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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

17. Democracy


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Democracy and respect for human rights are central components of U.S. foreign policy.  Supporting democracy not only promotes such fundamental American values as religious freedom and worker rights, but also helps create a more secure, stable, and pros­perous global arena in which the United States can advance its national interests.   The events of September 11 did not change the importance of these issues for the United States.  On the contrary, promoting American values and internationally recognized human rights standards remains central to our foreign policy.

Democracy is much more than just elections.  The slow development of democracy in some states demonstrates that elections should be regarded not as an end in themselves, but as the means to establish a political system that fosters the growth and self-fulfillment of its citizens by promoting and protecting their political and civil rights.  Genuine democracy thus requires not just elections, but respect for human rights, including the right to political dissent; a robust civil society; the rule of law, characterized by vibrant and pluralistic political institutions, constitutionalism, and an independent judiciary; open and competitive economic structures; an independent media capable of engaging an informed citizenry; freedom of religion and belief; mechanisms to safeguard minorities from oppressive rule by the majority; and full respect for women's and workers' rights.  These principles—combined with free-and-fair elections—form the basis for a culture of democracy.

The United States supports democracy for the long haul.  We foster the growth of democratic culture wherever it has a chance of taking hold.  We provide support for countries in transi­tion, defend democracies under attack, and strengthen the network of established democracies.  Each year, we invest hundreds of millions of dollars in these efforts.  We do so not just because it is right, but because it is necessary.  Our own security as a nation depends upon the expansion of democracy worldwide, without which repression, corruption, and instability would almost inevitably engulf countries and even regions.

The Department of State coordinates U.S. policy on democracy and human rights.  Through its relations with foreign governments and multilateral organizations, officers actively encourage the growth of democratic culture, including respect for human rights.  Through its coordi­nation of U.S. agencies that provide development assistance, State provides tangible financial and technical support for democracy and human rights programs, including activities related to conflict prevention and resolution.  Through the annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, State provides a comprehensive analysis of human rights conditions around the world.   The newer Annual Report on International Religious Freedom does the same for religious freedom.  In 2001, in response to new legislation, the Department issued a new report on Trafficking in Persons.

Democracy.  New guidelines were established for the Human Rights and Democracy Fund (HRDF) that focus on cutting-edge and innovative projects for key countries of strategic interest.  These guidelines will be applied to new grants in FY '02.  Progress toward democracy was made in a number of countries, notably Peru, where U.S. assistance facilitated new elections and a transitional government.  In Belarus, U.S. assistance to civil society and independent media did not ensure a free-and-fair election, and efforts continue to bring democracy to the country.  The U.S. joined other OAS member states in signing the Inter-American Democratic Charter in September 2001 at the OAS Special Session in Lima, Peru.  Multilaterally, the Department participated in a major review of the Community of Democracies, which resulted in an administration decision to proceed with participation in a refined CD.  In both the Commission on Human Rights and the UN General Assembly, U.S.-supported resolutions on the promotion of democracy were passed. 

Human Rights. U.S. policy seeks to promote human rights through objective reporting, effective programming, and an "inside-outside" approach that combines vigorous, external focus on human rights concerns with equally robust support for internal reform. To prevent future abuses, we promote the principles of early warning and preventive diplomacy.

In 2001, the Department issued the 25th annual edition of the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, describing the situation in 195 countries in a publication that is respected globally for its objectivity and accuracy.  We planned and carried out human rights dialog with Vietnam and planned for the FY '02 dialog with China, and developed individual country strategies to help ensure that recipients of AGOA preferences address ongoing human rights, worker rights, and democracy concerns.  We maintained and strengthened our relations with nongovernmental organizations through regular roundtables on countries such as Colombia and Zimbabwe. 

Most of the country resolutions supported by the United States were passed in the Commission on Human Rights.  However, the United States was not reelected to the Commission for 2002, and the administration is considering its future course of action.

