printable banner

U.S. Department of State - Great Seal

U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Strategic Goal 2: Counterterrorism


FY 2005 Performance Summary (The Plan)
Bureau of Resource Management
February 2004
Report
Share

Strategic Goal 2: Counterterrorism
Enhance Economic Prosperity and Security by Promoting Global Economic Growth, Development, And Stability, While Expanding Opportunities For U.S. Businesses

I. Strategic Goal Public Benefit
The tragic events of 9/11 demonstrated the gravity of the threat international terrorists pose to the United States and its citizens, at home and abroad. With a presence in some 60 countries, AI-Qaeda continues to be of great concern, although it has been significantly weakened by U.S. actions in the past two years. The Department has the lead in international aspects of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT), which remains its top priority. In every corner of the globe, the Secretary, other senior officials, and Ambassadors have pressed their counterparts for expanded cooperation and intensified efforts against terrorists. Through such effective diplomacy, the U.S. has developed and leads a worldwide coalition that acts to suppress terrorism on all fronts: military, intelligence, law enforcement, public diplomacy and financial. In collaboration with its partners in other agencies and in other countries, the Department will remain committed to combating terrorist networks wherever they exist, until the mission is accomplished and Americans are secure from such threats. To date, the Department has mobilized some 180 countries and territories in the GWOT to identity, disrupt and destroy international terrorist organizations. Over 3,000 terrorist suspects have been arrested, and over $138 million in terrorists' assets have been blocked by over forty foreign governments. Key to the ability to mobilize effective action by our foreign partners is the provision of training to those who want to help but lack the means. Since 9/11, these programs, including programs on anti-terrorist assistance, terrorist interdiction, and terrorist finance, have significantly improved the abilities of many countries to be effective partners.

II. Resource Summary ($ in Millions)

  FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request Change from FY 2004
Amount %
Staff 905 1,001 1,003 (2) (0.2%)
Funds $1,332 $2,078 $1,491 (586) (28.2%)

III. Strategic Goal Context
Shown below are the four performance goals, initiatives/programs, resources, bureaus and partners that contribute to accomplishment of the "Counterterrorism" strategic goal. Acronyms are defined in the glossary at the back of this publication.

Strategic Goal Performance Goal
(Short Title)
Initiative/Program Major Resources Lead Bureaus External Partners
Counterterrorism Active Anti-Terrorist Coalitions Diplomatic Engagement D&CP, NADR S/CT UN
Anti-Terrorism Assistance D&CP, NADR S/CT, DS N/A
Terrorist Interdiction Program NADR S/CT N/A
Meeting International Standards D&CP S/CT N/A
Freezing Terrorist Financing Combating Terrorist Financing D&CP EB, S/CT, INL Treasury, DOJ
Prevention and Response to Terrorism Foreign Emergency Support Team (FEST) D&CP S/CT DoD, DOE, FBI, CIA, DHS
Terrorist Financing Initiative D&CP, NADR S/CT, EB Treasury
U.S.-EU Cooperation on Border Security D&CP, NADR S/CT, EUR DHS
Frontline States in Global War on Terrorism D&CP, NADR SA, S/CT NSC, DoD, FBI, CIA, Treasury and DoJ
Diminished Terrorism Conditions Accomplishment of this performance goal is the responsibility of USAID, and is therefore not reported in the Department of State's FY 2005 Performance Plan.

IV. Performance Summary
For each Initiative/Program that supports accomplishment of this strategic goal, the most critical FY 2005 performance indicators and targets are shown below.

Annual Performance Goal #1
COALITION PARTNERS IDENTIFY, DETER, APPREHEND AND PROSECUTE TERRORISTS

I/P #1: Diplomatic Engagement
Ensure that the policies, plans, and activities of foreign governments support the United States' objectives in the Global War on Terrorism(GWOT) through intense diplomatic engagement.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Input Indicator
Indicator #1: Number of Bilateral and Multilateral CT Consultations with Key Partners.

2000:

6

2001:

9
13
25

Three (3) multilateral counterterrorism conferences and twenty-two (22) bilateral conference/ workshops were completed in FY 2003.

27 27

I/P #2: Anti-Terrorism Assistance
Develop the capacity of priority CT countries to combat terrorism.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
(P) Indicator #2: Number of ATA Courses Provided to Priority States and the Number of Program Reviews that are Conducted Not Later Than 18 Months After the Training.

2000:

117 ATA courses provided to forty-two states.

Five program reviews conducted.

2001:

135 ATA courses provided to forty-two states.

14 program reviews conducted.

A total of 180 ATA courses provided to forty-one states.

A total of 16 program reviews conducted.

A total of 238 courses provided to 50 states.

A total of 14 program reviews conducted.

A total of 210 ATA courses provided to 50 states.

A total of 16 program reviews conducted.

Provide a total of 220 training courses and consultations to priority countries.

I/P #2: Anti-Terrorism Assistance, cont'd
Develop the capacity of priority CT countries to combat terrorism.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
(P) Indicator #3: Number of Countries in Which a Quantifiable Needs Assessment and Program Review Rating System for Measuring CT Capacity is Implemented
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A
N/A Data pending.

Quantifiable needs assessment and program review rating system is applied to 12 countries.

Country Assistance Plans (CAPs) are developed with 12 countries.

CAP objectives are achieved as scheduled in 12 countries.

