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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Strategic Goal 9: Social and Environmental Issues


FY 2005 Performance Summary (The Plan)
Bureau of Resource Management
February 2004
Report
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Strategic Goal 9: Social and Environmental Issues
Improve Health, Education, Environment, and Other Conditions for the Global Population

I. Strategic Goal Public Benefit

"The strong partnership between American science and American statecraft is more critical than ever in meeting the challenges of the 21st century. Whether the mission is supporting the President's campaign against terrorism, implementing arms agreements, creating conditions for sustainable development, or stemming the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, the formulation of foreign policy must proceed from a solid scientific foundation. - Secretary Colin L. Powell

Disease, poverty, environmental degradation, and unchecked migration destroy lives, ravage societies, destabilize regions, and cheat future generations of prosperity. While these social and environmental problems are daunting, ample experience at the international and national level demonstrates that progress is possible through concerted efforts. The United States has both humanitarian and security interests in helping countries tackle social and environmental problems. Left unresolved, these problems will aggravate social and political instability and could reverse the development advances made over the last several decades. By confronting these problems, we can save lives, reduce human suffering, lay the groundwork for sustainable economic development, forestall the conditions that sow the seeds of terrorism, and prevent adverse conditions from spilling across our borders.

We will build public-private partnerships that leverage resources, strengthen international cooperation, and help other countries build their institutional capacity to manage these problems. We will encourage good governance, necessary for making sustainable gains against social and environmental problems by bringing problems to light, enabling varied, creative solutions in the context of public debate, and holding governments accountable for results.

II. Resource Summary ($ in Millions)

  FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request Change from FY 2004
Amount %
Staff 689 694 694 0 0%
Funds $3,687 $4,070 $4,554 $484 11.9%

III. Strategic Goal Context
Shown below are the four performance goals, initiatives/programs, resources, bureaus and partners that contribute to accomplishment of the "Social and Environmental Issues" strategic goal. Acronyms are defined in the glossary at the back of this publication.

Strategic Goal Performance Goal
(Short Title)
Initiative/Program Major Resources Lead Bureaus External Partners
Social and Environmental Issues Global Health Global Health D&CP, GAI,
CS&H, ESF
S/GAC, OES, IO HHS, USAID, DOD, DOL, EPA, CDC, NSC, CEQ, Commerce, UN, UNAIDS, WHO, private sector entities
Combating Bioterrorism D&CP PM, OES, IO HHS, DHS, DOD, Commerce, CIA, NSC, HSC, UN, WHO
Population D&CP PRM UNFPA, UN Population Division, USAID, HHS
Environmental Protection Institutionalizing Sustainable Development D&CP, ESF OES USAID, EPA, USDA, NOAA, DOE, Smithsonian Institution, civil society and private sector organizations
Marine Resources D&CP, ESF, IO&P OES DOC National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, USAID, USDA, DOE, DOI USFWS, EPA, NSF, NRC, NASA, DOD, USTR, USCG, NGOs, International Organizations, and International Coral Reef Initiative Partners
Conservation of Protected Areas and Tropical Forests D&CP
ESF
OES,
AF,
WHA
USAID, USDA, Treasury Department,
USDA-Forest Service,
NGOs, International Organizations
Global Climate Change and Clean Energy D&CP, IO&P, ESF OES, STAS DOE, EPA, CEQ, CEA, NOAA, NASA, USAID, Treasury, USDA, NSF, DOC, DOI, DOT, DOD,
Science and Technology Cooperation D&CP, ESF OES, STAS,
EB
USAID, USDA, DOE, DOC, DOI, EPA, NSF, NRC, NASA, DOD, USPTO, USTR, private sector entities
Access to Quality Education Accomplishment of this performance goal is the responsibility of USAID, and is therefore not reported in the Department of State's FY 2005 Performance Summary.
Migration Policies and Systems Effective and Migration Policies and Systems MRA, ERMA PRM IOM, DHS

IV. Performance Summary
For each Initiative/Program that supports accomplishment of this strategic goal, the most critical FY 2005 performance indicators and targets are shown below.

Annual Performance Goal #1
IMPROVED GLOBAL HEALTH, INCLUDING CHILD, MATERNAL, AND REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH, AND THE REDUCTION OF ABORTION AND DISEASE, ESPECIALLY HIV/AIDS, MALARIA, AND TUBERCULOSIS

I/P #1: Global Health
Improve global health by fighting the global HIV/AIDS pandemic, combating other emerging diseases, and countering bioterrorism.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #1: Countries or Regions With Stabilized or Reduced Rates of New HIV Infections
2000:
N/A


2001:
Uganda, Senegal and Thailand had stabilized or reduced rates of new HIV infections.

A total of five countries had stabilized or reduced rates of new HIV infections (Uganda, Senegal, Thailand, Zambia and Cambodia).
Tanzania is added as the sixth country to have stabilized or reduced rates of new HIV infections.
A total of seven countries stabilize or reduce rates of new HIV infections.
One additional country with stabilized or reduced rates of new HIV infections.
Output Indicator
Indicator #2: Implementation of the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief
2000:
N/A

2001:
0

0 President announced his AIDS initiative in January, and signed legislation authorizing the plan in May.
Prevention of new HIV infections. Treatment of HIV infected people. Care for HIV infected people and AIDS orphans.

Yearly targets will be developed by the Global AIDS Coordinator.

Prevention of new HIV infections

Treatment of HIV infected people.

Care for HIV infected people and AIDS orphans.

Provide services and support to women and their families.

Output Indicator
Indicator #3: Status of International Collaboration, and Partnerships to Support Health, Including the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria
2000:
N/A


2001:
The level of bilateral and multilateral collaboration on global health increased significantly; UN Special General Assembly Session on HIV/AIDS; negotiations completed for the Global Fund.

