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Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons 2009 Conference for Potential Bidders: Information and Technical Assistance for Fiscal Year 2010 Grant Solicitations


November 5, 2009

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The Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons (G/TIP) hosted the 2009 Conference for Potential Bidders on November 5, 2009 to provide information and technical assistance regarding the upcoming Fiscal Year 2010 grant solicitations. Speaker's presentations are included below for reference.

2010 G/TIP Solicitation Overview
Jane Nady Sigmon, PhD
Senior Coordinator for International Programs

Welcome

  • G/TIP International Programs Section is pleased to host the 3rd Annual Bidders’ Conference.
  • This Conference incorporates suggestions we received from last year’s participants. Based on the evaluations we added presentations describing G/TIP-funded projects and we provided nametags to promote networking. You will also find attendee questions and answers at the end of this presentation.
  • Today’s presentations will be posted on our website so that the material from the slides will be available to all, including those who cannot be here.

G/TIP International Programs

  • G/TIP allocates foreign assistance through an open and competitive process.
  • Our foreign assistance priorities are guided by information and recommendations in the country narratives of the annual Trafficking in Persons Report.
  • G/TIP’s program funds are the only USG funding that is dedicated solely to combating human trafficking outside the U.S. These funds are critical to our global efforts to combat human trafficking.
  • In 2009, $22 million was appropriated – 57 projects were selected for funding.

G/TIP International Programs

  • G/TIP Anti-TIP Programs have grown significantly
    – We currently administer 190 projects totaling over $50 million in 60+ countries
    – Efforts to improve effectiveness of our funds:
    – Conducted more on-site program and administrative grant reviews
    – Increased our emphasis on project design, goals, objectives, and indicators – prior to award
    – Awarded two projects to conduct evaluability assessments
    – Disseminated information about successful projects
    – Working with our grantees on common indicators for projects with similar activities
    – Plan to initiate small grantees meetings in FY 2010
  • Increased Interest in Anti-TIP Funding means tougher Competition for our limited funds.

Proposals Received by G/TIPAmount Requested
FY 2006 – 200 proposals2006 – $45 million
FY 2007 – 286 proposals2007 – $80 million
FY 2008 – 350 proposals2008 – $108 million
FY 2009 – 372 proposals2009 – $146 million

G/TIP’s 2010 Solicitation
  • The Request for Statements of Interest (SOI) was posted November 2, 2009, on three websites.
    – www.GrantSolutions.gov
    – www.Grants.gov
    – The G/TIP website, www.state.gov/j/tip
  • Information was sent to all U.S. embassies.
  • Appropriations are pending.
Two New Procedures for 2010 Competitive Grants

  1. Two-stage Competitive Review Process:
    a) Statements of Interest (SOI) submitted for review
    – Two-page SOI is intended to save precious time and resources of applicants and reviewers. (About 15% of full proposals were selected for funding in 2009.)
    – Preserves a fair and open competition
    b) Applicants with highly ranked SOIs will be invited to submit full proposals for competitive review.
  1. No applications will be accepted via email.
    – Applications must be submitted using 1 of 2 websites.

Who is Eligible to Apply?

  • U.S. and foreign non-governmental organizations (NGO)
  • Public international organizations (PIO)
  • Colleges and universities
  • For profit organizations

Programs May Focus on One or More Countries

  • Bilateral Programs: focus on 1 country
  • Regional Programs: focus on more than 1 country in a region (US State Department Regions)
  • Multiregional/global Programs: focus on countries in more than 1 region or global issues

Limited Funding Prompts Priorities

  • To target funds most effectively and provide potential applicants with information about funding priorities, G/TIP identified 40 priority countries for FY 2010 funding.
  • Selection of priority countries was conducted in consultation with other offices in the Department of State.
  • Factors considered in the selection of countries:
    • 2009 TIP Report Tier Rank
    • Political will to improve the response to human trafficking
    • Economic resources
    • Ongoing USG support for anti-TIP programs

2010 Priority Countries By Region (40)

  • Africa (14): Angola, Burundi, Chad, Dem Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Cote d’Ivoire, Ethiopia, Ghana, Lesotho, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Rwanda, Swaziland
  • East Asia/Pacific (7): Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam
  • European (3): Albania, Azerbaijan, Montenegro
  • Near East (3): Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon
  • South and Central Asia (5): Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan
  • Western Hemisphere (8): Argentina, Belize, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua

Types of Projects to be Funded

  • Focus on the “3 P” approach + Partnerships
  • Prevention, Protection and Prosecution
  • Secretary Clinton emphasized the importance of the 4thP” at the event announcing release of the 2009 TIP Report
  • Examples of the types of projects G/TIP seeks to fund are listed in the solicitation – not an exhaustive list.
  • Applicants may propose innovative programmatic approaches to combat human trafficking as appropriate for a country or region.

