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Diplomacy in Action

IV - General Assembly: Important Resolutions and Consensus Actions


Report
Bureau of International Organization Affairs
April 22, 2013

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Public Law 101-246 calls for analysis and discussion of “votes on issues which directly affected United States interests and on which the United States lobbied extensively.” An important basis for identifying issues is their consistency with the State Department’s Strategic Goals. For the 67th UN General Assembly (UNGA) in 2012, eight votes and 18 consensus resolutions were identified for inclusion in this section.

Section IV contains four parts: (1) a listing and description of the eight important UNGA votes; (2) a listing and description of the 18 important UNGA consensus resolutions; (3) voting coincidence percentages with the United States on these important actions that were adopted by votes, arranged alphabetically by country (with each country’s overall coincidence rate from Section III listed alongside the rate for important votes); and (4) voting coincidence percentages by UN regional groups and other important groups for the eight important votes. 

IMPORTANT VOTES

The following eight important votes are identified by title, resolution number, date of vote, and results (Yes-No-Abstain), with the U.S. vote noted. For each vote, a short description of the issue and U.S. policy considerations is provided. Where available, hyperlinks to additional explanatory material, as well as official U.S. statements, are provided. The resolutions are listed chronologically. Full texts of all resolutions can or will be found on the United Nations website, at: http://www.un.org/en/ga/67/resolutions.shtml. In the left-hand column, all resolutions are listed numerically. Where underscored, resolution numbers are linked to their texts. (Some resolutions were not yet linked by the submission date of this report.)

1. Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba

A/Res/67/4
November 13
188-3(US)-2

The United States imposed an embargo on trade and financial transactions with Cuba in 1960, because of Fidel Castro’s repressive policies and expropriation of U.S. property without compensation. The United States strengthened the embargo in 1962, 1992, and 1996. UNGA has adopted a resolution condemning this embargo each year since 1992.  Web Resource: Explanation of Vote by Ambassador Ronald Godard

2. Status of Palestine in the United Nations

A/Res/67/19
November 29
138-9(US)-41

The United States believes the only way to establish a Palestinian state is through direct negotiations between the parties to resolve all permanent-status issues. Moreover, Israel and the Palestinians repeatedly have affirmed their obligation to resolve all issues through direct negotiations. The United States continues to oppose unilateral actions in international bodies or treaties to circumvent or prejudge the outcome of permanent-status issues, including Palestinian statehood.  Web Resource: Explanation of Vote by Ambassador Susan E. Rice

3. Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

A/Res/67/20
November 30
106-7(US)-56

The General Assembly established this Committee in 1975, and renews its support annually.  Web Resource: Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

4. Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat

A/Res/67/21
November 30
103-7(US)-61

The General Assembly established the Division for Palestinian Rights in 1977. It renews its support annually.  Web Resource: Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat

5. Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories

A/Res/67/118
December 18
98-8(US)-72

The General Assembly established the Special Committee by Resolution 2443 (XXIII) in 1968. The United States believes that this committee embodies institutional discrimination against Israel, that it should be abolished, and actively lobbies other countries to withdraw their support for the annual resolution that renews the Committee’s mandate.  Web Resource: 2011 Human Rights Report: Israel and the occupied territories; Special Committee [GA Resolution 2443 (XXIII)]

6. Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran

A/Res/67/182
December 20
86(US)-32-65

Expressed deep concern at serious ongoing and recurring human rights violations, including flogging, amputations and arbitrary executions. Decried continued harassment, intimidation, and arbitrary detention of Iranian citizens. Called for full cooperation with the UN Special Rapporteur on human rights.  Web Resources: Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice; 2011 Human Rights Report for Iran

7. Situation of human rights in the Syrian Arab Republic

A/Res/67/183
December 20
135(US)-12-36

Condemned Syria’s “widespread and systematic” violations of human rights. The resolution urged those arbitrarily detained be released immediately, demanded that Syrian authorities provide a commission of inquiry unhindered access everywhere in the country, and emphasized its support for the nation to be peaceful, democratic, and pluralistic.  Web Resources: Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice; 2011 Human Rights report for Syria

8. Entrepreneurship for development

A/Res/67/202
December 21
141(US)-31-11

Emphasized the importance of government partnerships with private sectors to promote entrepreneurship, generate employment and investment, increase revenue potential, develop new technologies and innovative business models, and enable strong economic growth while protecting workers’ rights. Proposed by Israel.  Web Resource: Global Entrepreneurship Program

IMPORTANT CONSENSUS ACTIONS

The General Assembly approved the following resolutions by consensus. They have been chosen as indicative of major U.S. policy goals.

1. Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

A/Res/67/3
November 5

Reaffirmed “strong support” for the IAEA. Declared the Agency’s role indispensable, because nuclear technology continued to be important to energy production and national development.  Web resources: IAEA; IAEA Annual Report

2. Intensification of efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women

A/Res/67/144
December 20

Strongly condemned all violence against women and girls. Urged states to eliminate all forms of such abuse by establishing integrated national plans to combat this violence.  Web resources: Statement by Adviser Laurie Shestack Phipps; U.S. policy on Sexual and Gender-Based Violence

3. Trafficking in women and girls

A/Res/67/145
December 20

Urged states that had not yet done so to consider ratifying or acceding to the UN Convention on Transnational Organized Crime and the Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children. Urged governments to devise, enforce and strengthen gender and age-sensitive measures to eliminate all forms of trafficking in women and girls, including for sexual and economic exploitation.  Web resources: U.S. policy on Sexual and Gender-Based Violence; Sexual and Gender-Based Violence Programs

4. Follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and full implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcome of the 23rd Special Session of the General Assembly

A/Res/67/148
December 20

Reaffirmed commitments to gender equality and women’s advancement made at the Millennium Summit and the 2005 World Summit. Welcomed integration of a gender perspective into the outcome document of the UN Conference on Sustainable Development. Reiterated the call for the Development Cooperation Forum of the Economic and Social Council to place gender perspectives into all issues it considers.  Web resources: UN Women; Statement by Deputy Assistant Secretary of State Paula Schriefer

5. Report of the Human Rights Council

A/Res/67/151
December 20

Accepted the report, which noted positive Council actions concerning Belarus, Eritrea, Syria, internet freedom, and the right to a nationality, specifically focusing on women and children.  Web resources: Statement by State Department Spokesperson Victoria Nuland; Fact Sheet on Key U.S. Outcomes at the UN Human Rights Council 20th Session

6. Torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment

A/Res/67/161
December 20

Urged full implementation of prohibitions against torture, as well as other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment. Emphasized that acts of torture in armed conflict violated international humanitarian law and were war crimes. Exhorted all states to become parties to the convention against torture, and consider signing and ratifying its Optional Protocol.  Web resource: Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading treatment or punishment

7. Intensifying global efforts for the elimination of female genital mutilation

A/Res/67/146
December 20

Recognized that female genital mutilation was an irreparable, irreversible abuse of the human rights of women and girls, and reaffirmed it as a serious health threat. Urged states to condemn the practice, and take necessary measures to ban such mutilations.  Web resource: Remarks by Secretary Hillary Clinton

8. Combating intolerance, negative stereotyping, stigmatization, discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against persons, based on religion or belief

A/Res/67/178
December 20

Called on states to adopt measures to criminalize incitement to violence based on religion or belief.  Web resource: Explanation of Position by Deputy Representative to ECOSOC Teri Robl

9. Freedom of Religion or Belief

A/Res/67/179
December 20

Expressed concern over increasing violence against those of religious and other communities, noting attacks against Muslims, Jews, and Christians. Urged states to ensure that no one was discriminated against on the basis of religion or belief.  Web resource: Remarks by Secretary Hillary Clinton

10. Situation of Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK)

A/Res/67/181
December 20

Condemned unanimously for the first time the atrocious state of human rights in North Korea. Expressed serious concern about torture, absence of due process, restrictions of movement, mistreatment of refugees and asylum-seekers, as well as severe and widespread restrictions on freedom of thought.  Web resource: Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice

11. Implementation of Agenda 21, the Program for the Further Implementation of Agenda 21 and the outcomes of the World Summit on Sustainable Development

A/Res/67/203
December 21

Stressed the need for synergy, coherence, and mutual support among all processes relevant to the post-2015 development agenda. Reaffirmed the outcome document of the Rio+20 UN Conference on Sustainable Development, and urged its rapid implementation.  Web resource: Remarks by Secretary Hillary Clinton

