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Diplomacy in Action

2010-2011 Framework for Cooperation between the United States Department of State's Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees


2010-2011 Framework for Cooperation
Report
April 21, 2010

   
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I. Introduction

The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration at the United States Department of State (hereinafter referred to as PRM) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (hereinafter referred to as UNHCR) have been working in formal partnership since the year 2000 to provide protection, humanitarian assistance, and durable solutions to UNHCR’s beneficiaries. They have a unique relationship: PRM has long been UNHCR’s top donor, while UNHCR has been PRM’s largest multilateral partner. PRM and UNHCR regularly renew their bilateral Framework for Cooperation to advance shared objectives that appear both in PRM’s Bureau Strategic Plan (BSP) and UNHCR’s Global Strategic Priorities (GSPs).

This document begins with a discussion of shared global objectives and priorities. It then focuses on three elements: 1) the implementation of key UNHCR policies and programs; 2) the application of UNHCR’s new pillar- and needs-based budgeting approach; 3) and the consolidation of UNHCR’s results-based managerial reforms (including the refinement of UNHCR’s in-house performance monitoring systems, such as the creation of the new Division of Program Support and Management). It concludes by establishing a schedule of regular bilateral consultations and reporting on progress. In its entirety, this agreement constitutes policy commitments by UNHCR and PRM and is therefore not intended to be legally binding. In the interest of transparency it will be posted on the U.S. Department of State and UNHCR websites.

II. Shared Global Objectives and Priorities

In line with requests made by the United States and other Executive Committee Members that UNHCR establish clear priorities, UNHCR has developed 40 Global Strategic Priorities (GSPs) for 2010-2011 (see Annex II). These GSPs focus on protection, security from violence and exploitation, basic needs and essential services, community participation and self-management, durable solutions, and headquarters/regional management. Each GSP has relevant indicators, baseline data, and performance targets. In the event that UNHCR does not receive full funding in 2010 and 2011, it has assured Executive Committee Members that its GSPs will guide the allocation of limited funds. UNHCR will prioritize funding for interventions that:

  • deliver life-saving assistance;
  • ensure key protection measures (e.g., registration, refugee status determination, sexual and gender-based violence prevention and response);
  • expand access to education and livelihoods in protracted situations;
  • strengthen protection capacity in situations of mixed migration flows;
  • improve response to urban refugees;
  • ensure emergency preparedness and response; and
  • facilitate durable solutions.


PRM annually issues a Bureau Strategic Plan. Five of the seven goals outlined in PRM’s FY 2010 Bureau Strategic Plan and reflected in the FY 2010 Congressional Budget Presentation Document (see Annex III) relate to UNHCR’s Global Strategic Priorities, including goals related to protection and durable solutions, assistance, and the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. Like UNHCR, PRM has established indicators and targets to measure progress toward its goals. PRM relies on UNHCR to help it achieve these goals and targets, as UNHCR is PRM’s primary multilateral partner with the international mandate to provide protection, assistance and solutions for refugees and stateless persons.

Although all 40 of UNHCR’s GSPs are important, the PRM-UNHCR bilateral dialogue over the next two years will focus on 14 selected GSPs that most closely relate to objectives outlined in PRM’s Bureau Strategic Plan. PRM and UNHCR will also track progress towards two bilaterally-tailored targets associated with the achievement of durable solutions and the deployment of senior protection staff to the deep field. (See Annex I for a compilation of all objectives and targets of particular interest).

III. Implementation of Key UNHCR Policies and Programs

UNHCR has launched a variety of new policies to cope with the changing nature of displacement (especially with regard to urban refugees, mixed migratory flows, and climate change), to draw attention to forgotten populations of concern (like those in protracted refugee situations and those who are stateless), and to protect its staff and beneficiaries in an increasingly insecure environment. PRM attaches great importance to these initiatives and has supported UNHCR by participating in the annual High Commissioner’s Dialogue on Protection Challenges, by providing feedback on policy documents, and through regular meetings and interactions. During these consultations PRM has consistently urged UNHCR to focus its limited resources on its mandate, while encouraging other appropriate actors to address non-mandate issues (like natural disasters and development). According to GSP 7.1, UNHCR will strive to develop and/or update at least 10 key policies out of the remaining 15 outstanding policy areas by the end of 2011. PRM looks forward to receiving updates from UNHCR as these policies are developed.

Regarding program performance, PRM and UNHCR will focus their bilateral dialogue in 2010 and 2011 on UNHCR’s progress towards achieving goals set out in the GSP measures pertaining to policy and programs, funding and budget, and management and oversight. They will also track UNHCR’s progress in its overall delivery of durable solutions to refugees (including voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement) as indicated in the Strategic Plan of the U.S. Mission to the United Nations and Other International Organizations in Geneva. (All targets are available in Annex I).

IV. Application of UNHCR’s Four Pillar- and Needs-Based Budgeting Approach

In order to more accurately reflect the planning and work of the organization and in an attempt to tap into new funding sources, UNHCR has developed a new budget structure that is divided into four pillars: refugees, stateless persons, reintegration activities and internally displaced persons (IDPs). UNHCR has also responded to calls by the United States and other Executive Committee Members to present a needs-based budget (rather than a budget based upon projected income). In 2010, UNHCR’s overall budget is slightly over $3 billion (a 25 percent increase when compared to its overall $2.26 billion budget in 2009); in 2011 it is $2.78 billion, but this figure will be revised during the course of 2010 to reflect the changing needs and circumstances on the ground.

Recognizing the need for early and predictable funding, PRM will strive to provide a large and early contribution to UNHCR that will be applied to all four pillars. PRM has traditionally defined its fair share contribution to UNHCR as between 22 and 25 percent of the annual budget, although PRM’s contributions have typically been higher as a share of actual contributions received. With the new Global Needs Assessment and resulting sizable increase in identified requirements from 2009 to 2010, PRM’s percentage contribution to the overall budget will decrease. Understanding that UNHCR's performance in 2010 may be impacted by a funding shortfall, PRM will monitor UNHCR's progress towards results achieved in meeting its targets in 2010, and results will inform 2011 funding decisions. Over a period of years, PRM will strive to once again attain a funding level aimed at a fair share of between 22 to 25 percent of UNHCR’s annual program budget. This level of support would be contingent upon funding availability as well as UNHCR’s demonstration of needs and results. This is the first year for UNHCR in using a new budget structure based on a global needs assessment, which leaves some uncertainty regarding prioritization of needs and allocation of funds.

UNHCR should make every effort to ensure that the GNA-based funding increases made available over time by the United States should come with corresponding increases by other donors in order to accurately reflect the U.S. ‘fair share’ approach. PRM and UNHCR will work together to expand UNHCR’s donor base and to increase government, private sector, and pooled funds contributions. Along these lines, PRM will be interested to receive updates on UNHCR’s progress towards achieving its GSP targets for resource mobilization as they relate to private sector fundraising and pooled funding during bilateral discussions.

V. Consolidation of UNHCR’s Results-Based Managerial Reforms

Through a multi-year reform process, UNHCR has been transitioning into a results-based organization that is more responsive and accountable to its populations of concern. It, therefore, is critical that UNHCR be able to show the impact of U.S. and other donors’ funding as well as to demonstrate the consequences of unmet needs. To this end, it has developed a Results Framework, a strategy for age, gender, and diversity mainstreaming (AGDM), a Global Management Accountability Framework, and a results-based management software called Focus. UNHCR has re-organized its headquarters operation, transferred support functions to more cost-effective locations, and empowered its field operations by decentralizing key decision-making authority. The ultimate aim of these changes – which will require a long-term commitment on the part of UNHCR – is to enhance UNHCR’s overall responsiveness to populations of concern by reducing bureaucracy and bringing decision-making closer to the point of delivery. Along these lines, PRM and UNHCR will continue to monitor the deployment of senior-level staff to the deep field (see Annex I).

PRM welcomes UNHCR’s involvement in the Steering Committee for Humanitarian Response’s Peer Review on Accountability to Persons of Concern and its agreement to undergo the Humanitarian Accountability Partnership (HAP) baseline analysis. PRM would encourage UNHCR to continue integrating accountability to persons of concern in its protection interventions and programming and to consider seeking HAP certification.

PRM welcomes the integration of AGDM-related issues into the Global Strategic Priorities, like GSP3.1 (focused on SGBV), GSP3.3 (protection of children), GSP 4.7 (elderly and disabled), GSP5.1 (community self-management and representation), and GSP7.2 (global strategic direction and management). PRM takes seriously the results of the 2009 evaluation of UNHCR’s AGDM strategy, which recommended: 1) the development of a policy that sets out a clear vision for the mainstreaming of age, gender and diversity in the organization and establishes indicators to verify when success is achieved; 2) participatory action planning; 3) capacity-building focused on the weakest UNHCR operations; 4) strengthened oversight by senior managers and the Executive Committee; and 5) the avoidance of further in-house restructuring until mainstreaming is complete. PRM would like to consult UNHCR further on these recommendations throughout 2010 and 2011.

PRM believes that the reforms have been appropriate and have shown tangible results in institutional performance. However, efforts to downsize UNHCR headquarters as well as decentralize and regionalize functions have left a critical gap in headquarters’ capacity to monitor, evaluate and report on the global impact of UNHCR’s programs and activities. In line with recommendations by the United States and other Executive Committee Members, UNHCR announced in October 2009 that it would create a new Division for Program Support and Management (DPSM) and augment the responsibilities of UNHCR’s Policy Development and Evaluation Service (PDES) to address this gap. This effort is intended to enhance global performance monitoring and ensure that services meet minimum standards consistently in all regions. Implementation of a more rigorous set of accountability standards and procedures will be essential for full consolidation of UNHCR reform efforts. As decisions are made, PRM would appreciate further clarification regarding the division of labor between potentially overlapping in-house oversight functions. PRM and UNHCR will work together with other Executive Committee Members to ensure compliance with key recommendations made by PDES, DPSM, and others. PRM also will continue to share with UNHCR the results of its annual field-based analyses of UNHCR’s Country Operations Planning (COP) exercise, which takes place annually in the spring.

UNHCR did not meet its goal of concluding Human Resources reform by the end of June 2009. It is committed to finalizing this last phase of reform in 2010, which PRM will follow closely. PRM and UNHCR will regularly discuss strategic human resources and workforce management, including activities undertaken by the Global Learning Center (see Annex I). UNHCR acknowledges U.S. concerns regarding appropriate representation of U.S. National staff within the Office. While fully respecting relevant UN Rules and Regulations, UNHCR fully intends to continue to make every effort to attract and promote U.S. interest in employment with UNHCR by providing information on external vacancies via the Internet and other fora, widely disseminating the entry exam to be included on the International Professional Roster (IPR), and through the Junior Professional Officer program. UNHCR is committed to ensuring that current American staff is fully considered for promotion in accordance with UNHCR Human Resources rules and regulations. UNHCR is also committed to reviewing the level of retention of American staff and, in consultation with PRM, to undertaking an “awareness-raising” tour prior to the next IPR call in various U.S. cities.

