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Diplomacy in Action

Framework for the Cooperation Between the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, U.S. Department of State for the Year 2009


May 18, 2009

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This Framework for Cooperation is undertaken by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (hereinafter referred to as UNHCR) and the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, U.S. Department of State (hereinafter referred to as PRM). It is understood that this document, in its entirety, constitutes policy commitments by UNHCR and PRM, and is therefore not intended to be legally binding. In the interest of transparency, it will be posted on the U.S. Department of State and UNHCR websites.

I. Reform Efforts:

The United States (hereinafter referred to as the U.S.) remains committed to demonstrating performance and accountability in all U.S. foreign assistance programs and in its partners. This was underscored by the reform efforts undertaken by the U.S. to align all U.S. assistance funding with diplomatic and development goals. The U.S. provides humanitarian assistance on the basis of need according to principles of universality, impartiality and human dignity. Furthermore, the U.S. continues to recognize that provision of assistance requires an integrated, coordinated, and multi-sectoral approach to be most effective.

UNHCR has undertaken a series of internal and broader UN reforms over the past two years with the similar goal of becoming more effective and results-oriented with a workforce that can respond more easily to complex emergencies. PRM shares a particular interest in and support for these reform initiatives. PRM will continue to be supportive in the upcoming year during which further reform initiatives will be implemented with the aim of aligning the Structural and Management Change process with the needs and challenges currently facing the organization. PRM notes its specific interest in the following issues:

A. UNHCR’s world-wide roll-out of the Global Needs Assessment (GNA), in conjunction with the global launch of FOCUS, to facilitate comprehensive planning, budgeting, and accountability for results based on beneficiary needs;

B. UNHCR efforts to utilize more effectively its own standards, objectives, indicators and Results-Based Management (RBM) system and further develop a monitoring and evaluation function to ensure that beneficiary needs are met and the impact of UNHCR’s work is demonstrated;

C. UNHCR’s new budget structure and the manner in which it will align its budget with planning to ensure greater clarity and transparency in terms of addressing the needs of different categories of populations of concern. In so doing, UNHCR expects to provide a better basis for results-based management and improved governances.

D. Reform of UNHCR’s accountability structures, including bureau reorganization, regionalization, and decentralization, aimed at increasing authority and management in the field. In this process, the completion and roll-out of the Global Accountability Framework will be crucial to ensuring effective accountability, division of labor, and cooperation between headquarters and the field, as well as between the staff and management;

PRM and UNHCR believe it is critical, especially in years when funding is limited, that resources are managed and activities prioritized in a way that maximizes refugee protection, solutions, and care. PRM encourages UNHCR headquarters to consistently communicate and apply clear criteria for field operations’ prioritization of activities. In order to ensure that UNHCR’s services are meeting standards consistently in all regions, PRM believes it is vital that UNHCR headquarters strengthen its capacity to monitor, evaluate and report on the impact of its programs and activities in 2009.

PRM intends to continue to focus considerable attention in the coming year on these initiatives in order to help UNHCR achieve success. In line with this support, UNHCR is fully committed to share information and consult with PRM and other interested governments on these key issues during the year.

II. PRM Priorities and UNHCR Global Strategic Objectives:

PRM supports UNHCR’s Global Strategic Objectives (GSOs) for 2009 which largely reflect the broad PRM priorities for UNHCR. PRM and UNHCR intend that the commitment to meet these objectives and targets will continue to serve as the basis of the 2009 Framework agreement. UNHCR is committed to providing standardized reporting on progress made in accomplishing its objectives and targets. UNHCR is also committed to making progress in meeting its standards and in measuring and reporting on that progress. Reflecting the principles of Good Humanitarian Donorship to which the U.S. and UNHCR subscribe, PRM believes, with a few exceptions (see the list in section V below), that standardized UNHCR reporting on its GSOs, performance targets, standards and indicators will satisfy PRM requirements in 2009.

