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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Strategic Goal 9: Social and Environmental Issues


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Strategic Goal 9: Social and Environmental Issues

Improve Health, Education, Environment, and Other Conditions for the
Global Population

Public Benefit

"The strong partnership between American science and American statecraft is more
critical than ever in meeting the challenges of the 21st century.  Whether the mission
is supporting the President's campaign against terrorism, implementing arms agreements,
creating conditions for sustainable development, or stemming the global HIV/AIDS
pandemic, the formulation of foreign policy must proceed from a solid scientific foundation.   
                                                                                    
- Secretary Colin L. Powell

The Department works to improve health, education, and living conditions in order to ameliorate people's lives worldwide.  In addition to being an important humanitarian goal in and of itself, better health is integral to economic development, since healthy people can be more productive and contribute to the economic growth of their communities.  Better education helps people increase productivity, understand the need for health care and how to access it, and participate in community governance, including environmental protection.  A clean environment is essential for individual health, which, along with sound resource management, is critical for sustainable development.  Better migration policies permit people to emigrate in a more regular fashion, enabling individuals to improve their living conditions and receiving countries to benefit from the skills and backgrounds migrants have.

The Department seeks to accomplish this by negotiating and implementing treaties and agreements; promoting partnerships among governments, elements of civil society, academia, and the private sector; raising and coordinating funds among major donors; and expending USG funds on direct bilateral and multilateral assistance.  The Department helps countries and regions build capacity and sound institutions to provide healthcare and education, better manage migration issues, and provide environmental protection.  In the area of the environment, the Department helps countries promote access to environmental information and participation in environmental decision-making, and combat illegal environmental activities such as those involving forests, wildlife, hazardous wastes, ozone depleting substances, fisheries, and maritime issues.  These efforts promote good domestic governance and the rule of law, which are preconditions to successful and sustainable achievement of improved conditions and alleviating poverty within countries, and improving regional stability and sustainable development.

The Department targets its education efforts at improving conditions in developing countries, while its environmental, health, and migration efforts are global in reach.  These initiatives often help attain both international and domestic benefits.  By combating the illegal timber trade, the Department helps preserve valuable timber resources in developing countries, while protecting the competitiveness of the $114-billion U.S. timber industry.  The Department's support for improved global fisheries management and enforcement standards helps ensure long-term sustainability of these fisheries, provides for a level playing field for the $50-billion U.S. commercial fisheries industry, and ensures long-term global access to fisheries.  The negotiation of the Cartagena Protocol helped maintain the continued growth of the international biotech industry, leading to improved food security for all, and protected U.S. agricultural exports valued at over $60 billion annually.  The Department also helps protect the U.S. environment directly by combating and mitigating the impact of invasive species, which have cost the U.S. an estimated $138 billion over the last decade. 

The Department works to promote orderly and humane migration flows on the regional and inter-regional level.  Legal migration contributes to prosperity for both sending and receiving countries, including the United States.  National security and respect for the human rights of migrants are essential components of effective migration management.

A healthy and educated world population is more likely to participate in and promote democratic governance, economic opportunity, and environmental and human rights protection.  A sound environment is central to health and to sustainable development, and to political and economic security in key regions. U.S. efforts to improve these conditions for the global population thereby also promote American security, growth, and values.

Performance Goal 1

Improved Global Health, Including Child, Maternal, and Reproductive Health, and The Reduction of Abortion and Disease, Especially HIV/AIDS, Malaria, And Tuberculosis

Summary: Projected FY 2004 Performance

Disease Reduction: The Department will work to catalyze effective coalitions and partnerships, boost political and financial commitment to health, and garner public support for health programs, particularly those aimed at fighting infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and diarrheal and respiratory diseases.  This will require broad international cooperation among physicians, scientists, and development and health professionals.  To raise and coordinate funds for health-related efforts, the Department's Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs (OES) will promote innovative public-private partnerships, and work with multilateral agencies such as the World Health Organization (WHO); the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS); the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (The Global Fund); the World Bank and other international financial institutions (IFIs) as well as; other major donors.  The Department will engage in public diplomacy and educational campaigns to inform key foreign audiences about U.S. and international efforts in support of health, and use its influence and knowledge of individual countries to promote effective and coordinated health efforts, including operational synergies and regional approaches.  The Department will ensure information is available at overseas posts on global health issues such as HIV/AIDS prevention, the mitigation of impacts from increasing illness and death, and the need for sustainable solutions.

