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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

20. Environment


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Whether from overfishing in the oceans, greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, release of chemical pollutants, destruction of forests, or degradation of water supplies or the impact of invasive species, damage to the global environment threatens the health and security of all Americans and the future of our increasingly global economy.  As the international community concludes and implements agreements that will constitute the global environmental framework for the next several decades, it is critical that the United States provide strong leadership to shape outcomes that advance our environmental objectives, protect our economic interests, and promote standards abroad that approach those Americans enforce at home. 

Moreover, the United States needs to ensure that international private capital flows promote sustainable development.  This is critical in a world in which private international capital flows exceed government-provided funds by as much as 10 to 1 and fulfill the economic hopes of many developing countries.  In its trade liberalization policies, and through the work of international financial institutions and export credit agencies (ECAs), the United States seeks decisions on international private capital flows that take into account environmental impacts and, where possible, adhere to environmental standards found in the United States.

The Department of State's efforts on global environmental protection are outlined in three performance goal papers:

1. International Treaties and Agreements

Foreign direct investment is the primary means by which capital flows to developing countries to promote economic development.  Our goal is to ensure that our policies regarding private sector investment, trade agreements, and export credit agencies are supportive of our environmental protection objectives. Working with other U.S. agencies, scientists, businesses, and citizen groups, the State Department develops positions and policies that address complex international environmental issues.  We then negotiate with other countries, building support for those positions, and ensuring their inclusion in pertinent treaties and agreements.

In May, the United States signed an international agreement to phase out or minimize the use of Persistent Organic Pollutants, a group of hazardous chemicals and pesticides that do not biodegrade and which disperse over time throughout the globe.  Although the United States no longer uses these chemicals—such as DDT—their use in other regions can contaminate soil, food, and water both in the United States and abroad.  The United States ratified the Convention To Combat Desertification demonstrating our continued engagement on international environmental treaties and facilitating the promotion of U.S. experiences and technology. U.S. diplomatic leadership led to the ratification of the UN Straddling and Highly Migratory Fish Stocks Agreement, which entered into force in December 2001.  This agreement levels the playing field for U.S. fishermen by enhancing international fisheries' rules and enforcement.

2. International Private Capital

Private capital flows have become the engine of economic growth in many developing countries, eclipsing official development assistance.  As the United States sets out to negotiate free trade agreements, either bilaterally or regionally, it is critical that we include consideration of the environmental implications of expanded trade and help our trade partners level up their domestic environmental standards.  The Department of State assists the U.S. Trade Representative's Office in its efforts to help the WTO and other trade institutions to develop a framework for higher levels of environmental protection and effective enforcement, compliance, and monitoring of environmental treaties.  The financial decisions of ECAs, publicly funded government agencies that support private investments worth billions of dollars around the world yearly, have significant environmental consequences, as well.  State works with Treasury and other organizations to ensure that ECAs support capital flows that take environmental standards into account.   In addition, the United States has a long tradition of advancing market approaches to internalizing environmental objectives into good business practice.  In the forest sector, the U.S. supports laws and policies that encourage responsible long-term private sector investment in forests.

3.  International Initiatives and Official Development Assistance

Many developing countries, faced with a daunting agenda of public policy issues, do not have the capacity to address the environmental challenges they confront.  In the Middle East and Africa, water shortages threaten regional stability and undermine efforts to promote economic growth.  In East Asia and the Pacific, environmental degradation and air pollution cause widespread disease and greatly reduce economic productivity. The International Crime Threat Assessment highlights environmental crime as one of the most profitable and fastest growing new areas of international organized criminal activity ($22-$31 billion annually).  We are seeking to reduce environmental crime, such as hazardous waste dumping, smuggling proscribed hazardous materials, illegal logging, and exploiting and trafficking protected natural resources to protect the environment and address other U.S. national interests.  On forests, the Department cohosted the first-ever regional Ministerial Conference on Forest Law Enforcement and Governance, resulting in an historic East Asian Ministerial declaration committing nations to concrete actions to combat illegal forest practices.  Around the world, illegal logging and related illegal trade and corruption in the forest sector are destroying forests, robbing governments of needed revenue, and supporting the costs of regional warfare.  In developed and developing countries alike, invasive species entering countries through trade, transport, and tourism are increasingly one of the largest causes of habitat destruction.  In the United States alone, the annual cost of combating invasive species is more than $130 billion. 