PRM believes that the following UNHCR 2009 GSOs and their associated accomplishments and targets deserve particular attention and should be the focus of UNHCR progress reports, particularly in strengthening UNHCR as an effective, fully engaged, responsive and respected humanitarian agency:

A) GSO 1 – Ensure international standards of protection are met for all persons of concern to UNHCR taking into account their age, gender or personal background with priority given to:
  • Applying participatory age, gender and diversity approach in the design, implementation, and monitoring of programs;
  • Strengthen protection, particularly through strengthening standard operating procedures to prevent and respond to sexual and gender based violence, including systematic and timely reporting; and
  • Increase and improve the level and quality of registration of persons of concern and implement standard operating procedures for continuous registration.

B) GSO 2 – Advocate for and support governments in the development and maintenance of an international protection regime including its implementation at the national level, with priority given to:
  • Preserving asylum space through strengthening States’ legal frameworks and administrative capacity for effective implementation of the 1951 Convention/1967 Protocol and related international and regional standards;
  • Strengthening host country capacity to undertake refugee status determination, provide quality asylum and offer durable solutions;
  • Promoting values of tolerance and respect for asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs, stateless persons and others of concern to UNHCR (GSO 5.1); and
  • Addressing situation of statelessness more effectively by ensuring that minimum rights and a specific legal citizenship regime to address the situation of stateless persons with no prospect of obtaining nationality are established in various countries.

D) GSO 3 – Redoubling the search for durable solutions, with priority given to:
· Implementing best interest determination procedures in all UNHCR operations;
  • Implementing comprehensive strategies to resolve refugee situations and situations of statelessness, particularly those that are protracted (GSO 2.2);
  • Enhancing the use of resettlement as a strategic protection tool, durable solution, and burden and responsibility-sharing mechanism.

E) GSO 4 – Establish effective partnerships and frameworks for action for responding to the challenges of protecting and finding solutions for persons internally displaced due to conflict and abuses of human rights; protecting refugees in broader migration movements; and bridging the gap between relief and development, with priority given to:
  • Supporting and leading efforts to provide protection and solutions for persons internally displaced due to conflict and abuses of human rights as part of the collaborative response to IDPs, including engagement in UN Country Teams; and
  • Improving policy and operational responses, as well as enhanced cooperation with States and other relevant actors, to ensure protection of refugees and stateless persons within broader migration movements.

F) GSO 6 – Strengthen UNHCR as an effective, fully engaged, responsive and respected humanitarian agency worthy of public, political and financial support, with priority given to:
  • Maintaining financial stability; improving decision making and support to operations; and undertaking comprehensive reform of UNHCR’s human resources policies;
  • Institutionalizing RBM as a fundamental performance and accountability framework for the organization;
  • Improving gender balance in UNHCR’s workforce in the field and at Headquarters within the context of UNHCR’s Gender Policy;
  • Strengthening UNHCR’s partnerships and cooperation with all stakeholders;
  • Increasing global response capacity so as to have in place a capacity to respond to an emergency of 500,000 people; and
  • Regional response capacity strengthened through improved contingency planning, preparedness and cooperation with regional and national actors;

In addition to the priorities listed above, PRM expresses its support for UNHCR’s special initiatives focused on protracted and urban refugee situations. PRM believes these individuals require greater attention internationally. PRM supports UNHCR’s work to develop policies, pursue durable solutions, raise awareness, and increase advocacy for these persons of concern.

III. PRM and UNHCR further identify the following issues of a more bilateral nature:

i. UNHCR and PRM are committed to holding semi-annual Framework discussions on program and policy issues of mutual interest, and to preparing a joint written report on the these discussions following the mid-year consultations.

ii. PRM confirms its commitment to remain a strong supporter of UNHCR and to continue to partner with UNHCR to protect and find durable solutions for the millions of refugees, stateless persons, IDPs and other persons of concern around the world.

iii. PRM and UNHCR will work to expand UNHCR’s donor base and to increase government and private sector contributions. As UNHCR rolls out its 2009 Resource Mobilization Strategy, UNHCR will continue to channel all USG funding-related communication between its Donor Relations and Resource Mobilization Section and the U.S. Mission in Geneva.