The Global Fund began work; negotiations continued to put mechanisms in place that guarantee program and financial accountability, set rules for procurement, etc.; The Global Fund had multi-year pledges totaling $2.1 billion, with approximately $750 million available for the year; one large contribution was from the private sector.
All but one of the first round of grant agreements have been signed.

Database has not been established but a survey is evaluating country-level mechanisms.

Pledges have increased, with more-in-kind donations from both foundations and commercial enterprises.

Continued viability and success of the Global Fund. As reported by the Global Fund, one-fourth of all Country Coordination Mechanisms include NGO stakeholders as full participants in the design and implementation of proposals. Two more foundations and one more commercial enterprise make contributions to the Global Fund. The Global Fund has conducted evaluations of grants, and half of the grant recipients make progress toward the indicators outlined in the proposals and the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework.
ledges, from both public and private entities, continue to increase, permitting renewal of first and second round proposals, as they reach the end of their initial two-year funding and have met their targets, as well as funding new proposals.

NGO stakeholders and business are implementing a larger percentage of proposals.

Outcome Indicator
Indicator #4: Status of World Health Organization (WHO) International Health Regulations (IHRs)
2000:
N/A


2001:
The World Health Assembly (WHA) linked IHR revision process to global health security and bioterrorism.

WHO continued consultation and elaboration of approach and international consensus building.
WHO strengthened its activities related to global and national-level disease surveillance and undertook major efforts with governments in limiting and controlling SARS.

Work continued on revising the WHO International Health Regulations with the target for adoption in 2005 of revised regulations.

Technical review of the revised IHR continues at global, regional, and sub-regional level; regulatory draft IHR revision is submitted to member states for review.

Using lessons learned from SARS outbreak, increase surveillance and reporting on infectious disease outbreaks.

Revised IHR are submitted to the 58th WHA and approved by the member states.

Revised IHR provide maximum security against international spread of disease, whether of natural or deliberate occurrence, with a minimum interference with world trade and travel. Countries are reporting outbreaks sooner and requesting international help, where necessary, to contain infectious disease outbreaks.

Output Indicator
Indicator #5: Number of High Risk Countries or Regions With National Plans to Combat Malaria
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

12 17 19 21
Output Indicator
Indicator #6: Percentage of World Population with Access to Tuberculosis Care and Treatment
2000:
N/A

2001:
55%

63% 67% 71% 75%
Output Indicator
Indicator #7: Establishment of International Agreements and Programs That Minimize Use of Toxic Substances that Adversely Impact Human Health
2000:
N/A

2001:
U.S. and many other countries sign the Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) Convention to address substances that pose a global environmental and health threat.

General terms of reference for the creation of a pharmaceutical and biotech industry anti-terrorism code of conduct were developed.

U.S. submits the POPs Convention to Congress for ratification. 30 other countries ratify the agreement.

U.S. proposes new global actions to address mercury pollution, another toxic substance of global environmental and health concern.
50 countries ratify the POPs Convention and develop national plans to phase out the use of POPs; new global program of action to address mercury pollution is established under the UN Environment Program.
An additional 20 countries ratify the POPs Convention and develop national plans to phase out the use of POPs.
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #8: Number of Targeted Countries using Market-Based Approaches for Delivering Point-of-Use Technologies for Treating Water at the Household Level.
2000:
N/A

2001:
2

3 6 8 10

I/P #2: Combating Bioterrorism
Improve health security by combating bioterrorism.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Input Indicator
Indicator #9: Status of the Global Health Security Action Group (GHSAG)
2000:
N/A


2001:
Baseline:
The United States, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico, and the United Kingdom form GHSAG for cooperative, international efforts to counter bioterrorism.

General terms of reference for the GHSAG creation of a pharmaceutical and biotech industry anti-terrorism code of conduct were developed.
GHSAG formed technical working groups. In December 2002, GHSAG formed a new technical working group on Pandemic influenza. During the GHSAG working meeting in September 2003 in Ottawa, GHSAG members decided to add SARS to the topic of the Influenza technical working group. GHSAG has tested Incident Scale. GHSAG members are prepared to submit Terms of Reference.
GHSAG conducts cooperative, multi-nation exercises; the private sector, NGOs, and health and science institutions, are involved in the introduction of new knowledge to a rapidly evolving security area. GHSAG's lab network begins exchange of information, evaluation and validation of diagnostic procedures, and development of communication protocols.
GHSAG develops "lessons learned" and strategies for sharing with countries outside of GHSAG. GHSAG lab network develops safe and secure transport protocols, ensures that biosafety procedures are in place at all GHSAG labs, and promotes voluntary adoption of improved standards. GHSAG implements bioterrorism-related training programs and simulations for both GHSAG and non-GHSAG members. GHSAG develops rapid response methodologies for preventing and responding to bioterrorism.

I/P #3: Population
Strengthen families worldwide by encouraging reform of the United Nations Population Fund.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #10: Management Reforms at UNFPA.
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Data pending.
Baseline:
UNFPA reforms methods of monitoring and evaluating 2 programs.
UNFPA reforms methods of monitoring and evaluating 3 programs.

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
One additional country with stabilized or reduced rates of new HIV infections.

  • Engage foreign diplomats and health officials to advance bilateral opportunities.

Prevention of new HIV infections, treatment of HIV-infected people, and care for HIV-infected people and AIDS orphans

  • Develop a comprehensive, five-year, global strategy for fighting HIV/AIDS globally.
  • Begin funding agreed upon programs in the 14 focus countries.
  • Develop programs focused on HIV/AIDS and trafficking in persons, and HIV/AIDS and women.

Pledges to the Global Fund, from both public and private entities, continue to increase, permitting renewal of first and second round proposals. NGO stakeholders and business are implementing a larger percentage of proposals.

  • Use U.S. diplomatic missions to increase awareness of the Global Fund, especially among the private sector and NGOs, and to facilitate their involvement in Country Coordination Mechanisms.