Performance Trend: FY 2000 - FY 2004 --
Number of Countries With Stabilized or Reduced Rates of New HIV Infection:
2000 (Result): 3
2001 (Result): 3
2002 (Result): 5
2003 (Target): 6
2004 (Target): 7

The Department will also help strengthen U.S. global health programs by re-emphasizing the need for sustainable private financing along with governmental commitment, by improving health education to empower recipients and ensure informed decision-making, and by expanding programs to address chronic conditions and encompass entire families, including income earners and the elderly.  In countries where maternal and child mortality and morbidity remain particularly high, the focus will be on reducing mortality through maternal and child health care including pre-, post- and neonatal care; skilled birth assistance; nutrition; vaccination; hygiene and breastfeeding education and assistance; and other infant and child survival interventions.

Example of an FY 2002 Achievement:
The Global Fund To Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria --
In April 2001, the UN Secretary-General called for a global fund to combat the three great killer diseases: AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. The United States was the first government to pledge, before the Fund was even operational. With strong U.S. diplomatic involvement, the Fund was operational and had approved its first grants by April 2002. The Fund is intended to work through public-private partnerships and complement existing bilateral and multilateral assistance programs.

The Department will also work to reduce abortion by promoting compassionate alternatives such as adoption, by funding family planning assistance, including provision of contraceptives and of information about the reproductive system and the mechanisms, risks, and benefits of family planning options, and by promoting abstinence for the unmarried. The Department will not fund or promote abortion, abortion-related services, or the use of abortifacients such as RU486.  However, the Department supports humane treatment and counseling for women who have had recourse to abortion; the treatment of abortion-related illnesses or injuries is not considered an abortion-related service.  The Department also endeavors to ensure that men take part in family planning decisions and that parents are involved in decisions affecting their minor children.

The Department also encourages parents to teach responsible sexual behavior, including abstinence, fidelity, voluntary family planning, and disease prevention efforts, in order to promote adolescent health and well-being and prevent disease and unwanted pregnancies.

The Department will also work to eliminate violence against women including selective abortion of females; coerced abortion, forced sterilization and the coercive imposition of birth control; trafficking; rape; female genital mutilation; and honor killings and other harmful traditional practices.  The Department will work to ensure that international health care providers respect human rights and refrain from coercive practices, and will institute field monitoring of UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) programs and ask the UNFPA Executive Board to adopt guidelines and programs that prohibit coercion and require voluntarism and informed consent.

Finally, the Department is working to help governments identify and react appropriately to issues raised by the demographic changes facing the world today, as described by demographers at the UN Population Division.  Within the Western collectivity, lifespans are lengthening and fertility is falling.  Except for the United States, most Western and certain other nations are experiencing fertility that is far below replacement level.  For these nations, population aging and shrinkage are issues that may have broad economic and social implications.  Other nations are experiencing abnormal demography caused by poor health conditions, the impact of diseases such as HIV/AIDS, and discrimination against women (e.g., sex-selective abortions that can result in a significant imbalance in the gender ratio).  While decisions about family size are for families, not governments, to make, governments can play an important role in creating political and economic conditions that allow families to flourish, regardless of a country's overall population demographics. 

Example of an FY 2002 Achievement:
Oversight of the UN Population Fund (UNFPA) --
The United States used its position on the UNFPA Executive Board to press for reforms that would minimize programmatic redundancies across UN development agencies. The United States did not provide funding to UNFPA in 2002 because the Secretary determined that UNFPA provided funds and other support to the Chinese governmental entities charged with enforcing China's birth limitation program, which relies upon coercive abortion. The United States is working to encourage UNFPA to reform, and to cease its involvement with coercion so that future U.S. funding of UNFPA will be legally possible.


Summary: Indicators, Results and Targets

Baseline

Results

Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #1: Level of International Collaboration and Partnerships to Support Health, Including the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

More countries involved in developing alternative malaria and flu vector control methods; increased awareness of Roll Back Malaria and Stop TB partnerships.

The level of bilateral and multilateral collaboration on global health increased significantly; UN Special General Assembly Session on HIV/AIDS; negotiations completed for the Global Fund.

The Global Fund began work; negotiations continued to put mechanisms in place that guarantee program and financial accountability, set rules for procurement, etc.; The Global Fund had multi-year pledges totaling $2.1 billion, with approximately $750 million available for the year; one large contribution was from the private sector.

