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Diplomacy in Action

U.S.-India Counterterrorism and Homeland Security Cooperation


Fact Sheet
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
July 31, 2014

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Accelerating our partnership following the 2008 Mumbai terrorist attacks, the United States and India continue to expand their counterterrorism and homeland security cooperation, enhancing global as well as bilateral security through ongoing dialogues, capacity building initiatives, and multilateral efforts such as the Global Counter-Terrorism Forum. Together, our two countries are meeting the evolving security challenges of the 21st century.

  • U.S.-India Homeland Security Dialogue: The Department of Homeland Security and Ministry of Home Affairs plan to hold a third U.S.-India Homeland Security Dialogue to enhance homeland security cooperation and discuss building capacity in cybersecurity and critical infrastructure protection, countering illicit finance, global supply chain security, megacity policing, and science and technology. These senior-level exchanges have reinforced our strategic homeland security partnership and enhanced operational cooperation in investigations, capacity building, and countering threats. Upcoming law enforcement engagement proposals include sharing lessons learned and best practices in SWAT team training and responding to mass casualty exercises, improving both nations’ capabilities to respond to terrorist incidents and natural disasters. In January 2014, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement repatriated to India three recovered stolen sand stone sculptures dating from the 11th century, valued at more than $1.5 million.
  • Homeland Security Technology: The U.S. Department of Commerce plans to create a Homeland Security subgroup under the bilateral High Technology Cooperation Group (HTCG), helping to facilitate increased access to homeland security-related technology. The HTCG, which includes an industry component, intends to meet in Washington, D.C. in fall 2014. Less than 0.02 percent of U.S. exports to India require an export license today, compared with 24 percent in 2004.
  • U.S.-India Counterterrorism Joint Working Group: State Department Coordinator for Counterterrorism Ambassador Tina Kaidanow and DHS Under Secretary Francis Taylor met with their counterparts in the Indian government to continue the Counterterrorism Working Group process, including continued exchange of senior experts through the coming year. The two sides held an in-depth exchange of views on common areas of interest and collaboration to further mutual U.S.-India counterterrorism goals. U.S. and Indian cooperative efforts include coordination in international fora including the UN and GCTF, and mutually agreed bilateral capacity building measures.
  • Law Enforcement Collaboration: Through ongoing cooperation and consultations between the State Department’s Office of the Legal Adviser, the U.S. Department of Justice and India’s Ministry of Home Affairs and Ministry of External Affairs, the United States and India are further strengthening Mutual Legal Assistance and improving cooperation on extradition in the interest of advancing justice. This includes ongoing efforts by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National Investigative Agency to improve sharing of electronic evidence to combat cybercrime and mitigate counterterrorism threats.
  • Urban Policing: The Indian Government organized the first India-U.S. policing conference in New Delhi, December 2013. Bringing together U.S. and Indian police chiefs, federal, state, and local officials, from major metropolitan areas, the exchange included a focus on addressing gender-based violence and strategies for building effective partnerships between police and diaspora communities. From July 28-August 9, 2014, the International Association of Chiefs of Police is hosting a delegation of 90 senior police officials from India to participate in a study tour led by the International Association of Chiefs of Police, exchanging information on critical incident command, transnational crime, and emerging trends in policing.
  • Regional Safe Cities Program: USAID, state governments of India, and the government of Japan are partnering with UN Women to implement the Safe Cities program in New Delhi, creating safe urban spaces for women and girls by working with municipal leaders, law enforcement officials, and non-governmental organizations to monitor incidences of gender-based violence, strengthen systems to prevent and respond to this violence, and build women’s confidence in the justice system.
  • Facilitating Legitimate Travel: There are more than one million visits between the United States and India each year. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security continues to work with Indian partners to allow for Indian participation in DHS’s Global Entry program. The trusted traveler program enables expedited entry to frequent travelers, significantly reducing wait times. The United States has Global Entry partnerships in place with a very limited number of countries.



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