V. Communication and Partnership

In pursuit of meeting the goals and achieving the results articulated under this Framework, UNHCR and PRM will remain committed to continuous information sharing and cooperation at all levels. UNHCR colleagues in the field will work closely with PRM Refugee Coordinators and Embassy-based staff to keep PRM informed of developments on the ground, involve PRM in the annual Country Operations Planning exercise, and communicate achievements and challenges throughout the year. UNHCR Headquarters-based staff will continue to work closely with the U.S. Permanent Mission in Geneva and to share information and discuss strategies and plans. UNHCR’s Regional Office in Washington, DC, will remain the primary U.S.-based interlocutor with PRM’s Washington, DC-based staff, and the Donor Relations and Resource Mobilization Service at Headquarters and the Refugee and Migration Affairs Office at the U.S. Permanent Mission in Geneva will manage all funding-related communications and matters.

VI. Bilateral Consultations and Reporting

PRM and UNHCR will continue to hold semi-annual Framework discussions on policy and program issues identified in this agreement. Mid-year Framework discussions will take place in June, while end-of-year Framework discussions will take place in December. PRM and UNHCR will prepare a joint written report following the mid-year and end-of-year discussions. In Fall 2011, the Framework for Cooperation document will be revised to cover 2012-2013.

Reflecting the principles of Good Humanitarian Donorship, PRM believes that -- with exceptions noted below -- standardized UNHCR reporting on its GSPs, baseline data, and performance targets will satisfy PRM requirements in 2010 and 2011. In addition, UNHCR will provide PRM with survey and surveillance data on Crude Mortality Rates (CMR) and Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) for refugees, quarterly reports on resettlement referrals, and performance against targets related to the delivery of durable solutions and the deployment of senior protection staff to the deep field (see Annex I). Given the importance of this data for shaping evidence-based policies and programs, UNHCR agrees to provide the following reports on or before associated dates as follows in 2010 and 2011.


Report

Drafter

Due Date 2010 & 2011

Contributions: Reporting on USG broadly earmarked contributions for the previous year.

UNHCR

January 15

Resettlement Update: A report on previous quarter resettlement referrals to U.S.

UNHCR

January 31

Health Update: A report on: 1) HIS data on all camps and in all countries where HIS is functioning disaggregated by site, and 2) an updated list of all nutrition and mortality surveys conducted by UNHCR and its partners

UNHCR

February 1

Budget Forecast: UNHCR out-year budget forecasts

UNHCR

February 27

Durable Solutions Update: An update on UNHCR’s annual delivery of durable solutions, as outlined in Annex I (for U.S. Mission Performance Plan)

UNHCR

March 1

For 2010 Performance Update: Annual PART report on Framework-related performance targets (in Annex IV)

UNHCR

March 15

For 2011 Performance Update: Annual report on Framework-related performance targets (in Annex I)

UNHCR

March 15

Contributions: Reporting on USG broadly earmarked contributions for the previous quarter (January to March)

UNHCR

April 15

Resettlement Update: A report on previous quarter resettlement referrals to U.S.

UNHCR

April 30

Framework Update: Progress report in advance of mid-year Framework discussions structured according to the agenda for the framework talks.

UNHCR

June 15

COP Analysis: PRM feedback on UNHCR’s Annual Country Operations Planning Process

U.S.

June 15

Framework Consultations Report: Joint report on mid-year Framework discussions

Joint (U.S. to draft)

July 15

Health Update: A report on: 1) HIS data on all camps and in all countries where HIS is functioning disaggregated by site, and 2) a compilation of all nutrition and mortality surveys conducted by UNHCR and/or UNHCR’s partners

UNHCR

July 15

Contributions: Reporting on USG broadly earmarked contributions for the previous quarter (April to June)

UNHCR

July 15

Resettlement Update: Reporting on previous quarter resettlement referrals to U.S.

UNHCR

July 31

Contributions: Reporting on USG broadly earmarked contributions for the previous quarter (July to September)

UNHCR

October 15

Resettlement Update: A report on previous quarter resettlement referrals to U.S.

UNHCR

October 31

Framework Update: Progress report in advance of end-of-year Framework discussions, structured according to the agenda for the framework talks.

UNHCR

November 30

Framework Consultations Report: Joint report on end-of-year Framework discussions

Joint (HCR to draft)

January 15

VI. Conclusion

In closing, PRM and UNHCR confirm their commitment to remain strong partners to protect and find durable solutions for the millions of refugees, stateless persons, IDPs, and other persons of concern around the world.

This Framework for Cooperation will remain valid until December 31, 2011.

Betty E. King
Ambassador
United States Permanent Mission
to the United Nations in Geneva

António Guterres
High Commissioner
United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees


Date: April 21, 2010 Date: April 21, 2010



Annexes:

Annex I: Selected PRM-UNHCR Objectives and Targets for 2010-2011
Annex II: UNHCR’s 2010-2011 Global Strategic Priorities
Annex III: PRM’s FY 2010 Bureau Strategic Plan Summary



ANNEX I

Selected PRM-UNHCR Objectives and Targets for 2010-2011

These objectives and targets are divided into three areas: 1) policy- and program-related measures; 2) funding- and budget-related measures; and 3) management- and oversight-related measures. They are primarily drawn from UNHCR Global Strategic Priorities, which are based on the assumption of full funding. In addition, one is drawn from a previous Framework agreement and another is drawn from the Mission Strategic Plan of the U.S. Mission to the United Nations and Other International Organizations in Geneva. UNHCR is committed to reporting on the following performance measures and targets. Reporting is requested by March 15 on efforts concluded as of December 31 of the previous year.

POLICY- AND PROGRAM-RELATED MEASURES

Source

Objective

Baseline

Targets to be achieved by the end of 2011

GSP # 1.3

Prevention and Reduction of Statelessness

Measures are in place and implemented to prevent and reduce statelessness.

At least 77 countries do not grant nationality to persons born on territory who would otherwise be stateless.

There are an estimated 12 million stateless persons.

Legislation is improved in 8 of the 77 countries noted to grant nationality to persons born on territory who would otherwise be stateless.

Out of the estimated 12 million stateless persons, at least half a million have their nationality granted or confirmed.

GSP #1.5

Non-Refoulement

Refugees and asylum seekers are protected from refoulement.

In at least 60 countries, credible reports of refoulement (1,777 cases) received.

The risk of refoulement is reduced in at least 16 of the 60 countries where credible reports of refoulement have been received.

GSP #2.1 Registration and Profiling

Persons of concern are registered or profiled in a manner that enhances protection.

87% (1,661,294) or refugees and asylum seekers in 139 camps are registered on an individual basis.

44% (1,145,839) of refugees and asylum seekers in 103 urban areas are registered on an individual basis.

In at least 18 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, registration and/or profiling need improvement.

The percentage of refugees and asylum seekers in 139 camps who are registered on an individual basis increases from 87% to 89%.

The percentage of refugees and asylum seekers in 103 urban areas who are registered on an individual basis increases from 44% to 50%.

IDP registration and/or profiling are improved in at least 7 of 18 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs.

GSP #2.5

Individual and Civil Documentation

Refugees and asylum-seekers receive individual documentation confirming their protected status, and all persons of concern are provided with documents confirming civil status.

46% (22,528) of newborns in 103 camps are issued a birth certificate.


49% (4,580) of newborns in 94 urban areas are issued a birth certificate.

The percentage of newborn refugees in 103 camps that are issued birth certificates increases to 65 percent.

The percentage of newborn refugees in 94 urban areas that are issued birth certificates increases to 55 percent.

GSP# 3.1

Sexual- and Gender-based Violence (SGBV)

Persons of concern, particularly children, women, the elderly and disabled, are safe from acts of violence, abuse and exploitation.

83% of reported SGBV survivors in refugee camps receiving support.


In at least 48 UNHCR operations SGBV is recognized as a problem in the community.

SGBV is underreported in refugee camps. Currently, there are 22 reported incidents of SGBV per 10,000 population annually.

The percentage of reported SGBV survivors receiving support is increased from 83% to 88%.

Prevention and response to SGBV is significantly improved in at least 22 of the 48 UNHCR operations where SGBV is recognized as a problem in the community.

The number of SGBV incidents in refugee camps reported annually per 10,000 persons is increased from 22 incidents to 30.

GSP# 3.3

Protection of Children

Children of concern live in safety without exposure to the effects of armed conflict, forced recruitment, sexual exploitation, abuse and violence, and child labor.

67% (192,727) of out of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in camps do not participate in targeted programs.

85% (123,224) out of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in urban areas do not participate in targeted programs.

69% of unaccompanied and separated refugee children (approximately 3,500) have not had a BID.

In at least 15 countries, children are at risk of being recruited by armed groups.

The percentage of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in camps who do not participate in targeted programs is reduced from 67% to 60%.

The percentage of out of school adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in urban areas who do not participate in targeted programs is reduced from 85% to 82%.

The percentage of unaccompanied and separated refugee children who have not undergone a Best Interest Determination is decreased from 69% to 63%.

In at least 6 of the 15 countries noted, the risk of children being recruited by armed groups is reduced.

GSP# 4.1

Food Security and Nutrition

Persons of concern have a sufficient quantity and quality of food, appropriate hygiene conditions and access to public health and social care services adequate to their specific needs, including their age and physical condition.

In at least 73 camps, the global acute malnutrition rate exceeds acceptable standards.


In at least 14 countries, the prevalence of anemia in children under five years of age exceeds acceptable standards.

In 17 operations, the food ration in terms of KCals, as agreed with WFP, has not been distributed as planned.

The global acute malnutrition (GAM) rate will meet acceptable standards in at least 15 of the 73 camps where GAM rates currently exceed acceptable standards.

The prevalence of anemia in children under five years of age will meet acceptable standards in at least 8 of the 14 countries where anemia rates currently exceed acceptable standards.

In at least 17 operations there will be a significant improvement in the distribution of food rations in terms of calories/person/day.

GSP# 4.4

Primary Health Care

Persons of concern have access to adequate primary curative and preventative healthcare services as well as appropriate health education, according to their age and physical condition.

In 27 countries, the crude mortality rate of populations of concern exceeds acceptable standards.


In 28 countries, the mortality rate of populations of concern under five years of age exceeds acceptable standards.

In 20 countries, the measles vaccination coverage of populations of concern under five years of age is below acceptable standards.

In 68 out of 135 camps, the % of births being attended by a skilled health worker is below acceptable standards.

The crude mortality rate (CMR) of populations of concern will meet acceptable standards in 18 of the 27 countries where the CMR currently exceeds acceptable standards.

The mortality rate of populations of concern under five years of age will meet acceptable standards in 21 of the 28 countries where it currently exceeds acceptable standards.

In 15 of the 20 countries noted, the measles vaccination coverage of populations of concern under five years of age meets acceptable standards.

In at least 20 of the 68 countries noted, the attendance of skilled health workers at births meets acceptable standards.

GSP# 4.7 Services for Groups with Specific Needs

Persons of concern with specific protection needs have access to appropriate support.

47% (15,455) of adult refugees with disabilities in 92 camps have been assisted to improve their independence.

41% (6,292) of adult refugees with disabilities in 82 urban areas have been assisted to improve their independence.

47% (12,200) of older refugees with specific needs in 92 camps have

been assisted to improve their independence.

35% (12,500) of older refugees with specific needs in 84 urban areas have been assisted to improve their independence.

In 12 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, services for groups with specific needs require strengthening.

