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New York Native Named to Head the New York Field Office of the U.S. State Department's Diplomatic Security Service


Press Statement
Bureau of Diplomatic Security
Washington, DC
October 22, 2013

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David J. Schnorbus became Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. State Department’s Diplomatic Security Service’s New York Field Office on September 30, 2013. In this role, he oversees all operations at one of Diplomatic Security’s largest and most active domestic field offices.

“I am honored that the State Department has the trust and confidence to place me in this vital position, and am eager to work with law enforcement and government partners in New York City and the region,” said Mr. Schnorbus.

The New York Field Office is one of eight regional offices across the United States that form the backbone of Diplomatic Security’s domestic mission: protecting high ranking visiting foreign dignitaries; supporting the protection of the U.S. Secretary of State, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and other officials; conducting criminal, counterterrorism and background investigations; and coordinating security support for foreign missions, diplomats, and consulates in the United States. The office is responsible for the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Connecticut.

Prior to assuming his new position, Mr. Schnorbus served as executive director for the Overseas Security Advisory Council, a public/private-sector partnership created in 1985 to promote security cooperation between the U.S. Department of State and U.S. private-sector interests worldwide. In New York City, OSAC’s “New York Forum” meets regularly to exchange important and timely overseas security and safety information. Diplomatic Security also works in close cooperation with other federal, state and local law enforcement authorities.

Mr. Schnorbus began his career in security and law enforcement in 1987 as a special agent. He has managed security programs, criminal investigations, dignitary protection operations, threat analysis, countermeasures, international law-enforcement training, and security for major international events, both domestically and abroad.

From 2009-2011, he served as Director of the Diplomatic Security Service Training Center. He served in the New York Field Office from 1987-1992, as well as in various positions at Diplomatic Security headquarters, just outside of Washington, D.C. Overseas, he served as the regional security officer at the U.S. embassies in Spain, Bulgaria, Korea, and Mexico.

Mr. Schnorbus is the recipient of several Department of State Superior and Meritorious Honor awards, as well as numerous commendations and citations. He was promoted to the Senior Foreign Service in October 2008.

He earned his Bachelor’s degree in 1983 from Wagner College on Staten Island, New York.

 


The Bureau of Diplomatic Security is the U.S. Department of State's law enforcement and security arm. The special agents, engineers, and security professionals of the Bureau are responsible for the security of more than 280 diplomatic missions around the world. In the United States, Diplomatic Security personnel protect the U.S. Secretary of State and high-ranking foreign dignitaries and officials visiting the United States, investigate passport and visa fraud, and conduct personnel security investigations. For additional information about the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Diplomatic Security, visit www.state.gov/m/ds.

For additional information, contact:

DS-Press@state.gov or

Gale Smith
DS Public Affairs
Smithgl1@state.gov
571-345-2507

Barbara Gleason
DS Public Affairs
gleasonbc@state.gov
571-345-7948



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