12. Situation of human rights in Myanmar [Burma]

A/Res/67/233
December 24

Adopted — for the first time without a vote— a resolution on human rights in Burma. Welcomed positive developments, including a continuing commitment to political reform, democratization, and national reconciliation. Urged Burma to continue to release political prisoners and restore their rights, and to cease arbitrary detention, forced displacement, and rape. Called for accelerated efforts to address violence affecting ethnic minorities.  Web resource: Statement by Ambassador Susan E. Rice

13. Scale of assessments for the apportionment of UN expenses

14. Scale of assessments for the apportionment of the expenses of UN peacekeeping operations

A/Res/67/238 and A/Res/67/239
December 24

Adopted scales of assessment for 2013-2015 that preserve the 22 percent ceiling on regular budget assessments, which determines the amount of the U.S. assessment for 2013-2015. The peacekeeping rates of assessment for the United States, China, and Russia rose, while the rates for France and the United Kingdom fell. In general, assessments for developing countries increased while those for developed countries decreased.  Web resource: Fact Sheet: UNGA Main Session of Fifth Committee

15. Program Budget for the biennium 2012-2013

A/Res/67/247
December 24

Adopted a 4.7 percent increase in the UN regular budget to cover additional costs resulting from: (a) new or expanded special political missions in Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen; (b) new and expanded mandates resulting from the Rio+20 summit and Human Rights Council decisions; (c) higher-than-anticipated caseload for the UN’s Administration of Justice System; and (d) exchange rate losses, inflation, and lower-than-projected vacancy rates.  Web Resource: Fact Sheet: UNGA Main Session of Fifth Committee

16. Proposed program budget outline for the biennium 2014-2015

A/Res/67/248
December 24

Adopted a 2014-2015 outline level of $5.93 billion, which was $100 million less than the amount requested by the Secretary-General. This level, together with the revised amount of the 2012-2013 budget, represents zero growth in the UN regular budget over three consecutive biennia (2010-2011, 2012-2013, and 2014-2015).  Web Resource: Fact Sheet: UNGA Main Session of Fifth Committee

IMPORTANT VOTES: COMPARISON WITH UNITED STATES

The table that follows summarizes UN member state performance at the 67th General Assembly in comparison with the United States on eight important votes. This table shows what each member did for each of the eight votes. For comparison, each country’s overall coincidence rate with the United States is listed alongside the rate for the important votes.

The table is alphabetical by country. Each vote is listed in the table by the number assigned to it below.

Key:

S = Same as U.S. Vote;
O = Opposite of U.S. Vote;
A = Abstained;
X = Absent

1. Necessity of ending the economic, commercial and financial embargo imposed by the United States of America against Cuba (Res. 4)
2. Status of Palestine in the United Nations (Res. 19)
3. Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (Res. 20)
4. Division for Palestinian Rights of the Secretariat (Res. 21)
5. Work of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories (Res. 118)
6. Situation of Human Rights in the Islamic Republic of Iran (Res. 182)
7. Situation of Human Rights in the Syrian Arab Republic (Res. 183)
8. Entrepreneurship for development (Res. 202)


 

COUNTRY

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

COINCIDENCE:
IMPORTANT
VOTES ONLY

COINCIDENCE:
ALL VOTES

Afghanistan

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

A

14.3%

36.5%

Albania

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

60.3%

Algeria

O

O

O

O

O

A

X

O

0.0%

31.9%

Andorra

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

62.3%

Angola

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

30.9%

Antigua and Barbuda

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

X

16.7%

37.0%

Argentina

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

S

42.9%

37.8%

Armenia

O

O

O

A

O

O

A

S

16.7%

39.7%

Australia

O

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

85.7%

71.0%

Austria

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

55.2%

Azerbaijan

O

O

O

O

O

X

S

S

28.6%

31.9%

Bahamas

O

A

O

O

A

S

S

S

50.0%

38.9%

Bahrain

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

O

25.0%

31.9%

Bangladesh

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

A

14.3%

37.3%

Barbados

O

A

O

O

O

S

S

S

42.9%

38.4%

Belarus

O

O

X

X

O

O

O

S

16.7%

33.9%

Belgium

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

60.6%

Belize

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

S

37.5%

35.2%

Benin

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

36.0%

Bhutan

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

31.8%

Bolivia

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

24.3%

Bosnia/Herzegovina

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

58.2%

Botswana

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

S

42.9%

38.4%

Brazil

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

35.1%

Brunei Darussalam

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

A

14.3%

36.0%

Bulgaria

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

59.3%

Burkina Faso

O

O

O

O

X

A

S

S

33.3%

38.9%

Burundi

O

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

40.0%

9.1%

Cambodia

O

O

O

O

O

O

X

S

14.3%

33.3%

Cameroon

O

A

A

A

A

A

S

S

66.7%

33.3%

Canada

O

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

87.5%

85.7%

Cape Verde

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

S

37.5%

33.8%

Central African Rep.