Adopt revised International Health Regulations at the World Health Assembly.

  • Actively participate in the U.S. Government interagency review of the draft IHR and World Health Assembly discussions to ensure that revised IHR meets goal of increased global surveillance of infectious disease with minimum impact on global trade and travel.

Twenty-one high-risk countries adopt national plans to combat malaria.

  • Encourage political commitment to development of country-specific strategies.
  • Assist Roll Back Malaria's efforts to provide technical assistance to countries to develop plans.

Seventy-five percent of the world's population living in tuberculosis-endemic countries has access to DOTS.

  • Support efforts to overcome human and financial resources constraints to achieve 100% access to DOTS.
  • Target "hard-to-reach" population groups for DOTS.
  • Where needed, advocate health sector reforms to ensure maintenance and sustainability of tuberculosis-control programs.

An additional 20 countries ratify the POPs Convention and develop national plans to phase out the use of POPs.

  • Work with other countries to maximize involvement in POPs phase-out.
  • Support Global Environment Facility for assistance to key countries in developing national implementation plans.

Ten additional countries using market-based approaches for delivering point-of-use technologies for economically treating water at the household level to reduce exposure to water-borne diseases.

  • Launch initiatives with other donors to expand the use of water treatment technologies at the household level; mobilize investment for water-related infrastructure through revolving funds and loan guarantees; and support regional management of shared water resources.
  • Use multilateral fora to advance policies that promote sound water management, improve hygiene practices and strengthen the environment for water-related investments. (Key upcoming fora include the UN Commission on Sustainable Development's 2004-05 work cycle, and the Forth World Water Forum in FY06)

Development of "lessons learned," training programs and simulations, and rapid response methodologies for preventing and responding to bioterrorism.

  • Work with GHSAG member nations to create "lessons learned" documents.
  • Work collaboratively with GHSAG member nations and others (e.g., WHO) to design training programs and simulation exercises.
  • Participate in GHSAG working groups to develop rapid response methodologies.

Development of strategies for sharing these materials with countries outside of GHSAG.

  • Work with GHSAG member nations to create framework for outreach to non-member nations.

GHSAG lab network develops safe and secure transport protocols, ensures that biosafety procedures are in place at all GHSAG labs, and promotes voluntary adoption of improved standards.

  • Work with GHSAG member nations to identify and evaluate effective protocols.
  • Collaboratively review GHSAG labs to assess biosafety standards.
  • Identify candidate nations for voluntary adoption of improved standards.

UNFPA reforms methods of monitoring and evaluating 2 programs.

  • Discuss monitoring and evaluation methods with UNFPA.
  • Monitor UNFPA programs in the field.

Annual Performance Goal #2
PARTNERSHIPS, INITIATIVES, AND IMPLEMENTED INTERNATIONAL TREATIES AND AGREEMENTS THAT PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT AND PROMOTE EFFICIENT ENERGY USE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

I/P #4: Institutionalizing Sustainable Development
Reform bilateral and multilateral processes and institutions to focus efforts on key sustainable development issues (water, energy, and domestic good governance) and on implementation of sustainable development practices.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #1: Extent to Which Key Institutions and Processes Highlight Energy, Water, and Domestic Good Governance Issues and Adopt Approaches that Support the Implementation of Sustainable Development Projects.
2000:
N/A

2001:
UN processes, including the Commission on Sustainable Development, the UNECE, and Ministers at the World Water Forum are focused on a negotiated outcome - not implementation.

The Johannesburg Plan of Implementation calls for reform of the Commission on Sustainable Development to place more emphasis on implementation at all levels, including promoting and facilitating multi-stakeholder partnerships, and contains the strongest language to date on domestic good governance as a foundation for sustainable development.

U.S. continues to promote multi-stakeholder partnerships to advance international development. WSSD is the first UN conference to recognize partnerships as an official outcome.

U.S. discussion paper on CSD reform influences CSD Secretariat's proposed plan of work, which now focuses on implementation

Bilateral and regional meetings in key regions (Europe, Latin America) emphasize need for implementation, not new norm-setting. Europeans remain wedded to norm-setting approach in high-level multilateral meetings, although some begin supporting U.S.-led partnerships and OESI programs focusing on good domestic governance and implementation.

Commission on Sustainable Development focuses efforts on implementing the water elements of the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation and other internationally agreed development goals relating to water.

Capacity-building Institute at CSD 12 presents 8-12 classes, each with 10-20 issue experts and multi-stakeholder participants; CSD 12 Partnership Fair highlights 20 partnerships.

Key developing countries (e.g., Brazil, South Africa, India, Indonesia) support implementation and partnerships focused CSD reforms.

Energy fora including the World Energy Forum and the World Energy Council focus on public/private partnerships to implement sustainable development objectives.

Within the Commission on Sustainable Development, activities are centered on the development and implementation of partnerships and capacity building of key sustainable development areas included in the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation and Agenda 21.

EU members advocate more strongly for U.S. supported positions on sustainable development.

Output Indicator
Indicator #2: Key Developing Countries Build Capacity for Good Domestic Environmental Governance
2000:
N/A

2001:
U.S. and EU support Regional Environmental Centers in Eurasia to develop civil society organizations and enhance their engagement with governments.

Anti-corruption and Environmental Protection Initiative (AEPI) is launched, resulting in the development of projects to improve environmental rule of law and anti-corruption capacity in Mexico, Thailand, Uzbekistan and China.

International Network on Environmental Compliance and Enforcement (INECE), founded in 1989, launches efforts to promote regional sub networks in key regions.

USG efforts at the World Summit for Sustainable Development successfully led to inclusion in the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation of the strongest language to date on domestic good governance as a foundation of sustainable development.

EnviroLaw Conference in South Africa focused on importance of domestic good governance as a foundation for sustainable development.

First environmental crime course held at International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Budapest.