In the 92 camps, the percentage of adult refugees with disabilities that have been assisted to improve their independence increased to 53% (17,428).

In the 82 urban areas, the percentage of adult refugees with disabilities that have been assisted to improve their independence increased to 47% (7,673).

In the 92 camps, the percentage of older refugees with specific needs that have been assisted to improve their independence increased to 55% (14,200).

In the 84 urban areas, the percentage of older refugees with specific needs in these urban areas that have been assisted to improve their independence increased to 39% (13,929)

In 6 of these 12 countries, services for IDP groups with specific needs improved.

GSP# 6.3 Resettlement

Resettlement is actively used as a protection tool, a durable solution, and a means to effect greater responsibility sharing.

45,000 individuals submitted for resettlement in excess of the number of places offered by resettlement countries.

46.5% of individuals identified for urgent and emergency resettlement (6,200 persons) have been resettled

The percentage of the 6,200 individuals who have been indentified for urgent and emergency resettlement that are actually resettled increases from 46.5% to 60%.

The percentage of resettlement places offered by resettlement countries increases by 10%.

U.S. Mission Strategic Plan Target on Durable Solutions

UNHCR increases its delivery of durable solutions (voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement) for refugees over time.

According to results reported through UNHCR’s Focus software, the percentage of refugees for whom durable solutions are provided in 2011 is greater than the percentage of refugees for whom durable solutions were found in 2010.

FUNDING- AND BUDGET-RELATED MEASURES

Source

Objective

Baseline

Targets to be achieved by the end of 2011

GSP #7.3

Prioritization, Resources Allocation

UNHCR’s global budget provides a comprehensive picture of the organization’s operational, staffing and administrative requirements. Financial resources are allocated effectively and transparently to meet the GSPs.

UNHCR recently introduced tools to align resources accurately to prioritize needs for each population of concern.

There are many measures in place to ensure sound financial management, but there is no comprehensive framework that articulates all the elements which contribute to good financial internal control.

Resource allocation is informed by and accurate and prioritized presentation of needs of each population of concern.


MANAGEMENT- AND OVERSIGHT-RELATED MEASURES

Source

Objective

Baseline

Targets to be achieved by the end of 2011

GSP #7.4 Organizational Development and Design

UNHCR’s headquarters provides overall direction and maximum support to its field operations from the most efficient and streamlined platform.

8 regional officers require further knowledge and training to support achievements of GSPs 1-6 as targeted in the operations they cover.

A consolidated program management, analysis and support function does not exist to systematically monitor global performance and to assist operations achieve maximum results for populations of concern.

8 regional offices noted are capacitated (further knowledge and training) to support achievement of GSPs 1-6 as targeted in the operations they cover.

A program management, analysis and support function will monitor UNHCR’s global performance and assist operations to achieve maximum results for populations of concern.

GSP #7.8

Strategic Human Resource and Workforce Management

UNHCR has a diverse and gender-balanced workforce that is motivated and safe, has integrity and meets the current and future needs of the organization.

Individual career counseling is not yet in place.

There are concerns that the present postings system lacks transparency and is not consistently effective in placing the right staff in the right positions.

There is no systematic means for assisting staff to identify learning needs and access relevant learning activities.

According to UNHCR’s annual Global Staff Survey, 75% of staff perceive staff counseling as a valuable resource in assistance them to make career choices.

75% of staff and managers perceive the postings system to be transparent and effective in placing the right staff in the right positions.

75% of staff indicate they know how to identify their learning needs and how to access relevant learning activities.

50% of staff that identified their learning needs participated in a relevant learning activity.

GSP#7.12

Field Safety and Security

UNHCR manages security effectively in cooperation with the UN system, enabling the Office to meet the needs of persons of concern in a manner that minimizes risks to staff, partner, and persons of concern.

UNHCR has averaged 88% “[full] compliance with [some] limitations” in DSS evaluations of approximately 50% of field operations.

Recruitment of field safety advisers with suitable profile and technical skills continues to be a challenge.

100% of field operations meet DSS standards of compliance with MOSS guidelines.

Support coverage is provided and field safety advisers are deployed in a timely manner to assist offices to respond to sudden or unforeseen security needs.

2009 Framework Agreement

UNHCR promotes protection by presence by deploying more senior staff into deep-field locations.

The percentage of UNHCR’s senior staff positions (D-1/P-4/P-5) in the deep field (D/E/U duty stations) is 22%.

The percentage of UNHCR’s senior staff positions (D-1/P-4/P-5) in the deep field (D/E/U duty stations) increases from 22% to 24%.


ANNEX II

UNHCR’s 2010-2011 Global Strategic Priorities


1. Favourable Protection Environment: Promote a favourable protection environment for all populations of concern to UNHCR

1.1 International and Regional Instruments; National Legal Frameworks

The rights of persons of concern are recognized in law and in practice. There is adequate administrative capacity to support the implementation of international protection standards.

Challenges and Opportunities: Recognition in law and administrative practice of responsibilities to protect persons of concern is in need of strengthening around the world. Gaps in legislation weaken the protection of persons of concern and can have disproportionate impact on women, children and discriminated groups. Age, gender and diversity concerns need to be further enhanced in capacity building activities conducted with government and other partners.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent national legal framework consistent with international protection standards

· UNHCR operations report that in at least 108 countries, the national legal framework does not adequately meet international protection standards

· In at least 25 of these countries, the national legal framework improved to be more consistent with international protection standards

· # of countries that have ratified and incorporated the 1951 Convention and/or 1967 Protocol

· 147 countries have ratified and incorporated the 1951 Convention and/or 1967 Protocol

· The # of countries that have ratified and incorporated the 1951 Convention and/or 1967 Protocol increased to 148

· # of countries that have ratified/acceded to the 1954 and 1961 Statelessness Conventions

· 63 countries have ratified/acceded to the 1954 Convention Relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and 35 countries have ratified/acceded to the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness

· The # of countries that have ratified/acceded to the 1954 and 1961 Statelessness Conventions increased to 68 and 41 respectively

· Extent Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) protection needs are addressed in a manner consistent with the Guiding Principles

· In at least 24 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved, the protection needs of IDPs are not fully addressed in a manner consistent with the Guiding Principles

· In at least 13 of these countries, there is an improvement in the manner in which the protection needs of IDPs are addressed, consistent with the Guiding Principles

1.2 National and Regional Migration Policy

National and regional migration policies are protection sensitive. Measures to combat smuggling and trafficking of persons permit refugees to seek asylum and help to reduce risks of violence and exploitation, particularly of children and women.

Challenges and Opportunities: Mixed migration is a growing phenomenon. Efforts of States to counter irregular migration, and the smuggling and trafficking of persons, can inhibit access to asylum and stateless procedures for those in need of it. Regional plans of action in this area are an opportunity to instill a protection perspective and to ensure that appropriate mechanisms are in place to identify, register and refer persons of concern as well as to address specific needs of vulnerable individuals.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent broader migration policies contain protection safeguards

· UNHCR operations report that in at least 71 countries, broader migration policies do not contain protection safeguards

· In at least 25 of these countries, migration policies improved to contain more protection safeguards

1.3 Prevention and Reduction of Statelessness

Measures are in place and implemented to prevent or reduce statelessness.

Challenges and Opportunities: National strategies in many situations are insufficient to prevent statelessness and address its causes. Failure to register births is also a cause of statelessness.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent persons born on territory who would otherwise be stateless are granted nationality

· At least 77 countries do not grant nationality to persons born on territory who would otherwise be stateless

· In at least 8 of these countries, legislation improved to grant nationality to persons born on territory who would otherwise be stateless

· # of stateless persons who have their nationality granted or confirmed

· There are an estimated 12 million stateless persons

· At least half a million of these estimated 12 million stateless persons have their nationality granted or confirmed

1.4 Partnerships

Strong partnerships exist between host countries, international and national partners and States for the protection of persons of concern.

Challenges and Opportunities: While good partnerships exist in most countries of the world for the protection of persons of concern, there are areas in need of improvement. Strengthening the capacity of governments to be able to expand their own protection services remains a key priority as does strengthening the capacities of local NGOs. Additional work is needed to ensure that all concerned provide protection without discrimination on the basis of age, sex or diversity. In IDP situations, additional efforts are needed to strengthen the collaborative and cluster approaches.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent States cooperate with UN and NGO partners in addressing protection concerns

· 73 operations report that fully cooperative partnerships between the State and international and national partners are not yet in place

· In at least 30 of these operations, cooperative partnerships between the State and international and national partners improved to address protection concerns

· Extent cooperation among partners effective

· In 20 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, cooperation among partners needs strengthening

· In at least 15 of these countries, cooperation among partners improved

1.5 Access to Territory and Non Refoulement

Refugees and asylum-seekers have access to age and gender sensitive asylum systems and are protected from refoulement.

Challenges and Opportunities: Admission practices in a notable number of States do not adequately differentiate between asylum-seekers and irregular migrants, and treatment at borders does not consistently meet international standards, heightening the risk of refoulement. Specific needs of persons of concern may not be addressed in an appropriate and timely manner.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· # of credible cases of refoulement

· In at least 60 countries, credible reports of refoulement (1,777 cases) received

· In at least 16 of these countries, the risk of refoulement is reduced

· Extent asylum-seekers have access to territory

· In at least 49 countries, asylum-seeker access to territory falls below acceptable standards

· In at least 13 of these countries, access to territory for asylum-seekers improved

· Extent border authorities refer asylum-seekers to competent authorities

· In at least 63 countries, border authorities do not systematically refer asylum-seekers to competent authorities

· In at least 20 of these countries, border officials more frequently refer asylum-seekers to competent authorities

1.6 Environmental Protection

Natural resources and shared environment are better protected.

Challenges and Opportunities: The presence of significant numbers of displaced persons can have an adverse impact on the environment. Experience has shown that when environmental issues are taken into account from the earliest possible stage, negative environmental consequences of displacement can be mitigated and costly rehabilitation projects at a later stage avoided.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent consequences of displacement pose a risk to the environment

· In 21 countries, there are negative environmental consequences of displacement

· In at least 13 of these countries, rehabilitation efforts improved and risks reduced

2. Fair Protection Processes and Documentation: Ensure persons of concern are treated fairly, efficiently and without discrimination when seeking protection and that they receive adequate documentation.

2.1 Reception Conditions, Registration and Profiling

Persons of concern are registered or profiled in a manner that enhances protection. Reception arrangements improve their security and access to essential services.

Challenges and Opportunities: Reception arrangements for persons of concern may be non-existent or unable to respond fully to their needs. Reception centres may lack trained personnel or not be equipped to ensure basic sanitary requirements; to protect women, children and persons with disabilities; and to ensure access to legal counseling and required social services.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent reception conditions need improvement

· UNHCR operations report that in at least 78 countries reception conditions are not adequate and in need of improvement

· In at least 38 of these countries, reception conditions improved

· % of refugees and asylum-seekers registered on an individual basis

· 87% (1,661,294) of refugees and asylum-seekers in 139 camps are registered on an individual basis

· The % of refugees and asylum-seekers in these camps registered on an individual basis increased to 89%

· 44% (1,145,839) of refugees and asylum-seekers in 103 urban areas are registered on an individual basis

· The % of refugees and asylum-seekers in these urban areas registered on an individual basis increased to 50%

· Extent population of concern registered and/or profiled

· In at least 18 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, registration and/or profiling need improvement

· In at least 7 of these countries, IDP registration and/or profiling improved

· # of asylum-seekers detained for illegal entry/stay

· In at least 41 countries, asylum-seekers are detained (16,615) for illegal entry/stay

· In at least 13 of these countries, the use of detention of asylum- seekers for illegal entry/ stay is reduced

2.2 Access to Procedures

Persons of concern have access to status determination procedures.