Corporate responsibility. An important means of ensuring that the benefits of globalization are broadly distributed is the promotion of corporate responsibility.  The Department reached agreement with the UK, major corporations, and nongovernmental organizations on the Voluntary Principles on Corporate Security and Human Rights, and began their implementation.  In addition, the United States completed negotiations on the renewal of the Cambodian Textile Agreement, which provides trade benefits as an incentive to foster better labor standards and working conditions.


Trafficking in persons. The Department took an active role in combatting trafficking.  The first Trafficking in Persons report was issued in July 2001, addressing human rights and law enforcement concerns.  We cosponsored an antitrafficking resolution in the Commission on Human Rights.  A new office, established in October 2001, will consolidate the Department's anti-trafficking policy and programs.

Religious freedom. The Department continued to place religious freedom issues in the mainstream of U.S. foreign policy, advocating for religious freedom with such Governments as Saudi Arabia, Vietnam, and China.  We expanded our outreach program to Muslim-Americans and initiated a new outreach program to Hindu-Americans.

A couple of caveats to this section are important.  One, the very global nature of the democracy and human rights portfolio means that it can be difficult to identify performance indicators that are truly global.  We, therefore, have avoided including indicators that are country- or region-specific.  As a result, the indicators do not reflect as clearly as they could the truly bilateral nature of human rights work.  Two, the five performance goals outlined in this section are not ranked for a very specific reason.  To rank the five goals in any way could convey the impression that the United States advocates or supports efforts to create a hierarchy of rights, which would run contrary to the basic principle of U.S. foreign policy that all human beings are born free and equal in rights.


National Interest

Democracy and Human Rights

Performance Goal #

DE-01

Strategic Goal

Democracy

Outcome Desired

A worldwide community of democracies where human rights, including worker rights, and religious freedom are universally respected.

Performance Goal

Consolidate new democracies and promote greater liberalization of authoritarian regimes.

FY '01 RESULTS AS OF 9/30/01

In general terms, DRL and the regional bureaus worked together to use demarches, press statements and other diplomatic instruments to reach targeted countries.  Working with USAID and others, we help devise strategies that more actively promote free-and-fair elections.   

Progress was made in a number of countries.  In Belarus, the Department aided independent journalists, supported a cross-border radio station and funded a "get out the vote" campaign in "the last dictatorship in Europe."  We also worked with the OSCE and other governments to press the Belarus regime.  Although the election in September 2000 was far from free and fair, our efforts helped to develop and protect nascent elements of civil society. 

In Peru, U.S. assistance for vote monitoring and related activities facilitated elections that brought an end to the Fujimori regime and instituted a transitional government. 

New guidelines were established  for the Human Rights and Democracy Fund that focus on cutting-edge and innovative projects for key countries of strategic interest.    FY '02 grants from this Fund will be made in accordance with these guidelines.

The Department participated in a major administration review of the Community of Democracies, which resulted in an administration decision to proceed with participation in a refined CD.  We are now working with the CD Convening Group to implement these decisions.

In September, the U.S. joined other Organization of American States (OAS) members in adopting the Inter-American Democracy Charter, a major initiative designed to bolster  OAS  mechanisms to promote democracy while defending it against all threats

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Size of Human Rights and Democracy Fund

$9 million

$13.4 million

$13.0 million

Verification

Source:  Congress, H, DRL

Storage:  Department of State/DRL/DP

Frequency:  annually

Validation:  shows commitment


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Training for State Department and U.S. Agency for International Development officers working on democracy

Regular DRL/DP presentations in Global Issues Courses

Successful:  presentations to

A-100, political tradecraft courses

Minimal:  status quo

Unsuccessful: fewer presentations

Presentations were made in political tradecraft and global issues courses.

Verification

Source:  DRL/DP, National Foreign Affairs Training Center

Storage:  DRL/DP

Frequency:  annually

Validation:  educates system

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

United Nations resolutions on the right to democracy

United Nations Commission on Human Rights passed a resolution on the right to democracy for the second straight year.

