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Diplomacy in Action

Strategic Goal 11: Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs


FY 2005 Performance Summary (The Plan)
Bureau of Resource Management
February 2004
Report
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Strategic Goal 11: Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs
Increase Understanding For American Values, Policies, and Initiatives to Create a Receptive International Environment

I. Strategic Goal Public Benefit
"As we work to end the scourge of terrorism, let us also work to increase peace, prosperity and democracy. We can do this through international programs that promote the exchange of ideas and the sharing of experiences. These programs give us insight into other languages and cultures and in the process build long lasting relationships among peoples based on mutual understanding, respect and trust." -Secretary of State, Colin Powell

The exchange of information, persons, and ideas is fundamental to the security of the United States. Public Diplomacy and public affairs functions are premised on the knowledge that public opinion affects official decision-making almost everywhere in the world today.

Public diplomacy activities promote better appreciation of the United States abroad and greater receptivity for U.S. policies among foreign publics. Anti-American sentiment must be countered to win the War on Terrorism, achieve greater international stability, and dispel worldwide uncertainty. In the struggle of ideas, public diplomacy is a critical component. It provides a rapid and flexible capability for U.S. diplomacy abroad directed at improving understanding of and support for U.S. policy, encouraging and empowering moderates, and discouraging indoctrination in extremism. Used over the long term, public diplomacy programs build and maintain a foundation of positive public opinion that directly supports U.S. approaches to satisfying universal demands for human dignity: the rule of law; limits on the absolute power of the state; free speech; freedom of worship; equal justice; respect for women; religious and ethnic tolerance; and respect for private property. Through public affairs programs, the Department also informs the American people of U.S. foreign policy and initiatives that have a direct impact on their lives. In our democratic society, it is imperative that the public understands the basis of Department policies carried out on their behalf.

Domestic public affairs and international public diplomacy necessarily overlap. In the words of the Administration's National Security Strategy, "Today, the distinction between domestic and foreign affairs is diminishing. In a globalized world, events beyond America's borders have a greater impact inside them. Our society must be open to people, ideas, and goods from across the globe." In the words of the 1961 Fulbright-Hayes Act, educational and cultural exchanges promote "the improvement and strengthening of the international relations of the United States by promoting mutual understanding among the peoples of the world" - including the American people.

II. Resource Summary ($ in Millions)

  FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request Change from FY 2004
Amount %
Staff 2,392 2,421 2,435 14 0.6%
Funds $578 $493 $507 $14 2.9%

III. Strategic Goal Context
Shown below are the three performance goals, initiatives/programs, resources, bureaus and partners that contribute to accomplishment of the "Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs" strategic goal. Acronyms are defined in the glossary at the back of this publication.

Strategic Goal Performance Goal
(Short Title)
Initiative/Program Major Resources Lead Bureaus External Partners
Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs International Public Opinion Reaching Out to Allies and Regional Powers D&CP IIP/PA, Regional Bureaus DoD, Board of Broadcasting Governors, International media organizations, think tanks and polling organizations
Increase Knowledge of U.S. As Agent of Change D&CP IIP, Regional Bureaus USAID, DoD, U.S. NGOs, Think Tanks and Polling Organizations
Muslim Outreach D&CP IIP, Regional Bureaus USAID, Board of Broadcasting Governors, Private Sector Interest Groups (NGOs), Think Tanks, and Polling Organizations
Mutual Understanding Reach Younger Audiences ECE, ESF ECA, Regional Bureaus U.S. NGOs, academia, private sector
Reach Broader Audiences ECE, ESF ECA, Regional Bureaus U.S. NGOs, USAID, Dept of Education, academia, private sector
Engage Audiences More Deeply ECE, ESF ECA, Regional Bureaus U.S. NGOs, academia, private sector
American Values Respected Abroad Promote Democratic Values and Behavior D&CP, ESF, FSA/SEED ECA, IIP, PA, Regional Bureaus NED, Private Sector, NGOs, Think Tanks and Polling Organizations, Academia
Engage Young People D&CP, ECE ECA, IIP, Regional Bureaus Board of Broadcasting Governors, Private Sector Interest Groups (NGOs), Think Tanks and Polling Organizations, Academia
Counter Anti-Americanism D&CP, ECE ECA, IIP, Regional Bureaus BBG, DOD, Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Private Sector Interest Groups (NGOs), think tanks and polling organizations
Domestic Understanding of Foreign Policy Outreach to Expanded Audience D&CP PA Educational institutions, IG organizations, NGOs, and community groups
Historical Research and Publications D&CP PA CIA
Museum of American Diplomacy D&CP PA Foreign Affairs Museum Council, Private Donors

IV. Performance Summary
For each Initiative/Program that supports accomplishment of this strategic goal, the most critical FY 2005 performance indicators and targets are shown below.