Challenges and Opportunities: The protection of refugees is hindered when refugees cannot avail themselves of state asylum procedures, either because those procedures have not yet been established or because the means to access them are restricted. Similarly, the protection of stateless persons can be compromised if there are no proper statelessness determination procedures or interventions to identify and protect stateless persons.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent asylum-seekers have access to status determination procedures

· In at least 82 countries, asylum-seekers do not have access to status determination procedures

· In at least 20 of these countries, asylum-seekers have improved access to status determination procedures

· Extent stateless persons have access to status determination procedures

· In at least 17 countries, it is reported that stateless persons do not have access to status determination procedures

· In at least 6 of these countries, stateless persons have improved access to status determination procedures

2.3 Fair and Efficient Status Determination

Asylum systems provide for effective and fair decision-making.

Challenges and Opportunities: While a growing number of States have assumed responsibility for determining refugee status, considerable work needs to be done to ensure that procedures are fair, efficient, and age, gender and diversity sensitive. In many countries and regions, restrictive attitudes, legal reforms, regional harmonization efforts and/or high rotation of staff involved in Refugee Status Determination (RSD) procedures can negatively impact the application of international protection standards. Large influxes of asylum-seekers can also lead to a hardening of attitudes and may require innovative solutions to expedite procedures to deal fairly and expeditiously with such claims while helping to sustain support for the international protection regime.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent state status determination decisions reached in a fair manner

· UNHCR operations report that in at least 95 countries, improvements are needed to ensure status determination decisions reached in a fair manner

· In at least 20 of these countries, status determination decisions improved

· # of mandate RSD operations with a backlog

· There is a backlog of 27,418 RSD decisions in 7 of UNHCR’s largest mandate RSD operations

· There is at least a 15% reduction in this backlog

2.4 Family Reunification

Effective procedures are in place to facilitate family reunification.

Challenges and Opportunities: Family separation invariably leads to hardship and may also create serious obstacles to integration. Ensuring family reunification remains a challenge. Standard procedures and coordination with partners need to be reinforced.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of separated families seeking reunification that are reunited

· In at least 31 countries, problems related to family reunification have been identified as a serious concern

· In at least 10 of these countries, family reunification improved

· % of identified unaccompanied or separated children reunited with their families

· In at least 27 countries, problems related to reunification of unaccompanied or separated children have been identified as a serious concern

· In at least 9 of these countries, reunification of unaccompanied or separated children with their families is improved

2.5 Individual and Civil Documentation

Refugees and asylum-seekers receive individual documentation confirming their protected status, and all persons of concern are provided with documents confirming civil status.

Challenges and Opportunities: In a number of States, refugees, asylum-seekers and stateless persons are not provided with individual identity documents, increasing their risk of being refouled, arrested, detained, and denied access to employment and basic social services. Moreover, in many States there are no effective means for legally registering birth, marriage and deaths of persons of concern.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of newborns registered and issued birth certificates

· 46% (22,528) of newborns in 103 camps are issued a birth certificate

· The % of newborn refugees in these camps that are issued birth certificates increased to 65%

· 49% (4,580) of newborns in 94 urban areas are issued a birth certificate

· The % of newborn refugees in these urban areas that are issued birth certificates increased to 55%

· Extent persons of concern have access to identity documents

· 49% (432,002) of adult refugees and asylum-seekers in 123 camps have individual identity documents

· The % of refugees and asylum-seekers in these camps that have individual identity documents increased to 55%

· 41% (646,558) of adult refugees and asylum-seekers in 84 urban areas have individual identity documents

· The % of refugees and asylum-seekers in these urban areas that have individual identity documents increased to 47%

· In 13 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, IDPs do not have sufficient access to civil documentation

· In 7 of these countries, IDP access to civil documentation is improved

3. Security from Violence and Exploitation: Intensify efforts to ensure a safe and secure environment for people of concern, including protection from violence and exploitation.

3.1 Security from Violence (particularly SGBV)

Persons of concern, particularly children, women, older and disabled, are safe from acts of violence, abuse and exploitation.

Challenges and Opportunities: Persons of concern continue to be exposed to violence due to armed conflict. In many situations, sexual and gender based violence is a prevalent protection risk which is often not properly reported. Response and prevention mechanisms continue to expand but are inadequate to meet the needs of persons of concern.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % reported SGBV survivors receiving support

· 83% of reported SGBV survivors in refugee camps receiving support

· The % of SGBV survivors receiving support increased to 88%

· Extent SGBV is a problem in the community

· In at least 48 UNHCR operations SGBV is recognized as a problem in the community

· In 22 of these operations, prevention and response to SGBV is significantly improved

· Extent SGBV incidents are reported

· SGBV is underreported in refugee camps. Currently, there are 22 reported incidents of SGBV per 10,000 population annually

· The reporting rate of SGBV improves and the # of SGBV incidents reported per 10,000 populations annually increased to 30

3.2 Access to Legal Remedies

Persons of concern are able to access, in an effective manner, national justice systems.

Challenges and Opportunities: National justice systems may be ill-equipped, poorly staffed and/or geographically distant from populations of concern. Access may also be restricted due to discrimination or due to lack of knowledge amongst persons of concern regarding their rights and how they may be enforced. Even where systems are available, they may not be readily accessible to persons with disabilities.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent of effective access to national justice systems

· In at least 64 countries, populations of concern do not have effective access to national justice systems

· In at least 22 of these countries, persons of concern have improved access to national justice systems

· In at least 18 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, IDPs do not have effective access to national justice systems

· In at least 7 of these countries, IDPs have improved access to national justice systems

3.3 Protection of Children

Children of concern live in safety without exposure to the effects of armed conflict, forced recruitment, sexual exploitation, abuse and violence and child labour.

Challenges and Opportunities: Children in many situations continue to face violence, abuse and exploitation. National and community structures often lack sufficient capacity to reduce and respond to such risks and/or to ensure that children enjoy the right to education, rest and leisure. In many situations, Best Interest Determinations (BID) are not regularly undertaken in regard to fundamental decisions affecting the security of a child such as those relating to foster care, institutional care, relocation and the choice of a durable solution. Children with disabilities can be particularly at risk when there is a lack of services to address their specific needs.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of out of school adolescents who participate in targeted programmes

· 67% (192,727) of out of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in camps do not participate in targeted programmes

· The % of out of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in camps who do not participate in targeted programmes reduced to 60%

· 85% (123,224) of out of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in urban areas do not participate in targeted programmes

· The % of out of school adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in urban areas who do not participate in targeted programmes reduced to 82%

· % of unaccompanied/ separated children for whom a BID has been carried out

· 69% of unaccompanied and separated refugee children (approximately 3,500) have not had a BID

· The % of unaccompanied and separated refugee children who have not undergone a BID decreased to 63%

· Extent children being recruited by armed groups

· In at least 15 countries, children are at risk of being recruited by armed groups

· In at least 6 of these countries, the risk of children being recruited by armed groups is reduced

3.4 Freedom of Movement and Non-Arbitrary Detention

Persons of concern are able to move freely and are not at risk of arbitrary detention.

Challenges and Opportunities: In many situations, the freedom of movement of persons of concern is restricted, limiting possibilities for economic, social and cultural participation and heightening risks of exploitation and prolonged reliance on assistance. Arbitrary detention, including for entry related reasons, continues to be a pressing concern.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent persons of concern enjoy freedom of movement

· In at least 35 countries, persons of concern do not enjoy freedom of movement

· In at least 13 of these countries, persons of concern enjoy greater freedom of movement

· Extent UNHCR has access to persons of concern in detention

· In at least 52 countries, UNHCR does not have full access to persons of concern in detention

· In at least 22 of these countries, UNHCR has greater access to persons of concern

3. Security from Violence and Exploitation: Intensify efforts to ensure a safe and secure environment for people of concern, including protection from violence and exploitation.

3.1 Security from Violence (particularly SGBV)

Persons of concern, particularly children, women, older and disabled, are safe from acts of violence, abuse and exploitation.

Challenges and Opportunities: Persons of concern continue to be exposed to violence due to armed conflict. In many situations, sexual and gender based violence is a prevalent protection risk which is often not properly reported. Response and prevention mechanisms continue to expand but are inadequate to meet the needs of persons of concern.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % reported SGBV survivors receiving support

· 83% of reported SGBV survivors in refugee camps receiving support

· The % of SGBV survivors receiving support increased to 88%

· Extent SGBV is a problem in the community

· In at least 48 UNHCR operations SGBV is recognized as a problem in the community

· In 22 of these operations, prevention and response to SGBV is significantly improved

· Extent SGBV incidents are reported

· SGBV is underreported in refugee camps. Currently, there are 22 reported incidents of SGBV per 10,000 population annually

· The reporting rate of SGBV improves and the # of SGBV incidents reported per 10,000 populations annually increased to 30

3.2 Access to Legal Remedies

Persons of concern are able to access, in an effective manner, national justice systems.

Challenges and Opportunities: National justice systems may be ill-equipped, poorly staffed and/or geographically distant from populations of concern. Access may also be restricted due to discrimination or due to lack of knowledge amongst persons of concern regarding their rights and how they may be enforced. Even where systems are available, they may not be readily accessible to persons with disabilities.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent of effective access to national justice systems

· In at least 64 countries, populations of concern do not have effective access to national justice systems

· In at least 22 of these countries, persons of concern have improved access to national justice systems

· In at least 18 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, IDPs do not have effective access to national justice systems

· In at least 7 of these countries, IDPs have improved access to national justice systems

3.3 Protection of Children

Children of concern live in safety without exposure to the effects of armed conflict, forced recruitment, sexual exploitation, abuse and violence and child labour.

Challenges and Opportunities: Children in many situations continue to face violence, abuse and exploitation. National and community structures often lack sufficient capacity to reduce and respond to such risks and/or to ensure that children enjoy the right to education, rest and leisure. In many situations, Best Interest Determinations (BID) are not regularly undertaken in regard to fundamental decisions affecting the security of a child such as those relating to foster care, institutional care, relocation and the choice of a durable solution. Children with disabilities can be particularly at risk when there is a lack of services to address their specific needs.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of out of school adolescents who participate in targeted programmes

· 67% (192,727) of out of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in camps do not participate in targeted programmes

· The % of out of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in camps who do not participate in targeted programmes reduced to 60%

· 85% (123,224) of out of school refugee adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in urban areas do not participate in targeted programmes

· The % of out of school adolescents between 12 and 17 years of age in urban areas who do not participate in targeted programmes reduced to 82%

· % of unaccompanied/ separated children for whom a BID has been carried out

· 69% of unaccompanied and separated refugee children (approximately 3,500) have not had a BID

· The % of unaccompanied and separated refugee children who have not undergone a BID decreased to 63%

· Extent children being recruited by armed groups

· In at least 15 countries, children are at risk of being recruited by armed groups

· In at least 6 of these countries, the risk of children being recruited by armed groups is reduced

3.4 Freedom of Movement and Non-Arbitrary Detention

Persons of concern are able to move freely and are not at risk of arbitrary detention.