Projects to be Selected

  • We expect that most projects to be funded will be Bilateral – focusing on one of the priority countries.
  • Considering the need for transnational solutions that are tailored to a country or region, G/TIP also encourages SOIs that address cross border and regional trafficking problems, e.g., a project for the Dominican Republic and Haiti.
  • $750,000 maximum award.
  • Project duration may vary – up to 36 months.

How to Apply

Application Submission

  • Deadline: December 3, 2009, 5:00PM EST
  • Registration required for either website applicants use.
  • Register now – it takes time!
  • See details in the solicitation.
  • G/TIP cannot assist applicants with GrantSolutions.gov or grants.gov. Please contact the appropriate Help Desk.
  • GrantSolutions.gov
    – New web-based option for submitting proposals to G/TIP.

Technical Requirements Must be Met
Purpose: To ensure fairness – applicants have equal opportunity to describe their proposed project.

  1. Standard Form 424 and 424B (Instructions provided)
    a. Please note: #14 – Name the country or List the countries in alpha order, or Global
  2. Two-page Statement
  3. In English
  4. Typed using 12 Point font – Arial or Times New Roman
  5. Budget figures in U.S. dollars.

Application Review

  • G/TIP will screen all SOIs to determine whether they meet the stated Technical Requirements.
  • SOIs that meet the Technical Requirements will be reviewed by the U.S. embassy in the country where the proposed project would take place.
  • G/TIP will convene Regional Interagency Review Panels (representatives of relevant USG agencies with TIP and regional expertise).
  • The results of the Panels will be reviewed by the G/TIP Director.

Application Review and Approval

  • Applicants with highly rated SOIs will be invited to submit full proposals for competitive review.
  • Full proposals will be subjected to an Interagency Review Panel.
  • G/TIP Director will review the Panel results, considering G/TIP funding priorities, bilateral, regional and global factors, as well as any relevant funding restrictions
  • G/TIP Director will make funding recommendations to the Director of Foreign Assistance.
  • Final approval and Congressional notification must take place before a grant, cooperative agreement, or Interagency Agreement is awarded.
  • We will work hard to have all 2010 projects funded by September 30, 2010.

G/TIP 2010 Competitive Grant Process

  • Thank you for your interest and support of our anti-TIP programs.
  • We believe that partnerships with NGOs, institutions of higher education, and others – here today and those who cannot be here today – are critical to our efforts to end human trafficking in our time.
  • Thank you for your commitment and for your ongoing work.
  • We welcome your Statement of Interest for review.
  • Thank you!

G/TIP Grant Award
Katrina Fotovat, J.D., M.A.
Senior International Grants Officer

Grant Requirements

  • Federal Assistance Law and Regulations
  • Grant Terms and Conditions
  • Special Grant Conditions
  • Executive Orders
  • OMB Circulars

OMB Circulars

  • 2 CFR 230 (A-122)- Cost Principles for Nonprofit Organizations
  • A-21- Cost Principles for Educational Institutions
  • A-133- Compliance Requirements
  • 2 CFR 215 (A-110)- Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements with State and Local Governments
  • A-102- Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements with Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations

Monitoring of Grants

  • G/TIP requires quarterly or semi-annual financial (SF-425*) and programmatic (SF-PPR*) reporting.
    – Please note these new OMB forms are required.
  • Frequency of reporting is determined by the program’s scope and needs.
  • Site Visits: G/TIP conducts periodic visits which include programmatic, financial, and administrative review.
  • Audits: May be required depending on the project.

GO vs. GOR

  • Grants Officer (GO):
    – Ensure Grantee’s are in compliance with applicable DOS regulations and OMB Circulars.
    – Administer, modify, or alter grant or any terms and conditions.
    – The only official authorized to make significant changes in the project, cost, or other prior approvals.
  • Grants Officer Representative (GOR):
    – Program Officers consult with Grantee in all matters regarding the administration and programmatic progress of the grant.
    – Evaluate project performance for compliance with the Notice of Award Specifics and Requirements.
    – Evaluate progress of the program to report to the GO.

SAMS

  • G/TIP began the Pilot of SAMS (State Assistance Management System) in early 2009. We encouraged some of our Grantees to participate and we hope it has been beneficial.
  • In 2010 we plan to have all our Grantees using the system. Benefits will include:
    – Automatic notifications
    – Access to information throughout the stages of the Grant
    – Reporting capabilities to track Grant activities
  • To prepare for the switch, please visit www.GrantSolutions.gov and familiarize yourself with all the system has to offer. Thank you for your feedback and patience.
Statement of Fairness and Transparency
G/TIP makes every effort to have a fair and transparent grants process. In this spirit, as the solicitation has been published and the process has begun, we will NOT be speaking to applicants on the content of their proposals, providing suggestions, or giving any additional information not publicly available for all potential applicants.