Sign the first grant agreements for the Global Fund, which indicate agreement on the monitoring and evaluation framework; the Global Fund database to track country-level partnerships is in place, to ensure that country-level mechanisms are true public-private partnerships.  Funding increases, including funds from one additional foundation, one commercial enterprise.

Continued viability and success of the Global Fund.  As reported by the Global Fund, one-fourth of all Country Coordination Mechanisms include NGO stakeholders as full participants in the design and implementation of proposals.  Two more foundations and one more commercial enterprise make contributions to the Global Fund, including those at the country level.  The Global Fund has conducted evaluations of grants, and half of the grant recipients make progress toward the indicators outlined in the proposals and the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework.

Indicator #2: Number of Bilateral and Multilateral Meetings in Which the U.S. Plays a Leadership Role in Dealing with Health Issues. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

As of September, the United States participated in five UN meetings and one bilateral meeting.

The United States participate in UN meetings dealing with health issues, and in two bilateral meetings.

The United States participates in UN meetings dealing with health issues, and in three bilateral meetings.

Indicator #3: Department-Wide Awareness of Global Health Issues and USG Policy.

(New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Briefings for ambassadors and other USG personnel on health issues and USG policy.

Briefings for ambassadors and other USG personnel on health issues and USG policy.

Briefings for ambassadors and other USG personnel on health issues.

 

Indicator #4: Countries or Regions With Stabilized or Reduced Rates of New HIV Infections.

Uganda, Senegal, and Thailand stabilized or reduced rates of new HIV infections.

The same three countries stabilized or reduced rates of new HIV infections.

A total of five countries had stabilized or reduced rates of new HIV infections (Uganda, Senegal, Thailand, Zambia and Cambodia).

A total six countries stabilize or reduce rates of new HIV infections.

A total of seven countries stabilize or reduce rates of new HIV infections.

Indicator #5: Maternal Mortality Rate. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Five countries decrease maternal mortality rate by at least 2 percent. 

Five countries decrease maternal mortality rate by at least 2 percent.

Indicator #6: Number of UNFPA Field Monitoring Trips Conducted. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

Baseline:
One independent Department team visited China to assess the UNFPA program there.

Make three monitoring trips to UNFPA program countries.

Make monitoring trips to two countries in each region where UNFPA operates.

 

Indicator #7: Status of WHO International Health Regulations (IHR).

WHO revision mandate predated 2000.

New concept reassessed- elaborated on.

World Health Assembly linked IHR revision process to global health security and bioterrorism.

WHO continued consultation and elaboration of approach and international consensus building.

Work continues to ensure surveillance and reporting on man-made as well as natural disease outbreaks.

Submit draft of revised International Health Regulations to WHO Governing bodies and adopt it at the World Health Assembly.

Indicator #8: The Global Health Security Action Group (GHSAG)
Becomes Sustainable.

GHSAG (formerly known as the Ottawa Group) did not exist.

The United States, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, and the United Kingdom agreed to cooperative efforts to counter bioterrorism.

General terms of reference for the creation of a pharmaceutical and biotech industry anti-terrorism code of conduct were developed.

Revised Target:  The GHSAG clarifies its mission and membership considerations.  The GHSAG forms technical working groups on key issues such as risk management, containment/isolation, pandemic influenza and support for a WHO smallpox vaccine reserve.  GHSAG develops a formalized network of laboratories to enhance cooperation and collaboration.

GHSAG conducts cooperative exercises; the private sector, NGOs, and health and science institutions, are more involved in the introduction of new knowledge to a rapidly evolving security area.

Indicator #9: Countries With Smallpox Vaccine and Drug Stockpiles.
(New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Two countries agree to establish stockpiles.

Additional ten countries establish vaccine and drug stockpiles; work with WHO to strengthen its smallpox vaccine reserve.

Means and Strategies by Target

The Global Fund continues to be viable and successful.  As reported by the Global Fund,
25 percent of all Country Coordination Mechanisms include NGO stakeholders as full participants in the design and implementation of proposals.  Two more foundations and one more commercial enterprise make contributions to the Global Fund, including those at the country level.  The Global Fund conducts evaluations of grants, and half of the grant recipients make progress toward the indicators outlined in the proposals and the M&E framework.

•         Play a leading role in coordinating U.S. policy toward the Global Fund; participate in deliberations and decisions of the Global Fund's Board of Directors; work with the Global Fund's Board and Secretariat to ensure that its policies and operations are effective and accountable; brief members of Congress and staff, the private sector, and NGOs on major developments and U.S. policies.

Participate in UN and bilateral meetings dealing with global health issues.