Progress is measured in 12 countries.

Quantifiable needs assessment and program review rating system is applied to 12 countries.

Country Assistance Plans (CAPs) are developed with 12 countries.

CAP objectives are achieved as scheduled in 24 countries.

Progress is measured in 24 countries.

I/P #3: Terrorist Interdiction Program
Bolster the border security of countries at a high risk of terrorist transit.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
(P) Indicator #4: Number of TIP Installations at Immigration Points and Number of Immigration Officials Trained to Use TIP.
2000:
N/A

2001:
TIP software is developed.

Installed in Karachi International Airport in Pakistan in November 2001.

Installed at 12 immigration points in Yemen (100 workstations) in June 2002 and 125 immigration officials trained to use TIP.

TIP was installed in Afghanistan, Cambodia, Cote D'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Kenya, Ghana, Iraq, Kosovo, Nepal, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Senegal, and Yemen. A total of 430 workstations were installed and approximately 1000 immigration officials were trained to use the TIP system in the aforementioned countries. 5-6 additional installations in selected states and immigration officials are trained. 5-6 additional installations in selected states and immigration officials are trained.

I/P #4: Meeting International Standards

Encourage countries to become parties to the 12 International Counterterrorism Conventions, and meet their obligations under U.N. Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1373.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #5: Number of States That Have Periodically Submitted Required Reports to the UN Security Council, Corresponding to the Multiple Stages of Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1373.

2000:

UNSCR 1373 was passed in September 2001; it did not exist in 2000.

2001:

UN CTC established to monitor and assist members in implementing UNSCR 1373.

174 191 (all member states of the United Nations) Member States continue to submit follow-up reports as requested by the CTC Member States continue to submit follow-up reports as requested by the CTC

Anti-Terrorism Assistance
(PART Program Efficiency Measure)
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Efficiency Indicator

Indicator #6: Average Length of Time a Country Spends in Basic Training Programs Before Achieving Sustainment of Basic Anti-terrorism Capacities
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A
N/A Data pending. Baseline:

14 years

9 years

Terrorist Interdiction Program
(PART Program Efficiency Measure)
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Efficiency Indicator
Indicator #7: TIP Installations Completed/Yearly Appropriations (in Millions)
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A
N/A Baseline:
Installations: 6

Appropriation: $5m

Measure: 1.2

Installations: 5

Appropriation: $5m

Measure: 1

Installations: 5

Request: $5m

Measure: 1

Explanation: In FY 2003, the Terrorist Interdiction Program completed 12 installations of the PISCES border control system overseas, but S/CT appropriations provided for only 6 of the FY 03 installations (TIP is a joint USG agency program). These installations represented either the initial installation in a country or an expansion of the program, i.e. installations at additional ports of entry. Installation costs will vary widely due to external factors including geography, political environment and terrorist threat. The expected decline in efficiency between 2003 and 2004 is due to more challenging installation conditions (expanding installations from the main airport to the country's periphery).

FMF/IMET in WHA
(PART Program Efficiency Measure)
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Efficiency Indicator
Indicator #8: Ratio of FMF Program Costs to the Number of Days a Year that the Cano Limon Pipeline is Fully Operational
2000:
N/A

2001:
Baseline:

164 Days operational

Actual: 304
Cost: $93M

Goal: >300 days

Measure: 0.31

Cost: $4M

Goal: >325

Measure: 0.01

Cost: TBD

Goal: >335

Measure:

Explanation: FMF funds are being used to enhance the Colombian armed forces' capabilities to suppress and deter attacks on the Cano Limon pipeline since the 170 attacks during 2001 forced pipeline shutdowns that reduced Colombian government income by an estimated $480 M. The FMF program in WHA is relatively new, since FMF funds were not applied to Colombia until the FY03 Supplemental [hence the $93 M in start up costs]. The efficiency shown is that decreasing and even static levels of FMF program costs will still allow that the Cano Limon pipeline remains fully operational for more days a year as the Colombian Armed Forces increase their capacity to patrol the region and protect the pipeline. As the program costs go down and the pipeline is open longer, the measure will continue to decrease as the program becomes more efficient. The measure is calculated as follows: FY FMF Costs � [# of Days Pipeline is Open]

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
Undertake twenty-seven bilateral and multilateral CT consultations with key partners.

  • Assign an employee to coordinate CT policy consultation opportunities, and provide logistic support on a full time basis. This will ensure continuity, efficiency, and consistency of message, and effectiveness of those consultations.
  • Maintain close cooperation and coordination with the governments of key partners to ensure that bilateral and multilateral exchanges continue at which U.S. officials and their counterparts further specific counterterrorism goals and priorities, share concerns, and overcome challenges.


Provide a total of 220 training courses and consultations to priority countries.
  • Maintain mobile training units to provide emergency training to police units these priority countries when a CT-related situation exists.
  • Establish counterterrorism priority states through the Department-chaired, interagency Training and Assistance Sub-Group.
  • Increase the flexibility of ATA training through development of the Mobile Antiterrorism Training Team (MATT) concept;
  • Develop the ability to present domestic-based ATA courses, as needed, in participant countries.


UN Security Council receives reports from 191 states on their efforts to implement United Nations Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1373.
  • The importance of a country reporting on its implementation of UNSCR 1373, as called for by the Resolution, and in general giving high priority to CT, will be included in the talking points for each and every CT engagement and presentation.
  • Press delinquent Member States to submit their reports.