iv. PRM supports UNHCR’s efforts to build self-reliance of refugees and other persons of concern and to strengthen refugees’ capacity as agents of solutions and development.

v. Recognizing the need for early and predictable funding, PRM will strive to provide a large and early contribution to UNHCR. Subject to the availability of funds, PRM will strive to maintain its funding level for the year at between 22 –25% of the annual program budget for 2009;

vi. With the Global Needs Assessment, PRM and UNHCR support the strategy for needs-based resource allocation and budgeting, which should lead to a budget covering all UNHCR’s “persons of concern,” bearing in mind the requirement to ensure that the needs of refugees and stateless persons remain priority considerations consistent with UN General Assembly resolutions and UNHCR’s mandate.

vii. PRM and UNHCR commit to collaborating on strengthening monitoring and evaluation efforts already underway. Given the global rollout of the results-based management software (Focus), analysis of this data will be imperative. UNHCR should begin to ensure that there is a system in place in time for the 2010-2011 budget to aggregate and analyze Focus data. In addition, PRM and UNHCR will work together with other EXCOM members to ensure that recommendations of previous evaluations are followed-up on and that evaluations of mutual interest are included in future PDES work plans.

viii. PRM recognizes that protection is central to UNHCR’s mandate. In that vain, PRM acknowledges the contribution of all UNHCR staff towards protection, as reflected in the PART indicator. However, PRM retains its interest in working towards measuring the specific impact of protection-focused staff and activities in the future.

ix. In the event that new and unforeseen large-scale refugee crises occur during the year, PRM may consider supplementary appeals for programs that cannot be accommodated within the Operational Reserve, as well as supplementary appeals that are already foreseen to continue in 2009. PRM appreciates the difficulty inherent in planning for unforeseen events and will strive to meet funding agreements for supplementary budgets throughout the year. However, PRM registers its concern about the increasing number of supplementary appeals, especially for ongoing operations, and requests that it receive timely updates if/when supplementary appeal levels are adjusted by the Budget Committee and when appeals are included in larger UN Consolidated Appeals.

x. PRM supports UNHCR’s role in the IDP cluster approach and the integration of relevant IDP activities into UNHCR’s programs and budget. PRM will consider supplementary appeals for IDP operations issued during the year as well as for recurrent global cluster lead costs for UNHCR’s protection, camp coordination/management and emergency shelter responsibilities.

xi. PRM is committed to continuing to provide support to UNHCR to increase its resettlement capacity and encourages further efforts to ensure that resources are focused on improving the identification and referral of cases in need of resettlement. UNHCR is committed to continuing to make every effort to meet the agreed upon referral targets, recognizing the need to harmonize it with voluntary repatriation operations, in order to prevent any adverse impact on return movements;

xii. UNHCR acknowledges U.S. concerns regarding appropriate representation of U.S. national staff with the Office. While fully respecting related UN Rules and Regulations, UNHCR fully intends to continue to make every effort to attract and promote U.S. interest in employment with UNHCR by providing information on external vacancies via the Internet and other fora, widely disseminating the entry exam to be included on the International Professional Roster (IPR) and through the Junior Professional Officer program. UNHCR is committed to ensuring that current American staff are fully considered for promotion in accordance with UNHCR Human Resources rules and regulations. UNHCR is also committed to reviewing the level of retention of American staff and, in consultation with PRM, to undertaking an “awareness-raising” tour prior to the next IPR call in various U.S. cities.

IV. Performance Measures and Targets

UNHCR confirms its commitment to regularly monitor performance against its revised Global Strategic Objectives and Performance Targets for 2009, as outlined in the Global Appeal 2009 update, and to report to the United States and other Executive Committee members on performance results in a timely manner, including specific requests for its Standards and Indicators Report.

PRM has developed performance measures and targets that relate specifically to the work of UNHCR and that in many cases mirror UNHCR’s objectives and targets. Efforts to narrow the differences between the measures, objectives and targets established by PRM and UNHCR will continue. To the extent that they differ or the timing of the reporting on these activities differs, UNHCR is committed to providing PRM with the additional information it requires. PRM measures and targets that require specific reporting from UNHCR are listed in Annex I of the Framework. UNHCR’s 2009 GSOs and performance targets are attached as Annex II.