O

O

X

X

O

A

S

X

25.0%

41.2%

Chad

O

O

X

X

X

X

X

S

33.3%

41.2%

Chile

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

S

37.5%

39.0%

China

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

0.0%

30.3%

Colombia

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

40.8%

Comoros

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

27.7%

Congo

O

O

O

O

O

A

X

S

16.7%

35.6%

Costa Rica

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

S

42.9%

39.5%

Côte d’Ivoire

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

35.6%

Croatia

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

61.7%

Cuba

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

26.8%

Cyprus

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

S

42.9%

54.3%

Czech Republic

O

S

A

A

A

S

S

S

80.0%

65.1%

DPR of Korea

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

6.3%

Dem. Rep. of Congo

O

A

X

X

X

A

A

S

50.0%

43.8%

Denmark

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

60.0%

Djibouti

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

32.9%

Dominica

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

32.4%

Dominican Republic

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

S

37.5%

36.4%

Ecuador

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

0.0%

25.4%

Egypt

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

O

12.5%

30.0%

El Salvador

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

40.6%

Equatorial Guinea

O

X

X

X

X

X

X

S

50.0%

11.1%

Eritrea

O

O

O

O

X

O

A

S

16.7%

36.5%

Estonia

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

62.9%

Ethiopia

O

O

O

O

A

A

X

S

20.0%

35.7%

Fiji

O

A

O

A

A

A

A

S

33.3%

38.5%

Finland

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

57.8%

France

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

92.6%

Gabon

O

O

X

X

O

A

S

S

40.0%

37.9%

Gambia

O

O

O

O

X

A

S

S

33.3%

37.3%

Georgia

O

O

A

A

A

X

S

S

50.0%

59.6%

Germany

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

60.0%

Ghana

O

O

X

X

O

X

X

S

25.0%

44.0%

Greece

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

58.5%

Grenada

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

38.7%

Guatemala

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

40.5%

Guinea

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

31.9%

Guinea-Bissau

O

O

X

X

O

A

S

S

40.0%

34.9%

Guyana

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

35.6%

Haiti

O

A

O

O

O

S

S

S

42.9%

36.5%

Honduras

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

43.9%

Hungary

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

63.9%

Iceland

O

O

O

A

A

S

S

S

50.0%

58.2%

India

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

14.3%

29.7%

Indonesia

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

33.3%

Iran

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

15.6%

Iraq

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

30.9%

Ireland

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

55.2%

Israel

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

100.0%

92.3%

Italy

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

59.7%

Jamaica

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

38.7%

Japan

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

57.1%

Jordan

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

35.6%

Kazakhstan

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

25.0%

31.4%

Kenya

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

31.8%

Kiribati

O

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

0.0%

0.0%

Kuwait

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

O

12.5%

30.4%

Kyrgyzstan

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

35.4%

Laos

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

X

0.0%

33.8%

Latvia

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

63.3%

Lebanon

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

O

0.0%

30.4%

Lesotho

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

34.8%

Liberia

O

X

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

40.0%

Libya

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

O

25.0%

35.6%

Liechtenstein

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

57.4%

Lithuania

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

63.9%

Luxembourg

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

58.8%

Madagascar

O

X

X

X

X

X

S

S

66.7%

44.8%

Malawi

O

A

X

X

X

S

S

S

75.0%

40.4%

Malaysia

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

36.8%

Maldives

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

O

25.0%

37.3%

Mali

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

A

0.0%

33.8%

Malta

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

S

42.9%

52.9%

Marshall Islands

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

100.0%

83.0%

Mauritania

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

31.9%

Mauritius

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

A

16.7%

29.2%

Mexico

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

S

42.9%

39.7%

Micronesia

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

100.0%

92.2%

Monaco

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

65.5%

Mongolia

O

A

X

X

A

A

S

S

66.7%

38.6%

Montenegro

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

58.5%

Morocco

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

35.6%

Mozambique

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

33.3%

Myanmar (Burma)