Annual Performance Goal #1
PUBLIC DIPLOMACY INFLUENCES GLOBAL PUBLIC OPINION AND DECISION-MAKING CONSISTENT WITH U.S. NATIONAL INTERESTS

I/P #1: Reaching Out to Allies and Regional Powers
Emphasize U.S. interests in global security by reaching out publicly to friends, allies, and regional powers.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #1: Number of Weekly Page Views to Department's International Website, Mission Websites and Listservs
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Baseline:
Daily average of 155,000 USINFO pages read, an increase of approximately 20% over FY 2002.

Approximately 10% of users come for reference material on U.S. history, government.

The USINFO website was rated by users as "above average" in customer satisfaction, slightly higher than what users give commercial websites.

10,153 subscribers to listservs targeting all of the geographic regions of the world in six languages.

Ten percent increase over 2003 baseline.

Ten percent increase in listserv subscribers over 2003 baseline.

Ten percent increase over FY-2004 in unique weekly users.

Ten percent increase in listserv subscribers over 2004.

Input Indicator
Indicator #2: Level of Media Placement in Foreign Markets in Broadcast and Print
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Baseline:

Placement of Broadcast Media - Two short documentary films aired in 25 countries (Rebuilding Afghanistan & Afghan Spring); 120 special TV productions; 75 Foreign Press Center Briefings; 31 TV Co-ops with Foreign Broadcasters, 4 co-productions for Russian Public TV, Belarus TV, Georgian TV, and French African TV; 184 interviews; 38 radio interviews.
(PA) Print Media -
22 FPC Briefings, 87 interviews.

(IIP) Placement of Op-eds/by-liners/other IIP-generated materials, by region -
AF - 48
EAP - 53
EUR - 233
NEA - 50
SA - 48
WHA - 193

Ten percent increase in placement of IIP-generated materials over FY 2003.
Five percent increase in placement of IIP-generated materials over FY 2004.
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #3: Level of International Public Understanding of U.S. Policies
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Baseline:

Post reporting (as reflected in the RESULTS database) indicates that IIP's 846 speakers, 480 DVCs and 500,000 print publications reached their intended target audiences with information about USG policies.

Percentage of international information product/program users who demonstrate increased, accurate awareness of U.S. policies actions. Baseline data to be established.

(IIP will gather and establish baseline data for results of selected international information products/programs through targeted surveys evaluation in three or more countries.)

Note: Meeting this indicator is contingent upon funding being made available.

Set target and level of increase relative to established 2004 baseline.

Expand measurement to 10 countries, contingent upon additional funding.

I/P #2: Increase Knowledge of the U.S. as Agent of Change for a More Hopeful Future
Underscore the U.S. role as agent for change for a more hopeful future for populations vulnerable to the appeal of demagoguery and thereby diminish conditions that permit terrorism to flourish.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #4: Evidence of Increased Public Awareness of Positive U.S. Actions
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Data pending. Baseline:

Percentage of international information product/program users who demonstrate increased awareness of positive U.S. actions. Baseline data to be established.

Establish baseline data for results of selected international information products/programs.

Set target and level of increase relative to established 2004 baseline.

Expand measurement to 10 countries, contingent upon additional funding.

I/P #3: Muslim Outreach
Muslim population better understands U.S. society and values.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #5: Level of Public Understanding of U.S. Policies in Muslim Societies
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A


N/A

Provincial governments regularly harass journalists who are critical of government.

Draft press law contains articles that curtail press freedom.

Data pending. Percentage of international information product/program users who improve their understanding of U.S. policies. Baseline data to be established.

Establish baseline data for results of selected international information products/programs.


Set target and level of increase relative to established 2004 baseline.

Expand measurement to 10 countries, contingent upon additional funding.


Outcome Indicator
Indicator #6: Degree of Independent Media in Afghanistan
2000:
N/A

2001:
No free and independent media in Taliban-controlled Afghanistan.


150 media publications exist, with at least 35 owned by the government.
The government also controls almost all of the electronic media.