•         Assign staff to attend these meetings, and ensure that other U.S. representatives to these meetings are briefed on USG global health policies, including policies on reproductive health.

Brief ambassadors and other USG personnel on global health issues and USG policy.

•         Prepare briefing materials on global health for new ambassadors and other USG personnel; offer briefings to new personnel when issues arise.

Seven countries stabilize or reduce rates of new HIV infections.

•         Engage foreign diplomats and health officials to advance bilateral opportunities; contribute to the development of policies regarding the President's International Mother and Child HIV Prevention Initiative; seek out opportunities to use the Millennium Challenge Account to fight HIV/AIDS.

Five countries decrease maternal mortality rate by at least 2 percent.

•         Use diplomatic efforts to educate countries about the most common causes of maternal mortality; promote bilateral and multilateral policies, including the allocation of resources, targeted at reducing those causes ; and expend USG funds on building local capacity, training birth assistants, and providing direct health care for women giving birth.

Monitoring trips to two countries in each region where UNFPA operates.

•         Ask embassy staff to assist in monitoring UNFPA programs; send U.S.-based staff to participate in such monitoring.

Submit a draft of revised International Health Regulations to WHO governing bodies and adopt it at the World Health Assembly.

•         Review draft regulations; advocate needed changes.

The GHSAG conducts cooperative exercises; the private sector, NGOs, and health and science institutions, are more involved in the introduction of new knowledge to a rapidly evolving security area.

•         Continue to participate in the work of the GHSAG; develop a framework for risk communication of chemical, biological, and radio-nuclear (RCBN) terrorist incidents.

Additional ten countries establish vaccine and drug stockpiles; work with WHO to strengthen its smallpox vaccine reserve.

•         Encourage countries, through multilateral and bilateral diplomacy, to develop stockpiles.


Performance Goal 2

Partnerships, Initiatives and Implemented International Treaties And Agreements That Protect The Environment and Promote Efficient Energy Use and Resource Management

Summary: Projected FY 2004 Performance

In 2002 the Department participated in a series of multilateral fora, including the Doha World Trade Ministerial, the Monterrey Finance for Development Summit, and the Johannesburg World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD), which created a coherent international framework for new partnerships and innovative programs to promote the three pillars of sustainable development (environmental protection, economic development, and social development), based on a foundation of good domestic governance (democratic institutions, transparency, and the rule of law).  The Department intends to follow through on developing and implementing these goals during 2003 and 2004 in the UN and other multilateral, regional, and bilateral fora.  The Department will also work to ensure the effective implementation of the four key signature partnerships on water, energy, forests, and hunger, as well as many of the over 200 partnerships which emerged from the WSSD.  The Department also will promote domestic capacity in key countries for good environmental governance.

Through the Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP), which the Secretary announced at the WSSD, the Department will help to conserve the world's second largest tropical forest area in the world, and provide its inhabitants with sustainable economic benefits.  By 2004, the CBFP is scheduled to have established an international data network that would link project proposals to potential donors, and to an international data bank that will allow the partners to maximize funds for specific projects in the area while eliminating redundancies.  In addition, by working to develop funding agreements and public-private partnership for on-the-ground conservation efforts under the Tropical Forest Conservation Act (TFCA), the Department's efforts will help to stimulate forest conservation in countries that otherwise may lack interest in conservation. 

Effective environmental protection is critical to create a level playing field to harness trade, competition and investment for sustainable development.  Over the next two years, the Department will work to ensure that satisfactory environmental provisions are incorporated in free trade agreements with Morocco, the Southern African Customs Union, Central America, Australia, and the  entire Western Hemisphere, and to negotiate and implement complementary environmental cooperation mechanisms with Chile, Singapore and other U.S. trading partners.   The Department will also encourage its partners in the OECD to strengthen environmental standards and transparency for export credit agencies. 

Example of an FY 2002 Achievement:
Global Fisheries --
Illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing activities undermine sustainable management of fishery resources, often contributing to collapse of fish stocks, penalization of legal fishermen, and in some cases the facilitation of other illegal activities. The Department led international efforts to develop a voluntary international plan of action to address IUU fishing. Under the plan, countries agree to develop national plans by 2004 to prevent, deter, and eliminate IUU fishing. The plan also provides recommendations on vessel monitoring, information sharing, and the use of market-based control and surveillance measures to combat IUU fishing. The Department also helped establish a voluntary network of fisheries' law enforcement officials, enhanced developing countries' capacities for implementing the Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries, and led a fisheries law enforcement training workshop in East Africa.