Quantifiable needs assessment and program review rating system is applied to 12 countries.
  • Conduct bi-annual program reviews which measure progress in the areas for which the participating unit was trained and assess additional assistance needs to sustain the country's developing antiterrorism capacity.
  • To improve the existng process, ATA has developed a quantifiable assessment rating system which will be used to establish base-line ratings and better measure the impact of the ATA program.


Country Assistance Plans (CAPs) are developed with 12 countries.
  • Develop Country Assistance Plans for each participating nation containing specific and achievable goals and objectives for ATA training assistance activities.


5-6 additional installations in selected states and immigration officials are trained.
  • Continue to improve the capabilities of the PISCES computer system by taking advantage of technological advances to increase TIP's effectiveness in detecting and deterring terrorists.
  • Work with INL and other USG agencies to ensure that TIP meshes with other efforts to improve border security of partner nations.


Annual Performance Goal #2
U.S. AND FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS ACTIVELY COMBAT TERRORIST FINANCING

I/P #5: Combating Terrorist Financing
Combat terrorist financing by designating Foreign Terrorist Organizations (FTOs), supporters of terrorism under E.O. 13224, and submitting al-Qaeda-related individuals and entities to the UN 1267 Committee.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #1: Yearly Number of Names Designated Under E.O. 13224 for Terrorist Asset Freezing

2000:

N/A

2001:

Baseline: 136 names were designated by the U.S.

Eighty-nine names were designated Eighty additional terrorist-related individuals and entities were named. Designate additional terrorist-related individuals and entities as appropriate. Designate additional terrorist-related individuals and entities as appropriate.
Output Indicator
Indicator #2: Number of Countries Submitting Names to the UN 1267 Sanctions Committee's Consolidated List

2000:

N/A

2001:

Baseline:
No foreign countries submitted names to the 1267 Sanctions Committee.

A total of 68 foreign countries submitted al Qaeda-related names to the 1267 Sanctions Committee. A total of 39 foreign countries submitted al Qaeda-related names to the 1267 Sanctions Committee. Submission of additional names by foreign governments, as appropriate. Foreign governments submit additional names, as appropriate.
Input Indicator
Indicator #3: Yearly Number of Names Added to the UN 1267 Sanctions Committee's Consolidated List

2000:

N/A

2001:

Baseline: 153 Taliban-related and 117 al Qaeda-related names were added to the 1267 Committee's List.

Fifty-four al Qaeda names were added to the 1267 Committee's List. Sixty-three names (thirteen entities and fifty individuals) were added between October 2002 and September 2003. Add al Qaeda-related individuals and entities as appropriate. Add al Qaeda-related individuals and entities as appropriate.

I/P #5: Combating Terrorist Financing, cont'd
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Output Indicator
Indicator #4: Number of U.S. Training and Assistance Programs and Assessments Delivered to Priority States to Help Combat the Financing of Terrorists

2000:

N/A

2001:

N/A

Ten of the nineteen CT finance priority assistance countries have been assessed by U.S. interagency financial assessment teams (FSAT) and ten training and technical assistance plans developed.

Some form of training and technical assistance delivered to fifteen of the nineteen countries (training in one of the five functional areas: legal framework, financial/regulatory, financial intelligence unit, prosecutorial/judicial, financial investigations)

Fifteen assessments completed. Fifteen of the targeted nineteen states are now receiving training and technical assistance.

Two countries assessed by FSATs and two training and technical assistance plans developed.

Ten countries fully implement technical assistance and training plans (training received in at least all five of the functional areas).

Seven countries at least partially implement technical assistance and training plans (training received in at least three of the five functional areas).

Six new countries are added to the priority assistance list.

Six countries assessed by FSATs and six training and technical assistance plans developed.

Eight countries at least partially implement technical assistance and training plans (training received in at least three of the five functional areas).

Seven countries fully implement technical assistance and training plans (training received in at least all five of the functional areas).

Input Indicator
Indicator #5: Number of Groups Designated as Foreign Terrorist Organizations (FTOs) Pursuant to U.S. Law and Timeliness of Review of Such Groups

2000:

Twenty-nine groups designated as FTOs.

2001:

Thirty-one groups designated as FTOs.

Twenty-eight FTOs reviewed for redesignation, twenty-five groups redesignated and two other groups dropped from the list.

Six more organizations designated as FTOs, bringing the total to thirty-three.

Five groups were under review for possible FTO designation.
Two more new FTOs were designated, bringing the total to thirty-five. One FTO designation was amended to reflect its name change.

All 27 FTO designations due to expire during FY 2003 were reviewed and re-designated on time.
Complete all FTO reviews; no new addition pending for more than four months. Complete all FTO reviews; no new addition pending for more than four months.

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
Designate additional terrorist-related individuals and entities under E.O. 13224 for Terrorist Asset Freezing as appropriate.
  • Diplomatic engagement to ensure cooperation with GWOT partners on threat information and intelligence sharing.


Add al Qaeda-related individuals and entities to the UN 1267 Sanction Committee's Consolidated List as appropriate.
  • Diplomatic engagement with foreign governments to ensure submissions are accepted by the 1267 Committee. With other State bureaus, ensure UNSC members are thoroughly familiar with 1267 Sanctions Committee process to minimize procedural delays.
  • Lead the interagency process though which the USG develops and sustains bilateral and multilateral relationships, strategies and activities to win international support for and cooperation with our efforts to combat terrorist financing.


