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FY 2013 Program and Budget Guide: Centrally-Managed Programs


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Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
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Anti-Crime Programs

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

14,650

16,154

12,500

Includes: (1) Financial Crimes and Money Laundering, (2) Fighting Corruption, (3) Cyber Crime, Intellectual Property Rights and Critical Infrastructure Protection, (4) Border Security and Alien Smuggling; (5) Combating Transnational Criminal Networks.

Program Overview

Transnational criminal threats and illicit networks pose a significant threat to domestic and international security. The increasing role of illicit networks in the world of organized crime complicates the challenge of effectively combating transnational security threats. In support of the President’s Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime, which was released July 25, 2011, INL Anti-Crime teams design and implement efforts to address the growing threats posed to U.S. national interests by transnational crime, including high-level public sector corruption (kleptocracy), money laundering and terrorist financing, cyber- and intellectual property crimes, border security, narcotics trafficking, and other smuggling and trafficking crimes. INL Anti-Crime teams help to create and reinforce shared international standards on these issues; develop multilateral processes and special regional or substantive initiatives to promote the implementation of those standards through effective laws and institutions at the domestic level; and strengthen criminal justice systems and law enforcement capabilities around the world to act against transnational criminal threats before they extend beyond their borders and impact our homeland.

Program Goals and Objectives

INL Anti-Crime teams continue to develop and implement enforcement tools, such as international standards and groundbreaking conventions and protocols that provide the United States with the framework to raise political will and to strengthen international cooperation among committed governments and partners needed to develop capabilities to combat transnational crime and illicit networks (deter, disrupt, defeat, and dismantle).

Objective 1: Increase the total number of governments implementing, and complying with, internationally-recognized standards such as the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime (UNTOC), the UN Convention against Corruption (UNCAC), and the 40+9 Recommendations of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF).

Objective 2: Increase the number of countries that have criminalized corruption, money-laundering, and terrorist financing, and enacted and effectively implemented these and other important anti-crime legislation including by increasing the number of effective Financial Intelligence Units (FIUs) and financially-focused law enforcement and judicial authorities, task forces, anticorruption authorities, and other investigatory and prosecutorial bodies.

Objective 3: Strengthen criminal justice institutions and systems to successfully conduct criminal investigations, prosecutions, and seizures/forfeitures of assets in these and related areas and enhance processes for international and multilateral law enforcement cooperation and sharing of good practices.

FY 2013 Program

INL Anti-Crime programs include initiatives and projects that support the Administration’s priorities of fighting transnational crime and corruption and protecting the United States and its citizens from the effects of such crime and illicit threats.

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Border Security/Alien Smuggling

  • INL will continue to work with the Organization of American States, Counter-Terrorism Committee (OAS/CICTE), the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL), the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), the European Union, and other international and regional organizations to support global programs and regional activities in the Western Hemisphere, Asia, Africa, and Eurasia. U.S. Government agencies, such as Department of Homeland Security, Homeland Security Investigations (DHS/HSI), Customs and Border Protection (CBP), and others, may be utilized to deliver foreign assistance training and technical assistance projects to: raise global border security and related anti-crime capacity; raise international standards in border security; help countries adopt and implement these standards; foster international cooperation and coordination; and build the capability of law enforcement and border security institutions, e.g., detection and analysis of fraudulent travel documents, methods of bulk cash smuggling, illicit movement of goods and persons across international borders, promote criminal investigation and prosecution of cross-border crimes, and address the threat to U.S. and foreign border security posed by transnational organized criminal groups.

Intellectual Property Rights (IPR)/Cyber Crime

  • INL and the Department of State’s Bureau of Economic, Energy, and Business Affairs work together to ensure goals and objectives are consistent with the Intellectual Property Enforcement Coordinator’s office established by Congress and the President’s International Strategy for Cyberspace. While continuing to target training and technical assistance projects to focus on priority countries, we initiated new focus on combating counterfeit pharmaceuticals, which are an imminent threat to health and human safety. INL works to further U.S. foreign policy interests and coordinate with private industry to avoid duplicating efforts to address intellectual property crime. In the area of cyber crime, funds will continue to support improvements in foreign law enforcement capabilities to identify, investigate and successfully prosecute the growing misuse of information technologies, with particular emphasis on regional training initiatives for less developed nations that are just now expanding their wireless networks.

Anti-Money Laundering and Financial Crimes

  • INL will continue to support multilateral and regional organizations, including contributing to U.S. Government dues paid to the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and the Asia-Pacific Group against Money Laundering (APG). Funds will also support the efforts of FATF-Style Regional Bodies as they work with their members to build capacities, and adopt and implement international standards to address money laundering and other financial crimes. Funds will further INL and U.S. Government anti-money laundering/counter-terrorism financing goals in the Gulf, Middle East/North Africa, Latin America, Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Africa through bilateral engagement, capacity building, mentorship and diplomatic efforts. Assistance will continue to support regional mentors in Africa, as well as provide targeted training sessions. Programs will also continue to support DHS efforts to combat trade-based money laundering by establishing and helping to develop trade transparency units, delivering capacity-building training and technical expertise in key countries.