Provincial governments regularly harass journalists who are critical of government.

Draft press law contains articles that curtail press freedom.


USG-funded independent community radio stations begin broadcasting.
Press law adopted does not contain articles that curtail press freedom.
Radio and TV transmitters are provided to Afghan radio and television, as well as VOA to strengthen civil society programming.


National or provincial leaders harass no journalists.

Audiences for independent, non-state controlled media (radio, TV, print) expand 20%.

Over 50% of newly established print and electronic media are privately controlled. Independent media monitoring organizations, such as Reporters without Borders, reports that press freedom has improved markedly in Afghanistan.

.

"Reporters without Borders" notes no incidences of government harassment of journalists in annual report on media freedom.

Seventy-five percent of electronic media are privately controlled and no incidences of government harassment.


Outcome Indicator
Indicator #7: Number of Direct Placements of Articles in the Arab Press that Show Accurate Understanding and Interviews of Senior U.S. Arab Officials on Pan-Arab Satellite TV
2000:
N/A

2001:
Article placements:

Kuwait 35, Saudi Arabia 38

Article placements:

Kuwait 40, Saudi Arabia 283

45 USG officials interviewed by pan-Arab media.

379 article placements in the following Arabic-speaking countries: Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Qatar, UAE, Oman, Yemen, Tunisia, Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, and Kuwait (new baseline data).

253 interviews with pan-Arab TV, an increase of 500% over FY 2002, due to the war in Iraq.

5% increase in newspaper placements.

10% increase in pan-Arab TV interviews.

5% increase in newspaper placements.

10% increase in pan-Arab TV interviews

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
Number of Weekly Page Views to Department's International Website (usinfo.state.gov) and Listservs
  • There are approximately 30 public mailing lists ("listservs") hosted on lists.state.gov.
  • Web metrics programs track the numbers of users to usinfo.state.gov and the nature of their use (how long they stay on, what they download, etc.).


The Level of Media Placement in Foreign Markets in Print, Broadcast, and Radio

  • Analysis will be applied to subject matter and location of placement, both of which are strong indicators of impact and/or the need to refine program approaches.
  • In FY 2003, the Department began providing "generic" op-eds in the form of building blocks for chiefs of mission to customize for placement in their respective environments.
  • Op-eds published in the U.S. remain popular items for placement overseas. Other "by-line" items continue to be placed in the world's media. This successful approach will continue.
  • Develop capability for the production and marketing of Video News Releases (VNRs) on strategic topics, Foreign Press Centers events and Department initiatives on foreign policy goals.
  • Develop a strategic editorial broadcast management system utilizing web technology to delivery broadcast-quality video content to journalists and broadcast networks around the globe.
  • Increase the number of Foreign Press Center Journalist tours from countries representing Middle East and Muslim countries, to include targeted thematic programs for NEA, EAP, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, Latin America and AF.
  • Print 15 to 20 publications each year in English, Spanish, French, Russian, Chinese and Arabic, for distribution through embassies to international publics. At the option of field posts, publications are translated into other local languages.
  • Combat the pervasiveness of anti-American rhetoric in Islamic societies, where there is growing access to new information technology, with web-based material in indigenous languages that responds to the deep misunderstanding of the U.S. and its values; increase output in Arabic, Dari, Pashto, and Urdu.


Level of International Public Understanding of U.S. Policies

  • The Department's RESULTS database is the central source for Public Diplomacy impact reporting. The nature of reporting is qualitative; ranging from observed evidence that information has reached intended users, through observed evidence of learning and understanding to changed individual and institutional behavior consistent with U.S. interests.
  • The Department coordinates USG interagency strategic communication to ensure readiness to employ the appropriate tools and strategies to prevent, deter and/or mitigate international crises.
  • Funding is being sought for new research tools to measure the effect of public diplomacy initiatives on international public understanding of U.S. policies, values, and positive actions.


Level of Public Understanding of U.S. Policies in Muslim Societies

  • Funding is needed for targeted polling of public diplomacy program participants and users of public diplomacy products in countries with majority or significant Muslim populations in NEA, SA, EAP, EUR and AF to measure evidence that participants/users have more accurate understanding of U.S. policies. Results will be analyzed by geographic region and other relevant categories.
  • Number of direct placements of articles in the Arab press that show accurate understanding and interviews of senior U.S. officials on pan-Arab satellite TV
  • Anti-American editorial slants in much of the Arabic press make it difficult to gain greater acceptance of our message. More frequent placement of positive articles on the U.S. indicates improved receptivity on the part of Arab media to our message, and provides the general public with a greater exposure to USG policies.
  • Pan-Arab satellite television has become the most important element in forming Arab public opinion. Anti-American commentary dominates many of the stations. We must project a more positive image of and an objective message on the U.S. by using senior U.S. speakers.
  • Increase training for young Arab media professionals.