Foreign governments submit additional names to the UN 1267 Sanction Committee's Consolidated List as appropriate.
  • Diplomatic engagement to continue encouragement of other governments to utilize the 1267 mechanism. Raise awareness and serve as a resource for foreign governments on the process to facilitate submissions.


Complete all FTO reviews; no new additions pending for more than four months.
  • Indicator will be rendered moot by legislative amendment (note that new additions will still occur).


Six countries assessed by FSATs and six training and technical assistance plans developed.
  • Six teams from State, Justice and Treasury will travel to six countries to assess the financial systems and report back to the TFWG (Terrorist Finance Working Group) on vulnerabilities to terrorist financing.
  • Develop technical assistance plans tailored to the needs of each country, for approval by the TFWG and earmarking of funding for implementation.


Eight countries at least partially implement technical assistance and training plans (training received in at least three of the five functional areas).
  • Identify appropriate training providers within the USG and implement technical assistance plans to partially reduce the vulnerabilities to terrorist financing in the eight countries.


Seven countries fully implement technical assistance and training plans (training received in at least all five of the functional areas).
  • Implement technical assistance plans based upon findings of the FSAT using the identified training providers.


Annual Performance Goal #3
COORDINATED INTERNATIONAL PREVENTION AND RESPONSE TO TERRORISM, INCLUDING BIOTERRORISM

I/P #6: Foreign Emergency Support Team (FEST)

Provide U.S. Ambassadors with advice, assistance, and assessments concerning terrorism-related issues.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Input Indicator
Indicator #1: The Department's Ability to Respond to Terrorist Incidents and Exercise Its Lead Agency Responsibilities with the NSC-mandated Foreign Emergency Support Team (FEST)
2000:
N/A

2001:
N/A

No exercises scheduled because of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Co-chaired the CSG Exercise Sub-Group and developed the next 18 month, national- and international-Level exercise schedule.

Finalized Exercise Sub-Group's Operating Charter.

FEST participated in Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff no-notice counter-terrorist exercise. The Department participated in TOPOFF II. FEST participated in U.S. Pacific Command's counter-terrorist exercise. Participate in two national- and international-level counterterrorist exercises and the CJCS-sponsored, no-notice counterterrorist exercise.

Integrate and participate in 2 of the Combatant Commanders' full-scale, National- and International-Level CT exercises. (2-4 exercises scheduled by DOD each year).

Integrate and participate in the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff-sponsored, no-notice CT exercise.

Integrate and participate in the National Level Top Officials (TOPOFF) Exercise co-chaired by DHS and DoS.

I/P #7: Terrorist Financing Assistance Initiative

Support the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and fund the growing demand for assistance from terrorist finance priority countries.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #2: Implementation of Counterterrorism Financing Regimes in the 19 Countries Most Involved in Al Qaeda Financing

2000:

FEST participated in two of the Combatant Commanders' national- and international-level counter-terrorist exercises.

2001:

FEST participated in two national- and international-level counterterrorist exercises and the CJCS-sponsored, no-notice counterterrorist exercise.

Baseline:

USG assessed institutional/legal deficiencies on nine of the nineteen priority countries most heavily involved in funding al-Qaeda. The USG provided technical assistance to two of these countries.

The USG conducted in-country assessments of 6 of the 19 priority countries most heavily involved in funding al-Qaida and conducted a tabletop assessment of 1 priority country. The USG provided technical assistance to 15 of the 19 priority countries, with 3 of these countries receiving technical assistance in at least 3 of the 5 functional areas. Develop viable anti-terrorist financing legal and regulatory regimes in twelve of the priority countries.

Develop comprehensive anti-money laundering regimes in 5 TF priority countries designated in FY 2002.

Provide training to all 2003 designated TF priority countries.

I/P #8: U.S.-EU Cooperation on Border Security
Enhance cooperation with our European and Eurasian partners to support our systems to identify and interdict terrorists and terrorist threats before they reach our borders.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #3: Regional and Bilateral Counterterrorism Cooperation
(As Measured Through Greater Capabilities to Effectively Address Terrorist Threats)

2000:
N/A

2001:
EU deepens justice and home affairs cooperation among the 15 member states.
Central Asia counterterrorism discussions deepen within CIS and Shanghai Forum dialogues.
U.S. and Russia co-sponsor UNSCR 1333 and discuss elements of a monitoring mechanism.
Turkey, only NATO Muslim ally, provides unconditional assistance to Operation Enduring Freedom and global war on terrorism. Continues to support flight ops for ONW.

In addition to Olympic Security Advisory Group (OSAG), some European countries join the U.S. in dialogue with the Government of Greece on importance of dealing effectively with terrorism, particularly in advance of 2004 Olympics.

U.S. agencies increase information sharing with Spain on ETA. Cooperation with GOS on investigations, arrests, possible extraditions of Al Qaeda terrorists.

Countries of Southeast Europe, emerging from a decade of conflict and ethnic cleansing, begin to address terrorist networks that infiltrated the borders during the Balkan conflicts.

EU utilizes deepened internal JHA cooperation to strengthen external cooperation with third parties, like the U.S. through signing of the U.S.-EUROPOL agreement.