Transnational Organized Crime

  • INL will build on efforts underway to promote greater international cooperation against transnational organized crime, particularly in four thematic areas: 1) assisting UN member states to implement the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its supplemental protocols; 2) developing national central authorities for cross-border mutual legal assistance on transnational criminal cases in key regions most at risk to transnational crime; 3) promoting public-private partnership to combat illicit trade including with the World Economic Forum and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD); and 4) supporting committed governments through collaborative platforms to disrupt and dismantle transnational illicit networks including crime-terror pipelines. Funds will also support law enforcement cooperation with regional multilateral institutions such as UNODC, Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, OECD, OAS, the European Union, and partnerships across the Pacific and Atlantic to combat transnational crime and dismantle illicit networks.

Governing Justly and Democratically/Rule of Law and Human Rights

Anticorruption

  • Assistance will continue U.S. Government leadership on anticorruption issues by sustaining efforts to encourage adoption of good practices to prevent and combat corruption and to promote implementation of UNCAC and other international anticorruption frameworks. Funds will support efforts to expand the fight against corruption, including kleptocracy, around the world. Such efforts include securing action by a wider range of countries to join the United States in denying safe haven to corrupt officials and to recover proceeds of corruption, which furthers Congressional mandates as well as G-20 and other Presidential commitments. Funds will continue U.S. government participation in anticorruption multilateral monitoring mechanisms (e.g., United Nations Convention against Corruption and OAS) that rely on U.S. Government support and participation to effectively promote concrete domestic action by states parties to comply with these standards. Assistance will continue consolidation of the new UNCAC process for robust review of implementation of the convention’s provisions, bolstered by on-the-ground implementation activities in key areas including asset recovery, specialized anticorruption authorities and techniques, and other emerging issues. Funding will capitalize on new opportunities to engage reformers in the Middle East; sustain diplomatic and capacity building anticorruption efforts in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Eastern Europe/Eurasia/Central Asia and other regions of emerging interest and strategically important countries; permit enhanced support to Bureau and Department capacity on anticorruption, including through assistance in the development and implementation of bilateral programs; and leverage U.S. government resources through cooperation with initiatives such as the International Anticorruption Academy, World Bank, UNODC, and INTERPOL.

Anti-Crime Programs

INL Budget

($000)

 

 

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

 

 

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

   

 

Alien Smuggling/Border Security

1,000

1,000

750

 

1.3 Subtotal

1,000

1,000

750

 

     

 

1.5 Transnational Crime

   

 

Cybercrime and Intellectual Property Rights

3,750

5,000

3,500

Financial Crimes/Money Laundering

4,150

4,150

3,600

Transnational Organized Crime

1,000

1,000

750

 

1.5 Subtotal

8,900

10,150

7,850

 

     

 

2.1 Rule of Law and Human Rights

   

 

Fighting Corruption

4,750

5,004

3,900

 

2.1 Subtotal

4,750

5,004

3,900

 

     

 

Total

14,650

16,154

12,500

Civilian Police and Rule of Law Program

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

4,000

4,000

3,800

Program Overview

The Civilian Police and Rule of Law Program improves U.S. capacity to plan, design, implement, and monitor and evaluate law enforcement, criminal justice, and corrections programs that support peacekeeping, stability operations and broader INL missions globally. Funding will be used for subject matter experts in relevant fields to ensure sound, effective criminal justice programming built on best practices and to perform strategic outreach and partnership building to support the incorporation of qualified federal, state and local law criminal justice professionals, multilateral organizations, and non-governmental actors into INL’s foreign assistance programs and training. Funding will continue to develop and support INL-managed training for deploying criminal justice advisors to address the pre-deployment and continuing professional development requirements of INL advisors in the field.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Civilian Police and Rule of Law Program will improve the ability of INL and foreign partners to deploy trained experts to police, justice and corrections programs, and peacekeeping and stabilization operations.

Objective 1: Significantly increase the quality of INL-managed pre-deployment training and in-service training for criminal justice advisors deployed annually to INL-supported missions.

Objective 2: Improve INL capacity to design, manage, implement and evaluate police, criminal justice and corrections programs globally.

Objective 3: Improve the ability of INL to draw on the expertise of state, federal and municipal law enforcement, corrections officials and justice sector experts to enable INL to continue to better tailor its assistance programs to identified needs of partner countries. 