Developing Independent Media in Afghanistan

  • Fund independent media with small grants to promote democracy in Afghanistan.
  • Since Afghanistan is at its nascent stage of developing an independent media, and currently lacks an adequate communications infrastructure, the development of a community radio station and of radio and TV transmitters are the best initial indicators of free development. Concurrently, the drafting of press laws tracks progress towards freedom of the press. Expanding audiences and lack of harassment show such development in later years. The number of newspapers available is a good indicator for literate audiences.


Annual Performance Goal #2
INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGES INCREASE MUTUAL UNDERSTANDING AND BUILD TRUST BETWEEN AMERICANS AND PEOPLE AND INSTITUTIONS AROUND THE WORLD

I/P #4: Reaching Younger Audiences
Increase cultural awareness and mutual understanding among successor generations.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
(P) Indicator #1: Number of Foreign Youth Participants Reached by Exchange Programs
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

NEA: 101

WHA: 50

EAP: 83

AF: 24

EUR: 7,212

NIS: 1,595

SA: 54

Total: 9,119

NEA: 310

WHA: 17

EAP: 243

AF: 25

EUR: 1598

NIS: 1491

SA: 107

Total: 3791

3% increase in new participants in youth exchange programs from 2003.

NEA: 326

WHA: 60

EAP: 178

AF: 84

EUR: 7,230

NIS: 1,550

SA: 154

Total: 9,582

5% increase in new participants in youth exchange programs from 2003.

NEA: 400

WHA: 65

EAP: 200

AF: 100

EUR: 7,230

NIS: 1525

SA: 225

Total: 9,750

I/P #5: Reaching Broader Audiences
Increase cultural awareness and mutual understanding among broader target audiences.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
(P) Indicator #2: Number of Foreign Adult Participants in Exchange Programs from NEA and SA
NEA: 815

SA: 339

Total: 1,154

NEA: 1238

SA: 706

Total: 1,944

NEA: 938

SA: 390

Total: 1,328

NEA: 1560

SA: 890

Total: 2,450

NEA: 1609

SA: 918

Total: 2,527

I/P #6: Engaging Audiences More Deeply
Further improve the exchange of U.S. objectives and ideals by involving program participants at a more profound level.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
(P) Indicator #3: Percentage of Participants Who Increased Their Understanding of their Host Country Immediately After Their Program
2000:
N/A

2001:
Baseline: 92%

91% 89% 92% 93%
Outcome Indicator
(P) Indicator #4: Percentage of Participants who Remain in Contact with Host Country People Met on Their Program one Year or Longer After Their Program
2000:
N/A

2001:
Baseline: 76%

81% 81% 75% 77%
Outcome Indicator
(P) Indicator #5: Percentage of Participants who Initiate or Implement Positive Change in Their Organization or Community within Five Years of their Program Experience
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A 80% Baseline: 76% 76%

Educational Exchanges in Near East Asia and South Asia
(PART Program Efficiency Measure)
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Efficiency Indicator
Indicator #6: Ratio of Total Administrative Cost to Program Cost
(Administrative Efficiency)
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

35% 34% 33% 32%

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
Ninety-three percent of participants increase their understanding of the United States or host country immediately after the exchange program.
  • Provide foreign target audiences with exposure to a range of U.S. perspectives on -- and enhancement of skills and knowledge (education) relevant to specific strategic goals.
  • Improve quality of program instruction, exposure based on program feedback and evaluation.
  • During exchange programs, emphasize that the exchange experience is only the start, and that the real work of exchange—building trust and lasting relationships—comes after returning home.


Seventy-seven percent of participants remain in contact with the United States or host country people met on their program one year or longer after the program.

  • Improve quality of contacts based on analysis of domestic networks (e.g. Philadelphia study).
  • Assist communication via alumni programs. Develop alumni programming to encourage alumni to stay in contact with each other and the people they met on their program by means of websites, scheduled on-line chats, and professional and personal correspondence and collaboration.