Central Asia and Caucasus become more effective counterterrorism partners with the U.S.

Countries of Southeast Europe actively support the international coalition against terrorism.

Turkey steps up participation in GWOT by assuming command of the International Security Assistance Force in Kabul for six months to December. ONW operations continue.

Mandate of U.S.-Russia Working Group on Afghanistan broadened. Renamed U.S.-Russia Working Group on Counterterrorism. U.S. and Russia support the Loya Jirga process, transition to a new Afghan government. U.S. and Russian counterterrorism cooperation on Afghanistan discusses coordination of Russian military assistance to and other regions results in closure of some terrorist training camps and disruption of arms flows, movement of terrorists within Afghanistan.

European countries continue to raise the issue on a bilateral basis with Greece. In response to concerted bilateral European and U.S. pressure, Greece vigorously pursues terrorists and effectively addresses terrorism-related concerns related to the 2004 Olympics.

Europeans and Eurasians increase information sharing on terrorist groups.

During its EU Presidency, Spanish government seeks to minimize transatlantic differences related to war against terrorism.

Government of Poland hosts regional counterterrorism conference after September 11.

The U.S. and EU member states enhanced travel security, especially for commercial air transport, significantly through multilateral and bilateral steps.

The U.S. and EU agreed on terms for exchanging passenger name records on incoming flights coming to the United States, allowing the U.S. to screen individuals for security problems.

The U.S. worked bilaterally with France, the UK, and others to address specific threats to aviation security. The U.S. and UK agreed to pursue multilateral measures to institutionalize threat response guidelines.

The U.S.-EU Counterterrorism Dialogue was reinvigorated to focus on the implementation of UNSCR 1373 by other countries, with an initial focus on the Balkans and North Africa.

The U.S.-Russia Working Group on Counterterrorism continued to meet semi-annually. With progress made in intelligence sharing, law enforcement cooperation, and non-proliferation.

The USG continued its efforts to assist the Greek Government to prepare for the security challenges of the 2004 Olympics� through training programs, joint exercises, and law enforcement and intelligence exchanges.

EU, U.S. and Russian collaboration in the region result in some political and economic reform and improved infrastructure in Central Asia.

Turkey's engagement in region expands beyond Afghanistan as its economy recovers; actively participates in global coalition efforts in the region and elsewhere; enhances its ability to interdict smuggled WMD precursors through increased cooperation with the USG.

U.S. and Russian counterterrorism cooperation on Afghanistan and other regions results in closure of terrorist training camps and disruption of arms flows, movement of terrorists within Afghanistan.

Greece continues to make arrests of members of "November 17" and other domestic groups. 2004 Olympics are held under tight security.

DS/ATA training contributes to improved effectiveness of Spanish interagency counterterrorism forces.

Positive responses to most requests for law enforcement assistance from European and Eurasian countries.

Adherence to human rights standards improves in Caucasus and Central Asia.

Central Asian and Caucasus states are active partners with U.S., EU, and Russia in supporting and promoting counterterrorism and counter narcotics initiatives.

ETA operations made more difficult due to increased U.S.-Spanish CT cooperation and improved GOS internal coordination.

Intelligence sharing with European and Eurasian countries speeded up to near real-time.

Positive responses to most requests for law enforcement assistance from European and Eurasian countries.

I/P #9: Frontline States in the Global War on Terrorism
Terrorism is eliminated and prevented in Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #4: Capacity of the Afghan National Army to Defend the Legitimately Appointed Afghan Government and its Territory from External and Internal Threats
2000:
N/A

2001:
In early 2001, the Taliban control approximately 80% of Afghanistan.
The country is fractured into several regional fiefdoms that regional leaders with personal militias largely control.
Significant presence and influence of Al Qaida and other terrorist elements.

9/11 terrorist attacks lead to U.S. resolve to disrupt terrorist networks in Afghanistan.

U.S.-led Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) drove the Taliban from power and began to destroy the country's terrorist networks.

The Bonn agreement requested international assistance to build an Afghan National Army (ANA) to achieve internal security, extend the central Government's authority and prevent the regrouping of Taliban, al Qaida or other potential terrorist organizations or operations.

Initial planning to create the ANA began in December 2001 followed by a February 2002 assessment; U.S. Special Forces soldiers began training in early May 2002.

Three kanaks (battalions) completed basic training at the Kabul Military Training Center (KMTC) and one began training. However, none were fully equipped nor completed the full training due to lack of weapons, munitions and demined training sites. Other challenges included lack of warlord support, recruiting difficulties, and insufficient funding. No Border Guard battalions were trained.

France, UK and Romania made the only international pledges and donations of cash, training and military equipment.

The coalition continued to train ANA battalions, graduating the 11th Battalion on 1 October. Afghan non-commissioned officers are gradually taking over aspects of the training. Two brigades were activated in March, and these units, augmented by the addition of a third brigade, were organized as the Central Corps on 1 September. Elements of the ANA began operations in February, and in July six companies, numbering approximately 1000 soldiers, participated in the ANA's first major operation (Operation Warrior Sweep) in southeastern Afghanistan. By October, ANA strength reached approximately 6,000 men in 11 battalions.

The ANA continues to face challenges in recruiting, desertions, and maintaining a balance among the cometing ethnic groups. Warlord support remains questionable, although militias are gradually turning in their weapons to the central government.