The Department of State works to ensure that developmental assistance provided by U.S. agencies helps developing countries build their capacity to protect their environments.  We thereby build good will with our negotiating partners and directly improve the global environment.  Even with the best of efforts, no single donor country can hope to solve international environmental degradation on its own.  State therefore seeks to promote international responses targeted at key environmental issues that affect U.S. citizens and interests.  For example, building on our efforts and experience gained in the Middle East, we are forging a coalition of donor countries to focus official development assistance on regional cooperative management of vital freshwater resources.  In partnership with 11 countries representing 60 percent of the world's forests, and with the support of U.S. business and environmental constituencies, we are developing a comprehensive and voluntary framework for national assessment, monitoring, and reporting on the state of and trends in the world's forests.  And in partnership with more than 50 like-minded countries, scientists, and environmental groups we remain actively engaged in the U.S.-inspired International Coral Reef Initiative (ICRI) that protects coral reefs and the life systems they support.  All of these efforts leverage U.S. resources and greatly increase our ability to help developing countries protect the global environment.

4.  The Challenge of Environmental Diplomacy 

The United States has a long and proud history of environmental stewardship. The State Department's challenge in the years ahead will be to build coalitions of like-minded governments, civil society groups and the private sector, issue by issue, and to hold those coalitions together.  By continuing our active leadership to build these alliances, we can ensure that the health and welfare of U.S. citizens are protected now, and that we pass a cleaner environment on to future generations.

5.  Public Diplomacy

In support of State Department goals and general environmental awareness, the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs conducted nearly $4 million worth of exchanges, involving 36 U.S. and almost 200 foreign participants.


National Interest

Global Issues

Performance Goal #

EN-01

Strategic Goal

Secure a sustainable global environment to protect U.S. citizens and interests from the effects of international environmental degradation.

Outcome Desired

Foreign direct investment and trade that promotes a sustainable global environment.

Performance Goal

Build international support among donor countries and international financial institutions for U.S. positions to make trade and environment policies mutually supportive through coalition building, diplomatic engagement, and public diplomacy.


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Content and status of the Free Trade Agreement for the Americas

Parties negotiating the FTAA create a Governmental Committee on Civil Society that can recommend how concerns for sustainable development can be incorporated into the FTAA.

FTAA negotiators endeavor to insert language supporting environmental/ sustainable development concerns into the investment chapters of the proposed agreement.

Parties agree to consider environmental provisions similar to those of the NAFTA and FTAA.

Progress was made in garnering support for consideration of environmental provisions in the FTAA process.  However, some countries still question the need to address environmental issues in trade discussions.

Verification

Source:  FTAA parties

Storage: Department of State

Validation:  U.S. Trade Representative


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Status and impact of Jordan's environmental institutional capacity, its laws, and regulations

No data

Negotiation of U.S.-Jordan Free Trade Agreement (FTA).

Negotiation, conclusion, and beginning of implementation of U.S.-Jordan FTA.

Jordan establishes new Environment Ministry.

Establishment of U.S.-Jordan Environment Working Group.

U.S.-Jordan FTA signed and ratified.

While making some preparations in FY '01, Jordan did not establish its new Environment Ministry.

U.S. technical experts from EPA met with Jordanian officials for consultations on the new Ministry, but the U.S.-Jordan Environment Working Group has not yet been formally constituted. 

Verification

Source:  U.S. Government reports; reports from Jordan's Environment Ministry

Storage:  Department of State, U.S. Agency for International Development, and Environmental Protection Agency

Validation:  Improvements to Jordan's environment


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Compliance with World Bank Chad-Cameroon pipeline social/environmental program

Governments of Chad and Cameroon (GOCC), World Bank (WB), and consortium agree on programs promoting sustainable development as part of pipeline project.

Establish key priorities for project monitoring.

GOCC and WB begin capacity building training, establish project-monitoring boards

Formal regular mechanisms for consultation, conflict resolution established between local communities and consortium, WB, and local officials.

Chadian local development plan completed.

Development board established.

Baseline survey of Cameroon's Pygmy communities and implementation of community-based compensation projects complete.

Chadian local development plan completed.

Development board established.