O

O

X

X

O

X

X

S

25.0%

37.5%

Namibia

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

A

0.0%

33.8%

Nauru

O

S

X

X

X

S

S

S

80.0%

68.8%

Nepal

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

37.0%

Netherlands

O

A

A

A

A

S

A

S

66.7%

61.3%

New Zealand

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

55.2%

Nicaragua

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

25.4%

Niger

O

O

X

O

O

A

A

S

20.0%

34.3%

Nigeria

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

37.0%

Norway

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

58.5%

Oman

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

O

12.5%

30.4%

Pakistan

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

O

0.0%

23.0%

Palau

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

S

100.0%

96.7%

Panama

O

S

A

A

S

S

S

S

83.3%

48.5%

Papua New Guinea

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

47.4%

Paraguay

O

A

O

O

A

S

S

S

50.0%

34.8%

Peru

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

40.5%

Philippines

O

O

O

O

A

A

A

S

20.0%

36.5%

Poland

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

61.9%

Portugal

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

59.7%

Qatar

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

O

12.5%

30.4%

Republic of Korea

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

61.4%

Republic of Moldova

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

62.9%

Romania

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

62.9%

Russia

O

O

A

A

A

O

O

S

20.0%

42.9%

Rwanda

O

A

X

X

A

A

A

S

50.0%

40.7%

St. Kitts and Nevis

O

O

X

X

X

S

A

S

50.0%

48.3%

Saint Lucia

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

37.8%

St. Vincent/Grenadines

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

36.5%

Samoa

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

43.8%

San Marino

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

58.5%

Sao Tome/Principe

O

O

X

X

X

X

X

X

0.0%

52.8%

Saudi Arabia

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

29.2%

Senegal

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

S

37.5%

31.9%

Serbia

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

50.7%

Seychelles

O

O

X

X

X

S

S

S

60.0%

23.8%

Sierra Leone

O

O

X

X

X

A

S

S

50.0%

37.3%

Singapore

O

A

O

O

O

A

A

S

20.0%

38.4%

Slovak Republic

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

62.9%

Slovenia

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

59.7%

Solomon Islands

O

O

O

O

O

S

S

S

37.5%

37.8%

Somalia

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

X

0.0%

29.5%

South Africa

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

A

0.0%

36.1%

South Sudan

O

O

X

X

X

S

S

S

60.0%

58.7%

Spain

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

60.0%

Sri Lanka

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

0.0%

34.7%

Sudan

O

O

O

O

O

O

S

O

12.5%

29.0%

Suriname

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

32.4%

Swaziland

O

O

X

X

O

A

A

X

0.0%

34.4%

Sweden

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

56.9%

Switzerland

O

O

A

A

A

S

S

S

60.0%

54.5%

Syria

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

14.0%

Tajikistan

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

14.3%

31.3%

Thailand

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

S

33.3%

37.0%

TFYR Macedonia

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

60.0%

Timor-Leste

O

O

X

X

A

S

S

S

60.0%

35.3%

Togo

O

A

O

A

O

A

S

S

40.0%

40.3%

Tonga

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

50.9%

Trinidad and Tobago

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

38.7%

Tunisia

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

33.3%

Turkey

O

O

O

O

O

X

S

O

14.3%

51.4%

Turkmenistan

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

X

0.0%

29.7%

Tuvalu

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

S

28.6%

33.8%

Uganda

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

36.1%

Ukraine

O

X

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

58.7%

United Arab Emirates

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

31.9%

United Kingdom

O

A

A

A

O

S

S

S

60.0%

73.8%

United Rep. of Tanzania

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

16.7%

35.6%

Uruguay

O

O

O

O

A

A

S

S

33.3%

38.7%

Uzbekistan

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

X

0.0%

30.2%

Vanuatu

O

A

A

A

A

S

S

S

75.0%

40.0%

Venezuela

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

0.0%

26.4%

Vietnam

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

A

0.0%

34.2%

Yemen

O

O

O

O

O

A

S

O

14.3%

30.9%

Zambia

O

O

X

O

O

A

S

S

33.3%

37.0%

Zimbabwe

O

O

O

O

O

O

O

A

0.0%

23.4%

Overall Percentage

               

35.4%

42.5%

Totals: 192 Countries, 8 Resolutions: S = 388 O = 708 A = 344 + X 96 (A+X=440)



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