Challenges and Opportunities: In many situations, the freedom of movement of persons of concern is restricted, limiting possibilities for economic, social and cultural participation and heightening risks of exploitation and prolonged reliance on assistance. Arbitrary detention, including for entry related reasons, continues to be a pressing concern.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent persons of concern enjoy freedom of movement

· In at least 35 countries, persons of concern do not enjoy freedom of movement

· In at least 13 of these countries, persons of concern enjoy greater freedom of movement

· Extent UNHCR has access to persons of concern in detention

· In at least 52 countries, UNHCR does not have full access to persons of concern in detention

· In at least 22 of these countries, UNHCR has greater access to persons of concern

4. Basic Needs and Essential Services: Ensure provision of basic needs and essential services for persons of concern without discrimination.

4.1 Food Security and Nutrition

Persons of concern have a sufficient quantity and quality of food, appropriate hygiene conditions and access to public health and social care services adequate to their specific needs, including their age and physical condition.

Challenges and Opportunities: Nutritional indicators continue to reveal high malnutrition rates and micro-nutrient deficiencies in many situations. Limited livelihood options and insufficient social support mechanisms prevent persons of concern from supplementing food assistance and contribute to the incidence of harmful coping strategies and poor nutritional status. Poor health, lack of appropriate hygiene conditions and insufficient public health services contribute to, and exacerbate, problems associated with inadequate food and nutrition.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Global acute malnutrition rate (GAM)

· In at least 73 camps, the global acute malnutrition rate exceeds acceptable standards

· In at least 15 of these camps, the global acute malnutrition rate meets acceptable standards

· % of prevalence of anemia in children under five years of age

· In at least 14 countries, the prevalence of anemia in children under five years of age exceeds acceptable standards

· In at least 8 of these countries, the prevalence of anemia in children under five years of age does not exceed acceptable standards

· # of operations where the food ration in terms of Kcals, as agreed with WFP, has been distributed as planned

· In 17 operations, the food ration in terms of Kcals, as agreed with WFP, has not been distributed as planned

· In at least 17 of these operations there is a significant improvement in distribution of the food ration in terms of Kcals, as agreed with WFP

4.2 Shelter and Basic Domestic and Hygiene Items

Persons of concern have access to adequate housing and the basic domestic and hygiene items necessary to reduce protection risks.

Challenges and Opportunities: Adequate shelter in camps, settlements and urban locations is essential yet many persons of concern remain in dwellings that do not provide protection from the elements, proximity to essential services and/or sufficient space for family unity and privacy. Housing is also often not accessible for persons with disabilities. Moreover, in many situations, available clothing and other essential non-food items (e.g. cooking fuel, blankets, soap, mosquito nets, sanitary materials and school uniforms) are insufficient. Lack of basic domestic and hygiene items can lead to serious health problems and can cause critical protection risks, including sexual exploitation and abuse. The absence of adequate clothing and sanitary materials can impede girls from attending school.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of households living in adequate dwellings

· 40% of refugee households (approximately 1,600) in camps do not live in adequate dwellings

· The % of refugee households in camps that do not live in adequate dwellings is reduced to 35%

· In at least 33 areas of refugee return, not all returnees live in adequate dwellings

· In at least 4 of these areas of refugee return, all returnees live in adequate dwellings

· In at least 19 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, shelter for IDPs does not meet adequate standards

· In at least 8 of these countries, shelter for IDPs is significantly improved

· Extent clothes and household items sufficient

· In at least 23 countries, refugees/asylum-seekers do not have sufficient clothes and household items

· In 9 of these countries, refugees/asylum-seekers have sufficient clothes and household items

· Extent need for sanitary materials met

· In at least 53 camps, the need for sanitary materials is not met according to acceptable standards

· In at least 30 of these camps, the need for sanitary materials for women is met according to acceptable standards

4.3 Water and Sanitation Services

Persons of concern, including those with restricted movement capability, have access to safe and drinkable water and to proper sanitation services.

Challenges and Opportunities: Access to water and sanitation is a fundamental human right and essential to life, health and dignity. Timely and adequate provision of clean water and sanitation services are of special importance to refugees and displaced persons given that they have traditionally faced difficulties in fully exercising their rights and are prone to exploitation. Information gathered during the past five years indicates that over 50% of refugee camps still do not meet the minimum daily water requirement of 20 litres/person/day.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of refugee camps that meet the standard of providing (an average of) 20 litres of water per person per day

· 56 refugee camps (47%) are currently known not to meet the standard of providing (an average of) 20 litres of water per person per day

· At least 20 of these camps meet the standard of providing (an average of) 20 litres of water per person per day

· % of families in returnee areas that have improved water supply at an adequate level of service

· In 34 out of 40 areas of refugee return, not all families have access to improved water supply at an adequate level of service

· In at least 6 of these areas of refugee return, all families have access to improved water supply at an adequate level of service

· % of refugee camps that have adequate sanitation facilities

· 96 refugee camps do not have adequate sanitation facilities

· In at least 30 of these refugee camps, there are adequate sanitation facilities

· % of returnee areas where all families have latrines

· In at least 28 areas of refugee return, not all families have latrines

· In at least 8 of these areas of refugee return, all families have latrines

4.4 Primary Health Care

Persons of concern have access to adequate primary curative and preventative healthcare services as well as appropriate health education, according to their age and physical condition.

Challenges and Opportunities: Even when primary, curative and preventative healthcare services are available, they are often insufficient to meet the needs of refugees and others of concern.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Crude mortality rate

· In 27 countries, the crude mortality rate of populations of concern exceeds acceptable standards

· In at least 18 of these countries, the crude mortality rate of populations of concern meets acceptable standards

· Mortality rate of children under five years of age

· In 28 countries, the mortality rate of populations of concern under five years of age exceeds acceptable standards

· In at least 21 of these countries, the mortality rate of populations of concern under five years of age meets acceptable standards

· Measles vaccination coverage among populations of concern under five years of age

· In 20 countries, the measles vaccination coverage of populations of concern under five years of age is below acceptable standards

· In 15 of these countries, the measles vaccination coverage of populations of concern under five years of age meets acceptable standards

· Skilled birth attendance (proportion of births that are being attended by a skilled health worker)

· In 68 out of 135 camps, the % of births being attended by a skilled health worker is below acceptable standards

· In at least 20 of these camps, the attendance of skilled health workers at births meets acceptable standards

4.5 Prevention and Treatment of HIV/Aids

Persons of concern have non-discriminatory access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support services.

Challenges and Opportunities: In many countries, national HIV prevention programmes as well as HIV care, treatment and support services are not accessible on an equal basis to persons of concern. The challenge is to address discrimination and ensure universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support at national, district and community levels. Opportunities exist through bilateral funding and the Global Fund, however, national governments and global partners need to include refugees and other persons of concern in national HIV plans so as to ensure their needs are met in a sustainable manner.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of locations where persons of concern have the same access to Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) programmes as the surrounding host communities

· In at least 16 countries, persons of concern do not have the same access to ART as the surrounding host communities

· In at least 13 of these countries, persons of concern have the same access to ART programmes as surrounding host communities

4.6 Education

Boys and girls of concern have equal access to quality primary and secondary education, and the development of children and youth is supported.

Challenges and Opportunities: Access to free primary education remains elusive for many children of concern. Even when the right to attend school is recognized, obstacles such as the lack of a safe learning environment, fees, language difficulties, school supplies/uniforms, lack of support for education in the community and lack of documentation and certification as well as poverty can hinder access. The absence of secondary schooling for adolescent boys and girls can contribute to increased risks of child labour, military recruitment, exploitation and abuse. It can also severely limit their future productive capacities.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of refugee population aged 6-11 enrolled in primary education

· In 132 refugee camps, 31% of refugee children aged 6-11 are not enrolled in primary schools (37% of girls and 24% of boys)

· In these 132 refugee camps, the % of children aged 6-11 not enrolled in primary schools reduced to 21%, with special attention to gender parity

· In 87 urban areas, it is reported that 37% of refugee children aged 6-11 are not enrolled in primary schools (overall primary enrolment rate is 63%)

· In these 87 urban areas, the % of refugee children not enrolled in primary schools is reduced to 32%, with special attention to gender parity

· % of refugee population aged 12-17 enrolled in secondary education

· In 92 refugee camps, 69% of children aged 12-17 (73% of refugee girls and 66% of refugee boys ) are not enrolled in secondary schools

· In these 92 refugee camps, the % of children aged 12-17 not enrolled in secondary schools is reduced to 60%, with special attention to gender parity

· In 66 urban areas, it is reported that 62% of refugee children aged 12-17 are not enrolled in secondary schools

· In these 66 urban areas, the % of refugee children aged 12-17not enrolled in secondary schools is reduced to 58%, with special attention to gender parity

4.7 Services for Groups with Specific Needs

Persons of concern with specific protection needs have access to appropriate support.

Challenges and Opportunities: Services provided to those with specific needs are often in short supply, including services for women, single-parent families, older persons and persons with disabilities as well as households headed by children or grandparents. Good practices exist that can be replicated elsewhere.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of persons of concern with disabilities with improved independence

· 47% (15,455) of adult refugees with disabilities in 92 camps have been assisted to improve their independence

· In these camps, the % of adult refugees with disabilities that have been assisted to improve their independence increased to 53% (17,428)

· 41% (6,292) of adult refugees with disabilities in 82 urban areas have been assisted to improve their independence

· In these urban areas, the % of adult refugees with disabilities that have been assisted to improve their independence increased to 47% (7,673)

· % of older persons with specific needs with improved independence

· 47% (12,200) of older refugees with specific needs in 92 camps have been assisted to improve their independence

· In these camps, the % of older refugees with specific needs that have been assisted to improve their independence increased to 55% (14,200)

· 35% (12,500) of older refugees with specific needs in 84 urban areas have been assisted to improve their independence

· In these urban areas, the % of older refugees with specific needs in these urban areas that have been assisted to improve their independence increased to 39% (13,929)

· Extent services are available for groups with specific needs

· In 12 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, services for groups with specific needs require strengthening

· In 6 of these countries, services for IDP groups with specific needs improved

5. Community Participation and Self Management: Promote community participation and self-reliance to help people of concern live constructive lives.

5.1 Community Self-Management and Equal Representation

Many communities have self-management structures where men and women of different ages and backgrounds actively participate.