Baseline survey of Cameroon's Pygmy communities and implementation of community-based compensation projects completed.

Verification

Source:  Embassy, nongovernmental organizations, consortium, World Bank and GOCC reports

Storage: Treasury and Department of State

Validation:  U.S. Government, World Bank, and GOCC reports


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

International private capital flows for the South-North Water project in China incorporate environmental protection.

No data

China announces plans to initiate South-North Project.

U.S.-China consultations produce recommendations for how environmental protection can be incorporated into South-North Project.

Interagency participation (including Bureau of Reclamation, TVA, and State) with Chinese Ministry of Water Resources in 2-day conference on environmental-protection practices in the South-North Water Project.

Interagency coordination on tracking the environmental impact and management of the South-North Water Project. 

Verification

Source: Mission reporting, nongovernmental organizations, PRC Government Reports

Storage: Department of State and Environmental Protection Agency


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Number of countries' Export Credit Agencies that agree to common environmental guidelines.

No data

OECD consultations continue.

OECD Export Credit Group develops environmental guidelines.

OECD Export Credit Group holds five rounds of negotiations on common environmental guidelines.  Group is close to reaching a final agreement on this issue.

Verification

Source:  OECD

Storage:  EXIM

Validation: Environmental guidelines


Countries

G-8 countries, African nations, Jordan, Western Hemisphere countries, and APEC economies.

Complementary

U.S. Government Activities

(Non-Department of State)

                     Multilateral consultations in the OECD Export Credit Group (Treasury and EXIM Bank).

                     G-8 consultations (NSC and Treasury).

                     Treasury and EXIM Bank will continue to lead multilateral consultations in the OECD Export Credit Group and National Security Council will continue to lead multilateral discussions in the G-8.

                     Capacity- and institution-building for strengthening Jordan's enforcement of environmental laws and regulations (Environmental Protection Agency).

Lead Agency

Treasury

Partners

Environmental Protection Agency, EXIM, international financial institutions, World Bank, Department of State, United Nations Agencies (UNEP, UNDP, CITES), U.S. Trade Representative


National Interest

Global Issues

Performance Goal #

EN-02

Strategic Goal

Secure a sustainable global environment to protect U.S. citizens and interests from the effects of international environmental degradation.

Outcome Desired

International treaties and agreements, when signed and ratified by the United States and universally adhered to, reduce international environmental degradation.

Performance Goal

International treaties and agreements that protect the environment are negotiated, implemented, and enforced.


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Response of the international community to alternative approaches to the Kyoto Protocol

Parties progress in elaborating components of the Kyoto Protocol. General modalities for CDM and other mechanisms become clearer.

Increasing number of developing countries agree to take on more responsibilities to address climate change.

The administration confirmed that it would not join the Kyoto Protocol because it is not a sound approach to addressing climate change.   The Department has continued to participate actively within the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, as well as bilaterally and regionally to promote effective approaches to climate change.

Verification

Source: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

Storage:  Department of State

Validation: UNFCCC


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Effect of Prior Informed Consent Convention

Submit to Senate for advice and consent.

U.S. ratification complete.

Senate has not yet considered the Prior Informal Consent Convention.

Verification

Source:  UNEP

Storage:  Department of State, Environmental Protection Agency

Validation: UNEP


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Convention To Combat Desertification mitigates the effects of drought on arid, semiarid, and dry subhumid lands

Senate provides advice and consent.

U.S. ratification completed.

Goal achieved.  The Senate gave its advice and consent to ratify the Deserts Convention in October 2000.  Our instrument of ratification was deposited with the United Nations on November 17 of that year.  Under the terms of the treaty, the United States became a Party to the Convention on February 15, 2001.

Verification

Source:  CCD

Storage:  Department of State, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Agency for International Development

Validation: CCD

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Status of ratification of Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPS) Convention

Under negotiation

Submit to Senate for advice and consent.

President Bush, in a Rose Garden ceremony, endorsed the POPS Convention.  United States signed Convention in May 2001 and began preparing documentation to request Senate advice and consent.

Verification

Source:  UNEP

Storage:  Department of State, Environmental Protection Agency

Validation:  UNEP

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Status of Force of United Nations Fish Stocks Agreement and FAO Compliance Agreement

United States completes implementation of the two agreements.