Successful:  UNGA passes resolution on right to democracy

Minimal:  UNCHR passes resolution for third year

Unsuccessful:  no resolution

UNCHR resolution on promotion of democracy was passed; similar resolution passed in UNGA plenary; U.S.-sponsored resolution on supporting UN democracy programs passed with more cosponsors than previously.

Verification

Source:  United Nations, post reporting

Storage:  Department of State/DRL/MLA

Frequency:  annually

Validation:  secures recog­nition of universality of principles

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Community of Democracies (CD)

Community of Democracies holds its first ministerial in Warsaw.

Successful:  establish Community of Democracies Caucus at United Nations General Assembly

Minimal:  Community of Democracies Caucus discussed

Unsuccessful:  no meetings

CD Caucus at UNGA was established and met.

Verification

Source:  Department of State/DRL/DP, S/P

Storage:  Department of State/DRL/DP

Frequency:  annually

Validation:  promotes democracy


Countries

Worldwide, with priority focus on

  • AF:  Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Togo, Uganda, Zimbabwe
  • EAP:  Australia, Burma, Cambodia, China (incl. Hong Kong), Fiji, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, North Korea, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam
  • EUR:  Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia-Montenegro (including Kosovo), Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom (Northern Ireland only), Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Turkmenistan, Russian Federation, Ukraine, Uzbekistan
  • NEA:  Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel (including Occupied Territories and Palestinian Authority), Jordan, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen
  • SA:  Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka
  • WHA:  Argentina, Brazil, Caribbean states, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela

Complementary U.S. Government Activities

(Non-Department of State)

Commerce:  judicial training and education;

Defense:  military assistance, training and sales programs;

HHS:  HIV/AIDS education and awareness programs;

Judiciary:  training and assistance to foreign judicial systems;

Justice:  judicial assistance programs, immigration policies and procedures, antitrafficking measures;

Labor:  programs that promote worker rights, support the ILO, and eradicate child labor;

NSC:  interagency working groups, democracy coordination;

Treasury:  tracking IMF and World Bank activities to ensure protection of worker rights;

U.S. Agency for International Development: Democracy Center - sustainable, democratic development programs; and

U.S. Trade Representative:  monitoring and analysis of internationally recognized worker rights.


Lead Agency

Department of State/DRL 

Partners

Department of State:  AF, EAP, EUR, NEA, SA, WHA, G, P, R, L, H, M, T, IO, INL, OES, PRM, S/P, CA, PICW, S/WCI, S/RPP

Other U.S. Government:  U.S. Agency for International Development, Justice, Defense, Health and Human Services, INS, Commerce, Labor, Treasury, U.S. Trade Representative, NSC, Congress, Judiciary, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, U.S. Institute of Peace, National Endowment for Democracy, U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom

Multilateral:  United Nations, Organization of American States, Organization for African Unity, Association of South East Asian Nations, Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, European Union, ILO, WTO, Community of Democracies

Nongovernmental organizations:  media, AFL-CIO, corporations, religious organizations, international financial institutions


National Interest

Democracy and Human Rights

Performance Goal #

DE-02

Strategic Goal

Democracy

Outcome Desired

A worldwide community of democracies where human rights, including worker rights, and religious freedom, are universally respected.

Performance Goal

Greater respect for human rights around the world.

FY '01 RESULTS AS OF 9/30/01

U.S. human rights policy begins with objective and comprehensive reporting.  The Department published the 25th annual edition of the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, critically assessing the human rights and democracy performance of 195 countries and providing a reference for diplomatic discussions.

Human rights issues were addressed through both bilateral and multilateral mechanisms. 

In the 57th Commission on Human Rights, the United States helped ensure passage of the crucial Cuba resolution, as well as those on Sudan, FRY, Iraq, Iran, and Chechnya.  However, the China resolution was again defeated on a procedural motion.  In the UNGA's Third Committee, we also secured passage of high-priority resolutions, including Burma, Afghanistan, and terrorism and human rights.