FY 2013 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Assistance in Launching Critical Programs: Police, justice sector and corrections senior experts will provide a key resource to INL and the Department in providing immediate assessment, program development, and coordination for critical law and order functions around the world.

Improved Programs Bureau-wide: Senior subject matter experts will assist INL in the development and implementation of project management, program assessments, training curriculum, monitoring and evaluation, and technical assistance, drawing from lessons learned from prior and ongoing INL assistance efforts.

Directly Managed Pre-Deployment Training: INL will continue to develop and support an INL-directed and managed pre-deployment and professional development training program for the U.S. police, justice, and corrections personnel deployed to help implement INL missions globally, improving the consistency, quality, management and oversight of the training and equipping of U.S. personnel and better ensuring their appropriate preparation for duty.

Outreach and Partnerships: Funds will support integration of a broad range of qualified law enforcement and criminal justice experts into INL foreign assistance programs through outreach efforts and vital institutional partnerships with police, corrections and criminal justice related organizations including domestic state and local law enforcement, multilateral organizations, and non-governmental actors. 

;

Civilian Police Program

INL Budget

($000)

   

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

   

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

   

 

Civilian Police Program

4,000

4,000

3,800

 

1.3 Subtotal

4,000

4,000

3,800

       

 

Total

4,000

4,000

3,800

             
 

Criminal Youth Gangs

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

7,000

7,000

3,000

Program Overview

Transnational gangs, such as MS-13 and M18, are a security threat for the United States and the countries where they are active, particularly in Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador. Gangs are responsible for massive levels of extortion, homicides, drug distribution, thefts and other crimes, and there is also anecdotal evidence of the growing transnational nature of gangs, particularly MS-13. The Criminal Youth Gangs program continues to implement a regional strategy to combat transnational gangs. In FY 2013, the program will share best practices and leverage examples to address anti-gang issues in other regions of the world, based on experiences in Central America.

Program Goals and Objectives

The Criminal Youth Gangs program supports the U.S. Strategy to Combat the Threat of Criminal Gangs from Central America and Mexico. Public security, particularly criminal youth gangs, is a primary element in the 2012 Mission Strategic and Resource Plans of the U.S. Embassies in Central America. This program also supports the FY 2013 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Counternarcotics, Transnational Crime, and Criminal Justice Sector Capacity Building and Security Sector Reform.

Objective 1: Build bilateral and regional capacity to reduce crime by transnational criminal youth gangs operating overseas and the United States.

Objective 2: Support cross-country coordination, technical training and equipment for the region where current programming is underway, and support strong prevention and law enforcement programs in areas were gangs are expanding. 

FY 2013 Program

Transnational Crime

  • Investigative Capacity – Funds will provide vetting and group training in such areas as investigative techniques, portable fingerprint registration devices and related training, electronic surveillance programs targeting gang-related organized crime and digitization of paper fingerprint cards. The program will support officer exchanges between and among the regions Anti-Gang Units.

     
  • Legal Capacity - Judges, prosecutors and technicians will be trained in such topics as evidence collection by ballistics and fingerprint analysis, including collection techniques, analysis, and use as evidence in courts.

     
  • Intelligence Capacity – Funds will provide training and tools such as computers, computerized data bases, crime mapping, and analyst exchanges. It will also support anonymous tip lines for community members who fear reprisals for reporting gang crime in person, and support the development of multi-agency intelligence sharing models.

     
  • Community Policing - Funds will expand community policing models, analyze successful elements of community policing in other countries, and interchange experts, among other activities. Funds will also support the implementation of police-led after-school programs such as the Police Athletic League.

     
  • Prevention – Funds will support in-country and regional programs, such as non-governmental organizations (NGOs), programs for youth at risk, media campaigns to de-glamorize the gang image, the school based Gang Resistance Education and Training (GREAT) program, and a regional prevention conference. Funds will also support training and implementation of preventative policing tools such as digital crime mapping and analysis.

     
  • Technical Assistance - Funds will support a Regional Gangs advisor, three country gang program managers, three model precinct/community police advisors, and a regional prisons training advisor, among other support.
 

Criminal Youth Gangs

INL Budget

($000)

   

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

   

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.5 Transnational Crime

   

 

Investigative Capacity

1,000

1,000

300

Legal Capacity

260

260

160

Intelligence Capacity

1,000

1,000

300

Community Policing

1,350

1,350

1,000

Prevention

1,350

1,350

490

Prisons

890

890

-

Technical Assistance

650

650

750

Program Administration

500

500

-

 

1.5 Subtotal

7,000

7,000

3,000

       

 

Total

7,000

7,000

3,000


Critical Flight Safety Program

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

16,250

16,250

12,385

Program Overview

The Critical Flight Safety Program (CFSP) is a multi-year program to modernize the INL air fleet and provide ongoing life cycle fleet management (life cycle analysis, safety upgrades and programmed depot-level maintenance). The program was established to address the declining condition of aged aircraft (primarily former military aircraft for which there was no commercial or military support available) in order to ensure safety and airworthiness, extend service life, and maximize reliability and availability of aircraft to perform essential missions.