Challenges and Opportunities: Participatory assessments undertaken by UNHCR with groups broken down by age and sex and from diverse backgrounds are key to ensuring that the operations plan reflects their needs, priorities and capacities. Similarly, participatory assessments are central to expanding community based approaches and ensuring that age, gender and diversity perspectives are part of their design. Regular and ongoing participatory assessments need to be encouraged and more needs to be done to follow up on the results of these assessments. In some cases, reluctance by the authorities, or even by communities themselves, to participate or to enable diverse groups among them to take part in assessments, must be addressed.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent participatory assessment informs programme design

· 53 operations report that participatory assessments do not adequately inform programme design

· In at least 35 of these operations, participatory assessments adequately inform programme design

· Extent persons of concern represented in leadership management structures

· In at least 49 operations, it is reported that refugees are not sufficiently represented in leadership management structures

· In at least 31 of these operations, refugees are sufficiently represented in leadership management structures

· In at least 8 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, it is reported that IDPs are not sufficiently represented in leadership management structures

· In at least 4 of these operations, IDPs are sufficiently included in leadership management structures

· % active female participants in leadership/ management structures

· In at least 95 out of 135 camps, leadership/management structures do not have 50% active female participants

· In at least 40 of these camps, management structures have 50% active female participation

5.2 Self-Reliance and Livelihoods

Men and women of different ages and capacities are able to pursue self-reliance activities necessary to lead dignified lives, to reduce protection risks and to enhance the sustainability of any future durable solution.

Challenges and Opportunities: Many refugees and other persons of concern face restrictions on their right to work and engage in self-reliance activities. Such restrictions increase the risk of exploitation and limit their ability to live in dignity. Other obstacles to achieving self-reliance are loss of productive and financial assets, language barriers, discrimination, non-recognition of foreign diplomas, loss of professional and educational documentation, property restrictions, administrative barriers, and/or limited access to vocational training, technical education and financial support for small businesses.

Self-reliance and livelihood projects are successfully implemented in certain operations. A number of protracted refugee situations are implementing multi-year strategies for self-reliance and have strengthened coordination with development and private sector partners. These good practices can be expanded elsewhere, notably for urban refugees.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent refugees have the right to engage in gainful employment

· In at least 47 countries, refugees do not have the right to engage in gainful employment

· In at least 6 of these countries, refugees have the right to engage in gainful employment

· Extent government allows refugees/ asylum-seekers to access land/ agricultural production

· In at least 50 countries, the government does not allow refugees/ asylum-seekers to access land/ agricultural production

· In at least 8 of these countries, the government allows refugees/ asylum-seekers to access to land/ agricultural production

· Extent population of concern is able to engage in livelihoods and become self-reliant

· In 16 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, IDPs have limited opportunity to engage in livelihoods and become self-reliant

· In at least 5 of these countries, the livelihoods and self-reliance potential of IDPs significantly improved

6. Durable Solutions: Intensify efforts and gain sustained international support to find durable solutions for people of concern.

6.1 Voluntary Return

Safe and dignified return is promoted, voluntariness is assured and men and women are individually informed and consulted.

Challenges and Opportunities: Potential for voluntary return can be strengthened in many situations where stability and peace has been restored, through enhanced cooperation and agreement, well-adapted information dissemination and the provision of return assistance.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent persons of concern able to return with means of livelihoods or productive assets

· In at least 23 countries, populations of concern are not able to return with means of livelihoods or productive assets

· In at least 10 of these countries, populations of concern are able to return with means of livelihood or productive assets

· Extent potential for voluntary return realized

· In 12 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, the potential for voluntary return is not fully realized

· In 5 of these countries, the potential for voluntary return is reached for more IDPs

· Extent durable solution strategy for IDPs needs strengthening

· In 11 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, the durable solution strategy needs strengthening

· In at least 8 of these countries, the durable solution strategy is strengthened

6.2 Rehabilitation and Reintegration Support

The right of return is respected and returnees are reintegrated within an acceptable framework that guarantees political, social and economic rights to all men and women of all ages and with different capabilities.

Challenges and Opportunities: Refugees, IDPs and non-refugee stateless persons often return to areas where the infrastructure and community networks have been destroyed. Basic social services may not be available and security is fragile. Socio-economic recovery is a pressing need in areas of return for both returnees and other nationals. Discrimination against returnees, often against minorities, can also hinder the maintenance of peace and sustainable return. In many communities of origin where peace or stability has been restored, unresolved issues can impede further development. Such obstacles include the absence of housing restitution, the non-recognition of land and property rights, insufficient guarantees of security, and non-recognition of birth, education, marriage and divorce. Cross-sectoral programmes aimed at fostering peace and reconciliation and strengthening national capacities are often key to sustaining return and accelerating reintegration.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent national rights of returnees are re-established

· In at least 21 countries of return, national rights of returnees have not been sufficiently re-established

· In at least 6 of these countries of return, national rights of returnees are sufficiently re-established

· Extent of access to effective mechanisms for housing, land and property restitution

· In at least 22 countries of return, access to effective mechanisms for housing, land and property restitution is not effective

· In at least 4 of these countries of return, access to effective mechanisms for housing, land and property restitution improved

· Extent rehabilitation and reintegration efforts sustainable

· In 15 countries where UNHCR is operationally involved with IDPs, rehabilitation and reintegration efforts need strengthening to be sustainable

· In at least 7 of these countries, reintegration efforts improved to be sustainable

6.3 Resettlement

Resettlement is actively used as a protection tool, a durable solution and a means to effect greater responsibility sharing.

Challenges and Opportunities: Although, the number of refugees in need of resettlement is growing, available resettlement places are not keeping pace. Responding to this challenge requires encouraging more countries to establish resettlement programmes as well as working with established resettlement countries to increase the number of refugees they resettle. In addition, operational efficiencies need to be enhanced to ensure resettlement needs are appropriately prioritized and the processing of resettlement cases is improved.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· # of resettlement places

· 45,000 individuals submitted for resettlement in excess of the number of places offered by resettlement countries

· The # of resettlement places offered by resettlement countries increased by 10%

· % individuals identified for urgent or emergency resettlement actually resettled

· 46.5% of individuals identified for urgent and emergency resettlement (6,200 persons) have been resettled

· The % of individuals identified for urgent and emergency resettlement that are resettled increased to 60%

6.4 Local Integration Support

Refugee and non-refugee stateless men and women are granted the range of rights and entitlements by the State necessary to integrate locally. Possibilities for self-reliance are improved through the provision of opportunities to refugees appropriate to their age and capabilities.

Challenges and Opportunities: Local integration is often the least preferred durable solution for host States yet, for many thousands of refugees and stateless persons, it is their only hope for a durable solution. Ensuring that state services include persons of concern can be a challenge, especially where services have mostly been funded by UNHCR. Encouraging development actors to invest in hosting areas remains another challenge as persons of concern often reside in marginalized areas in the country. Local integration projects successfully implemented in certain operations could be reviewed and adapted elsewhere.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent refugees treated favourably in naturalization procedures

· In at least 78 countries, refugees are not treated favourably in naturalization procedures

· In at least 10 of these countries, refugees are treated favourably in naturalization procedures

· Extent local integration permitted

· In at least 41 countries, local integration of refugees is not permitted for any group of refugees

· In at least 7 of these countries, local integration of refugees is permitted for groups of refugees


7. Headquarters and Regional Support: Ensure the Office maintains a leadership role in international protection and that field operations are supported to provide the fullest possible coverage of the needs of people of concern.

7.1 Policy, Advice and Support

UNHCR’s policies, standards and doctrine ensure coherent quality protection for populations of concern across regions.

Current Challenges and Opportunities: Forced displacement and statelessness, by their magnitude and complexity, remain prominent global issues requiring coherent and forward looking policies grounded in fundamental humanitarian and human rights principles. UNHCR must demonstrate conceptual leadership in protecting and finding solutions for uprooted populations, including those mixed in with today’s complex migratory movements, as well as for stateless persons. This encompasses working to: improve legal and administrative practices; ensure basic needs and essential services are accessible; help empower communities to meet their own needs; and find durable solutions. The upcoming 60th anniversaries of the establishment of the Office (1950) and the 1951 Refugee Convention as well as the 50th anniversary of the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness are major landmarks providing a platform to generate new and innovative responses to the protection challenges of today and in the future and to invigorate the search for and attainment of durable solutions.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent HQ and regional offices support achievement of targets in GSPs 1 - 6

· The current situation elaborated in GSPs 1 - 6 illustrates that many operations around the world do not adequately meet the needs of persons of concern

· Targeted HQ functional and regional oversight and support provided on a priority basis to 20 operations where GSPS 1-6 demonstrate comparatively critical gaps in meeting the needs of persons of concern

· Extent UNHCR formulates coherent, consistent and operationally relevant policies

· Currently there are approximately 15 policy areas in need of development and/or updating

· At least 10 of these areas are updated and/or developed to provide coherent, consistent and operationally relevant guidance

· Extent inspected UNHCR field offices and HQ units comply with the recommendations in inspection reports

· The current rate of compliance with inspection report recommendations is 90% (55 % completed and 35% in progress)

· The rate of compliance with recommendations in inspection reports is maintained

· Extent UNHCR utilizes the findings and recommendations of evaluations

· UNHCR lacks a systematic means of agreeing upon and implementing evaluation recommendations

· A systematic means of agreeing upon and implementing evaluation recommendations exists


7.2 Global Strategic Direction and Management

UNHCR has a clearly articulated corporate vision, strategy, results framework and set of priorities that guide its operations worldwide in meeting its commitment to protect and find solutions for people of concern.

Current Challenges and Opportunities: UNHCR is transitioning to a results-oriented organization that is more responsive and accountable to populations of concern. Among the central developments in this regard is the Results Framework, the new budget structure, the Global Needs Assessment, the age, gender and diversity strategy, the Global Management Accountability Framework and the new results based management software, Focus. To ensure these tools and methodologies permeate the culture of the organization and are applied consistently worldwide, headquarters will need to provide timely, systematic and coherent advice and support to field operations.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent the capabilities of UNHCR’s results-based management tools are maximized

· Various RBM tools, such as Focus, the AGDM Accountability Framework and the Global Management Accountability Framework, need to be further aligned and better understood both in the field and at HQ

· RBM tools are aligned and their use by field operations and HQ maximized

7.3 Prioritization, Resource Allocation and Financial Management

UNHCR’s global budget provides a comprehensive picture of the organization’s operational, staffing and administrative requirements. Financial resources are allocated effectively and transparently to meet the organization’s global strategic priorities and UNHCR’s system of financial management has integrity.

Current Challenges and Opportunities: The Global Needs Assessment and the New Budget Structure will provide a more comprehensive picture of the needs of persons of concern and of UNHCR’s global funding requirements to meet those needs. They will also facilitate a predictable and equitable distribution of resources across operations. Additionally, through the new Resource Allocation Framework, managers are vested with the authority to reallocate resources within their approved budgets and to operate with full spending authority at the start of each year. This needs to be accompanied by further strengthening of UNHCR’s system of financial management and oversight through greater guidance and training of staff.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent resources allocated according to an accurate and prioritized presentation of needs

· UNHCR recently introduced tools to align resources accurately to prioritize needs for each population of concern

· Resource allocation informed by an accurate and prioritized presentation of needs of each population of concern

· Extent all elements that contribute to good internal financial control mechanisms are understood

· There are many measures in place to ensure sound financial management, but there is no comprehensive framework that articulates all the elements which contribute to good financial internal control

· A comprehensive internal financial control framework exists and staff are aware of its elements, which contribute to good financial internal control

7.4 Organizational Development and Design

UNHCR’s headquarters provides overall direction and maximum support to its field operations from the most efficient and streamlined platform.