U.S. funds American Bar Association (ABA) Rule of Law program to engage government and civil society stakeholders in improving environmental law in China.

USG interagency teams explore and develop partnerships with civil society, private sector organizations, and governments to promote good domestic governance.

U.S.-Chile Free Trade and Environmental Cooperation Agreements include focus on capacity-building for environmental enforcement, compliance and public access to information.

U.S. funds efforts to promote public participation and access to information on environmental matters in Baltic states and Chile.

U.S. funds course for Southeast Asian representatives on enforcement of laws on trade in endangered species at International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in Bangkok.

USG interagency teams launch capacity-building efforts to promote effective environmental legal regimes and enforcement programs in Southern Africa, South America and the Middle East.

Bilateral and regional U.S. Free Trade Agreements and environmental cooperation arrangements with Central American, southern African and Middle Eastern countries commit these nations to effective enforcement of environmental laws, and to cooperation programs to improve domestic environmental governance capacity.

INECE promotes the development of national-level performance indicators to measure the success of environmental enforcement and compliance programs in Latin America, Africa and Eastern Europe.

2-3 key developing countries or emerging economies demonstrate measurable improvements in the effectiveness of domestic environmental enforcement programs, compliance with environmental laws, and national systems for public participation, access to information and access to justice on environmental matters.

I/P #5: Marine Resources
Develop, negotiate, and implement initiatives, treaties, and agreements to better protect both living and nonliving marine resources and promote sustainable development.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #3: Status of Marine Resources Agreements
2000:
N/A

2001:
The UN Fish Stocks Agreement (UNFSA) enters into force.
The Inter- American Sea Turtle Convention (IAC) enters into force.
The Indian Ocean Sea Turtle MOU becomes effective with 7 signatories.
Efforts to renegotiate the eastern Pacific tuna convention ongoing.
Efforts to negotiate an amendment to the U.S. albacore tuna treaty with Canada and to extend the 1988 agreement with Russia ongoing.
International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted changes to the International Convention on the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL), the Hazardous and Noxious Substances Protocol for the Oil Pollution Response Convention, and U.S. draft instrument to manage invasive species through ballast water controls as the base document for negotiations.

Began consultations with other States Parties to the UN Fish Stocks Agreement (UNFSA) to promote its effective implementation, particularly cooperation with developing states. A U.S.-drafted rebuilding plan of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) contributed to the near full recovery of North Atlantic swordfish stocks, up from 65% of healthy levels in just four years.

Southern Ocean Albatross and Petrel Agreement entered into force. Further progress was made toward establishing a regime to conserve and manage highly migratory fish stocks in the central/western Pacific.

Raised U.S. concerns with EU fisheries policies at a high level. Continued to work with EU counterparts as the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) was finalized.

U.S./Canada agree to amend albacore tuna treaty; agree to negotiate an agreement on Pacific whiting stocks.

U.S. and Taiwan sign MOU on fisheries issues.

Japan rejoins the discussions to establish a regime to conserve and manage highly migratory fish stocks in the central and western Pacific.

The package of amendments to the U.S. - Canada Albacore Treaty is submitted to the Senate.

Renegotiation of the eastern Pacific tuna convention is concluded.

Extension of 1988 U.S.-Russia Agreement is submitted to Congress.

The Second Meeting of the Parties to the Inter-American Sea Turtle Convention is held; other States in the region become Parties.

First meeting of the signatories to the Indian Ocean MOU is held.

Three new marine species are listed on CITES.

UNFSA has 34 parties.

CITES rejected proposals to down list whale and other marine species and allow trade in whale products.

The SPAW Protocol was ratified.

Central and Western Pacific fisheries convention and Eastern Pacific tuna agreement are submitted to the Senate.

U.S. -Canada agreement on Pacific whiting stocks concluded.

FAO holds policy level meeting on sea turtle conservation and fisheries bycatch reduction.

Institutional arrangements to implement the IAC are established; additional States become parties.

EU members become party to UNFSA; bringing total number to 50.

IWC adopts the revised management scheme.

The Western and Central Pacific fisheries convention enters into force and Japan and Korea join as Parties.

U.S. -Russia agreements on science and enforcement are concluded.

IAC Parties adopt and implement regional sea turtle conservation measures.

Indian Ocean MOU implements regional sea turtle/habitat conservation programs and measures.

Canada hosts UNFSA implementation review meeting.

U.S. judge is elected to the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea; U.S. begins implementation of the Law of the Sea, including a review of domestic and international policies and practice.

U.S. negotiates an oil spill response agreement with the U.K. on behalf of the British Virgin Islands.

Output Indicator
Indicator #4: Partnerships to Build Capacity for the Sustainable Use
and Protection of Marine Resources

2000:
N/A


2001:
FAO activities were often limited to pelagic fisheries which are limited by weak fisheries data collection and reporting.

The World Bank Fund for Sustainable Fisheries established with a donation from Japan.

Earth observation systems, GCOS (Climate), GTOS (Land) and GOOS (Ocean), are operated as independent Earth observation systems.

Issue of protected areas, terrestrial and marine, is placed on the agenda of several international fora.

Initiated interagency dialog regarding the White Water to Blue Water Initiative (WW2BW) designed to promote regional cooperation and strengthen developing country capacity to address land-based sources of marine pollution, promote sustainable fisheries, agricultural and forestry practices, challenges associated with tourism; and degradation of coastal areas

Funded Regional workshops held in support of the International Coral Reefs Initiative (ICRI).

APEC workshop on shark conservation and management was held to build capacity to implement FAO International Plan of Action (IPOA).

The UN General Assembly and States Parties to the UNFSA agreed in principle to establish a voluntary trust fund to help developing states implement the UN Fish Stocks Agreement.

New FAO voluntary program to support responsible fisheries and aquaculture implemented in some developing countries.

FAO drafts strategy for improving data collection and reporting in fisheries.