Seventy-six percent of participants implement positive change

  • Provide alumni follow-on activities that assist in advancing knowledge, skills and ideas gained from program experience.
  • Work within programs to have participants develop plans for action upon their return home.


Five percent increase in new participants in youth exchange programs.

  • Launch specific YES and PLUS program initiatives
  • Shift funding to provide more programming opportunities for key audiences
  • In conjunction with regional Bureaus and Missions, and employing Fulbright Commissions, RELOs and advising offices, step up targeting and recruitment.


Annual Performance Goal #3
BASIC HUMAN VALUES EMBRACED BY AMERICANS ARE RESPECTED AND UNDERSTOOD BY GLOBAL PUBLICS AND INSTITUTIONS

I/P #7: Promote Democratic Values and Behavior
Foster the development of democratic institutions, including a vibrant civil society.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #1: Percentage of Program Participants who Demonstrate an Affinity for Democratic Values Three or More Years After Their Program Experience
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A 68% Baseline: 65% 65%
Attempt to use comparison groups and compare targets to the percentage point difference between exchange participants and the comparison group.
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #2: Percentage of Participants Who Improve Their Understanding of U.S. Society and Values
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A 86% 88% 90%
Output Indicator
Indicator #3: Number of American Corners and Interactive Exhibits
2000:
N/A

2001:
Embassy Moscow opens a network of 12 American Corners using FSA funding.

Baseline:

Eight additional Corners established in Russia, bringing the total number to 19.


Throughout FY 2003, new American Corners were developed in other regions of the world. There are now a total of 71 American Corners in operation in EUR, AF, SA, and EAP.

Interactive Exhibit prototype developed in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution.

Target: An additional 221 American Corners are under development and are expected to be open in FY 2004 and FY 2005; 15 in Iraq alone.

All geographic regions of the world will have opened American Corners by the close of FY 2004.


Field test a prototype of the Interactive Exhibit in Turkey. Baseline of public interaction will be established from this test.

TBD once budget levels have been identified.

Interactive Exhibit:

Target levels for public interaction and impact will have been determined from test results in FY-04.

I/P #8: Engage Young People
Reach out to young international audiences to promote international public understanding of U.S. society and values.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #4: Sales of Arabic-Language Periodicals for the Under-30 Generation
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Produce Arabic language periodical for the under-30 successor generation in the Arab world.

Baseline: A baseline figure for sales is not yet available. However, the online version of "hi" was read by approximately 80,000 people during the last quarter of FY 2003.

200,000 online readers throughout the Arabic-speaking world.

Baseline sales data not yet available.

TBD once budget levels have been identified.

I/P #9: Counter Anti-Americanism
Educate global publics on American human values, policies, and leadership in order to promote a positive image of the U.S. abroad.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #5: Timeliness of U.S. Responses to Misinformation or Deliberate Disinformation in International Media
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A All reported incidents are countered in a timely manner, 50% within 24 hours.

Posts report that some (no baseline figure available) rebuttals are published or aired in media, which initiated offending item(s).

All reported incidents are countered in a timely manner, 60% within 24 hours.

Posts report that rebuttals are published or aired in 25% of media which initiated offending item(s).

All reported incidents are countered in a timely manner, 65% within 24 hours.

Posts report that rebuttals are published or aired in 35% of media which initiated offending item

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets Ninety percent of participants improve their understanding of U.S. society and values

  • Provide participants with experiences to meet Americans in hospitality and host family settings.
  • Provide participants balanced programs that demonstrate the diversity within the United States


Evidence shows that information has reached the intended user.

  • Conduct quantitative and qualitative opinion research to manage the effectiveness of our messages.
  • Purchase re-broadcast and educational rights to high-quality commercial documentary programs that depict American government, society and values, and secure placement on these programs on foreign broadcast outlets.


Effectiveness Of American Corners In Engaging Users To Seek Greater Access To Information

  • Facilitate international public access to extensive American reference sources, which could be a vital link in building the institutions of a democratic culture, through American Corners & Interactive Exhibits, an expanded Information Resource Officer corps, Information Resource Centers and reference specialist services.
  • As of the end of FY 2003, there are a total of 71 American Corners in operation in EUR, AF, SA, and EAP. The Russian Parliamentary Library has requested a Corner at the Russian Duma (parliament).
  • Field-test a prototype of the Interactive Exhibit in Turkey. This exhibit will make use of interactive, multimedia technology and provide visitors access to written material about the U.S. in the form of encyclopedias, current literature, and other themes.