Program Goals and Objectives

By providing depot-level maintenance, extending the service life of aircraft, upgrading aircraft to commercially supportable configurations, and ensuring the long term availability of safe, reliable aircraft, CFSP makes it possible for individual country programs to continue to be successful in their overarching objectives and missions. Through CFSP, airworthy and maintainable aircraft will continue to be available to support eradication, interdiction, surveillance, and reconnaissance efforts within the counternarcotics area of the Peace and Security objective. Aircraft also provide other elements of support such as basic transportation of personnel and cargo, search and rescue, medical evacuation, and security that support overall Peace and Security and Governing Justly and Democratically objectives.

Objective 1: Ensure the structural integrity and airworthiness of all aircraft operated by the INL Air Wing.

Objective 2: Guarantee that Air Wing aircraft are maintainable, commercially supportable, and reliable to support country programs.

FY 2013 Program

  • The program is designed to ensure safety, structural integrity, and functionality of the aircraft deployed and operated to support the various country counternarcotics aviation programs.

     
  • Funds will increase safety for aircrew and personnel flying in these aircraft, extend the service life of the aircraft, reduce excessively high costs for maintenance, components and parts, increase operational readiness rates, sustain mission success, and continue long-term programmed depot maintenance cycles for the aircraft fleet.

     
  • Funds will provide ongoing life cycle fleet management with the induction of ten rotary-wing and three fixed-wing aircraft for depot maintenance; and the continuation of the Aircraft/Aircrew Safety upgrade program.

Centrally-Managed Critical Flight Safety Program

       

INL Budget

       

($000)

     

 

 

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

     

 

Fixed Wing Depot

-

700

700

Rotary Wing Attrition

7,000

3,500

-

Rotary Wing Depot

4,000

9,990

10,000

Aircraft/Aircrew Safety of Flight

5,250

1,900

1,685

Program Management

-

160

-

Total

16,250

16,250

12,385

       
       

Budget by Program Objective and Area ($000s)

   

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

5,500

3,400

4,200

1.4 Counternarcotics

10,750

7,838

8,185

2.1 Rule of Law and Human Rights

-

5,012

-

Total

16,250

16,250

12,385

             

Demand Reduction/Drug Awareness

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

12,500

12,500

12,500

Program Overview

The need for demand reduction is reflected in escalating worldwide drug use that takes a devastating toll on the health and welfare of all countries, in addition to undermining economic development, social and political stability, and security in emerging democracies and developing countries that are strategic U.S. allies. Unprecedented child drug addiction and lack of services to target rising drug addiction among women pose challenging public health threats to selected regions worldwide.

Program Goals and Objectives

The demand reduction program supports INL’s FY 2013 Bureau Strategic and Resource Plan goals of Transnational Crime and Counternarcotics, in addition to international drug prevention and treatment priorities outlined in the President’s National Drug Control Strategy.

Objective 1: Significantly reduce drug use, related crime, and violence in targeted country populations.

Objective 2: Significantly delay onset of first use in targeted country populations.

FY 2013 Program

Training and Technical Assistance

  • Regional Training: Funding will support sub-regional training that disseminates the latest science-based information and “best practices” on effective methods to prevent and reduce drug use and related violence. Training will target cocaine abuse (especially crack addiction among juveniles), methamphetamine and intravenous heroin abuse that lead to increased prevalence of HIV/AIDS, rising adolescent drug use, and unique addiction problems affecting women and children. Target sub-regions include Africa, South America, Central Asia, Southeast/Southwest Asia, and Central America/Mexico (addressing multiple threats of criminal gangs, drug cartels, and illegal drug use).

Research and Demonstration Programs

  • Women’s Drug Treatment Initiative: Funds will support the continued development of critically needed, gender-sensitive training curricula, follow-on training assistance, research, and demonstration programs that address the unique needs and closes the treatment gap of female addicts worldwide.

     
  • Anti-Drug Demonstration Programs: Funds will support model outreach and aftercare centers in volatile regions, especially Southeast and Southwest Asia. These centers are designed to reduce drug consumption whose proceeds are a potential source of terrorist financing and provide at-risk youth alternatives to radical or terrorist indoctrination centers.

     
  • Child/Adolescent Drug Treatment Initiative: Funds will support world’s first pilot drug intervention programs for drug addicted children (as young as 7 - 8 years of age) and adolescents in Latin America (crack cocaine), South Asia (opiates), and Sub-Saharan Africa (amphetamines/crack), in addition to development of unique drug treatment protocols and related training curricula.