U.S. holds successful Western Indian Ocean Fisheries Enforcement Workshop that increases capacity for fisheries enforcement and compliance monitoring.

U.S. contributions to the Inter-governmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and other organizations enabled the international scientific community to discuss the production of an integrated and sustained earth observation system

WW2BW launch at the World Summit on Sustainable Development generates international interest in both this initiative and cross-sectoral approaches to integrated management of watersheds and marine ecosystems.

U.S. provides assistance to help developing States implement the Indian Ocean Sea Turtle MOU.

FAO adopts strategy for improving data collection and reporting in fisheries.

World Bank initiates projects with targeted sustainable fisheries components in developing countries.

The U.S. hosts ministerial-level Earth Observation Summit in July to promote the development and financial support of an integrated and sustained earth observation system.

Significant progress is made through DOS-led WWW2BW to energize partnerships to address integrated approaches to watershed and marine ecosystems management.

World Bank, FAO, and other institutions increase cooperation on and resources devoted to sustainable fisheries programs.

FAO begins work on its strategy for improving fisheries data collection and reporting, particularly in developing countries.

APEC holds workshop on economic sustainability of aquaculture.

FAO convenes international conference on fisheries enforcement with U.S. support.

Implementation plan for the Earth Observation System is completed and undergoing review by the participating countries

U.S. supports the Global Ocean Observation system of the IOC.

Secretariat for the Antarctic Treaty becomes operational.

USG hosts WW2BW Miami Partnership conference designed to generate 20 new public-private partnerships in the Wider Caribbean. USG funds WW2BW implementing projects on priority areas including coral reefs, fisheries management, land- and ship- based sources of pollution, improved regional cooperation between regional bodies, etc.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopts the ballast water convention, to manage the spread of invasive marine species.

U.S. conducts law enforcement training and capacity building work in Caribbean region.

Work begins in FAO and APEC on a mechanism to promote closer cooperation on aquaculture issues in the Americas.

Countries adopt the implementation plan created by the Earth Observation System ad-hoc working group.

Countries adopt the implementation plan for an integrated and sustained earth observation system as created by the ad-hoc working group.

With U.S. support and an expanded number of government and private partners, ICRI becomes more effective in conservation of the world's coral reefs as evidenced by establishment of additional national coral reef committees and new or expanded marine protected areas.

International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES) and the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) produce ecosystem status reports on the North Atlantic and North Pacific; data will be used to better manage marine resources in the two regions.

Conference convened in the Wider Caribbean to develop a regional protocol for the handling of cruise ship-based pollution.

1996 Protocol to the London Dumping Convention is ratified.

I/P #6: Conservation of Protected Areas and Tropical Forests
Promote economic development, alleviate poverty, and improve local governance by improving conservation and management of the world's natural protected areas.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #5: Status of Agreements and Programs Related to Forest Conservation
2000:
N/A

2001:
TFCA agreements concluded with El Salvador and Belize.
USG develops government and non-government partners for CBFP to be launched at WSSD to sustainably manage forests of the region.

TFCA agreements concluded with Peru and the Philippines.

Secretary Powell launches CBFP with 29 partners at WSSD. U.S. commits $50 million over 4 years.

WSSD reaffirms the importance of protected areas in sustainable development.

USG launches President's Initiative Against Illegal Logging with up to $15 million first-year commitment.

TFCA agreement concluded with Panama.

TFCA agreements concluded with Jamaica, Sri Lanka and Colombia.

All FY03 CARPE funds committed to projects which implement the CBFP objectives. Development of proposed training approach and schedule developed. Training of senior forest officials carried out in U.S. New funds committed by other partners for 11 landscapes.

Federal Advisory Committee established at DOS; Studies begun on 2 major issues; Africa Forest Law Enforcement and Governance Ministerial held in Cameroon and commitment for action in the region agreed to.

CBD COP 7 adopts concrete recommendations to conserve biological diversity in protected areas.

TFCA agreements concluded with Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Ecuador.

The 6 CBFP regional partners agree to protect 11 areas of tropical forests for permanent management thorough national legislation.

PIAIL % generates political commitments from 4 countries, one per region, identified as strategic targets under this initiative

The CBD program of work and other fora develop plans for increased capacity building in developing countries on protected area designation and management.

I/P #7: Global Climate Change and Clean Energy
Implement the President's new approach to climate change and energy technologies.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #6: Status of Bilateral Regional, and Global Climate Change Partnerships
and Initiatives
2000:
N/A


2001:
New partnerships announced with Japan, the EU, Central American countries, and Italy to initiate the President's directive to engage internationally toward more effective global effort to address climate change.

New bilateral partnerships announced or initiated with Australia, Canada, India, South Korea, and China.

Implementation of partnerships with Japan, the EU, Central American countries, Italy, and Australia.

Key working groups were established and specific projects and project-related activities agreed to and begun.

Initiated partnerships with New Zealand, Russia, Mexico, and South Africa. Continued exploratory discussions with Kazakhstan and Brazil. Advanced a range of cooperative activities with Australia, Canada, Central American countries, China, the EU, India, Italy, and Japan. Results were consistent with 2002 timelines, and existing partnerships were reviewed.

Launched new ministerial-level international initiatives on earth observation, carbon capture and storage, and the hydrogen economy.

Establish additional climate change partnerships, as necessary (Brazil and/or Egypt).

For existing climate change partnerships, the Department meets timelines and deliverables established in previous years.

Review existing climate change partnerships, increase or adjust engagement where needed.

Implement international initiatives on earth observation, carbon capture and storage, and the hydrogen economy and build consensus on U.S. positions in support of U.S. energy and science policy objectives.


Establish partnerships with additional targeted countries as necessary and strengthen existing partnerships, with particular emphasis on activities and deliverables related to international initiatives on adaptation, science, and energy technologies.