Prior to the June 2004 elections, Phase I training completed.

Full 3 brigades of "Kabul Corps" fully fielded, including all Combat Support (CS), Combat Service Support (CSS) and combined arms units.

Fielding of additional 3 border force brigades.

Continued development of Border Command and Support Command.

A partially functioning Ministry of Defense (MOD) and General Staff.

Kabul Corps capable of providing for all security needs in Kabul; ISAF no longer necessary in Kabul.

At least six Central Corps battalions conduct operational deployments in Bamiyan, Paktiya, Khost, Kunduz, Nangarhar, Balkh, Kandahar, and Herat provinces.

All planned units fielded at >90% strength; unit equipment and sustainment requirements (barracks, training facilities, follow-on training, etc.) fully met.

ANA presence, influence and capability continue to grow in Kabul.

Border command, Ministry of Defense (MOD) and General Staff (GS) continue to develop capability for managing ongoing operations. 15-25 trainers assigned to each battalion to develop U.S. training and operational standards. Additional trainers assigned to help develop an ANA training base.

Begin fielding/development of small supporting air corps.

Continue fielding of border units.

Begin integration of regional militias into ANA structure, through demobilization and accession into ANA.

MOD & GS begin to manage their own policy, planning, budget and operations.

Central Corps units conduct operational deployments to remaining provinces, as well as routine operational deployments in provinces named in FY 2004 target.

Barracks, headquarters, ranges and unit facilities constructed for 12 new infantry battalions and 6 new CS and CSS battalions. 18 new battalions operational and mobile.

I/P #9: Frontline States in the Global War on Terrorism, cont'd
Results Targets
2000 & 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005
Outcome Indicator
Indicator #5: Pakistan's Law Enforcement/Border Control and Counter-Terror Efforts in Support of OEF

2000:
N/A

2001:
Pakistan government supportive of Taliban regime.
Madrassahs that recruit terrorists and terrorist training networks operative in Pakistan. Post 9/11, Pakistan agrees to assist USG with OEF and ends official support of Taliban regime in Afghanistan, severs relations.

Begins military support for OEF.

 

 

As partner, Pakistan intelligence and law enforcement agencies coordinate to hunt Al-Qaida and other terrorists within Pakistan, including its border with Afghanistan.

Pakistani Ministry of Interior Air Wing established with operating location in Quetta; five helicopters delivered.

Procurement of commodities (vehicles, communications equipment) and fixed wing aircraft delivered and deployed.

Aircraft training and technical assistance team deployed in Quetta, with pilot training already begun.

U.S. training program for Pakistani border security personnel underway.

Joint U.S.-Pakistan Counter-terrorism Working Group meeting held in May 2002, which established counterparts and areas of responsibility for both nations.

Pakistan adopted an important and extensive police reform law aimed at significantly improving law enforcement institutions in Pakistan.

The GOP captured September 11 plotter Ramzi bin-al-Shibh. Pakistan ranks third in the world for the amount of terrorist finances seized. Daniel Pearl kidnapper/murderer apprehended and Church bombing suspects detained. Over 500 international terrorists turned over to U.S. custody.

Pakistan agencies continue their cooperation in hunting al-Qaida and other terrorists. The Ministry of Interior Air Wing supported by INL achieved operational status and was given "operational control" at the end of 2003. all helicopter pilots are fully trained and certified for day, night and night vision goggle missions. Six helicopter mechanics are at an intermediate level of competence. The Air Wing also has a certified quality control inspector, logistics technician, and avionics technician for rotary wing operations and a team of six qualified aerial gunners, including instructors. Three C-208 surveillance aircraft were delivered in September.

Special Investigative Group (SIG) and conducted crisis response training for police in several provinces. The SIG has been involved in several investigations this year and significantly increases Pakistan's CT capability.

Pakistan security forces have made several terrorist arrests in 2003, including Khalid Shaikh Mohammad, the reported number 3 in al-Qaida and the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks.

In October, Pakistan armed forces conducted a major raid of a terrorist stronghold in the country's northwest province of Waziristan. Numerous terrorist were killed or captured. Among those killed was Hasan Mahsum, a leader of the Eastern Turkistan Islamic Movement, a designated terrorist organization.

DS/ATA has completed two out of three phases of installing an automated fingerprint identification system in Pakistan. It is currently converting up to 30,000 manual fingerprints into the system.

214 km of roads completed in FATA, enabling law enforcement to access 30% of previously inaccessible areas.

Training and equipment delivered to FATA levies and khassadars to facilitate Government-sponsored reforms and improve law enforcement capabilities.

Effective use of air and ground assets and training, expansion of Air Wing to Peshawar, and fortification of ports of entry on the western border results in 25% increase in the seizure of contraband and arrests of terrorists and criminals.

Border control coordination cell in Quetta established to facilitate information collections/analysis and operational planning

National criminal database and AFIS system deployed at federal and provincial levels to improve quality and coordination of investigations.

Electronic fingerprint database established.

FIA's new Special Investigative Groups (SIGs) establish field offices in all provinces.

GOP fingerprints all current inmate population and integrates U.S. standard booking procedures.

Effective, international-standard Anti-Money Laundering Law enacted by GOP.

DS/ATA continues training for regional CIDs.

Law enforcement/Intel National Database has been created, linking TIP, fingerprint and national I.D. databases, as well as all relevant GOP entities.