Although PRM does not require direct reporting from UNHCR on Crude Mortality Rates (CMR) and Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) for refugees, PRM does rely on UNHCR to provide data to the Center for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) on these indicators, which in turn provides PRM with this data. UNHCR is committed to providing this data to CRED in a timely manner.

V. Reporting

In addition to standard reporting made broadly available by UNHCR, PRM requires reporting and/or input from UNHCR each year on activities of particular interest to PRM, as listed below and based on the following general reporting/input schedule:

Reporting/Input (by Drafter) Timing

Reporting on Goals in the U.S. Mission Performance Plan (U.S.) January 15
Reporting on previous quarter resettlement referrals to U.S. (UNHCR) January 31
Out-year budget forecasts (UNHCR) February 27
Annual reporting on PRM performance measures/targets (UNHCR) March 15
Reporting on previous quarter resettlement referrals to U.S. (UNHCR) April 30
Progress report in advance of mid-year Framework discussions (UNHCR) June 15
Joint report on mid-year Framework discussions (Joint) July 31
Reporting on previous quarter resettlement referrals to U.S. (UNHCR) July 31
Reporting on previous quarter resettlement referrals to U.S. (UNHCR) October 31
Progress report on Framework priorities and objectives in advance of
year-end Framework discussions (UNHCR) November 20



Done in two originals in the English language.

This Framework for Cooperation will remain valid until 31 December 2009.

Samuel M. Witten António Guterres
Acting Assistant Secretary of State for High Commissioner for Refugees
Population, Refugees, and Migration United Nations
United States Department of States

Date: 18 May 2009 Date: 18 May 2009

Annexes:
Annex I: PRM Performance Measures with Relevance to the Work of UNHCR
Annex II: UNHCR’s 2008 Global Strategic Objectives


Annex 1: PRM Performance Measures with Relevance to the Work of UNHCR

UNHCR is committed to addressing and reporting to the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration on the following performance measures and targets established by PRM for the current year. Reporting is requested annually by March 15 on efforts as of December 31 of the previous year.

Long-term Objective
Performance Indicator
Target for 2008
Target for 2009
Target for 2010
1) Improve refugee protection, care, and provision of lasting solutions to their plight through deployment of an effective refugee registration system.
Number of countries where UNHCR has deployed its Project Profile refugee registration system. By 2006 the goal is to have Project Profile deployed worldwide, followed by the roll out of Project Profile to governments in 2007 and beyond.
10 governments and NGOs receive Project Profile

12 governments and NGOs receive Project Profile

14 governments and NGOs receive Project Profile

2) Enhance UNHCR’s protection capacity through creation and mainstreaming of additional protection-related posts.
Number of additional UNHCR protection posts created worldwide with USG support. Target is twofold: a) Cumulative number of posts created with USG support; b) cumulative number of posts mainstreamed into UNHCR's budget.
a) 50; b) 39
a) 50; b) 41
n/a – this indicator will be discontinued in 2010
3) Increase UNHCR’s senior staff presence in deep-field locations.
Percentage of D-1/P-4/P-5 positions in D/E/U duty stations.
21.3%
22%
23%
4) Provide refugee solutions through third-country resettlement
Number of individual and group refugee referrals to the U.S. from UNHCR.
25,000 referrals
25,000 referrals
25,000 referrals
5) Improve the care of refugees by assessing their needs and prioritizing refugee programs based on assessed needs
Undertake an assessment of refugee needs in countries where UNHCR operates.
Needs assessments are provided to donors for each country where UNHCR assists refugee populations greater than 5,000.
Needs assessments are provided to donors for each country where UNHCR assists refugee populations
Global Needs Assessment implemented world-wide
6) Demonstrate strong budget and program management
The percentage of critical recommendations in UNHCR’s annual audit report that are fully addressed by June of the year following issuance of the audit report.
65% addressed; 30% being addressed
65% addressed; 35% being addressed
65% addressed; 38% being addressed
7) Demonstrate sound resource management
UNHCR Inventory Control: Value of non-expendable items procured versus total value of recorded non-expendable property procured.
Track and account for items procured worldwide (at headquarters and in the field), the ratio is 1.4:1
Track and account for items procured worldwide (at headquarters and in the field), the ratio is 1.3:1
Track and account for items procured worldwide (at headquarters and in the field), the ratio is 1.3:1