Coalition and Networks

  • Drug-Free Community Coalitions: Funds will support the enhancement of effective drug-free community coalition programs (in Mexico, Latin America, Asia, and Africa) that assist civil society/grassroots organizations in fighting illegal drugs. These public/private sector coalitions work towards reducing substance abuse among youth. 

Demand Reduction

INL Budget

($000)

   

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

   

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.4 Counternarcotics

   

 

Training and Technical Assistance

8,000

9,500

9,000

Research and Demonstration Programs

3,000

1,000

1,500

Coalitions and Networks

1,500

2,000

2,000

 

1.4 Subtotal

12,500

12,500

12,500

       

 

Total

12,500

12,500

12,500

             

International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEA)

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

34,000

31,300

24,000

Program Overview

ILEAs promote international law enforcement cooperation and social, political, and economic stability by providing law enforcement training and technical assistance that develop law enforcement capabilities, supporting related institution building, and fostering U.S. law enforcement relationships with foreign counterparts to address common problems resulting from criminal activities.

Program Goals and Objectives

National law enforcement capabilities will be strengthened and stronger linkages between U.S. law enforcement entities and foreign counterparts will be established through training at the five ILEAs: Bangkok, Budapest, Gaborone, San Salvador, Roswell, New Mexico, and the Regional Training Center (RTC) in Lima, Peru.

Objective 1: The total number of students trained will be approximately 4,600.

Objective 2: Graduates will apply methods and technologies learned at the academies to conduct successful criminal investigations.

Objective 3: Increase regional cooperation and capacity building through strategic training efforts. 

FY 2013 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

The FY 2013 program consists of the traditional ILEAs, and projects that support security sector and capacity building initiatives.

  • ILEA Program: Funds will continue to support the work of the established ILEAs in Bangkok, Budapest, Gaborone, Roswell, San Salvador and the Regional Training Center (RTC) in Lima, Peru. They provide relevant, timely, and quality training to counter transnational criminal activities such as terrorism, financial crimes, organized crime, corruption, illegal narcotics, trafficking in persons and other emerging international criminal trends. Funds will also continue to support the ILEA Global Network (IGN), and program support costs.

     
  • Emerging Regional Security Priorities: Funds will support emerging regional security priorities in West Africa, as well other high threat regions to enhance regional and local-level criminal justice institutions. Focus will be on facilitating regional cooperation and capacity building by providing strategic training efforts that address a wide array of existing threats to U.S. national security posed by terrorist and criminal organizations, and other criminal activities such as piracy of the coast of Africa.

International Law Enforcement Academy

INL Budget

($000)

 

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

   

 

ILEA

   

 

Bangkok, Thailand

3,300

3,600

3,600

Budapest, Hungary

3,500

3,600

3,600

Gaborone, Botswana

3,200

5,300

3,800

Roswell, New Mexico

4,500

4,500

4,500

San Salvador, El Salvador (Includes Lima RTC)

4,000

5,000

4,200

ILEA Global Network

0

2,000

300

Program Administration

1,000

1,300

1,400

ILEA Subtotal

19,500

25,300

21,400

     

 

Shared Security Partnership (SSP)

   

 

Regional Security Priorities/Mobile Training Teams

9,500

6,000

2,600

San Salvador Phase II Construction

2,000

0

0

ILEA Global Network

2,000

0

0

Program Administration

1,000

0

0

SSP Subtotal

14,500

6,000

2,600

     

 

1.3 Subtotal

34,000

31,300

24,000

     

 

Total

34,000

31,300

24,000

International Organizations

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

4,500

5,000

4,500

U.S. funding to the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and to the OAS Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (CICAD) supports the Administration’s “front line” effort to confront three key global and regional threats – transnational organized crime, international drug trafficking, and terrorism – through multilateral action. UNODC is the primary mechanism through which the international community sets criminal law standards, pools resources, shares best practices and other expertise, and works together to close off safe havens (e.g., weak or corrupt states, under-governed areas such as Afghanistan and neighboring states, key vulnerable African states, and the Middle East) to crime, drug, and terrorist groups. UNODC and CICAD are largely donor-funded and lack the resources, especially for “core” functions, needed to carry out their mandates. The funding provided will strengthen U.S. political influence and leadership at a time when both organizations are reshaping themselves under new Executive Directors. 

Program Overview

INL supports two international organizations as a means to pursue our national drug control and anti-crime objectives: UNODC and CICAD. Notably, INCLE funding enables anti-crime and counterdrug treaty implementation activities that directly advance U.S. interests and globalize international norms based on U.S. standards/law. U.S. support for UNODC and CICAD effectively leverages political and financial contributions from other states, which is critical because both organizations are largely (90 percent) funded from voluntary funds provided outside of the regular UN and OAS funding systems.