Current Challenges and Opportunities: Through a multi-year reform process, UNHCR has streamlined its structures and processes, reduced duplication at headquarters, transferred support functions to more cost-effective locations and reinforced and empowered its field operations. The ultimate aim of these changes – which will require a long-term commitment on the part of the Office – is to enhance UNHCR’s overall responsiveness to populations of concern by reducing bureaucracy and bringing decision-making closer to the point of delivery. In looking to the future, it will be necessary to capacitate the field to assume its new authorities and responsibilities by developing the appropriate tools and guidance and recruiting and deploying staff with the right skills and profile. Performance monitoring needs to be enhanced and targeted learning opportunities expanded.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent regional offices have requisite understanding and capacities for achievement of GSPs 1-6 as targeted in the operations they cover

· 8 regional offices require further knowledge and training to support achievement of GSPs 1-6 as targeted in the operations they cover

· All these regional offices capacitated to support achievement of GSPs 1-6 as targeted in the operations they cover

· Extent UNHCR is able to monitor the achievement of results in the field and through a combination of self-assessment, monitoring and analysis, improve impact and performance

· A consolidated programme management, analysis and support function does not exist to systematically monitor global impact and performance and to assist operations achieve maximum results for populations of concern

· A programme management, analysis and support function monitors UNHCR’s global performance and assists operations to achieve maximum results for populations of concern

7.5 Resource Mobilization

Donors are regularly informed of policy, operational matters, and funding requirements. Resource mobilization strategies are strengthened globally, regionally and locally.

Current Challenges and Opportunities: Donor relations and resource mobilization, especially in these times of economic and financial crisis, require constant attention to increase the funding base and ensure that the comprehensive needs of people of concern are fully met. In addition, the growing importance of decentralized funding (pooled funds, CERF, MDTFs) places greater fundraising responsibilities on field operations.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of financial needs covered by pooled funding mechanisms

· 3% of financial needs are covered by pooled funding mechanisms

· The % of financial needs covered by pooled funds increased to 5%

· % of annual budget met by contributions from the private sector and % of which is unallocated

· 4% of global UNHCR financial needs are covered by PSFR income. 60% is unallocated

· The proportion of global UNHCR financial needs covered by private sector donations increased to 6%, and the proportion that is unallocated increased to 65 %

7.6 Media Relations and Public Affairs

Public, political and financial support for UNHCR is generated through pro-active and reactive multi-media communication and targeted campaigns. Coherent and accurate information is provided to the media and the public to focus attention on the plight of persons of concern, promoting values of tolerance and respect.

Challenges and Opportunities: Public awareness of persons of concern to UNHCR and of their hardships is often low, and in many cases skewed by prejudice and misinformation. The level of tolerance in many host countries for refugees and asylum-seekers is decreasing, and xenophobia is often fueled by the tabloid media. In the global recession, trends towards criminalizing refugees as ‘’illegal’’ migrants are growing as competition for jobs and public services becomes more intense. Addressing xenophobia, discrimination and marginalization of all persons of concern is crucial to enhancing their protection and expanding opportunities for their integration. Widespread, sympathetic and accurate reporting has been linked to improved public attitudes towards persons of concern in some countries and needs to be supported to raise awareness elsewhere.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of countries in which media reporting and commentary towards persons of concern is favourable and frequent

· In at least 70% of countries in which UNHCR operates, media reporting on persons of concern is either unfavourable or infrequent

· The % of countries in which UNHCR operates where media reporting on persons of concern is unfavourable or infrequent is reduced to 65%

· % of international news media coverage in which the full spectrum of UNHCR work is represented

· In 60% of international media coverage, UNHCR’s work is only partially presented

· The % of international media coverage that does not represent the full spectrum of UNHCR’s work is reduced to 55%

7.7 Inter-Agency Relations and Strategic Partnerships

Strong operational and strategic partnerships are promoted and inter-agency cooperation strengthened, including through participation in humanitarian country teams and through the cluster approach in IDP situations.

Challenges and Opportunities: Effective partnerships are critical to ensuring that responses to the needs of persons of concern are most effective. Recent developments, including improvement to the selection process of implementing partners, provide new opportunities to widen the pool of implementing and operational partners. In addition, the cluster approach could be strengthened by improving inter-agency coordination, including by deploying staff with demonstrated capacities in this area. Moreover, humanitarian country teams should be further promoted as they offer a structure for improving coordination among the UN agencies, NGOs and the Red Cross/Crescent movement. Strengthening of the cluster approach in complex emergencies and natural disasters will further enhance the protection of IDPs and other affected populations.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of UNHCR budget implemented through partners

· 35% of UNHCR budget is implemented through partners

· At least 37% of UNHCR budget implemented through partners

· Extent strong partnerships exist with other UN bodies

· UNHCR’s relationships with other UN bodies can be strengthened, particularly in the context of engagement with priority interagency and policy issues and processes

· Joint advocacy and mutual understanding with UN bodies optimized

7.8 Strategic Human Resource and Workforce Management

UNHCR has a diverse and gender-balanced workforce that is motivated and safe, has integrity and meets the current and future needs of the organization.

Current Challenges and Opportunities: UNHCR’s most important asset is the strength and commitment of its staff worldwide. Guided by the results of the Global Staff Survey, the reform of the organization’s human resources policies seeks to maximize operational effectiveness while also building on and reinforcing staff dedication, integrity and welfare. Through enhanced career planning and management and improvements to the promotions and postings process there will be a better matching of people to positions. Through a Global Learning Centre and a new performance appraisal and management system, learning in UNHCR will be more strategic, harmonized and linked to career development. A newly established Ethics Office will lead efforts to foster a culture of ethics, respect, transparency and accountability among staff. A reinforced Ombudsman’s office contributes to early informal resolution of workplace concerns and conflicts. UNHCR has also put in place important policies on gender and diversity, which will require close monitoring and follow-up in the years ahead.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent staff perceive staff counselling as a valuable resource in assisting them to make career choices

· Individual career counselling not yet in place

· 75% of staff perceive staff counselling as a valuable resource in assisting them to make career choices

· Extent staff and managers perceive postings system as transparent and effective in placing the right staff in the right positions

· There are concerns that the present postings system lacks transparency and is not consistently effective in placing the right staff in the right positions

· 75 % of staff and managers perceive the postings system to be transparent and effective in placing the right staff in the right positions

· Extent staff assisted in meeting their learning needs

· There is no systematic means for assisting staff to identify learning needs and access relevant learning activities

· 75 % of staff indicate that they know how to identify their learning needs and how to access relevant learning activities

· 50 % of staff that identified their learning needs participated in a relevant learning activity

7.9 Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Management

ICT strategic organizational objectives and priorities are fully aligned and supportive of Field ICT needs. Cost effective ICT infrastructure, equipment, and systems are maintained and data protection mechanisms are effective.

Challenges and Opportunities: ICT has become critical to UNHCR’s operations and key administrative functions. Demand on ICT applications and support is increasing and meeting this demand is a challenge both on staff and financial resources. ICT management and support need to be realigned to better meet the needs of the Office and to strengthen customer focus and service effectiveness, especially in the Field. Further ICT investments at HQ, regional, and country levels are required and need to be complemented by additional ICT support resources, training, and guidance for users.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent ICT security policy is comprehensive

· UNHCR lacks a comprehensive ICT Security Policy

· ICT Security Policy implemented, disseminated, and monitored

· # of offices with access to reliable and secure data, information, and communications systems and applications

· In at least 70 offices, ICT infrastructure, services, and applications need to be updated

· In at least 35 of these offices, ICT infrastructure, services, and applications improved

7.10 Supply Chain and Logistics

UNHCR is able to ensure the expeditious and cost effective delivery of critical services to people of concern.

Challenges and Opportunities: Effective supply management is essential for UNHCR to respond to emergencies, but also to ensure the regular provision of materials and relief items to populations of concern. UNHCR has recently strengthened its response capacity with the creation of the Division of Emergency and Supply Management. The immediate challenge is to fine-tune systems, procedures and tools so that, without compromising flexibility, field operations can meet the needs of persons of concern in a timely and cost-effective manner. It will also be necessary to reinforce oversight, control and flexibility of the use of logistical assets.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent global stock management is harmonized under a single system with simplified supply chain for core non-food items and other items (high volume and/or high value)

· Global Stock Management System needs to be established and aligned with central emergency and regional stockpiles

· Global Stock Management System fully established and aligned with central emergency and regional stockpiles

· Extent sufficient supplies received on time

· In at least 41 operations, sufficient supplies are not systematically received on time

· In at least these 41 operations, sufficient supplies are systematically received on time

7.11 Central Emergency Preparedness and Response Capacity

UNHCR responds rapidly and robustly to the urgent needs of persons of concern in complex emergencies. Emergency preparedness is ensured and the exposure of UNHCR staff and partners to risks is reduced.

Challenges and Opportunities: Successful emergency response requires operational engagement, available staff, resources, and effective coordination. Its success depends on how fast the right people and the necessary relief items can be mobilized, as well as on good emergency management. Crisis scanning, situation-specific awareness and contingency planning are key components of emergency preparedness, which need to be constantly up-dated.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· Extent early warning, contingency planning and a robust emergency standby capacity are effective

· Early warning mechanisms need improvement and emergency procedures require updating

· Early warning mechanisms improved and global emergency response capacity able to immediately respond to an emergency of 500,000 persons

7.12 Field Safety and Security

UNHCR manages security effectively in cooperation with the UN system, enabling the Office to meet the needs of persons of concern in a manner that minimizes risks to staff, partners and persons of concern.

Challenges and Opportunities: To successfully discharge its mandate UNHCR must operate in insecure environments. UN and NGO partners are increasingly at risk and viewed as easy targets. Security preparedness and risk mitigation are of paramount importance. Through proper security risk management processes and the UN security management system, the safety of staff and persons of concern need to be addressed vigourously.

Indicators

Current situation

Targets

· % of field operations achieving full compliance with MOSS guidelines

· UNHCR has averaged 88% “[full] compliance with [some] limitations” in DSS evaluations of approximately 50% of field operations

· 100% of field operations meet DSS standards of compliance with MOSS guidelines

· Extent UNHCR has the capacity to respond to sudden or unforeseen security and safety needs of offices in the field

· Recruitment of field safety advisers with suitable profile and technical skills continues to be a challenge

· Support coverage is provided and field safety advisers are deployed in a timely manner to assist offices to respond to sudden or unforeseen security needs


 

INDICATORS

1) Percentage of PRM-funded projects that include activities that focus on prevention and response to gender-based violence (GBV).

2007

Result: 27.5%

2008

Target: 33%

SLIGHTLY BELOW TARGET

Although results did not show improvement, PRM funding for GBV refugee assistance programs increased to $6.3 million in FY 2008. Funding availability for IOs and NGOs limited the extent to which GBV could be mainstreamed into multi-sectoral programs.

Result: 27.5%

2009

Target: 33%

2010

Target: 35%

2) Percentage of countries with zero credible reports of refoulement (involuntary return to a place where there is risk of persecution.)

2007

Result: 71% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of asylum-seekers. 83% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of refugees.

2008

Target: 73% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of asylum-seekers. 77% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of refugees.

