrorism in the West Bank. In this regard, the SSRP advances leading objectives of the Roadmap for Peace and contributes significantly toward achieving a two-state solution to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, a U.S. foreign policy and national security priority. Since becoming operational in August 2007, the SSRP has progressed rapidly and achieved tangible training, equipping, and garrisoning objectives for over 3,000 PA Security Forces as well as other capacity-building goals. The Palestinian Authority has deployed these forces successfully to respond to urgent security requirements in Jenin, Bethlehem, Hebron, Qalqilyah and elsewhere in the West Bank, limiting lawlessness and cracking down on terrorism. They have performed impressively according to U.S., Israeli, and Palestinian officials, as well as Palestinian citizens themselves. The successful operations by these security forces underscore the need to sustain the “train and equip” efforts and broaden our program into complementary Rule of Law (ROL) initiatives in the Justice and Corrections sectors.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Security Sector Reform Program supports the Roadmap requirements to have consolidated and professionalized Palestinian Security Forces eventually replace Israeli forces in the West Bank and underpins priorities in PA Prime Minister Fayyad’s two-year reform and institution-building program. Announced in late 2009, PM Fayyad’s two-year program aims to establish the foundations of an independent, viable Palestinian state that can meet the needs of its citizens without reliance on external donor support. Accordingly, INL programs support the FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan’s goal to reform Palestinian security forces to improve law and order and reduce terrorism.

Objective 1: Train and equip PA Security Forces so they can be deployed throughout PA-controlled areas of the West Bank to help maintain law and order and combat terrorism.

Objective 2: Provide infrastructure support to facilitate the operations of the trained forces by building operations camps, training facilities, and joint operations centers

Objective 3: Build institutional cooperation among criminal investigators, prosecutors, and other justice sector actors so that stronger criminal cases are developed leading to faster and fairer judgments.

Objective 4: Strengthen and improve the corrections sector so that prisoners are managed in a safe, secure, and humane environment that complies with international standards, promotes the rule of law, and affords them opportunity for rehabilitation.

Objective 5: Support the development of strategic planning in the Ministry of Interior and promote its institutionalization.

Objective 6: Strengthen the civil protection forces so that fire, rescue, and other first responders are better able to protect the lives, property, and public safety of Palestinian citizens.

FY 2011 Program

Funds will continue to focus on training, equipping, and garrisoning Palestinian Authority Security Forces (PASF) and supporting more recently developed programs for the justice and corrections sectors, civilian police, and civil defense.

Palestinian Authority Security Forces: Funds will support training in Jordan and the West Bank for newly formed National Security Force Special Battalions and other members of the security forces. Training in Jordan will focus on comprehensive basic training and some specialized training for these battalions. West Bank training includes additional specialized training as well as leaders training for the PASF. Funds will provide the full range of non-lethal equipment, such as vehicles, uniforms, tents, and field/medical gear, to make the battalions fully operational. Funds will also be used to build or renovate facilities from which the trained and equipped security forces can operate. This is an ongoing project.

Rule of Law: Justice, Corrections, Law Enforcement, Civil Defense: Funds will support programs to strengthen and improve the performance of the Justice (prosecutors and investigative police) and Corrections (prisons, prison staff, directors) Sectors. For the Justice Sector, this includes funding for training, technical assistance, equipment, and infrastructure to help develop stronger ties among investigative police and prosecutors so that stronger criminal cases are developed leading to faster and fairer judgments. Similar assistance will be provided to the Corrections Sector so that prisoners are managed in a safe, secure, and humane environment that complies with international standards, promotes the rule of law, and affords them the opportunity for rehabilitation. Training, equipment, and infrastructure development support will also be provided to the civilian police and civil defense to complement assistance they have been receiving from other donors. This is an ongoing project.

Strategic Development/Capacity Building: Funds will continue to provide programmatic (training, equipment) and technical assistance support to the Ministry of Interior’s Strategic Planning Department with the goal of ensuring that the Palestinian Authority is fully capable of managing and accomplishing its own strategic planning for the PASF and support the Ministry’s institutionalization. This is an ongoing project.

West Bank-Gaza

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009 FY 2009
Bridge
FY 2009
Supp
FY 2010
Estimate
FY 2011
Request
Training 13,500 22,600 43,000 41,000 56,000
Non-Lethal Equipment 7,000 - 32,000 17,000 33,000

Strategic Development/
Capacity Building

3,500 4,000 2,000 6,500 3,000
Infrastructure Development - 18,400 31,000 30,500 53,000
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel 478 1,800 - 950 950

Non-U.S. Personnel 143 200 - 220 220

ICASS Costs 376 - - 400 400

Program Support 3 3,000 1,000 3,430 3,430

SubTotal 1,000 5,000 1,000 5,000 5,000
Total 25,000 50,000 109,000 100,000 150,000

Yemen

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2009 Actual FY 2010 Estimate FY 2011 Request
1,000 11,000

Program Overview

Yemen has seen a substantial increase in terrorist activity directed at Western targets, including two attacks on the U.S. Embassy and another on the residences of its personnel in 2008. These incidents highlight the need to continue and increase efforts to work with the Government of Yemen to fight terrorism, thwart al-Qaeda's recruitment and deprive it of safe haven, while at the same time building the capacity of the Yemeni government to provide justice and enforce the rule of law in Yemen. In service of these critical U.S. strategic goals, INL assistance will be used to support law enforcement development, increase the capacity of Yemen’s justice system, strengthen prison management systems and bolster civilian customs and border security.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Yemen program supports the embassy’s FY 2011 Mission Strategic Plan priorities of Achieving Peace and Security and Governing Justly and Democratically, and INL’s FY 2011 Bureau Strategic Plan goal of Building Criminal Justice Systems.

Objective 1: To help law enforcement institutions build capacity to combat criminal threats, conduct investigations and protect Yemen’s borders.

Objective 2: To assist prosecutors in cooperating with law enforcement to manage cases of terrorism and transnational crime.

Objective 3: To enhance the capacity of Yemeni correctional systems.

FY 2011 Program

Criminal Justice Sector Support

Police Development Project provides training, technical assistance and equipment donations to build sustainable capacity within Yemeni law enforcement agencies to investigate transnational crimes and terrorism, collect and evaluate forensic evidence, enforce the rule of law, respect human rights and work with prosecutors to bring perpetrators to justice. This is a new project.

Prosecutorial Development Project provides assistance in supporting efforts to prosecute terrorists and other transnational criminals, and combat corruption. This is a new project.

Prison Management Project assists Yemeni corrections institutions and officials in their efforts to provide correctional services that respect human rights and counter the fostering of radicalization. This is a new project.

Border Security Project builds Yemeni customs and border security agencies’ capacity in securing Yemen’s borders through training, technical assistance and equipment donations. This is a new project.


Yemen

INL Budget

($000)

FY 2009

FY 2010
Estimate

FY 2011
Request

Criminal Justice Sector Support - - 10,000
Law Enforcement Support - 925 -
Program Development & Support

U.S. Personnel - - 400

Non-U.S. Personnel - - 100

ICASS Costs - - 300

Program Support - 75 200

SubTotal - 75 1,000
Total - 1,000 11,000



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