The United States was not reelected to the Commission on Human Rights for 2002, and during the performance period, the administration was considering its future course of action, both as an observer for 2002 and for future candidacy for the Commission.

Bilaterally, the Department developed and carried out human rights dialogs with countries including China, Vietnam, and Sri Lanka.  We developed individual country strategies to help ensure that recipients of preferences under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) addressed ongoing human rights, worker rights, and democracy concerns.  

We maintained and strengthened our relations with nongovernmental organizations through a series of roundtables on such countries as Zimbabwe, Colombia, and China, as well as on the Human Rights Commission.  At the Commission, we joined with NGOs to present high-profile roundtables for delegates, the press, and public on repressive regimes and on media and Internet freedom. 

The Department increased its emphasis on trafficking in persons as an important part of human rights policy.  The new Trafficking in Persons report was issued in July 2001, in response to new legislation.  The report addresses human rights and law enforcement concerns.  In addition, we cooperated with the Stability Pact Task Force on Trafficking to support antitrafficking efforts in Southeast Europe.  The United States cosponsored an antitrafficking resolution in the Commission on Human Rights. 

Direct support for antitrafficking programs included funding through certain of the Partnership To Eliminate Sweatshops program grants and a program to provide victim advocacy support in Kosovo.

The management of the Department's trafficking policy and programs will shift in FY '02 with the establishment of the Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons.  This office was created in October 2001 and reports directly to Under Secretary Dobriansky.

Public diplomacy  programs addressed several  human rights issues of importance; for example, DRL and ECA organized a study tour for foreign NGO leaders and educators to examine U.S. advances in tolerance and antiracism education programs.


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Leahy amendment limits on security assistance

Leahy amendment made operational by DRL

Successful:  Leahy monitoring fully institutionalized

Minimal:  Leahy monitoring partially implemented

Unsuccessful:  Leahy monitoring not implemented

Leahy monitoring was partially implemented, and was effective for certain countries.  A Department-wide vetting procedure was in place.

Verification

Source:   Mission, NGO, media, and intelligence reporting

Storage:  Department of State/DRL/BA, INR

Frequency:  annually

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Country-specific resolutions at the United Nations Commission on Human Rights

Commission action on country-specific resolutions subject to political factors; most U.S.-supported resolutions pass

Successful:  all U.S.-sponsored or co-sponsored resolutions pass

Minimal:  all but one passes (comparable to FY '00)

Unsuccessful:  more than one resolution defeated

Most major country resolutions sponsored or cosponsored by the United States were passed, with the exception of the China resolution. 

Verification

Source:  UNCHR, Mission reporting

Storage:  Department of State/DRL/MLA, U.S. Mission in Geneva, UNCHR

Frequency:  annually

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Enhanced training for U.S. Government officials on combating trafficking

No training provided

Successful:  presentations in Poli­ti­cal Tradecraft, A-100, Global Issues courses

Minimal:  presentations in Global Issues

Unsuccessful:  status quo

Training sessions were provided in A-100, political tradecraft, Global Issues courses.

Verification

Source: Department of State/DRL/SEA, NFATC

Storage:  DRL/SEA

Frequency:  annually

Validation:  enhancing FSO awareness of issue will integrate issue into U.S. policy


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Antitrafficking protocol to the crime convention

Negotiations are underway, but are bogged down in debate over definition of prostitution.

Successful:  U.S. signs antitrafficking protocol.

Minimal:  negotiators resolve de­bate over definition of prostitution.

Unsuccessful:  status quo

The U.S. signed the trafficking protocol on 12/12/2000, the first day on which it was open for signature.