Sales of Arabic-language periodical for the under-30 generation

  • "hi" magazine and its companion website (www.himag.com or www.himagazine.com) was launched in late FY-03 with an initial print run of 50,000 copies per month. The magazine is intended for sale in Arabic speaking countries. The level of sales, as well as the number of online readers are important indicators of the magazine's success.


Timeliness of U.S. responses to misinformation or deliberate disinformation in international media.

  • Create a permanent Counter-Propaganda Unit to spot hostile media reaction, misinformation or deliberate disinformation, and provide U.S. spokespersons and foreign news media with factual information to respond.
  • Refine methods to detect incidents of hostile statements from responsible media outlets and, either directly, or through U.S. Mission spokespersons.


Annual Performance Goal #4
AMERICAN UNDERSTANDING AND SUPPORT FOR U.S. FOREIGN POLICY, DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS, THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE, AND THE U.S. AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

I/P #10: Outreach to Expanded U.S. Audience
Reach beyond traditional audiences to a younger, broader, and deeper audience.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #1: Number of Interviews and Contacts With U.S. Media
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Baseline:

120 daily press briefings

15,000 calls from the press

1,000 print, radio, and TV interviews, Opinion Editorials (OP Eds), and major press conferences with Department principals

16,000 interviews/contacts per year with the media.
16,000 interviews/contacts per year with the media.
Output Indicator
Indicator #2: Increase in the Number of Outreach Activities to Targeted U.S. Audiences
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

Information provided has reached intended user.
Distributed 14,000 curriculum video packages to U.S. educators

Conducted over 1500 outreach activities.

Reached over 12,000 students through in-house briefings and other programs.

Conducted 23 student town meetings at high schools and colleges

Conducted over 600 Washington and Regional Events for the Department's Speakers Program.

Delivered over 70 presentations at state and national Governmental conferences

Ten percent increase in FY 2003 baseline to include student events, town meetings, and intergovernmental Conference participation.
Ten percent increase in FY 2003 baseline to include student events, town meetings, and intergovernmental Conference participation.

Evidence shows that information provided has reached intended user.

Output Indicator
Indicator #3: Number of "hits" on the Department's Domestic Website
2000:
N/A

2001:
4.8 million hits
per month

4 million hits
per month
5 million hits per month 6 million hits per month 7 million hits per month

I/P #11: Historical Research and Publications
Increase efforts to publish Foreign Relations volumes within the 30-year time period required by law, support the policy process with adequate research studies, and bring a historical context to "broader, deeper, and younger" outreach activities.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #4: Number of Historical, Research, and Educational Publications
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Published six Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) volumes:

1964-1968, Vol. V. Vietnam

1964-1968, Vol. VI, Vietnam, 1968

1969-1976, Vol. III, Foreign Assistance

1952-1954, (retrospective) Guatemala

1969-1976, Vol. I, Foundations of Foreign Policy

1964-1968, Vol. VII, Vietnam, 1968-Jan, 1969

Publish five for a total of eleven Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) volumes.
Publish four for a total of fifteen Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) volumes.

I/P #12: United States Diplomacy Center's Museum of American Diplomacy
Work toward the creation of a museum of the history, practice, and challenges of American diplomacy.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #5: Progress Toward Museum Completion
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

N/A Completed 75% of the Initial Concept Design Phase

Completed the Feasibility Study

Raise $9M of the Capital Campaign goal of $25M (36%).


Complete the Initial Concept Design Phase


Complete the Concept Phase.

Complete 50% of the Design Development Phase

Raise $21M of the Capital Campaign goal of $25M (84%)


Complete the Design Development Phase


Complete the Construction Documents and Bid Phase.

Complete 15% of the Construction of Exhibitions and Installation Phase.

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
Sixteen thousand interviews and contacts with media per year.

  • Increase media engagement in local, national and international markets to deliver our foreign policy messages.


Ten percent increase in outreach activities to targeted audiences.

  • Develop products for an educational/informational grassroots campaign for domestic audiences including CD ROM components, brochures, and newsletters
  • Launch strategic marketing designed to reach youth in all segments of American society.
  • Implement a Speakers Pool and Core to create a cadre of speakers from each of the bureaus who will be sent out on speaking engagements on a proactive basis.
  • Develop a Hispanic outreach program involving media, NGOs, government officials, and the public.
  • Through the United States Diplomacy Center, develop outreach programs for the public that will dramatize the challenges that American diplomacy has faced in the past, engages in the present, and will confront in the future.