Note: PRM does not require direct reporting from UNHCR on Crude Mortality Rates (CMR) and Global Acute Malnutrition (GAM) for refugees, however, PRM does rely on UNHCR to provide data to the Center for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) on these indicators, which in turn provides PRM with this data.


Annex 2: UNHCR Strategic Objectives and Performance Targets for 2009

Global strategic objective 1 - Ensure international standards of protection are met for all persons of concern to UNHCR taking into account their age, gender or personal background, with priority given to:

Expected accomplishments
Performance targets
1.1 Improving protection against refoulement and physical security and reducing incidents of violence, in particular preventing and responding to sexual and gender-based violence;
1.1.1 States respect the principle of non-refoulement and grant all asylum-seekers access to asylum procedures that provide for fair, effective and prompt decision-making with UNHCR’s monitoring detecting no instances of refugees being returned against their will (Agenda for Protection (AfP) Goal 1, Objective 2).

1.1.2 100 per cent of UNHCR operations have in place standard operating procedures to prevent and respond to sexual and gender based violence, including systematic and timely reporting (AfP Goal 4, Objective 4 and Goal 6, Objective 1).
1.2 Preventing malnutrition, and reducing the prevalence and impact of HIV and AIDS;
1.2.1 In operations receiving food aid and recording high malnutrition rates, steps have been taken in collaboration with WFP to stabilize acute malnutrition rates to a level below 10 per cent and to eliminate micronutrient deficiencies.

1.2.2 At least 85 per cent of refugees in camps have access to culturally appropriate HIV and AIDS information-education-communication materials and at least 80 per cent can benefit from antiretroviral therapy when it is available to surrounding local host populations.

1.3 Ensuring civil, social and economic rights are secured and opportunities for self-reliance maximized with particular attention to the rights of women and children;

1.3.1 100 per centof UNHCR operations utilize a participatory age, gender & diversity mainstreaming approach in the design, implementing and monitoring of programmes.

1.3.2 Self-reliance and empowerment of refugees, including community self-management, are enhanced in 100 per cent of UNHCR operations enabling refugees’ increased enjoyment of their civil, social and economic rights, reduced dependence on assistance and enhanced sustainability of any of the three durable solutions (AfP Goal 5, Objective 7).

1.4 Ensuring the right to education;

1.4.1 School enrolment of primary-aged boys and girls in camp and urban situations is increased.


1.5 Increasing and improving the level and quality of registration of persons of concern.

1.5.1 All country operations registering refugees and others of concern are implementing standard operating procedures for continuous registration (AfP Goal 1, Objective 11).


Global strategic objective 2 - Advocate for and support governments in the development and maintenance of an international protection regime including its implementation at the national level, with priority given to:

Expected accomplishments
Performance targets
2.1 Preserving asylum space through effective implementation of the 1951 Convention and its 1967 Protocol and related international and regional standards;

2.1.1 The legal frameworks and administrative capacities of States are strengthened in order to ensure compliance with their international protection obligations.

2.1.2 The UNHCR mandate refugee status determination (RSD) processes in the 15 countries accounting for 90 per cent of UNHCR’s global RSD operations are further improved in terms of quality of decisions and more efficient processing capacity (AfP Goal 1, Objective 2).

2.2 Strengthening host country capacity to undertake RSD, provide quality asylum and offer durable solutions;

2.2.1 Host countries are assuming increased responsibility for protection and durable solutions, including their capacity to undertake RSD, provide quality asylum and offer durable solutions, through the provision of technical and financial assistance, and increased usage of international human rights instruments, Executive Committee conclusions and UNHCR guidelines, in particular in States not parties to the 1951 Convention and its 1967 Protocol (AfP Goal 3, Objective 2).