Verification

Source:  Department of State/DRL/SEA, INL

Storage:  DRL/SEA

Frequency:  annually

Validation:  establishes international standard

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Institutionalization of reporting on trafficking

Separate section on trafficking introduced

Successful:  section on trafficking significantly expanded

Minimal:  section on trafficking expanded, but not significantly

Unsuccessful:  no expansion

The new Trafficking in Persons report required by legislation, was issued in July 2001; the trafficking section of the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices was expanded.

Verification

Source:  Mission reporting, Department of State/DRL/CRA, Congress

Storage:  DRL/CRA

Frequency:  annually

Validation:  growth of reporting shows commitment to issue

Countries

Worldwide, with priority focus on:

  • AF:  Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Togo, Uganda, Zimbabwe
  • EAP:  Australia, Burma, Cambodia, China (including Hong Kong), Fiji, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, North Korea, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam
  • EUR:  Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia-Montenegro (including Kosovo), Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom (Northern Ireland only), Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Turkmenistan, Russian Federation, Ukraine, Uzbekistan
  • NEA:  Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel (including Occupied Territories and Palestinian Authority), Jordan, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen
  • SA:  Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka
  • WHA:  Argentina, Brazil, Caribbean states, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela

Complementary U.S. Government Activities

(Non-Department of State)

Commerce:  Judicial training and education;

Defense:  Military assistance, training, and sales programs;

HHS:  HIV/AIDS education and awareness programs;

Judiciary:  Training and assistance to foreign judicial systems;

Justice:  Judicial assistance programs, immigration policies and procedures, antitrafficking measures;

Labor:  Programs that promote worker rights, support the ILO, and eradicate child labor;

NSC:  Interagency working groups, democracy coordination, World Conference Against Racism;

Treasury:  Tracking IMF and World Bank activities to ensure protection of worker rights;

U.S. Agency for International Development: Democracy Center, sustainable, democratic development programs; and

U.S. Trade Representative:  Monitoring and analysis of internationally recognized worker rights

Lead Agency

Department of State/DRL 

Partners

Department of State:  AF, EAP, EUR, NEA, SA, WHA, G, P, R, L, H, M, T, IO, INL, OES, PRM, S/P, CA, PICW, S/WCI, S/RPP

Other U.S. Government: U.S. Agency for International Development, Justice, Defense, Health and Human Services, INS, Commerce, Labor, Treasury, U.S. Trade Representative, NSC, Congress, Judiciary, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, U.S. Institute of Peace, National Endowment for Democracy, U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom

Multilateral: United Nations, Organization of American States, Organization for African Unity, Association of South East Asian Nations, Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, European Union, ILO, WTO, Community of Democracies

Nongovernmental organizations: financial institutions international, media, AFL-CIO, corporations, religious organizations



National Interest

Democracy and Human Rights

Performance Goal #

DE-03

Strategic Goal

Democracy

Outcome Desired

A worldwide community of democracies where human rights, including worker rights, and religious freedom are universally respected.

Performance Goal

Expand observance of worker rights, in context of broader participation in global economic growth and prosperity.

FY '01 RESULTS AS OF 9/30/01

The Partnership To Eliminate Sweatshops made substantial progress in working with nongovernmental organizations, governments, and private enterprise to eliminate sweatshop conditions in several regions.  The first set of grants were issued during the performance period, and plans were made for a workshop to exchange information on best practices.

The Department and other agencies carried out successful negotiations with Cambodia to renew the Textile Agreement, which provides trade benefits as an incentive to foster better labor standards and working conditions, and also with Cote d'Ivoire to join the International Program for the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC) and engage in regional projects to eliminate child labor, trafficking in persons, and slave labor on coca plantations. 

In spite of our attention to the problem, the assassination of trade union leaders in Colombia has continued unabated.

The Department completed the negotiations of the U.S.-UK Voluntary Principles on Corporate Security and Human Rights in January 2001, and cochaired plenary sessions of the corporate, government, and nongovernmental organizations participants in the process. 

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Work of Secretary's Advisory Committee on Labor Diplomacy (ACLD)

ACLD issues initial report, makes initial recommendations.