All paper fingerprint cards converted into electronic system.

FIA training sustained at all national academies.

High profile CT arrest or disruption by U.S. trained units.

Helicopter, fixed-wing aircraft, and land patrols are expanded along the entire border region between Afghanistan and Pakistan, with a resulting 25% additional increase in interdictions of contraband, criminals and terrorists.

National criminal database and AFIS system expanding to district levels.

Border security coordination cell established in Peshawar.

GOP establishes effective control over the tribal areas, measured by arrests of extremists and drug traffickers.

Total of 410 km of road completed, opening up 60 % of previously inaccessible areas where road building taking place.

U.S. citizens and businesses largely freed from the terrorist threat, as indicated by the number of terrorist incidents directed against American targets. Effective border security Intel/coordination cells operating in NWFP and Balochistan. GOP replicating border security training on its own.

Arrests of criminals/terrorists on western border increase by at least an additional 25 percent.

Community policing programs are initiated; a police reorganization plan has been developed; system of internal controls to reduce police corruption is being instituted; a common (enhanced) standard of criminal investigation training has been established.

Pakistan law enforcement becomes more effective, as demonstrated by increased arrest rates, and wins greater public acceptance, as demonstrated by fewer acts of mass demonstrations nationwide and conviction rates.

Means for Achieving FY 2005 Targets
Fully integrate and participate in 2 of the Combatant Commanders' full-scale, National- and International-Level CT exercises. (2-4 exercises scheduled by DOD each year).

  • Dedicate one officer, as the project officer for each exercise, who represents the Department's lead agency role, and attends all exercise related conferences and site surveys.
  • Utilize opportune military aviation support to facilitate cost savings in commercial air fare while attending pre-exercise events.
  • Deploy the FEST for 10-14 days in each exercise to enhance the Department's ability to respond to terrorist incidents.
  • Incorporate lessons learned in each exercise into subsequent exercises to refine policies and procedures required in the Department's lead agency role.


Fully integrate and participate in the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff-sponsored, no-notice CT exercise.
  • Dedicate one officer, as the project manager for each TOPOFF exercise (every two years), who represents the Department's lead agency role for the international aspects of the exercise, and attends all exercise related conferences and site surveys.
  • Retain a contract team of exercise planners (2-6 personnel) who work the myriad of TOPOFF activities during the two year work up to the exercise.
  • Work with the entire interagency to incorporate lessons learned in TOPOFF into subsequent exercises to refine policies and procedures required in the Department's international role.


Fully integrate and participate in the National Level Top Officials (TOPOFF) Exercise co-chaired by DHS and DOS.
  • Dedicate one officer, as the project manager for each TOPOFF exercise (every two years), who represents the Department's lead agency role for the international aspects of the exercise, and attends all exercise related conferences and site surveys.
  • Retain a contract team of exercise planners (2-6 personnel) who work the myriad of TOPOFF activities during the two year work up to the exercise.
  • Work with the entire interagency to incorporate lessons learned in TOPOFF into subsequent exercises to refine policies and procedures required in the Department's international role.


Adherence to human rights standards improves in Caucasus and Central Asia.
  • All CT training provided to European and Eurasian partners will be required to include training modules on respect for human rights in the curriculum.


Intelligence sharing with European and Eurasian countries speeded up to near real-time. Positive responses to all requests for law enforcement assistance from European and Eurasian countries.
  • Washington-based intelligence community analysts will be encouraged to create direct communication channels with appropriate personnel at stations/embassies overseas to raise attention to relevant and time-sensitive intelligence items.


ANA presence, influence and capability continue to grow in Kabul. Border command, MOD and GS continue to develop. Begin fielding/development of small supporting air corps. Continue fielding of border units and development of border command. Begin integration of regional militias into ANA structure, through demobilization and accession into ANA. MOD & General Staff (GS) begin to manage their own policy, planning, budget and operations. Central Corps units conduct operational deployments to remaining provinces, as well as routine operational deployments in provinces named in FY 2004 target.
  • Rebuild and refurbish the central military facilities in Kabul.
  • Re-establish an institutional training base to sustain he ANA's self-sufficiency.
  • Continue to develop a cadre of Afghan trainers.
  • Support both politically and materially President Karzai's attempts to bring regional leaders under effective control and integrate their militias into the ANA.


Develop comprehensive anti-money laundering regimes in 5 TF priority countries designated in FY 2002.
  • The training needs outlined in the interagency implementation plans of 5 priority countries will have been met, and the countries will have received the training and technical assistance needed to put a comprehensive anti-money laundering regime in place.


Provide training to all 2003 designated TF priority countries.
  • All priority countries will have received some training in at least one functional area as outlined in the country's interagency approved implementation plan.


Law enforcement/Intel National Database has been created, linking TIP, fingerprint and national I.D. databases, as well as all relevant GOP entities.
  • Continue expansion of TIP installation to all identified sites and complete FBI fingerprint computerization program.
  • Institute information technology training program to include improved communications and intercept capabilities.


Annual Performance Goal #4
DIMINISHED POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC CONDITIONS THAT PERMIT TERRORISM TO FLOURISH
[USAID Goal]

V: Illustrative Examples of FY 2003 Achievements
Counterterrorism
Afghan National Army (ANA)

Approximately 5,000 soldiers in 10 battalions of the ANA are now operational. In July 2003, elements of the ANA conducted their first major combat operations in the Zormat Valley region in southern Afghanistan.

