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Diplomacy in Action

Special Edition -- South Sudan


Office of Public Liaison
Bureau of Public Affairs
July 11, 2011

   
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In This Issue

  • Celebrating the Creation of South Sudan
  • Background: Steps to the Referendum
  • Photos from the Independence Celebration
  • The Way Forward in South Sudan
  • Statements and Releases

 

 

 
Independence Celebration for the Creation of Southern Sudan

Date: 07/09/2011 Description: Sudanese citizens show their excitement during the independence celebration held in Juba capital of the new republic of South Sudan. © USAID Image

Guests at the new Republic of South Sudan Independence celebrations in Juba, South Sudan, on July 9 2011. (Jenn Warren/USAID)

“Today is a reminder that after the darkness of war, the light of a new dawn is possible. A proud flag flies over Juba and the map of the world has been redrawn... Together, we can ensure that today marks another step forward in Africa’s long journey toward opportunity, democracy and justice.” – President Barack Obama

“Independence presents a new beginning for the people of South Sudan; an opportunity to build a nation that embodies the values and aspirations of its people. The challenges are many, but the South Sudanese people have demonstrated their capacity to overcome great odds.” – Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton

“For South Sudan, independence is not a gift that you were given. Independence is a prize that you have won.” – Ambassador Susan E. Rice

Statement of President Barack Obama: Recognition of the Republic of South Sudan | Statement Congratulating the Republic of South Sudan on Its Independence | South Sudan Independence Ceremony

 

Background


Steps to the Referendum

Date: 07/08/2011 Description: A Bari community member holds the flag of southern Sudan during celebrations on the eve of their declaration of independence in Juba, South Sudan, Friday, July 8, 2011. South Sudan is set to declare independence from the north on Saturday. (AP Photo/David Azia) © AP Image

A Bari community member holds the flag of southern Sudan during celebrations on the eve of their declaration of independence in Juba, southern Sudan, Friday, July 8, 2011. (AP Photo/David Azia)

The United States has been deeply engaged in Sudan, having led international efforts to broker the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement and assist in the Referendum on independence for South Sudan. The United States has worked closely with the Southern Sudan Referendum Commission (SSRC) and international partners to achieve a transparent and successful outcome. The Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) between the two regions of Sudan was signed in January of 2005, ending decades of civil war. An independence movement was furthered by the South Sudan Referendum from January 8- 15, 2011. According to section 41(2) of the Southern Sudan Referendum Act “the Southern Referendum shall be deemed legal if at least 60% of the registered voters cast their vote,” meaning that 2,359,553 votes were necessary in order for the referendum to be declared legal. The referendum passed with 3,792,518 in favor of independence. Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir stated that he would accept the outcome of the vote. The Republic of South Sudan became a sovereign state on July 9, 2011.

South Sudan: Lessons Learned at the Negotiating Table | Briefing on the New Republic of South Sudan | Video: Behind the Scenes - Dispatches from Sudan

 

Celebration of Independence


Secretary Clinton: “This weekend, in Juba, South Sudan, Africa’s 54th nation was born. Millions of people are celebrating a new national identity and new national promise. Like on our own July Independence Day 235 years ago, there is reason to hope for a better future -- if the people and leaders of both Sudan and South Sudan commit themselves to the hard work ahead. This day was far from inevitable. For more than two decades, Sudan has been riven by intense fighting over land and resources. Just a year ago, talks between the Sudanese Government in the north and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement in the south had stalled. Preparations for a referendum on southern independence had fallen behind. The Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed in 2005 appeared close to collapse. A return to open conflict seemed likely.”

“Thankfully, people on both sides and across the world worked together to chart a different path.”

Secretary Clinton Op-Ed: Independence Day for South Sudan


 

Date: 07/09/2011 Description: Johnnie Carson, Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of African Affairs; Ret. General Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State; Susan R. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations; and Ambassador R. Barrie Walkley inaugurating the new U.S. Embassy in Juba, South Sudan on Independence Day. USAID photo courtesy of Jenn Warren © USAID Image Honorable Johnnie Carson, Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of African Affairs, Department of State; Ret. General Colin Powell, Former Secretary of State for the United States; Honorable Susan E. Rice, United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations; and Ambassador R. Barrie Walkley inaugurating the new US Embassy in Juba, South Sudan, on Independence Day, July 9 2011. (Jenn Warren/USAID) 
Date: 07/09/2011 Description: A woman waves the flag of South Sudan during independence celebrations in Juba Saturday, July 9, 2011. South Sudan raised the flag of its new nation for the first time on Saturday, as thousands of South Sudanese citizens swarmed the capital of Juba to celebrate the country's birth. (AP Photo/David Azia) © AP Image A woman waves the flag of South Sudan during independence celebrations in Juba, South Sudan, Saturday, July 9, 2011. South Sudan raised the flag of its new nation for the first time on Saturday, as thousands of South Sudanese citizens swarmed the capital of Juba to celebrate the country’s birth. (AP Photo/David Azia) 
Date: 07/09/2011 Description: Susan R. Rice, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, with Government of South Sudan Minister to the Office of the President Dr. Cirino Hiteng in Juba, South Sudan on Independence Day.  USAID photo courtesy of Jenn Warren © USAID Image

Honorable Susan E. Rice, United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations and Ret. General Colin Powell, Former Secretary of State for the United States; with Government of South Sudan Minister to the Office of the President Dr. Cirino Hiteng in Juba, South Sudan, on Independence Day, July 9 2011.

 

South Sudan: The Road Ahead


Secretary Clinton

“...Just as independence was not inevitable, neither is a lasting peace between Sudan and South Sudan. Decades of war have left deep distrust on both sides and significant social, political and economic challenges. Both nations will have to take decisive steps to consolidate progress.”

Ambassador Rice

“Peace and prosperity rest on the foundation of strong institutions devoted to the public interest. Law and justice rest on the foundation of a political system free of corruption and fraud. And education and public health rest on the foundation of a government dedicated to the well-being of all rather than the interests of a few. The same self-reliance that won your freedom can now move you from independence and self-determination to opportunity and democracy. South Sudan’s leaders, and the citizens who hold them accountable, now have the chance to create a state that stands out not for its flag or its currency but for the investments it makes in the development of its people.”

Ambassador Lyman

“Even as much work remains, I am proud that the United States has been in the forefront of this commitment. It will serve us well if there is peace in this part of Africa, if turmoil and human crises no longer dominate the scene and if we welcome a new partner in the search for a more stable and prosperous world.”

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