Regarding climate change, in 2003-2004 the Department intends to establish and begin implementing new partnerships with Russia, Ukraine, South Korea, Brazil, Mexico, the United Kingdom, and other countries, as necessary.  The Department will work to identify key outcomes, deliverables, and associated timelines and begin implementation of partnerships with Canada, the EU, India, China, and other countries that meet established timelines for deliverables.  The Department will complete reviews of existing partnerships, and use the lessons learned to adjust activities to enhance effectiveness of the overall climate change approach.  By building bilateral and regional partnerships, the Department will enhance the capacity of key countries to understand and address global climate change.

Over the next two years, the Department will continue cooperative efforts to promote the effective implementation of fisheries treaties and instruments; fight illegal fishing; address fishery-related pollution; and promote conservation of sharks, sea turtles, and other species.  Working with Australia, New Zealand, and Peru bilaterally and through FAO and APEC, the Department will promote better science and more effective management of the earth's deep-sea fisheries.  Through global and regional bodies, the Department will promote capacity building activities that contribute to the scientific, legal, and enforcement capabilities of managers in developing countries to promote responsible fisheries and aquaculture.  Through this work, the Department will help to ensure the sustainability of the world's fisheries and a level playing field for the U.S. fishing industry.

The Department will support sustainable development by building partnerships among governments, research institutions, and industry for science and technology (S&T) cooperation, including science-based decision-making, environmental and biodiversity protection, marine sciences, energy, climate, HIV/AIDS, and other health issues.  In 2003-2004, the Department will work to negotiate and implement new S&T agreements with Oman, Uzbekistan, Australia, and Pakistan; renew the S&T agreement with Ukraine; update and expand the interactive database that tracks activities under existing S&T agreements; and conduct a policy review of the China S&T agreement. 

Summary: Indicators, Results and Targets

Baseline

Performance Results

Performance Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #1: Status of Trade Agreements or Guidelines That Minimize Environmental Harm.

Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with Jordan was signed. 

Environmental review of the Free Trade Agreement of the Americas (FTAA) undertaken pursuant to Executive Order 13141. 

G-8 Summit calls for negotiation of a new agreement on environmental guidelines for export credit agencies (ECAs).

FTA negotiations with Singapore and Chile are launched. 

The WTO agreed to negotiate trade and environment issues within the Doha Round.

Negotiations were ongoing for four bilateral FTAs.

The Trade Act of 2002 authorized the President to negotiate trade agreements subject to an up-or-down vote in Congress. 

FTAA negotiators agreed at the Quito Ministerial to language in the declaration that included protecting the environmental as an FTAA goal.

FTAs with Singapore and Chile are completed that have satisfactory environmental provisions. 

OECD members agree to undertake formal discussions of environmental standards. 

U.S.-Jordan Environmental Forum agrees on workplan for environmental cooperation.

OECD partners take qualitative and quantitative steps to strengthen environmental standards and transparency for export credit agencies. 

New FTA negotiations incorporate satisfactory environmental provisions.

Implementation of environmental cooperation agreements negotiated with FTA partners.


Baseline

Performance Results

Performance Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #2: Enhance or Establish Bilateral and Regional Climate Change Partnerships in Target Countries to Implement the President's new Approach on Climate Change.

Several bilateral policy dialogues existed, but most did not involve specific implementing activities.

New partnerships announced with Japan, EU, Central American countries, and Italy to initiate the President's directive to engage internationally toward more effective global effort to address climate change.

New partnerships announced or initiated with Australia, Canada, the EU, India, South Korea, and China.

Implementation of partnerships with Japan, Central American countries, Italy, and Australia.

Key working groups were established and specific projects and project-related activities agreed to and begun.

Establish and begin implementing new partnerships with additional countries including Russia, Kazakhstan, South Korea, Brazil, Mexico, and the United Kingdom.  Identify key outcomes and deliverables, with associated timelines. Begin detailed implementation of partnerships with Australia, Canada, the EU, India, and China. 

For existing partnerships, the Department will meet timelines for deliverables established in 2002.  Complete reviews of existing partnerships will take place.

Establish additional climate change partnerships, as necessary (Mexico, Brazil, South Africa, and Egypt). 

For existing climate change partnerships, the Department meets timelines and deliverables established in previous years. 

Review existing climate change partnerships, increase or adjust engagement where needed.

Indicator #3: Coordination and Management of all U.S. Government S&T Activities Derived From S&T Agreements.