The department's website (www.state.gov) receives 7 million hits per month.

  • Added site promotion through an ongoing translation of English into Spanish for the Spanish site.
  • Augment the Youth Website on www.state.gov where youth can explore U.S. foreign affairs and learn about foreign policy and the work of the Department using interactive programs, teacher aids, and research guides.


Progress made in meeting mandated compliance with legislative mandate for completion of FRUS volumes.

  • Increase the staff of the Historian's Office to address legislative mandate for completion of the Foreign Relations process.
  • Update, and develop new historical products for broad-based use throughout the Department, and for inclusion in the Public Affairs Speakers Kit and the Department website.
    Increase the number of policy-supportive historical studies for the Administration.
  • Engage in Cultural Diplomacy with the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs on the joint preparation and publication of two volumes of historical documents on the era of d�tente (1969-1976).


Progress in completion of the United States Diplomacy Center.

  • Engage the services of a professional fundraising contractor to coordinate the capital campaign to raise $25M in private funds for the museum of American diplomacy.
  • Continue to work with commercial contractors to complete the design, construction, and installation phases of the museum of American diplomacy.
  • Increase staffing of the Diplomacy Center to develop outreach and educational programs on American diplomacy.


Publish four for a total of fifteen Foreign Relations of the United States (FRUS) volumes.

  • Increase resources needed to publish four volumes.
    Separated the positions of General Editor and Deputy Historian to allow the General Editor concentrate fully on overseeing the Foreign Relations series
  • Created Declassification and Publishing Division (what do this do?)
  • Hire contract historians for the three Foreign Relations Divisions and the Declassification and Publishing Division.
  • Institute a mixture of print and e-volumes for the series. E-volumes allow the series to meet its requirement for "comprehensiveness" at a lesser cost.
  • Fill vacant FTE positions stemming from resignation and retirements.


For the Diplomacy Museum - Raise $21M of the Capital Campaign goal of $25M (84%), complete the design development phase, complete the construction documents and bid phase, and complete 15% of the construction of exhibitions and installation phase.

  • Seek assistance from the non-profit Foreign Affairs Museum Council to raise $21M. Funds will be used to pay for the architectural and design fees that will pay for the Design Development Phase, and Construction Documents and the Bid Phase and 15% of the Construction and Installation Phase.


V: Illustrative Examples of FY 2003 Achievements
Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs
A Responsible Press Office: An Insider's Guide

As of July 2003, the Department's publication, "A Responsible Press Office: An Insider's Guide," has been distributed in 18 languages. Presidential/prime ministerial spokespersons have reported using the publication with staffs, in seminars and in organizing their offices. One prime minister opened discussions with the press after reading the volume. A presidential spokesperson in another country reported the publication "saved our lives." The publication, released in December 2001 was written by Marguerite Sullivan, a former spokesperson for Lynne Cheney and Marilyn Quayle. It is a direct response to the many questions Ms. Sullivan was asked during her tours as U.S. Speaker.

Persian Website

Within a week after the Department's Persian website: Pol-e-Ettela'ati (Information Bridge) went live on May 12, 2003, it recorded an average of 30,000 hits per day (although it has subsequently eased off). News of the site spread quickly, by e-mail, and by word of mouth: one Iranian-American telephoned his father in Iran to tell him about the site; the father's response was "I know, I've already seen it!" Other samplings from the many e-mails we have received: "(I) hope this to be the start of a process that ends up in restoration of bilateral relations with the U.S. "I thank you for building many bridges for communication." - signed: "Hoping for Iran's freedom." "Please force this Islamic government to stop this scandal and give us back our freedom, which was granted by his majesty Cyrus the Great 2500 years ago." "I sent your site address to most of my friends... we hope we can communicate with the U.S. Government and U.S. people as soon as possible."

Former Exchange Participants Lead "Revolution of Roses" in Georgia

Ten years of individual and institutional exchange programming in Georgia reached a critical mass as ECA exchange alumni led the opposition in democratic ferment in 2003. The backbone of a new Georgian era is a network of participants in U.S. visits for students and young government officials, professionals, and experts in a variety of fields, who were introduced to U.S. counterparts in carefully designed programs on themes ranging from "Human Rights Protection" to "U.S. Democratic Principles." In the new Georgian government, exchange alumni include: President-elect (FSA Muskie 2-year graduate program, International Visitor), interim President (NATO Tour), Foreign Minister (Voluntary Visitor), Deputy State Minister (Muskie Fellowship), members of parliament and leaders of major political parties and voluntary associations.