Program Goals and Objectives

The International Organizations program supports Transnational Crime and Counternarcotics goals, the National Drug Control Strategy, and the Strategy to Combat Transnational Organized Crime. It is also a crucial component of the Administration’s effort to increase engagement with multilateral organizations.

  • Objective 1: Promote implementation and practical application of the three UN drug control conventions; the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its Protocols; and, the legal instruments against terrorism. (As previously mentioned, all are based on U.S. law and support U.S. policy objectives.)
  • Objective 2: Enhance implementation of precursor chemical controls required under the conventions to block the production of cocaine, heroin and amphetamine type stimulants, as well as methamphetamine.
  • Objective 3: Strengthen counternarcotics capacity, particularly in the countries of the Western Hemisphere.

FY 2013 Program

UNODC:

  • Implementation of UN anti-crime and counter-drug treaties: Funds will be used to expand UNODC technical assistance and capacity-building efforts to promote treaty implementation, particularly in the area of mutual legal assistance and extradition. This support bolsters other countries’ ability to cooperate with the United States, which alone has used the UNTOC over 70 times, including for cases involving illegal arms tracking, money laundering, and fraud. Funds will also support the efforts of the UNODC’s Terrorism Prevention Branch (TPB) to promote international cooperation in criminal matters. In the first half of 2011, the TPB assisted 41 countries in ratifying and implementing the universal legal instruments against terrorism, provided 19 countries with specific legal and legislative drafting assistance (including several in the Middle East and throughout Africa), facilitated 6 regional and sub-regional workshops that reached 25 countries, and trained 679 national criminal justice officials on the legal regime against terrorism.

     
  • Precursor Chemical Control: Funds will continue support for International Narcotics Control Board (INCB) activities, including its global database and early warning system to prevent the diversion of precursor chemicals used to manufacture illegal drugs, including methamphetamine. In 2011, this database registered 126 users (an increase of 9 users since 2010) and reached an average of 1,800 transactions per month. INCB’s database is also essential to the success of its precursor chemical control operations, which result in real-time cooperation among governments to track suspicious chemical shipments. For example, under the auspices of the INCB, countries continue to cooperate and exchange data on precursor and essential chemical used to produce illicit drugs. Preliminary results from a newly launched operation indicates that 59 countries recently launched a time-bound operation to target shipments of phenylacetic acid, which is used in the production of methamphetamine and other amphetamine-type stimulants. Under the operation in 2011, the INCB seized or stopped 32 shipments in international trade, totalling 600 tons of precursor chemicals that could be used in the production of methamphetamine. The INCB with partner countries have designed several follow-up/expanded programs to target illicit trade in these precursors in the Americas, Africa, Oceania and West Asia.

     
  • General Purpose funding and Independent Evaluation Unit (IEU): UNODC requires funding to support its field office infrastructure necessary to implement U.S.-funded projects, as well as to support the monitoring and evaluation of its activities. While overall voluntary funding to UNODC has increased over the past several years, General Purpose funds have not kept pace with this growth. Much of UNODC’s important data collection and reporting function comes out of GP funding. It also helps fund the IEU, which the U.S. helped create and which plays a vital role in the oversight and evaluation of UNODC programs. However, the IEU has been underfunded, which led to staff reductions. In 2011, following political pressure from the U.S. and others, the IEU received full staffing and became fully functional. The IEU helps provide needed transparency and builds confidence among donors and others about UNODC use of its resources and the effectiveness of its programs.

CICAD:

  • Multilateral Evaluation Mechanism: Funds will support this peer review system and the activities that stem from its recommendations on ways in which governments need to strengthen their anti-drug efforts.

     
  • Money Laundering Controls, Counternarcotics Institution Building, Supply Reduction and Demand Reduction: Funding to CICAD supports a wide range of multilateral initiatives in all phases of narcotics control, from expert groups that produce model legislation, to regional public health education in support of demand reduction, to building data collection capacity throughout the region, to developing and supporting pilot projects aimed building institutional capacity. The United States particularly supports drug control-training efforts to achieve objectives established in the Anti-Drug Strategy for the Hemisphere. Most of these programs stress the importance of multilateral cooperation and information sharing to build a unified approach among OAS/CICAD member states.

 

International Organizations

INL Budget

($000)

     

 

 

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)

2,875

3,250

3,000

OAS Inter-American Drug Abuse Control Commission (OAS/CICAD)

1,375

1,750

1,500

G-8 Roma Lyon Group

250

-

 

Total

4,500

5,000

4,500

       

Budget by Program Objective and Area ($000s)

     

1.4 Counternarcotics

3,400

3,900

3,400

1.5 Transnational Crime

1,100

1,100

1,100

Total

4,500

5,000

4,500

         

International Police Peacekeeping Operations Support

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

-

10,000

5,000

Program Overview

The International Police Peacekeeping Operations Support (IPPOS) program helps fill a critical gap in policing and rule of law in peacekeeping and stabilization operations. IPPOS helps build the capacity of police contributing countries (PCCs) to deploy highly trained and well-equipped police to peacekeeping and stabilization missions, thereby increasing the effectiveness of these missions.