Continued implementation of U.S. initiatives on earth observation, carbon capture and storage, and the hydrogen economy.

I/P #8: Science and Technology Cooperation
Negotiation and implementation of bilateral multilateral science and technology agreements and partnerships, promoting sound science and technological advance as a foundation of sustainable development and environmental stewardship.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #7: Status of Science and Technology Agreements
2000:
N/A


2001:
Policy review was concluded of the S&T activities under the U.S.-Russia S&T agreement.

Policy review was conducted of the S&T activities under the U.S.-China S&T agreement.
Established new S&T agreements in Bangladesh, Pakistan, and the Philippines.

Renewed Ukraine S&T Agreement for 1 year to allow time to negotiate a new five-year agreement.

Conducted S&T assessments of Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia).

Initiated S&T dialogue with Baltic States (Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania), Kazakhstan, Norway, and Switzerland.

Expanded S&T relationships under existing agreements with Italy, Japan, South Korea, and Vietnam by adding new topics and partnerships.

Achieved record levels for Embassy Science Fellows Program.

Agreements with several additional states stalled due to lengthy negotiation over IPR negotiations, liability, and taxation issues.

Conduct a policy review of S&T activities under the U.S.-China S&T agreement.

Implement new S&T partnerships with Pakistan, Bangladesh and the Philippines. S&T partnerships with India, Australia, Chile, Russia and Ukraine to be renewed. New S&T partnerships with Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, and Kazakhstan to be initiated.

Develop new partnerships with Central Asia and Central America.

Renew partnerships with Brazil, Argentina.

Significant implementation of new partnerships in North Africa and South Asia.

Significantly advance U.S. science agenda in international forums, such as UNESCO, OECD, APEC and G-8.

Streamline processes for negotiating S&T Agreements and subsidiary arrangements.

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
Energy fora including the World Energy Forum and the World Energy Council focus on public/private partnerships to implement sustainable development objectives.

  • Negotiate changes in bilateral, regional and multilateral processes.
  • Outreach through workshops, conferences and other mechanisms, including the Internet, to key stakeholders and donor countries to build support for approach
  • Catalyze new partnership activities as "proof-of-concept" for proposed approaches in water and energy.


Within the Commission on Sustainable Development, activities are centered on the development and implementation of partnerships and capacity building of key sustainable development areas included in the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation and Agenda 21.

  • Negotiate changes in bilateral, regional and multilateral processes.
  • Outreach through workshops, conferences and other mechanisms, including the Internet, to key stakeholders and donor countries to build support for approach
  • Catalyze new partnership activities as "proof-of-concept" for proposed approaches in water and energy.


EU members advocate more strongly for U.S. supported positions on sustainable development.

  • Negotiate changes in bilateral, regional and multilateral processes.
  • Outreach through workshops, conferences and other mechanisms, including the Internet, to key stakeholders and donor countries to build support for approach
  • Catalyze new partnership activities as "proof-of-concept" for proposed approaches in water and energy.


2-3 key developing countries or emerging economies demonstrate measurable improvements in the effectiveness of domestic environmental enforcement programs, compliance with environmental laws, and national systems for public participation, access to information and access to justice on environmental matters.

  • Partner with U.S. agencies, donor countries, international organizations, and civil society institutions to build environmental governance capacity in key countries and regions.
  • Focus on partners in free trade agreements as well as developing countries and countries in transition in work to promote improved legislation to reduce illegal activities and enhance public participation and access.
  • Develop and promote training programs to build policy-making, institutional and technical capacity for sound environmental laws and regulation, enforcement and compliance, public participation, access to information and justice, and anti-corruption efforts.
  • Identify and involve the full range of stakeholders including the legal and regulatory community, civil society, and regulated industry.
  • Develop mutually supportive linkages between these efforts and USG efforts to promote democracy and the rule of law, and to combat organized crime and corruption.


The Western and Central Pacific fisheries convention enters into force and Japan and Korea join as Parties.

  • Promote the development and implementation of practical and effective policies and measures under the Convention that continue to take into account the interests and concerns of the Asian distant water fishing nations.
  • Press other nations, particularly the Pacific Island states, to consider the importance of the participation of the distant water nations, as Parties, to the work of the Commission and the effective conservation of the resource.
  • Strengthen U.S. fisheries ties with Japan and Korea on issues of mutual concern and maintain constructive relationship with the Pacific Island states.


U.S.-Canada agreement on Pacific Whiting enters into force.

  • Arrange for signing ceremony for the new agreement.
  • Submit the text of the agreement to Senate for its advice and consent to ratification.
  • Work with the Commerce Department to develop domestic implementing regulations.


U.S.-Russia agreements on science and enforcement are concluded.

  • Undertake multiple rounds of negotiations with Russia to determine and resolve concerns regarding the agreements.
  • Seek and incorporate input from U.S. stakeholder groups in these negotiations.
  • Work with U.S. Coast Guard to strengthen practical cooperative measures in fisheries law enforcement.


IAC Parties adopt and implement regional sea turtle conservation measures.

  • Press to establish the scientific committee, as provided for in the Convention, and promote the committee to conduct scientific analyses, assessments, and recommend sea turtle protection measures to the Parties.
  • Engage other Parties to agree to adopt national and regional measures implementing the IAC that are consistent with scientific advice and the provisions of the agreement.
  • Promote the effective implementation of such measures through technical training and other efforts.


Indian Ocean MOU implements regional sea turtle/habitat conservation programs and measures.

  • Support the work of the advisory body and Secretariat and propose specific regional conservation programs and measures to implement the MOU.
  • Engage other signatories to agree to implement the national and regional measures called for in the MOU, consistent with scientific advice and the provisions the MOU.
  • Promote the effective implementation of such measures through technical training and other efforts.


Canada hosts UNFSA implementation review meeting.