Terrorist Interdiction Program

During FY 2003, 12 nations expanded their partnership with the United States in the global fight against terrorism by agreeing to accept TIP to strengthen control of their air, land and sea ports of entry. By assisting these nations to secure their borders, TIP has enhanced the security of all Americans, including those who live and travel abroad. TIP has broadened cooperation and strengthened a shared sense of urgency between the United States and these nations in the effort to defeat international terrorism, and in several cases, has served as the cornerstone of an evolving comprehensive mutual counterterrorism strategy. Finally, the information provided by nations operating TIP has significantly broadened our understanding of terrorist movements and methods.

Pakistan Alliance

Pakistan is a key U.S. ally in the war against terrorism. Nearly 500 al-Qaeda suspects have been arrested in Pakistan and many of them have been handed over to the United States. Those captured include senior al-Qaeda suspects, such as Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, who was arrested in March 2003 and is believed to be the No. 3 leader in al-Qaeda and a suspected planner of the September 11 terror attacks. Adil Al-Jazeeri, a suspected Osama bin Laden aide was recently arrested by Pakistani authorities and turned over to the U.S. Pakistan's relationship with India is a crucial element of this complex issue.

"3+1"
Counterterrorism Dialogue

Measured diplomatic CT engagement with Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay has led to the creation of the "3+1" Counterterrorism Dialogue including the U.S. The grouping serves to maintain the goals of the war on terrorism as a priority issue among participating states and as an avenue for mutual CT capacity-building efforts. The United States has already delivered regional CT finance seminars in Paraguay and Panama to strengthen regional abilities to identify suspicious financial activity and to take appropriate action.

VI: Data Verification/Validation by Performance Goal

Performance Goal 1
Coalition partners identify, deter, apprehend, and prosecute terrorists.
  • The Department's Bureau of Counterterrorism (S/CT) conducts program reviews of all bilateral and multilateral consultations to ensure that they occur, assess the accomplishments of the consultations, and review the status of the program.
  • The ATA program produces an annual report to Congress that details the accomplishments of the program. In order to ensure that training is having its intended effect, ATA conducts program reviews using course-specific evaluations to assess the unit's skills in the areas for which it was trained.
  • The UN CTC receives and reviews all reports submitted by member states detailing the states' efforts to implement UNSCR 1373. The Department of State (IO) coordinates a USG interagency review of the reports, including input from the Embassies in those countries, and provides comments and suggestions on them to the CTC via the U.S. Mission to the UN.
Performance Goal 2
U.S. and foreign governments actively combat terrorist financing.
  • EB monitors the number of names designated under E.O. 13224; EB and IO monitor the number of names submitted to the UN 1267 Sanctions Committee; and EB and IO monitor the number of foreign countries submitting names to the Sanctions Committee.
  • S/CT conducts program reviews to ensure the status of the FTO list timeliness of the designation.
  • The financial systems assessment team that conducts the assessment and the service providers that conduct training and/or provide technical assistance produce After Action Reports. S/CT conducts program reviews to review the status of the counterterrorism finance training and technical assistance program.
Performance Goal 3
Coordinated international prevention and response to terrorism, including bioterrorism.
  • The Counterterrorism Security Group's Exercise Sub-Group will track the progress of both the domestic and international counterterrorism exercise program. The International Counterterrorism Guidelines, signed by the National Security Advisor in January 2001, provides guidance and instructions on carrying-out international counterterrorism response.
  • TSWG produces an annual report that assesses the status of current research projects and the ability to accept new projects.

VII. Resource Detail

Table 1: State Appropriations by Bureau ($ Thousands)

Bureau FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request
European and Eurasian Affairs $27,149 $28,278 $45,908
East Asian and Pacific Affairs 19,222 20,057 20,690
African Affairs 18,292 19,179 19,401
Western Hemisphere Affairs 15,531 15,932 18,402
Near Eastern Affairs 37,079 40,857 42,351
Total State Appropriations 117,273 124,303 146,752

Table 2: Foreign Operations by Account ($ Thousands)

Title/Accounts FY 2003 Actual FY 2004 Estimate FY 2005 Request
Title I - Export and Investment Assistance
Export-Import Bank      
Overseas Private Investment Corporation      
Trade and Development Agency      
Title II - Bilateral Economic Assistance
USAID      
Other Bilateral Economic Assistance 467,398 1,155,994 422,023
Independent Agencies      
Department of State 101,838 152,669 149,190
Department of Treasury      
Complex Foreign Contingencies      
Title III - Military Assistance
International Military Education and Training 5,357 6,726 8,483
Foreign Military Financing 505,403 564,561 732,674
Peacekeeping Operations 134,276 72,338 31,200
Title IV - Multilateral Economic Assistance
International Financial Institutions      
International Organizations and Programs 300 994 1,100
Total Foreign Operations 1,214,572 1,953,282 1,344,670
 
Grand Total $1,331,845 $2,077,585 $1,491,422



Back to Top
Sign-in

Do you already have an account on one of these sites? Click the logo to sign in and create your own customized State Department page. Want to learn more? Check out our FAQ!

OpenID is a service that allows you to sign in to many different websites using a single identity. Find out more about OpenID and how to get an OpenID-enabled account.