Congress requests list of all S&T agreements and derivative MOUs and protocols.

Policy review was concluded of the S&T activities under the U.S.-Russia S&T agreement.

Policy review was conducted of the S&T activities under the U.S.-China S&T agreement.

Touching on the full spectrum of OES issues (science-based decision-making; environmental and biodiversity protection; marine sciences; energy; climate; HIV/AIDS and other health issues, and science, technology and engineering for sustainable development), establish, renegotiate, as necessary, and implement S&T agreements that forge partnerships between USG agencies, foreign counterparts, public and private research institutions, and industry.

Conduct a policy review of S&T activities under the U.S.-China S&T agreement.

Touching on the full spectrum of OES issues (science-based decision-making; environmental and biodiversity protection; marine sciences; energy; climate; HIV/AIDS and other health issues, and science, technology and engineering for sustainable development), establish, renegotiate, as necessary, and implement S&T agreements that forge partnerships between USG agencies, foreign counterparts, public and private research institutions, and industry.






Baseline

Performance Results

Performance Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #4: Partnerships, Capacity-Building Efforts, Level of Funding and
Sectoral Policies Promoting Sustainable Development.

MDBs adopted new measures to take environmental considerations into account in project reparation.

FAO activities were often limited to pelagic fisheries.  The World Bank Fund for Sustainable Fisheries established with a donation from Japan.  The World Bank undertook work on new environmental policy paper for forest sector projects.

The Department began consultations with other States Parties to the UN Fish Stocks Agreement (UNFSA) to promote its effective implementation, particularly cooperation with developing states.  The UN General Assembly and States Parties to the UNFSA agreed in principle to establish a voluntary trust fund to implement the UNFSA.

A rebuilding plan of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, (ICCAT) contributed to recovery of the North Atlantic swordfish.  APEC workshop on shark conservation and management was held to build capacity to implement FAO International Plan of Action (IPOA).  A regional fisheries management organization adopted the first limitations on fishing capacity.  The Southern Ocean Albatross and Petrel Agreement entered into force. Further progress was made toward establishing a regime to conserve and manage highly migratory fish stocks in the central and western Pacific.   

The Department raised U.S. concerns with EU fisheries policies at a high level and in multilateral fora, and continued to work with EU counterparts as the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) was finalized. 

Increase contributions to the World Bank Fund for Sustainable Fisheries by $2 million.  Increase contributions to FAO FishCODE.  GEF institutes environmental performance measures and establishes an independent monitoring unit.  Approximately
$600 million is available for project funding through GEF.

Launch and maintain partnerships and initiatives with governments, elements of civil society and the private sector to advance U.S. interests on water, access to energy, health, forests, oceans, and science and technology. Promote good domestic governance in developing countries by building environmental enforcement and compliance capacity and public access to information.

The Congo Basin Forest Partnership improves forest conservation efforts and promotes sustainable development and forest management in eleven critical landscapes.

Develop additional country participation for debt reduction in return for conservation under the Tropical Forest Conservation Act

Implement fisheries treaties and voluntary instruments (including ones to resolve fisheries disputes and the reduce illegal fishing), in order to conserve sharks, mitigate sea turtle by-catch, and increase awareness of fishery-related marine pollution, through cooperative work programs and technical and financial assistance to developing countries.  Encourage additional states to sign or participate in existing agreements, and develop new instruments, as needed.

Promote trading regimes that support sustainable fisheries by continuing inspections in shrimp exporting countries, achieving progress in implementing cooperative agreements on trade-related fisheries issues, and achieving by working for WTO agreements that do not undermine U.S. interests.


Means and Strategies by Target

OECD partners take qualitative and quantitative steps to strengthen environmental standards and transparency for export credit agencies. 

  • Consult with key OECD partners bilaterally.
  • Negotiate in OECD committee sessions.

Incorporate satisfactory environmental provisions in FTA negotiations.

  • Coordinate among the Department's regional and economic bureaus.
  • USG interagency consultations.
  • Community outreach.
  • Negotiate with partners in bilateral and multilateral FTA negotiations.

Implement environmental cooperation agreements negotiated with FTA partners.

  • Coordinate among the Department's regional and economic bureaus.
  • USG interagency consultations
  • Community outreach regarding partnerships.