2.2.2 Number of protracted statelessness situations have decreased through acquisition of effective citizenship.

2.3 Addressing situations of statelessness more effectively.

2.3.1 Minimum rights and a specific legal citizenship regime to address the situation of stateless persons with no prospect of obtaining nationality are established in various countries.




Global strategic objective 3 - Redoubling the search for durable solutions, with priority given to:

Expected accomplishments
Performance targets
3.1 Promoting the creation of conditions conducive for return and ensuring sustainable reintegration;

3.1.1 Within one year of return, returnees are making steady progress towards self-reliance and are fully integrated into national and area recovery and development programmes (AfP Goal 5, Objective 3).


3.2 Developing and implementing comprehensive strategies to resolve protracted situations;

3.2.1 Multi-year comprehensive durable solutions strategies, in which the strategic use of resettlement and local integration have their proper place, jointly developed by UNHCR and relevant actors are under implementation in 100 per cent of operations with protracted refugee situations (AfP Goal 5, Objective 1).

3.2.2 Best interests determination procedures to identify durable solutions for unaccompanied and separated children are being implemented in all UNHCR operations (AfP Goal 6, Objective 2).


3.3 Strengthening local integration as a durable solution;

3.3.1 Refugee-hosting areas are being included in national development plans and strategies for sustainable funding based on mechanisms such as the Common Country Assessments (CCA) and United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks (UNDAF), as well as Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSP) (AfP Goal 3 Objective 5).

3.3.2 Number of countries allowing refugees to locally integrate as a durable solution has increased (AfP Goal 5, Objective 4).

3.4 Enhancing the use of resettlement as a strategic protection tool, durable solution, and burden and responsibility sharing mechanism;

3.4.1 The strategic use of resettlement has been expanded in line with the guidance provided in the Multilateral Framework of Understandings on Resettlement (AfP Goal 5, Objective 5).

3.5 Implementing effective exit and phase-down strategies through partnerships and handover arrangements with development partners and the competent authorities.
3.5.1 UNHCR’s presence and cost of operations have been reducedin situations in which durable solutions are being achieved.

Global strategic objective 4 – Establish effective partnerships and frameworks for action for responding to the challenges of protecting and finding solutions for persons internally displaced due to conflict and abuses of human rights, protecting refugees in broader migration movements, and bridging the gap between relief and development, with priority given to:

Expected accomplishments
Performance targets
4.1 Supporting and leading efforts to provide protection and solutions for persons internally displaced due to conflict and abuses of human rights as part of the collaborative response to IDPs;

4.1.1 Cluster arrangements for IDPs and the appropriate tasks and responsibilities of UNHCR as cluster lead have been implemented at the country level in IASC-prioritized situations and have resulted in a better, predictable, coordinated, effective and consistent delivery of protection and assistance.
4.1.2 UNHCR is actively engaged in UN Country Team needs assessments, planning and strategy formulation for IDPs, and when appropriate, is delivering timely and effective humanitarian assistance in clusters outside of its lead responsibilities.
4.1.3 Adequate funding support from the donor community has been received so as to enable UNHCR to undertake its cluster-lead role in countries selected for implementation of the new collaborative response to IDP situations.

4.2 Improving policy and operational responses to ensure that refugees are protected within broader migration movements;
4.2.1 States are increasingly turning to UNHCR to provide practical solutions in responding to the need to protect refugees within broader migration movements (AfP Goal 3).
4.2.2 UNHCR, in cooperation with States and other relevant actors in regions receiving refugees within mixed flows, is establishing a system through which persons wishing to seek asylum will be identified and given access to the asylum procedure while persons with other needs are channeled into alternative response mechanisms and solutions (AfP Goal 1, Objective 2 and Goal 2, Objective 1).


4.3 Mobilizing development actors to support reintegration and recovery in returnee-impacted areas so as to make return of the displaced sustainable.