  • Press for a balanced meeting that does not deter the major distant water fishing states from acceding to the Agreement in the future.
  • Engage other Parties and states to set the agenda and priority outcomes for the meeting.


1996 Protocol to the London Dumping Convention is ratified;

  • Facilitate interagency agreement on the domestic legislation required to support the Protocol.
  • Submit the package to the Senate for Advice and Consent.


U.S. judge is elected to the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea; U.S. begins implementation of the Law of the Sea, including a review of domestic and international policies and practice.

  • Create process for nominating U.S. judge and support his/her election
  • Form interagency group on implementation


U.S. negotiates an oil spill response agreement with the U.K. on behalf of the British Virgin Islands.

  • Obtain Letter of Entrustment from London so the BVI can enter negotiations
  • Obtain C-175 Authorization
  • Initiate negotiations


U.S. incorporates innovative protected area approaches through international activities and partnerships.

  • Promote the development of ocean observation systems and other technologies to provide accurate assessments of ecosystems
  • Facilitate interagency discussion and participate in international fora designed to develop policy with regard to marine protected areas.


World Bank, FAO, and other institutions increase cooperation on and resources devoted to sustainable fisheries programs; craft possible projects.

  • Engage other donors and fishing nations to provide resources and set project priorities.
  • Work with international financial institutions and other multilateral development banks to encourage environmentally sound policies and appropriate sustainable development projects.


U.S. conducts law enforcement training and capacity building work in Caribbean region

  • Work with U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies to provide technical enforcement training and other assistance to strengthen fisheries management capabilities in the region.
  • Work through regional and global organizations and with other donor nations to contribute to this effort.


Work begins in FAO and APEC on a mechanism to promote closer cooperation on aquaculture issues in the Americas.

  • Engage APEC and FAO partners to support and assist in developing an appropriate mechanism.
  • Press for recognition of the need for aquaculture food safety and animal health standards in the Americas.


Countries adopt the implementation plan for an integrated and sustained earth observation system as created by the ad-hoc working group.

  • Facilitate the intersessional gathering of experts, and provide timely U.S. response to all stages of development.


International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES) and the North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) produce ecosystem status reports on the North Atlantic and North Pacific; report data will be used to better manage marine resources in the two regions.

  • Maintain and enhance U.S. IFC Account, to enable U.S. scientific participation in ICES and PICES and the development of the reports.
  • Conference convened in the Wider Caribbean to develop a protocol for the handling of cruise-ship-basedpollution regionally.
  • Engage regional groups to set and implement criteria for endorsement by international bodies.
  • Continue the dialog between the cruise industry and Caribbean stakeholders during the WW2BW Conference in March 2004 are further developed at the UNEP-CEP Intergovernmental Meeting in May 2004.
  • With U.S. support and an expanded number of government and private partners, ICRI becomes more effective in conservation of the world's coral reefs as evidenced by establishment of additional national coral reef committees and new or expanded marine protected areas.
  • Coordinate with other member states and NGOs to develop new partners
  • Drafting and meetings with other member states to complete reorganization of ICRI
  • Implement policies and programs already in place to improve impact of funding for conservation of coral reefs.
  • Utilize the White Water to Blue Water Conference to highlight coral reef issues, consider potential economic benefits from reef conservation and economic loses from reef degradation, and provide opportunities for private sector leadership in coral reef protection.
  • TFCA agreements concluded with Ecuador, Costa Rica, and Guatemala
  • Funding made available through Congress and Treasury Department for TFCA.
  • Discussions with developing countries regarding their participation.
  • Negotiation of agreements under TFCA.
  • The 6 CBFP regional partners agree to protect 11 areas of tropical forests for permanent management through national legislation.
  • Discussions in partnership meetings.
  • Use of OESI and partner funding for training and capacity building.
  • Frequent discussion with Congo Basin country partners.
  • PIAIL generates political commitments from 4 countries, one per region, identified as strategic target areas under this initiative (South and South-East Asia, The Congo Basin, Amazon Basin, and Central America).
  • OESI funded Forest Law Enforcement Ministerial Conference in Latin America
  • Follow-up of previous Forest Law Enforcement Ministerial Conferences in Asia and Africa
  • Coordination with other governments and international organizations to provide training and capacity building for community-based forest management and protection, forest monitoring technologies, and reduced impact-logging techniques.
  • The CBD program of work and other fora develop plans for increased capacity building in developing countries on protected area designation and management.
  • Negotiations in the CCD, CEC, and other fora related to protected areas.
  • Establish climate change partnerships with additional targeted countries as necessary and strengthen existing partnerships, with particular emphasis on activities and deliverables related to international initiatives on adaptation, science, and energy technologies.
  • Senior-level interagency delegations will meet in-country with senior officials of host countries, with tailored messages that emphasize Administration initiatives of likely interest (e.g. in the case of South Africa, a major coal producer, emphasis on the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum).
  • Advance U.S. initiatives on earth observation, carbon capture and storage, and the hydrogen economy.
  • Ministerial-level meetings to be conducted in 2003 and/or 2004, with implementation plans developed by working groups of partner countries for each initiative.
  • Develop new S&T partnerships with Central America, Jordan, Ecuador, and key countries in Central Asia. Renew partnerships with Brazil, Argentina. Significant implementation of new partnerships with Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, and Kazakhstan.
  • Negotiate S&T agreements which support USG funded research and access to plant, animal and aquatic genetic materials, promote equitable benefit sharing and protection of intellectual property, with increased emphasis on bringing science to market.
  • Promote S&T cooperation as a component to Free Trade Agreement negotiation and implementation.
  • Place USG representative at posts overseas under a fellowship to identify areas of common science interest and potential collaboration in health, agriculture, biotechnology, energy and other science fields.
  • USAID collaboration with State on implementation of development-oriented science programs will be encouraged along similar lines as the 2003 USAID $2 million contribution to S&T partnerships under the U.S.-Pakistan Agreement.
  • Develop new language and/or annexes to address taxation, intellectual property rights. Evaluate adequacy of existing agreements, negotiate amendments or annexes as necessary.
  • Greater emphasis will be placed on utilizing AAAS and other scientific Fellows in the organization and execution of seminars and workshops on science issues to enhance implementation of S&T agreements/partnerships.