Establish climate change partnerships with additional countries as necessary (Mexico, Brazil, South Africa, and Egypt)

  • Mobilize interagency teams; inventory/assess existing bilateral climate programs; develop new/expanded areas of engagement; engage environment, science and technology staff at U.S. embassies, identify/contact appropriate officials in country to elaborate bilateral agreement text.
  • Identify specific staff responsibilities; assign/reassign portfolios to reflect additional work, secure needed funds, and identify future needs for additional work (staff, training, and budget).

Meet timelines and deliverables established in previous years for existing climate change partnerships.

  • Engage interagency working group to evaluate progress in bilaterals; review resource allocation (travel, videoconferencing, etc.) to ensure balance.
  • Identify specific staff responsibilities; assign/reassign portfolios to reflect additional work, secure needed funds, and identify future needs for additional work (staff, training, and budget).

Review existing climate change partnerships and increase or adjust engagement where needed.

  • Engage interagency working group to evaluate progress in bilaterals and review resource allocation (travel, videoconferencing, etc.) to ensure balance.
  • Identify specific staff responsibilities; assign/reassign portfolios to reflect additional work, secure needed funds, and identify future needs for additional work (staff, training, and budget).

Conduct policy review of S&T activities under U.S.-China S&T agreement.

  • Conduct biennial reviews of all activities conducted under the U.S.-China S&T Agreement and summarize report results in both classified and unclassified form, as required by Congress..

Touching on the full spectrum of OES issues (science-based decision-making; environmental and biodiversity protection; marine sciences; energy; climate; HIV/AIDS and other health issues, and science, technology and engineering for sustainable development), establish, renegotiate as necessary, and implement S&T agreements that forge partnerships between USG agencies, foreign counterparts, public and private research institutions, and industry.

  • Examine agreements up for renewal in light of OES-wide S&T issues and propose new language to ensure that the agreements remain a useful platform from which the full spectrum of S&T diplomacy can be pursued.
  • Examine current partnerships under existing S&T agreements to determine best practices that can be applied to other existing relationships and new agreements.
  • Pursue new S&T agreements at the national, multilateral, and regional levels that support OES-wide issues and USG agency mandates; and support partnerships in science, technology, engineering, and medical fields.  Select target countries and regions in consultation with other USG agencies, OES offices, and the U.S. scientific community.

Develop additional country participation for debt reduction in return for conservation under the Tropical Forest Conservation Act

  • Work with the Department of the Treasury to allocate available funds to eligible countries
  • Interact with domestic and international stakeholders
  • Coordinate with interested foreign governments 

The Congo Basin Forest Partnership improves forest conservation efforts and promotes sustainable development and forest management in eleven critical landscapes.

  • Continue to develop partners and implement programs.
  • Coordinate with USAID's Central African Regional Program for the Environment (CARPE) on allocation of U.S. share of funding.

Implement fisheries treaties and voluntary instruments, (including ones to resolve fisheries disputes and reduce illegal fishing), in order to conserve sharks, mitigate sea turtle by-catch, and increase awareness of fishery-related marine pollution, through cooperative work programs, technical and financial assistance to developing countries.  Encourage additional states to sign or participate in existing agreements, and develop new instruments, as needed.

  • Cooperate and coordinate with other USG agencies, especially the Department of Commerce, the U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
  • Consult with Congress.
  • Participate in intergovernmental organizations and regional bodies.
  • Promote science-based decision making in fisheries management and the use of appropriate technologies (e.g., vessel monitoring systems) that contribute to sustainable fisheries.
  • Develop and transfer selective gear technologies that reduce trade and environment disputes (e.g., turtle excluder devices).
  • Target activities to build coalitions among like-minded countries, promote regional cooperation, and strengthen developing country capacity building.
  • Conduct public diplomacy and outreach to key stakeholders.

Promote trading regimes that support sustainable fisheries by continuing inspections in shrimp exporting countries, achieving progress in implementing cooperative agreements on trade-related fisheries issues, and achieving by working for WTO agreements that do not undermine U.S. interests.

  • Cooperate and coordinate with other USG agencies, especially The Department of Commerce, the U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
  • Consult with Congress.
  • Participate in inter-governmental organizations and regional bodies.
  • Promote science-based decision making in fisheries management and the use of appropriate technologies (e.g., vessel monitoring systems) that contribute to sustainable fisheries.
  • Develop and transfer selective gear technologies that reduce trade and environment disputes (e.g., turtle excluder devices).
  • Target activities to build coalitions among like-minded countries, promote regional cooperation, and strengthen developing country capacity building.
  • Conduct public diplomacy and outreach to key stakeholders.