Compliance agreement enters into force following accession of 25 states.

The Compliance Agreement did not enter into force due to the delay by some countries in completing internal procedures.  However, the entry into force of the UN Fish Stocks Agreement (FSA), was achieved a year earlier than expected.   State Department leadership produced an UNGA resolution containing a plan for agreement implementation.

Verification

Source: FAO and Office of Legal Affairs, United Nations

Storage: FAO, United Nations

Validation: Entry into force


Performance Indicator

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Effect of an integrated U.S. Government position on the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD)

United States begins to develop interagency position on substantive issues and strategies for addressing procedural questions to reach a consensus U.S. Government position.

Consensus U.S. Government position is reached.

Consensus WSSD position evolving as part of an integrated U.S. Government international development policy, in close coordination with related development events (FFD, G-8, and Food Summit +5).   State-led interagency policy coordination subcommittee identifying U.S. Government deliverables and priority initiatives for WSSD.

Verification

Source: United Nations

Validation: United Nations (UNEP, CSD, UNEP)

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Quality of trade decisions

Biosafety Protocol implementation proceeds effectively with emphasis on information sharing.

Implementation of Biosafety Protocol continues.

Information-sharing mechanism established.

Goal achieved.  The Intergovernmental Committee for the Cartagena Protocol met for the first time in December 2000 to begin preparations for entry into force of the treaty. We were successful in gaining agreement to develop and launch the pilot phase of the Biosafety Clearing House, which was made operational in FY '01 due largely to U.S. financial and technical support.

Verification

Source: CBD Secretariat

Storage: Department of State

Validation: Developing countries have increased access to environmental information on biotechnology

Performance Indicator

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Effect of FAO International Plans of Action (IPOAs) for seabird by catch avoidance, for shark conservation and management, and for fishing vessel capacity reduction by FAO members, and for combatting illegal, unregulated, and unreported (IUU) fishing.

While some countries are taking actions, no countries have established National Plans of Action to implement IPOAs.

 Several countries make progress on implementation of IPOAs on sharks, seabirds and fishing capacity, and IPOA on IUU fishing adopted by FAO.

The United States fulfilled its commitments on publishing National Plans of Action on Seabirds and Sharks.  A number of other countries also published plans. 

National Plans of Action on fishing capacity are not due until 2003.   However much more remains to be done before all countries establish and implement IPOAs. 

In  2001, the United States successfully led the effort to adopt an IPOA on combatting IUU fishing.

Verification

Source:  National Marine Fisheries Service, FAO,

Storage:  Department of State, NMFS, FAO

Validation:  FAO, other international organizations.


Countries

Worldwide.  In particular, the following key countries: Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Nigeria, Russia, South Africa, Taiwan, United Kingdom, and Iran, as well as the EC and European Union.

Complementary U.S. Government Activities (non-Department of State)

Department of Commerce (NOAA), Department of Interior, Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Agency for International Development, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and USGS

Lead Agency

Department of State

Partners

Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Department of Interior, Department of Transportation, Environmental Protection Agency, FDA, Nongovernmental organizations, U.S. Agency for International Development, USCG, UNDP, UNEP, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Trade Representative, Treasury, and White House, CSD/ECOSOC, Department of Commerce (NOAA/NMFS)


National Interest

Global Issues

Performance Goal #

EN-03

Strategic Goal

Secure a sustainable global environment to protect U.S. citizens and interests from the effects of international environmental degradation.

Outcome Desired

International initiatives and official development assistance (ODA) from donor countries and multilateral institutions protect the global environment.

Performance Goal

International financial and multilateral institutions and donor countries increase development assistance to address key environmental issues that support U.S. environmental foreign policy goals.

Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Activity of chlorofluorocarbons (CFC)-producing enterprises

No data

All seven CFC-producing enterprises halt production.

CFC producers destroy production line equipment.

Target achieved.

Verification

Independent monitoring and verification team

Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Regional Environmental Centers

No data

Kiev and Chisinau Regional Environmental Centers (RECs) established.  Tbilisi and Almaty REC agreements being finalized.

Kiev and Chisinau RECs functioning.  Tbilisi and Almaty RECs established.  Moscow REC Agreement finalized.