Successful:  recommendations implemented, charter renewed

Minimal:  charter renewed

Unsuccessful:  ACLD disbanded

Charter extended to 12/31/2001.  The Department accepted the majority of the ACLD recommendations; some have been implemented.

Verification

Source:  Department of State/DRL/IL, ACLD

Storage:  DRL/IL

Frequency:  annually


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Funding of U.S. Government Anti-Sweatshop Initiative

$4 million

$5 million

$4 million

Verification

Source:  Congress, Department of State/DRL/IL

Storage:  DRL/IL

Frequency:  annually

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

U.S. Government support for International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor (IPEC)

U.S. provides $30 million to support IPEC.

U.S. Government provides:

$45 million to support IPEC;

$55 million to support U.S. Agency for International Development education programs.

$45 million for IPEC

Verification

Source:  ILO, Congress, Department of State/ DRL/IL

Storage:  DRL/IL

Frequency:  annually

Countries

Worldwide, with priority focus on

  • AF:  Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Togo, Uganda, Zimbabwe
  • EAP:  Australia, Burma, Cambodia, China (include Hong Kong), Fiji, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, North Korea, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam
  • EUR:  Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia-Montenegro (including Kosovo), Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom (Northern Ireland only), Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Turkmenistan, Russian Federation, Ukraine, Uzbekistan
  • NEA:  Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel (including Occupied Territories and Palestinian Authority), Jordan, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen
  • SA:  Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka
  • WHA:  Argentina, Brazil, Caribbean states, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela

Complementary U.S. Government Activities

(Non-Department of State)

Commerce:  Judicial training and education;

Defense: Military assistance, training and sales programs;

HHS:  HIV/AIDS education and awareness programs;

Judiciary:  Training and assistance to foreign judicial systems; 

Justice:  Judicial assistance programs, immigration policies and procedures, antitrafficking measures;

Labor:  Programs that promote worker rights, support the ILO, and eradicate child labor;

NSC:  Interagency working groups, democracy coordination, World Conference Against Racism;

Treasury:  Tracking IMF and World Bank activities to ensure protection of worker rights;

U.S. Agency for International Development: Democracy Center, sustainable, democratic development programs; and

U.S. Trade Representative:  Monitoring and analysis of internationally recognized worker rights

Lead Agency

Department of State/DRL 

Partners

State:   AF, EAP, EUR, NEA, SA, WHA, G, P, R, L, H, M, T, IO, INL, OES, PRM, S/P, CA, PICW, S/WCI, S/RPP

Other U.S. Government:  U.S. Agency for International Development, Justice, Defense, Health and Human Services, INS, Commerce, Labor, Treasury, U.S. Trade Representative, NSC, Congress, Judiciary, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, U.S. Institute of Peace, National Endowment for Democracy, U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom

Multilateral: United Nations, Organization of American States, Organization for African Unity, Association of South East Asian Nations, Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, European Union, ILO, WTO, Community of Democracies

Nongovernmental organizations: international financial institutions, media, AFL-CIO, corporations, religious organizations


National Interest

Democracy and Human Rights

Performance Goal #

DE-04

Strategic Goal

Democracy

Outcome Desired

A worldwide community of democracies where human rights, including worker rights, and religious freedom, are universally respected.

Performance Goal

Worldwide acceptance of freedom of religion and conscience

FY '01 RESULTS AS OF 9/30/01

The Department continued to place religious freedom issues in the mainstream of U.S. foreign policy.  The Office of International Religious Freedom (IRF) staff advocated for U.S. policy on IRF with Governments abroad, including China, Laos, Vietnam, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt and met with victims of religious persecution.  

The Department discussed foreign assistance programming on religious freedom issues with USAID, but no decisions were reached during the year. 

The Department prepared the third Annual Report on International Religious Freedom, although its delivery, scheduled for September 2001, was delayed until October, due to the events of September 11. 