4.3.1 UNHCR’s active involvement in United Nations common programming processes (CCA and UNDAF), post-conflict needs assessments and the preparation of poverty reduction strategies is resulting in early and sustained engagement of development actors in supporting sustainable reintegration of returnees, early recovery of affected communities, and support to refugee-impacted areas.


Global strategic objective 5 - Strengthen UNHCR’s external relations through improved public information, public awareness, media relations and fund raising, with priority given to:

Expected accomplishments
Performance targets
5.1 Promoting values of tolerance and respect for asylum-seekers, refugees, IDPs and other persons of concern to UNHCR;

5.1.1 Respect and tolerance for asylum seekers and refugees has increased through the implementation of preventive and reactive advocacy strategies as elaborated in UNHCR’s respect and tolerance strategy (AfP Goal 1 Objective 8).

5.2 Raising UNHCR’s overall visibility, branding and image; and

5.2.1 New Public Information strategy, including a multi-media branding campaign, is developed and under implementation, resulting in increased visibility and public awareness of UNHCR.

5.3 Expanding UNHCR’s donor base and increasing contributions to UNHCR’s programmes.

5.3.1 New fund raising strategy that includes increased delegation to field representatives, including country-specific strategies that take into account bilateral and other initiatives being implemented, is resulting in an enlarged donor base and increased contributions to UNHCR programmes and a reduced gap between UNHCR’s total budget and funds received.

5.3.2 Current level of USD 28 million from individuals, companies and foundations as well as the number of private individuals donating regularly to UNHCR has significantly increased.

Global strategic objective 6 - Strengthen UNHCR as an effective, fully engaged, responsive and respected humanitarian agency worthy of public, political and financial support, with priority given to:

Expected accomplishments
Performance targets
6.1 Maintaining financial stability by redesigning the structure of UNHCR so as streamline the organization and reduce bureaucracy, improve decision-making and support to operations, and reduce fixed costs;

6.1.1 A comprehensive review of the design of UNHCR has been completed and implementation of results is under way, resulting in a streamlined structure, reduced bureaucracy, improved decision-making and support to operations, and improved internal management control.

6.2 Strengthening UNHCR’s partnerships and cooperation with all stakeholders, in particular with Governments, the UN, and NGOs;

6.2.1 All UNHCR field teams are active participants in UN common programming processes and are utilizing comprehensive assessment of needs and participatory planningwith stakeholders to strengthen partnership and develop strategies that utilize the full range of resources available.

6.3 Developing and maintaining an emergency preparedness and response capacity to respond to emergencies of 500,000 persons;

6.3.1 UNHCR’s global emergency response capacity (including non-food relief items, vehicles, office accommodation, and staffing surge capability) have increased so as to have in place a capacity to respond to an emergency of 500,000 persons.

6.3.2 UNHCR’s regional response capacity has been strengthened through improved contingency planning, preparedness and cooperation with regional and national actors.

6.4 Undertaking comprehensive reform of UNHCR’s human resource policies, in order to ensure maximum operational effectiveness, including enhanced capacity to operate in situations of insecurity, and progress in the achievement of gender equity;


6.4.1 An integrated workforce strategy is being implemented which enhances the speed and effectiveness of organizational response and better meets the needs of the organization and aspirations of staff.


6.5 Institutionalizing results-based management (RBM) as a fundamental performance and accountability framework for the organization.
6.5.1 An RBM framework and strategy is under implementation resulting in improved strategic and operations planning, performance management and reporting.
6.5.2 Planning and prioritization of and within operations as well as resource allocation decisions are increasingly based on the systematic use of standards and indicators.
6.5.3 A knowledge management strategy for UNHCR has been developed and implementation is under way.
6.5.4 A comprehensive management development strategy is under implementation including individual development plans and increased participation in security management learning programmes.
6.5.5 Management Systems Renewal Project (MSRP) roll-out is completed resulting in increased efficiency and savings.
6.5.6 Percentage of unsatisfactory audits and inspections is decreased and above-average increased.






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