Tbilisi REC: Successfully established by the U.S. and operational.  Expectations were exceeded when the REC finalized a strategic plan and conducted a water management conference that brought together government and civil society from the three Caucasus countries to discuss management of shared water resources.  Almaty REC: established by EU; work plans are being developed.  Moscow REC: Established and operational.

Verification

Source:  Environmental Protection Agency

Storage:  Environmental Protection Agency, Department of State

Validation:  RECs


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Progress among U.S. Government, donors and riparians in addressing transboundary water issues in key regions

No data

Riparians met infrequently and unproductively.  Donors met but little coordination.

Riparians meet regularly and begin work on joint project proposals.  Donors meet to discuss coordination.

Riparians in the Nile and Mekong met regularly to develop joint project proposals.  Donors met to discuss cooperation and coordinationl. Nile donor conference held in Geneva, and raised $140 million (U.S.) Initial discussions taking place among the riparians in the Caucasus, Okavango.

Verification

Source:  Reporting cables from Regional Environmental Hubs

Storage: Department of State

Validation:  U.S. Government records and Websites.

Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Management of water

Construction of wells and pipelines in West Bank.

Wastewater treatment project in Gaza.

Planning for Amman system rehabilitation and wastewater treatment plant.

Construction of Wadi Musa wastewater system.

Four new wells in West Bank come online.

Initiate project to protect Gaza aquifer.

Initiate Amman system rehabilitation project.

Initiate West Bank village water project.

Wastewater project in Wadi Musa comes online.

Initiate Hebron wastewater treatment project.

Additional West Bank wells come online.

Initiate Gaza water carrier project and development of Gaza desalination master plan.

Initiate Amman area wastewater treatment project.

Intifada-related violence in the West Bank and Gaza made work on water projects there much more difficult.  Despite the difficult conditions, initial work on the Hebron wastewater treatment project, the Gaza water carrier, and the Gaza desalination project got underway.  In Jordan, preparations for the Amman area wastewater treatment project continued, but due to the complex structure of the financing for the project, progress was slower than planned, and construction will not begin until FY '02.

Verification

Source:  AID reports, State/AID cables, local water agencies

Storage:  AID & Department of State, local water agencies

Validation: Field visits to project sites and local agencies


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Effect of Water Resources and Environment Working Groups

Key water and environment projects continue to produce results, even in the face of continued slowdown in the peace process; four existing water and environment projects initiate new activities.

Three water and environment projects initiate new activities; current activities continue to make progress.

Initiation of 1-2 new water and environment activities; establishment of regional water center in Amman; additional research projects and training funded by Desalination Center; water curriculum developed for schools.

The political climate in the Middle East was very poor in FY '01, which along with the Intifada-related violence made all regional activities extremely difficult.  Progress on all projects was slower than originally planned.  Despite those obstacles, one new water activity and one new environment activity were initiated.  The regional water center in Amman was not formally established due to the political situation, but work at the center was undertaken on an informal basis.  The Desalination Center initiated several new research projects.  Development of the water curriculum continued.  In the context of the very difficult political situation in the region, the U.S. efforts on regional water and environment activities were successful. 

Verification

Source:  MEPP Working Group and ICCON reports. U.S. Government technical agencies' reports.

Storage:  U.S. Government agencies.

Validation:  Regional participants' and donors' assessments.

Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

ICCON activities

Initiate environmental study in Nile Basin in support of preparations for establishment of ICCON.

Nile Basin environmental study completed.

Initiation of ICCON with inaugural meeting in 2/01.

Riparians held ICCON meeting in June 2001 and raised $140 million for regional and subregional activities.   Significant progress has been made in developing regional projects.

Verification

Source: MEPP Working Group and ICCON reports. U.S. Government technical agencies' reports.

Storage:  U.S. Government agencies

Validation:  Regional participants' and donors' assessments


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

UNEP assistance and capacity-building

UNEP agrees on need for more technical assistance on trade-related environmental issues.

U.S. engages support of UNEP leadership for more assistance on trade-related environmental issues.

U.S. has more contact with the Economics and Trade Unit. 

Encourages Governing Council to direct more funds to technical assistance to deal with trade-related environmental issues.

Governing Council agrees to direct more funds to technical assistance to deal with trade-related environmental issues.  U.S. involvement of work of Economic and Trade Unit expands.