ABOVE TARGET

Result: 74% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of asylum-seekers. 83% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of refugees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNEX III

UNHCR’s 2010-2011 Global Strategic

Annex III

UNHCR’s 2010

-2011 Global Strategic Priorities

GOAL 1: Protection & Durable Solutions

Ensure respect for the rights and safety of refugees, conflict victims, stateless persons, and, in some cases, internally displaced persons in accordance with international humanitarian, human rights, and refugee laws. Our primary goals are to: prevent refoulement (involuntary return of refugees or asylum seekers to a place where their lives or freedom would be threatened), promote access to asylum, ensure humanitarian access, enhance physical protection (especially for women, children, and other vulnerable populations), uphold human dignity, and achieve durable solutions.


2009

Target: 75% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of asylum-seekers. 80% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of refugees.

2010

Target: 75% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of asylum-seekers. 83% of countries have zero credible reports of refoulement of refugees.

3) Number of countries with effective registration capacity of UNHCR in refugee situations.

2007

Result: ProGres registration system implemented with three governments and three partners.

2008

Target: 10 governments or partners operate proGres registration system alone or jointly with UNHCR.

ON TARGET

Result: ProGres implemented with nine governments and three partners; 15 operations or governments are using proGres to issue refugee ID cards.

2009

Target: 12 governments or partners use proGres registration system alone or jointly with UNHCR.

2010

Target: 14 governments or partners use proGres registration system alone or jointly with UNHCR.



2009

Target: In complex humanitarian crises, CMR does not exceed regional emergency thresholds in 95% of targeted sites. In stable refugee settings, CMR does not exceed 1.5 per 1,000 per month (0.5/10,000/day) in 92% of targeted sites.

2010

Target: In complex humanitarian crises, CMR does not exceed regional emergency thresholds in 96% of targeted sites. In stable refugee settings, CMR does not exceed 1.5 per 1,000 per month (0.5/10,000/day) in 93% of targeted sites.

2) Percentage of targeted refugee sites where Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) in children under age five does not exceed 10%.

2007

Result: In 91% of targeted refugee sites, less than 10% of children under five suffered from global acute malnutrition.

2008

Target: In 92% of targeted refugee sites, less than 10% of children under five suffer from global acute malnutrition. In 90% of non-emergency settings with stable refugee populations, less than 5% of children under five suffer from global acute malnutrition.

SLIGHTLY BELOW TARGET/

ABOVE TARGET

Result: In 91% of targeted refugee sites, less than 10% of children under five suffered from global acute malnutrition. In 94% of non-emergency settings with stable refugee populations, less than 5% of children under five suffered from global acute malnutrition.

2009

Target: In 92% of targeted refugee sites, less than 10% of children under five suffer from global acute malnutrition. In 94% of non-emergency settings with stable refugee populations, less than 5% of children under five suffer from global acute malnutrition.

2010

Target: In 93% of targeted refugee sites, less than 10% of children under five suffer from global acute malnutrition. In 95% of non-emergency settings with stable refugee populations, less than 5% of children under five suffer from global acute malnutrition

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOAL 2: Assistance

Save lives and alleviate the suffering of refugees, returning refugees, conflict victims, and in some cases, internally displaced persons, by providing life sustaining goods and services at internationally accepted standards. PRM’s assistance is provided on the basis of need according to principles of universality, impartiality, and human dignity while fostering a transition from relief to development.

INDICATORS

1) Percentage of targeted refugee sites where Crude Mortality Rates (CMR) do not exceed emergency thresholds.

2007

Result: In complex humanitarian crises, CMR did not exceed regional emergency thresholds in 100% of targeted sites.


2008

Target: In complex humanitarian crises, CMR does not exceed regional emergency thresholds in 95% of targeted sites. In stable refugee settings, CMR does not exceed 1.5 per 1,000 per month (0.5/10,000/day) in 90% of targeted sites.

ABOVE TARGET

Result: In complex humanitarian crises, CMR did not exceed regional emergency thresholds in 100% of targeted sites. In stable refugee settings, CMR did not exceed 1.5 per 1,000 per month (0.5/10,000/day) in 98% of targeted sites.


GOAL 3: U.S. Refugee Admissions Program

The goals of the Admissions program are to ensure that:

  • Eligible refugees in need of protection are offered the durable solution of resettlement to the United States or other resettlement countries;
  • The annual refugee admissions ceiling for the U.S. is based on a valid assessment of the number of refugees at risk overseas and U.S. capacity to respond;
  • The U.S. government admits as many refugees as possible within the regionally allocated ceilings determined annually by the President;
  • The Bureau provides support and influence so that UNHCR maintains a strong capacity to identify and refer refugees in need of resettlement;
  • Relevant U.S. government agencies make the most efficient use of available resources to maximize benefits to refugees;
  • Security, health, and anti-fraud measures are fully implemented in refugee processing;
  • Refugees approved by DHS and otherwise admissible are moved to the U.S. as quickly as possible;
  • Standardized essential services are provided by a nationwide network of sponsoring agencies to recently resettled refugees, so that they can begin the process of becoming self-sufficient, fully integrated members of U.S. society.

INDICATOR

1) Percentage of Refugees Admitted to the U.S. against the Regional Ceiling Established by Presidential Determination

2007

Result: Of regionally allocated ceilings totaling 50,000 refugees, 97% were admitted.

2008

Target: 100% of regionally allocated ceilings totaling 70,000 refugees.

SLIGHTLY BELOW TARGET

In FY 2008, the U.S. admitted 60,192 refugees for resettlement, a 25% increase over the FY 2007 admissions level. This achievement included the arrival of 13,823 Iraqi refugees, almost an eight-fold increase over the number of Iraqi refugees admitted to the U.S. in FY 2007.

Result: Of regionally allocated ceilings totaling 70,000 refugees, 60,192 (or 86%) were admitted.

2009

Target: 100% of regionally allocated ceilings totaling 75,000 refugees.

2010

Target: 100% of regionally allocated ceilings to be established by the President before the beginning of FY 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOAL 4: Humanitarian Migrants to Israel

Provide support to the United Israel Appeal through which Jews in distress throughout the former Soviet Union, Eastern Europe, Africa and the Near East, and other countries are resettled to Israel and are provided assistance to achieve self-sufficiency and integrate into Israeli society. The United Israel Appeal is the only U.S. organization with a resettlement program in Israel.


INDICATORS

1) Availability and quality of mandatory services to eligible humanitarian migrants. Mandatory services are defined as care and processing en route, transport to Israel, and transitional housing.

2007

Result: 100% of eligible migrants received mandatory services under grant; and 98% of program participants were satisfied with these services.

2008

Target: 100% of eligible migrants receive mandatory services under grant; and at least 90% of program participants are satisfied with these services.

ABOVE TARGET

Result: 100% of eligible migrants received mandatory services under grant; and 94% of program participants were satisfied with these services

2009

Target: 100% of eligible migrants receive mandatory services under grant; and at least 90% of program participants are satisfied with these services.

2010

Target: 100% of eligible migrants receive mandatory services under grant; and at least 95% of program participants are satisfied with these services.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2) Humanitarian migrants are provided with effective Hebrew language training.

2007

Result: 93% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advanced a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 60% of language trainees from Ethiopia advanced a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

2008

Target: 90% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advance a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 75% of language trainees from Ethiopia advance a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

ABOVE TARGET/

BELOW TARGET

Result: 96% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advanced a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 54% of language trainees from Ethiopia advance a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

2009

Target: 90% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advance a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 75% of language trainees from Ethiopia advance a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

2010

Target: 90% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advance a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 75% of language trainees from Ethiopia advance a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 GOAL 5: Migration Management 

Build the capacity of governments and civil society for effective, orderly, and humane migration management policies and systems at the national and regional levels, including programs and activities to protect and assist vulnerable migrants such as asylum seekers and victims of trafficking in persons.


INDICATORS

1) Availability and quality of mandatory services to eligible humanitarian migrants. Mandatory services are defined as care and processing en route, transport to Israel, and transitional housing.

2007

Result: 100% of eligible migrants received mandatory services under grant; and 98% of program participants were satisfied with these services.

2008

Target: 100% of eligible migrants receive mandatory services under grant; and at least 90% of program participants are satisfied with these services.

ABOVE TARGET

Result: 100% of eligible migrants received mandatory services under grant; and 94% of program participants were satisfied with these services

2009

Target: 100% of eligible migrants receive mandatory services under grant; and at least 90% of program participants are satisfied with these services.

2010

Target: 100% of eligible migrants receive mandatory services under grant; and at least 95% of program participants are satisfied with these services.

2) Humanitarian migrants are provided with effective Hebrew language training.

2007

Result: 93% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advanced a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 60% of language trainees from Ethiopia advanced a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

2008

Target: 90% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advance a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 75% of language trainees from Ethiopia advance a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

ABOVE TARGET/

BELOW TARGET

Result: 96% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advanced a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 54% of language trainees from Ethiopia advance a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

2009

Target: 90% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advance a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 75% of language trainees from Ethiopia advance a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

2010

Target: 90% of language trainees from Newly Independent States advance a full grade level within the specified period (five months) and 75% of language trainees from Ethiopia advance a full grade level within the specified period (ten months).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOAL 6: Population  

Advances USG interests in bilateral and multilateral fora dealing with population and development issues.

INDICATOR

1) Percent increase from 2005 in population-related resolutions negotiated that contain language in keeping with USG population policy. (The percentage of population-related resolutions negotiated that contained language in keeping with USG population policy was 60% in FY 2005.)

2007

Result: There was a 5% increase from FY 2005 in the number of population-related resolutions negotiated that contain language in keeping with USG population policy.

2008

Target: 6% increase from FY 2005 in population-related resolutions negotiated that contain language in keeping with USG population policy.

ON TARGET

2008

Result: 6% increase from FY 2005 in population-related resolutions negotiated that contain language in keeping with USG population policy

2009

Target: 8% increase from FY 2005 in population-related resolutions negotiated that contain language in keeping with USG population policy.

2010

Target: 9% increase from FY 2005 in population-related resolutions negotiated that contain language in keeping with USG population policy.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GOAL 7: Managing Human & Programmatic Resources 

PRM monitors and evaluates its program and personnel requirements and resources to ensure that they efficiently and effectively support the Department’s transformational diplomacy agenda.


INDICATOR

1) Monitoring & Evaluation: Percentage of funding that is monitored and evaluated (M&E) by PRM staff through formal reporting channels (i.e., reporting cables, official memos and/or e-mails.)

2007

Result: 87.5% of funding to NGO and other international organization* programs was monitored and evaluated (M&E) by program officers and refugee coordinators through formal reporting channels.

2008

Target: 75% of funding to NGO and other international organization* programs is monitored and evaluated (M&E) by program officers and refugee coordinators through formal reporting channels.

BELOW TARGET

Some programs supported with Supplemental funds received near the end of the fiscal year could not be monitored during the fiscal year but would be monitored later in the project period.

Result: 70% of funding to NGO and other international organization* programs was monitored and evaluated (M&E) by program officers and refugee coordinators through formal reporting channels.

2009

Target: 80% of funding to NGO and other international organization* programs is monitored and evaluated (M&E) by program officers and refugee coordinators through formal reporting channels.

2010

Result: 85% of funding to NGO and other international organization* programs is monitored and evaluated (M&E) by program officers and refugee coordinators through formal reporting channels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 *Other international organizations include those that are not primary PRM partners (PRM’s primary partners are UNHCR, ICRC, UNRWA, and IOM)



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