Performance Goal 3
Broader Access to Quality Education With Emphasis on Primary School Completion
[USAID Goal]

Activities related to this goal will be undertaken by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and reported in USAID's FY 2004 Performance Plan.

Performance Goal 4
Effective and Humane International Migration Policies and Systems

Summary: Projected FY 2004 Performance

The Department will continue its work that promotes orderly, legal, and humane international migration through the promotion of regional migration dialogues, capacity building programs, and support for the International Organization for Migration (IOM).  The Department will seek to ensure that it balances human rights and protection concerns of migrants, including those of trafficking victims, against the need for national security and counterterrorism.  The Department accomplishes this by supporting specific projects that bolster the capacity of governments, international organizations (especially the International Organization for Migration), and NGOs to address these issues.  The Department's work will be closely coordinated with the Department of Homeland Security, as appropriate.

Example of an FY 2002 Achievement:
Regional Conference on Migration (RCM) --
FY2002 was a particularly successful year for the Regional Conference on Migration (RCM). Made up of eleven member states in North and Central America and the Caribbean, the RCM tackled several important migration issues of regional concern, including migrant smuggling and trafficking in persons, modernization of management systems and the return of regional and extra-regional migrants. Most significantly, the forum addressed the common concern of regional security. Member states adopted a declaration against terrorism and worked together in a joint training and interdiction exercise involving the detection of fraudulent documents and the assessment of security risks posed by travelers to the region. Seven of these countries later participated in a joint interdiction effort, which recorded incidents of use of fraudulent documents. This week-long joint exercise was the first of its type to be undertaken by RCM member countries.

 

Summary: Indicators, Results and Targets

Baseline

Results

Targets

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Indicator #1: Percentage of Initiatives Agreed Upon at Regional Migration Dialogues That are Implemented. (New Indicator)

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Baseline:

Implement approximately 60 percent of the activities agreed upon in the Regional Conference on Migration (RCM), and about half of the activities agreed upon in the Intergovernmental Consultations on Asylum, Refugees, and Migration (IGC), and the Western and Southern African dialogues.

Means and Strategies by Target

Implement approximately 60 percent of the activities agreed upon in the Regional Conference on Migration (RCM) and about half of the activities agreed upon in the Intergovernmental Consultations on Asylum, Refugees, and Migration (IGC), and the Western and Southern African dialogues.

  • The United States will advance proposals that are practical and achievable.  The Department will work to advance their success and support appropriate projects as funds are available.

Summary: Verification/Validation and Cross Cutting Activities

Performance Goal 1

Improved global health, including child and maternal health, the reduction of abortion, and the reduction of disease, especially HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis.

Verification and Validation

Data will be validated and verified by comparison with data supplied by international organizations, (including UNAIDS and WHO), information supplied by the Global Fund, and information from other sources.

Crosscutting Activities

The Department cooperates closely with partner USG agencies (including USAID, the Departments of Health and Human Services, Defense, and Labor; and the Peace Corps), the NSC, and the White House Office of National AIDS Policy (ONAP), in the formulation and implementation of U.S. global health policy.  The Department works particularly closely with USAID and HHS on all activities concerning the Global Fund, and with HHS on all activities concerning the GHSAG.  The Department serves, along with other partner agencies, on the ONAP-led steering committee for the President's International Mother and Child HIV Prevention Initiative.  The Department convenes interagency working groups frequently to coordinate policies with partner agencies.

Performance Goal 2

Partnerships, initiatives, and implemented international treaties and agreements that protect the environment and promote efficient energy use and resource management.

Verification and Validation

The Department consult with USG agencies, foreign governments, the private sector, and NGOs to critique the effectiveness of its activities, provide relevant data, and assist in evaluating the extent to which U.S. objectives are being met.  There will be formal, fully documented reviews of the China S&T agreement and the implementation of agreements conducted by UN agencies/ treaty Secretariats.  In other cases, validation will occur in the context of ongoing formal and informal consultations.

Crosscutting Activities

There broad coordination with USG agency partners (the Departments of Commerce, Interior, Energy, and Treasury; the EPA; NAS; USAID; and USTR), NGOs, private sector partners, and a range of donor and developing country partners.

Performance Goal 4

Effective and humane international migration policies and systems.

Verification and Validation

The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) manages the Department's participation in multilateral migration dialogues and tracks the implementation of follow-on activities..

Crosscutting Activities

The Department coordinates with other USG agencies (including the Departments of Homeland Security and Labor), international organizations (IOM and the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe), and a variety of NGOs.

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