To expand the constituency for international religious freedom, and to seek input from concerned U.S. NGOs and religious groups, IRF expanded its outreach program to Muslim Americans, helped organize the Secretary's Iftaar dinner, began a Hindu Roundtable, and briefed a wide variety of student, NGO, academic,  and religious groups. 

IRF staff also provided training to State Department employees on international religious freedom issues at the Foreign Service Institute.  

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

State Department-wide awareness of U.S. religious freedom policy

Department conference on religion and foreign policy

Successful:  two conferences

Minimal:  status quo

Unsuccessful:  no conferences

A conference on Islam and Foreign Policy was held in November 2000.

Verification

Source:  Department of State/DRL/IRF, IRM/RES

Storage:  DRL/IRF

Frequency:  annually


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Foreign assistance programming

No foreign assistance programming devoted to promoting religious freedom

Successful: U.S. Agency for International Development agrees to implement IRF-related programs

Minimal:  issue debated, but no resolution reached

Unsuccessful:  status quo

Discussions were held with USAID but no decisions were reached; consultations are ongoing.

Verification

Source:  DRL/IRF, U.S. Agency for International Development

Storage:  DRL/IRF

Frequency:  annually

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Baseline

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Outreach to faith-based communities

Islamic Roundtable outreach program

Successful:  new program

Minimal:  Islamic outreach

Unsuccessful:  no outreach to faith-based communities

The Islamic Roundtable met several times during the year.  A new outreach program, the Hindu Roundtable, met for the first time. The Secretary hosted an Iftaar dinner to reach out to the Muslim-American community.

Verification

Source:  DRL/IRF, DRL/BA

Storage:  DRL/IRF, DRL/BA

Frequency:  annually

Countries

Worldwide, with priority focus on

  • AF:  Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Sudan, Togo, Uganda, Zimbabwe
  • EAP:  Australia, Burma, Cambodia, China (including Hong Kong), Fiji, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, North Korea, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam.
  • EUR:  Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Poland, Romania, Serbia-Montenegro (including Kosovo), Spain, Turkey, United Kingdom (Northern Ireland only), Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Moldova, Turkmenistan, Russian Federation, Ukraine, Uzbekistan
  • NEA:  Algeria, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel (including Occupied Territories and Palestinian Authority), Jordan, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen
  • SA:  Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka
  • WHA:  Argentina, Brazil, Caribbean states, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Nicaragua, Peru, Suriname, Venezuela

Complementary U.S. Government Activities

(Non-Department of State)

Commerce:  judicial training and education;

Defense:  military assistance, training, and sales programs;

HHS:  HIV/AIDS education and awareness programs;

Judiciary:  training and assistance to foreign judicial systems; 

Justice:  judicial assistance programs, immigration policies and procedures, anti-trafficking measures;

Labor:  programs that promote worker rights, support the ILO, and eradicate child labor;

NSC:  interagency working groups, democracy coordination;

Treasury:  tracking IMF and World Bank activities to ensure protection of worker rights;

U.S. Agency for International Development:  Democracy Center, sustainable, democratic development programs; and

U.S. Trade Representative:  monitoring and analysis of internationally recognized worker rights;

Lead Agency

Department of State/ DRL 

Partners

Department of State:  AF, EAP, EUR, NEA, SA, WHA, G, P, R, L, H, M, T, IO, INL, OES, PRM, S/P, CA, PICW, S/WCI, S/RPP

Other U.S. Government:  U.S. Agency for International Development, Justice, Defense, Health and Human Services, INS, Commerce, Labor, Treasury, U.S. Trade Representative, NSC, Congress, Judiciary, U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, U.S. Institute of Peace, National Endowment for Democracy, U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom

Multilateral:  United Nations, Organization of American States, Organization for African Unity, Association of South East Asian Nations, Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, European Union, ILO, WTO, Community of Democracies

Nongovernmental organizations: international financial institutions, media, AFL-CIO, corporations, religious organizations



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