Verification

Source:  United Nations

Storage:  Department of State, U.S. Trade Representative, United Nations

Validation:  United Nations (UNEP, CSD, UNEP)

Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Status of U.S. - Japan global issues cooperation and Environmental Policy Dialog

The U.S.-Japan global issues cooperation and Environmental Policy Dialog promotes cooperation in developing countries.

The U.S.-Japan global issues cooperation and Environmental Policy Dialog promotes cooperation in developing countries.

Expanded science and technology cooperation on climate change measurement through ARGO and IODP, and coordinated U.S.-Japan approach to transboundary water in developing countries.

Expanded science and technology cooperation on climate change measurement through ARGO and IODP, and coordinated U.S.-Japan approach to transboundary water in developing countries.

Verification

Source: Department of State

Storage:  Department of State, USAID, other Government Agencies

Validation:  U.S. Government, Japanese Government


Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Status of E.U. fisheries

E.U. fisheries' policies dominated by socioeconomic concerns; U.S.-E.U. relations in international fisheries forums strained.

E.U. embarked on review of its Common Fisheries Policy (CFP).

E.U. and United States engage in meaningful dialogue on primacy of conservation over commercial gain in fisheries.

Provided the E.U. with detailed feedback on its CFP Green Paper.  Fisheries included as an early-warning item in New Trans-Atlantic Agenda discussions and raised with visiting E.U. Parliamentarians.   E.U. included conservation as critical focus in draft Green Paper on domestic fisheries.  E.U. will finalize the new CFP in the next year.

Verification

Source: U.S.-EU

Storage: Department of State

Validation: FAO

Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Haze pollution situation in Indonesia

Policies and enforcement in Indonesia is negligible.

Government of Indonesia adopts managed burn policy and begins enforcement.

Government of Indonesia prosecutes and fines most significant violators.

Government of Indonesia did not enforce its no-burn laws.  Significant violators were not prosecuted.  Without enforcement, Indonesian haze pollution will continue to be a problem for the region, particularly during the next El Nino.

Verification

Source: GOI

Storage: Department of State

Validation: U.S. Agency for International Development

Performance Indicator

FY '99 Baseline

FY '00 Actual

FY '01 Target

FY '01 Actual

Status of UNEP/Global Resources Information Database (GRID) based at the USGS/Eros Data Center in Sioux Falls, SD

No program

Interest and support has spread to U.S. Government agencies, private sector and nongovernmental organizations.

Possible new donors identified.

Potential donors identified. Contributions made by the GEF and Germany.

Verification

Validation: UNEP


Countries

Countries (cont'd)

Riparians: Amazon Basin and Upper Paraguay/Paran´┐Ż (Bolivia, Brazil, Paraguay, Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru); central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan); Caucasus (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia); Mekong (Cambodia, China, Laos, Thailand, Vietnam); Nile (Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, Eritrea); South Asia (Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Pakistan); Southern Africa (Angola, Botswana, Namibia, Mozambique, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe); West Africa (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Cote d'Ivoire, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Togo)

Donors: Canada, Denmark, EU, Germany, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden

MEPP-Jordan, Israel, the Palestinian Territories, Egypt, and other regional delegations of the working groups

Russia, Moldova, JUSCANZ, and G-77

Complementary

U.S. Government Activities

(Non-Department of State)

U.S. Agency for International Development environmental management programs; Environmental Protection Agency environmental management and quality programs;

MEPP-Regional Water Data Banks project (U.S. Government); Public Awareness and Water Conservation project (U.S. Government); Electronic water network project (U.S. Government); Middle East Desalination Research Center (BUREC); Safe and Effective Use of Pesticides projects (U.S. Department of Agriculture and National Institutes of Health); Coastal zone management project (NOAA); environmental training program (EPA & U.S. Department of Agriculture); initiative to combat desertification (U.S. Department of Agriculture); and ICCON-technical assistance activities (U.S. Government, BUREC, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Environmental Protection Agency, NOAA, ACOE).

Lead Agency

Department of State

Partners

ACOE, DOC (NOAA), Department of Energy, Department of Defense, Department of Interior, Environmental Protection Agency, NASA, nongovernmental organizations, private sector, USACE, U.S. Agency for International Development, U.S. Department of Agriculture, USGS, USBUREC, World Bank, private sector.



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