International policing has become a critical component of peacekeeping operations, and as such there has been a greater need to build the capacity of PCCs to provide qualified, trained police for United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operations either as formed police units (FPUs) or individual police officers (IPOs). Over time, the number of police involved in these missions has increased significantly while their peacekeeping responsibilities have increased in complexity. FPUs provide much needed protection of civilians and public order management as seen in Darfur and Haiti while IPOs help reform domestic police through training, advising/mentoring, and other support.

Rapid and effective response to unforeseen crisis like the Haiti earthquake and to new peacekeeping missions ( e.g., Southern Sudan) require IPOs and FPUs who are fully trained and qualified to respond in an appropriate manner to perform their mandated duties. The UN has requested assistance from Member States to ensure that all IPOs and FPUs are provided with pre-deployment training to build the knowledge, skills and abilities required for the proper performance of essential responsibilities.

The U.S. government deploys roughly 90 police, corrections, and judicial peacekeepers to UN missions, ranking 61st of the contributing countries, and we do not deploy FPUs; as such, another way for us to contribute to peacekeeping efforts is to help other PCCs who have the manpower but lack training and resources.

The IPPOS program will help enhance the operational effectiveness of police peacekeepers through training, equipment, and capacity building support, as well as assist the UN and other regional organizations with the coordination, policy, and projects in support of improved international policing and rule of law in peacekeeping operations. Also, the IPPOS program benefits many countries at the same time – i.e., the training we provide the Nepalese for deployment to Darfur will benefit both Nepal and Sudan. 

Program Goals and Objectives

Objective 1: Increase the capacity of partner police contributors to deploy well-trained and qualified police to peace and stabilization missions.

Objective 2: Assist UN to strengthen its policies to improve international policing in peacekeeping missions and to develop the tools to implement these policies.

Objective 3: Support deployment of peacekeepers to new missions or emerging crises.

FY 2013 Program

Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

Partnership with Targeted Police Contributors to Build FPU and IPO Capacity: A critical precursor to ensuring the safety of civilians in peacekeeping missions is the deployment of qualified police peacekeepers, both IPOs and FPUs. INL will bolster the operational capacity of FPUs and IPOs in mission through training of trainers, pre-deployment training, equipment, and other capacity building assistance.

Support for UN Initiatives: INL will continue to assist the UN to develop policies and training modules for specific skill sets to get people with the right skills into mission. Additionally, INL will provide training to PCCs on the new UN training modules and policies, support the maintenance of a database of trained police peacekeepers and their skill-sets, fund an advisor to help facilitate the coordination with the UN and provide oversight of various programs and activities, and fund specific UN project(s).

Support to New Peacekeeping Missions/Emerging Crises: There will be a need to rapidly establish new missions or enhance existing missions to provide public order and safety. Funds will allow INL to respond to emerging crises and aid a new peacekeeping mission for a limited time by supporting the deployment of police peacekeepers.

 

International Police Peacekeeping Operations Support

INL Budget

($000)

   

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

   

Actual

Estimate

Request

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

   

 

International Police Peacekeeping Operations Support

-

10,000

5,000

 

1.3 Subtotal

-

10,000

5,000

       

 

Total

-

10,000

5,000

             

 Interregional Aviation Support

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

57,052

53,652

46,322

Program Overview

The Interregional Aviation Support (IAS) budget provides centralized core-level services necessary to operate the Air Wing’s fleet of over 135 fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft supporting INL’s aviation activities worldwide. This base of support is essential for sustaining logistical systems, depot-level maintenance and the safe and professional operational employment of INL air assets. Centrally-administered oversight includes: setting, implementing and monitoring uniform safety and training standards consistent with aviation industry practices; a logistics support system for acquiring, storing and shipping critical aviation parts and components worldwide; fleet-wide maintenance management; management of the Critical Flight Safety Program; and administration of the aviation support contract. INL aircraft are employed in Colombia, Bolivia, Peru, Guatemala, and Pakistan and are also available, as needed, to support other temporary deployment locations. This budget is augmented with funding from various country programs to support specific, dynamic local Embassy requirements.