Educating the Public About Terrorism

In an exciting new outreach initiative, the Bureau of Public Affairs produced a high-quality historical video and curriculum package on terrorism for use in high school classrooms around the country. A War Without Borders was designed to give students a brief overview of the history and impact of terrorism and help them understand its relationship to their own lives. Distributed to nearly 13,000 social studies teachers, A War Without Borders reached more American students than any other post-9/11 curriculum package, according to an independent university study. Feedback has been overwhelmingly positive, and many teachers have decided to re-use the package annually. The video is the first in a series created especially for students to help them understand both the complexities and opportunities of the world in the 21st century.

VI: Data Verification/Validation by Performance Goal

Performance Goal 1
Public diplomacy influences global public opinion and decision-making consistent with U.S. national interests
  • The RESULTS database is the most comprehensive public diplomacy impact reporting database currently available to the Department. (All PD)
  • Independent polling and targeted survey research.
  • Independent program evaluation. (ECA, IIP)
  • Media placement tracking (PA, IIP).
  • Field reporting by posts (PA, IIP).
  • Listserv analysis and feedback on website effectiveness (IIP).
  • Other verification sources, including IIP's Project Tracker (database) and post program reviews and evaluations.
Performance Goal 2
International exchanges increase mutual understanding and build trust between Americans and people and institutions around the world.
  • Grant reporting from program agencies using ECA/P-designed, standardized questionnaire/reporting templates.
  • ECA participant database.
  • Political, economic, public affairs and topical reporting from U.S. missions.
  • Exchange alumni activities and communications.
  • GPRA reports from field and domestic USG agencies.
  • Planned program evaluations conducted by independent evaluators using recognized and valid data collection methodology and scientifically valid sampling.
  • Quantitative measures based on increases in number of programs and participants are reliable and give an accurate measure of potential increased impact of ECA activities.
  • Qualitative measures combine rigorous measurement based on statistically valid survey research with ad hoc feedback from knowledgeable professionals on the quality of programs. Together they present a reliable picture of quality.
Performance Goal 3
Basic human values embraced by Americans are respected and understood by global publics and institutions.
  • The RESULTS database is the most comprehensive public diplomacy impact reporting database available to the Department. (All PD)
  • Independent polling and targeted survey research.
  • Focus groups, qualitative/quantitative sampling and audience polling (PA).
  • Field reporting by posts and NGOs.
  • Listserv analysis and feedback on website effectiveness (IIP)
  • Other verification sources, including IIP's Project Tracker (database) and post program reviews and evaluations.
Performance Goal 4
American understanding and support for U.S. foreign policy, development programs, the Department of State, and the U.S. Agency for International Development.
  • Website customer survey and data reports (PA)
  • Feedback reporting (PA)

VII. Resource Detail

Table 1: State Appropriations by Bureau ($ Thousands)

Title/Accounts FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request
Educational and Cultural Affairs $193,155 $234,955 $238,006
European and Eurasian Affairs 60,522 61,509 67,756
East Asian and Pacific Affairs 40,670 40,446 41,754
Coordinator of International Information Programs 38,872 38,110 39,054
Other Bureaus 111,563 110,721 114,314
Total State Appropriations 444,782 485,741 500,884

Table 2: Foreign Operations by Account ($ Thousands)

Title/Accounts FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request
Title I - Export and Investment Assistance
Export-Import Bank      
Overseas Private Investment Corporation      
Trade and Development Agency 1,479 1,259 1,256
Title II - Bilateral Economic Assistance
USAID 805 2,048 1,629
Other Bilateral Economic Assistance 130,540 3,977 3,640
Independent Agencies      
Department of State      
Department of Treasury      
Complex Foreign Contingencies      
Title III - Military Assistance
International Military Education and Training 0 50 65
Foreign Military Financing      
Peacekeeping Operations      
Title IV - Multilateral Economic Assistance
International Financial Institutions      
International Organizations and Programs      
Total Foreign Operations 132,824 7,334 6,590
 
Grand Total $577,606 $493,075 $507,474



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