GTIP Program Highlights
Shereen Faraj, MSW, International Programs Officer (SCA/NEA)
Janet Zinn, PhD/MSW, International Programs Officer (EAP)
Marisa Ferri, MSFS, International Programs Officer (WHA)

Things to Remember
  • Each program example is context specific. They cannot all be replicated.
  • The outlined programs are examples.
  • One program example is not prioritized over another.

Prevention Strategies

  • Community Vigilance Groups/Committees.
  • Public Awareness and Outreach (radio, TV, street theatre, SMS, print media) with specific calls to action.
  • Highlighting the Power of TIP Survivors.
  • Assessing the Impact of Community Vigilance Groups (CVG)
    – CVGs have long served as a grassroots prevention technique to empower local villages to increase awareness of TIP, keep track of community members seeking employment, advocate for access to government services and benefits, and hold local government bodies accountable for prosecution of trafficking cases. 
  • Public Awareness and Outreach Campaigns—with a Call to Action
    – Combining the mass appeal of radio drama with social mobilization and elements of impact evaluation as a way to encourage community ownership and participation as well as develop effective programming with broad reach. 
  • Highlighting the Power of TIP Survivors—One of the Most Powerful and Effective Forms of Awareness Raising:
    – Experiences and testimonies and stories of TIP survivors used in street theatre productions in order to spread the message among trafficking prone villages about the hazards and consequences of exploitative employment.
    – This also empowers trafficking survivors who have the opportunity to develop their advocacy skills and re-enact their trafficking situations—this time with different outcomes.

Protection Strategies

  • Specialized Direct Assistance to Victims
  • Developing Media Capacity in Victim Protection
  • Coordinated Local Efforts for Protection
  • Specialized Direct Assistance to Victims
    – One grantee locates a shelter in an Immigration Center and provides identification, medical, mental health, and recreational services.
    – Immigration personnel can be partners, victims are more likely to be identified, staff, victims are more likely to get assistance.
  • Skill Building for Media in Victim Protection
    – One grantee trains journalists in developing greater sensitivity and awareness in investigative reporting about victims of TIP.
    – Victims stories are more likely to be told with greater attention to protecting the victim with more chances of personal safety.
  • Coordinated Local Efforts
    – An example of a G/TIP project is an NGO provincial coordination unit that meets regularly with local stakeholders—law enforcement, judiciary and a direct services unit—to assist victims of abuse and trafficking.
    – The Center regularly engages law enforcement, judiciary and a direct services unit to conduct rescue missions and provide individual legal or other assistance.
    – Partnerships with key stakeholders also allow the Center to conducts training workshops on interviewing children.

Prosecution Strategies

  • Engagement with governments to develop a legal framework for addressing TIP throughout a region.
  • Training for judges, prosecutors, and law enforcement officials to build capacity for investigating and prosecuting TIP cases.
  • Creation and implementation of a police registry of statistics about TIP cases and traffickers to ensure to track investigations.
  • Creation and institutionalization of a police registry of TIP cases and traffickers to ensure availability of tools to track investigations:
    – A grantee created a statistical database for the National Police in order to capture the magnitude of the TIP problem, forms of trafficking taking place, suspected traffickers, and regions in which the problem is most prevalent.
    – The TIP registry system was adopted by a government ministry and the grantee began training police officers in use of the system as part of the police training academy curriculum.
    – The system was subsequently incorporated into the regulations of the federal law against TIP, ensuring sustainability of the system long past the initial USG investment.
  • Training for judges, prosecutors, and law enforcement officials to build capacity for investigating and prosecuting TIP cases:
  • – A grantee provided integrated training to judges, prosecutors, and police to build their capacity to conduct effective investigations of TIP cases to be prosecuted.
    – The training centered around collaborative development of investigative protocols, and emphasized the planning and coordination of the different activities that investigations require.
    – Consequently, this country has significantly increased the number of TIP cases investigated and it is hoped that these cases will eventually be prosecuted.
  • Creation and institutionalization of a police registry of TIP cases and traffickers to ensure availability of tools to track investigations:
    – A grantee created a statistical database for the National Police in order to capture the magnitude of the TIP problem, forms of trafficking taking place, suspected traffickers, and regions in which the problem is most prevalent.
    – The TIP registry system was adopted by a government ministry and the grantee began training police officers in use of the system as part of the police training academy curriculum.
    – The system was subsequently incorporated into the regulations of the federal law against TIP, ensuring sustainability of the system long past the initial USG investment.
End Bidders Conference Presentations – Thank you.



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