Annual Performance Goal #3
BROADER ACCESS TO QUALITY EDUCATION WITH EMPHASIS ON PRIMARY SCHOOL COMPLETION
[USAID Goal]

Annual Performance Goal #4
EFFECTIVE AND HUMANE MIGRATION POLICIES AND SYSTEMS

I/P #9: Effective and Humane Migration Policies and Systems
Promote orderly and humane migration policies on the regional and inter-regional level.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #1: Percentage of Initiatives Agreed Upon at Regional Migration Dialogues that are Implemented
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Data pending.


Baseline:

Implement approximately sixty percent of the activities agreed upon in the Regional Conference on Migration (RCM), and about half of the activities agreed upon in the Intergovernmental Consultations on Asylum, Refugees, and Migration (IGC), and the Western and Southern African dialogues.

Seventy percent of activities agreed to in the Regional Migration Dialogues are implemented.

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
Seventy percent of activities agreed to in Regional Migration Dialogues are implemented.

  • The U.S. will advance proposals that are practical and achievable. We will work diplomatically to advance their success, and support appropriate projects as funds are available.

V: Illustrative Examples of FY 2003 Achievements

Social and Environmental Issues
Regional Conference on Migration (RCM)

FY 2003 was a successful year for the RCM. Made up of 11 member states in North and Central America and the Caribbean, the RCM tackled several important migration issues of regional concern, including migrant smuggling and trafficking in persons and the return of regional and extra-regional migrants. Member states formulated work plans, including training and project proposals, in the areas of consular protection and combating migrant smuggling and trafficking in persons. RCM member countries also agreed to include UNHCR protection modules in training courses to inform border guards how to help ensure protection of asylum seekers, even if they use fraudulent documents to seek such protection. To improve the treatment of returning migrants, member countries committed to create a framework for returns of nationals within the region, as well as a framework to address the return of extra-regional migrants.

Global Fisheries

Effective multilateral conservation and management of highly migratory and straddling fish stocks requires the participation and commitment of all major distant water fishing nations and coastal states active in the fishery. Multilateral management regimes that prevent or do not include such broad participation will be unable to promote long-term sustainable conservation and management of such fisheries because any measures adopted will not have the support or buy-in of all those that harvest the resource. Furthermore, those nations that are not party to such arrangements have no binding legal obligation to implement adopted conservation and management measures. With respect to highly migratory fisheries in the Pacific, the Department led a successful 3-year international effort to work with certain Asian distant water fishing nations, within the context of an adopted fisheries management agreement, to create the conditions under which these nations could re-engage in the process and ultimately be in a position to join the management arrangement.

The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief

President Bush announced his Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in January 2003. It will provide $15 billion, including nearly $10 billion in new funding, to fight the HIV/AIDS pandemic over the next five years, focusing on 14 of the hardest hit countries. The Emergency Plan pledges $1 billion to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) over the next 5 years, increasing the total U.S. commitment to over $1.6 billion since the Fund's inception. The U.S. Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Act, authorizing the initiative, was passed in May 2003. Ambassador Randall Tobias was confirmed in October as Global AIDS Coordinator to administer the Emergency Plan.

VI: Data Verification/Validation by Performance Goal

Performance Goal 1
Improved global health, including child and maternal health, the reduction of abortion, and the reduction of disease, especially HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis.
  • Data will be validated and verified by comparison with data supplied by international organizations, (including UNAIDS, UNFPA, and WHO), information supplied by the Global Fund, and information from other sources.
Performance Goal 2
Partnerships, initiatives, and implemented international treaties and agreements that protect the environment and promote efficient energy use and resource management.
  • The Department consult with USG agencies, foreign governments, the private sector, and NGOs to critique the effectiveness of its activities, provide relevant data, and assist in evaluating the extent to which U.S. objectives are being met. There will be formal, fully documented reviews of the China S&T agreement and the implementation of agreements conducted by UN agencies/ treaty Secretariats. In other cases, validation will occur in the context of ongoing formal and informal consultations.
Performance Goal 4
Effective and humane international migration policies and systems.
  • The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) manages the Department's participation in multilateral migration dialogues and tracks the implementation of follow-on activities.

VII. Resource Detail

Table 1: State Appropriations by Bureau ($ Thousands)

Bureau FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request
International Organization Affairs $233,023 $248,193 $168,653
Educational and Cultural Affairs 11,523 12,526 14,724
Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs 12,098 12,287 12,315
East Asian and Pacific Affairs 9,093 9,473 9,759
Other Bureaus 24,328 25,178 21,038
Total State Appropriations 290,065 307,657 226,489

Table 2: Foreign Operations by Account ($ Thousands)

Title/Accounts FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request
Title I - Export and Investment Assistance
Export-Import Bank      
Overseas Private Investment Corporation      
Trade and Development Agency 11,437 12,084 12,159
Title II - Bilateral Economic Assistance
USAID 2,560,520 2,385,858 1,938,634
Other Bilateral Economic Assistance 531,290 548,659 531,399
Independent Agencies 228,189 238,343 309,451
Department of State 16,275 505,406 1,465,500
Department of Treasury      
Complex Foreign Contingencies      
Title III - Military Assistance
International Military Education and Training      
Foreign Military Financing      
Peacekeeping Operations      
Title IV - Multilateral Economic Assistance
International Financial Institutions      
International Organizations and Programs 48,975 71,942 70,700
Total Foreign Operations 3,396,686 3,762,292 4,327,843
 
Grand Total $3,686,751 $4,069,949 $4,554,332



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