Program Goals and Objectives

By providing core-level aviation fleet-wide support services projected from Patrick AFB and specific in-country aviation support, the IAS program makes it possible for individual country programs to be successful in their overarching objectives and missions. The IAS program provides safe, professionally operated and maintained aircraft that support eradication, interdiction, surveillance, and reconnaissance efforts within the counternarcotics area of the Peace and Security objective. Aircraft also provide other elements of support such as basic transportation of personnel and cargo, search and rescue, medical evacuation, and security that support overall Peace and Security and Governing Justly and Democratically objectives.

Objective 1: Execute aviation missions safely and professionally in support of individual country program objectives.

Objective 2: Provide and maintain fleet-wide systems, standards, and procedures that ensure quality aircraft maintenance and airworthiness, worldwide logistics support, safety, and operational effectiveness.

Objective 3: Train and professionalize host government aviation units to develop institutional capability to assume increased responsibility for counternarcotics operations in their respective countries.

FY 2013 Program

The Interregional Aviation Support budget will continue to provide core-level services necessary to operate a fleet of over 135 fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft. The IAS program will continue to: provide aerial eradication and Colombian Army aviation support in Colombia while facilitating the transition of responsibility and equipment to the host government; provide logistical and technical support and training to successful, mature aviation programs in Peru and Bolivia; and border security efforts in Pakistan; and support a six helicopter air interdiction program in Guatemala directed against drug trafficking in the transit zone.

 

Interregional Aviation Support

INL Budget

($000)

       

 

   

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

Aviation Support Services Contract

41,152

43,545

36,100

DOD-Source Parts

1,000

1,000

1,000

Operations Support

   

 

 

Salaries and Benefits

9,750

6,243

6,243

 

Field Travel

650

353

352

 

Administrative Services and Program Support

1,423

650

767

 

GSA Warehouse Leases

1,760

900

933

 

ICASS Costs

575

335

354

 

Base Support at Patrick AFB

330

190

212

 

AQM Fee

412

436

361

 

SubTotal

14,900

9,107

9,222

Total

57,052

53,652

46,322

         
         

Budget by Program Objective and Area ($000s)

 

 

 

1.3 Stabilization Operations and Security Sector Reform

337

3,290

4,271

1.4 Counternarcotics

56,715

50,362

41,951

2.1 Rule of Law

-

-

100

Total

57,052

53,652

46,322

           
 

Program Development and Support

Budget Summary ($000)

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

29,250

34,500

32,550

Program Overview

INL develops strategies and programs to achieve international counternarcotics and criminal justice foreign-policy objectives. INL maintains a cadre of both domestic and overseas program and technical experts to carry out a wide range of initiatives. Washington personnel functions include, but are not limited to: international narcotics control and law enforcement policy formulation and implementation; coordination of policies and programs with other U.S. government agencies and with other governments and international organizations; budget and financial management activities; program administration and analysis including development, implementation, oversight and of overseas programs; contract, procurement and information systems support; field assistance visits to Embassy Narcotics Affairs Sections and Law Enforcement Sections to review, analyze and make recommendations on programs, funds control and procurement; sponsoring regional policy and program management conferences and seminars; and, developing and providing training programs both domestically and overseas for INL personnel.

FY 2013 Program

The Program Development and Support (PD&S) account funds the domestic administrative operating costs associated with the Washington-based INL staff. The majority of the PD&S budget is used for salaries and benefits of U.S. Direct Hire (USDH) employees, personal services contracts, rehired annuitants and reimbursable support personnel.

Field travel for personnel based in Washington is also funded from the PD&S account. This is an essential component of the bureau’s program, needed for program development, implementation, oversight and review, as well as for the advancement of international counternarcotics and criminal justice foreign policy objectives. PD&S funds are utilized to maintain a reliable and secure information resource management system and operating infrastructure to enable bureau employees to pursue policy objectives and complete work requirements effectively and efficiently. In addition, funding for the following expenses ensure an adequate level of administrative support to allow the bureau to function effectively: office equipment purchases and rentals, telephone services, printing and reproduction, miscellaneous contractual services (Information Management non-personal services contractor personnel, INL office renovation expenses, etc.), materials, supplies, furniture, furnishings and equipment. 

Funds will provide for staffing and associated costs needed to properly oversee the expanded requirements associated with INL’s programs. 


FY 2013 Washington PD&S

 

     

INL Budget

 

     

($000)

 

 

 

 

 

FY 2011 Actual

FY 2012 Estimate

FY 2013 Request

Personnel Compensation

17,469

20,500

20,500

Personnel Benefits

5,060

5,945

5,945

Field Travel and Transportation

918

1,050

910

Training

-

450

400

Equipment Rentals, Communication and Utilities

336

355

355

Printing and Reproduction

304

330

330

Miscellaneous Contractual Services

3,757

4,785

3,332

Materials and Supplies

124

135

138

Security Upgrades

91

-

-

Furniture, Furnishings, and Equipment

1,190

950

640

Total

29,250

34,500

32,550



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