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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Strategic Goals 1 and 2


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National Interest: National Security

Strategic Goal 1: Regional Stability
Ensure that local and regional instabilities do not threaten the security
and well being of the United States and its allies.

STRATEGIC GOAL OVERVIEW / PUBLIC BENEFIT

The United States must provide for the safety of Americans at home and abroad, protect against threats to its interests worldwide, and honor commitments to its allies and friends. The Department advances U.S. national security interests by promoting regional stability, so that all Americans, in the United States and abroad, are safe from violence. Through diplomacy, the United States builds and strengthens relationships with its neighbors and allies worldwide by shaping regional environments, promoting democracy and economic growth, and educating foreign audiences how to prevent, contain, or resolve conflicts.

[Text version of a photo: Seated left to right are Secretary Powell, Vice President Cheney, and President Bush. Caption/credit reads: "President George W. Bush meets on September 19, 2002, with his national security team including Vice President Dick Cheney and Secretary of State Colin Powell in the Oval Office at the White House. AFP Photo/Luke Frazza."] 

STRATEGIC GOAL SUMMARY OF RESULTS ACHIEVED
Four Annual Goals and Eighteen Targets Represented
Four Annual Goals Represented
Number of Targets
Significantly Below Target
Slightly Below Target
On Target
Above Target
Significantly Above Target
No 2002 Data Available
TOTAL
18
2
6
8
2
0
0
Percent of Total
100%
11%
33%
44%
11%
0%
0%

Annual Performance Goal 1
US ties with neighbors and key allies are close, strong, utilized and effective

Working together with friends, neighbors, and key allies fosters regional stability. Similar to a preference for coalition warfare when required to engage in combat operations, the United States prefers that others join in the conduct of diplomacy and operations other than war. The United States is able to use these strong ties to its best advantage when the relationships are strong.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACTS

Consistent with US advice and recommendations, US allies made commitments at the NATO summit in Prague in 2002 to increase their defense capabilities. With US assistance, they will need to follow-up so that NATO can be in a position to address new threats and close the U.S.-European capability gap. Focusing efforts on "niche" capabilities should help close the gap. The Response Force agreed to at Prague will allow NATO to respond quickly and directly to threats wherever they arise.

The NATO Russia Council (NRC) gave Russia a voice in NATO, easing Russian concerns over NATO's enlargement. The NRC increased NATO-Russian cooperation in the key areas of civil emergency planning, counterterrorism, and peacekeeping, establishing a foundation for closer NATO-Russian relations in the future.

In July 2002, Japan adopted the Basic Plan for relocating the Futenma Marine Corps Air Station, enabling the project to go forward in a manner agreed upon by the US and Japanese governments. Progress on relocating the facility is an important element of the Special Action Committee on Okinawa (SACO) Final Report on reducing the impact of US forces stationed
on Okinawa.

KEY RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

EUROPEAN SECURITY RELATIONSHIPS
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating

Strong reinforced transatlantic framework with an emerging European capacity to act where the Alliance as a whole is not engaged.

Transatlantic framework includes European ability to act where the Alliance as a whole is not engaged.

Seven new members invited at Prague.

On Target
New members make the Alliance more "Atlanticist."

Improved capabilities bolstering both DCI (Defense Capabilities Initiative) and ESDI (European Security and Defense Identity). Open Door decisions made.




Improved capabilities bolstering both DCI and ESDI.

 





Europeans made pledges at Prague to improve their capabilities. New capabilities to focus on filling key
shortfalls, encouraging pooling and specialization, introducing the NATO Response Force (NRF) and reforming NATO's Command Structure.
On Target
European military capabilities continue to improve. Focus on "niche" capabilities helps close the U.S.-European gap.



NATO-Russian relationship
continues to develop. Strong NATO coordination achieved on WMD and regional security interests outside Europe that affect Alliance interests.
NATO-Russian relationship outlined. NATO-Russia Council (NRC) and 2002 work plan established in May 2002.
On Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.
BILATERAL SECURITY COOPERATION WITH JAPAN
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
Progress on construction and operational plans for Futenma replacement site. Special Measures Agreement (SMA) further implemented. Launch a comprehensive security
dialogue with Japan.
US and Japan agree on type of replacement facility to build, including sea, land or a combination of options. Japanese authorities adopted a Basic Plan for the relocation of Marine Corps Air Station Futenma in July 2002. On Target

1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 2
Foster stable and secure regional partners

Nations that are politically and economically stable and militarily secure are less likely to resort to military conflict to resolve differences with neighboring states and non-state actors, particularly if others in their immediate environs have a similar sense of stability and security. US efforts to foster democracy, economic development, and a sense of military sufficiency contribute to regional stability and diminish the likelihood that conflict will erupt.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

The United States, with assistance from France, the UK, and others, is training, equipping, and funding a new Afghan national army. Three battalions were trained in FY 2002 and more are in training as part of an ongoing, long-term program that will eventually result in a robust army of multiple combined-arms, division-sized units. The first of these graduated battalions has begun taking part in Operation Enduring Freedom, thus demonstrating the Afghan government's growing capacity to assume responsibility in its own country.

China stated its support for a nuclear weapons-free Korean Peninsula, which increased worldwide support for ending North Korea's Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) program. The Department will continue to seek Chinese support for dismantling the HEU program. Coordination on North Korea has helped strengthen Sino-U.S. ties. China continued to play a constructive role in South Asia in 2003. However, tension between China and Taiwan remains.

Russia's fulfillment of the Flank Commitment of the adapted Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty was a significant achievement. However, Russia's failure to fulfill its commitments regarding Georgia and Moldova has delayed its ratification of the adapted CFE Treaty. While the current CFE Treaty is adequate for ensuring security and confidence through data exchanges and inspections, the long delay getting the adapted Treaty in place undermines confidence and stability. Russia's
failure to fulfill all its commitments also raises questions about its intentions in this region.

KEY RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

CHINESE COOPERATION ON REGIONAL SECURITY IN CROSS STRAITS
RELATIONS AND IN ENGAGING NORTH KOREA
Initial Target
Revised Target 2
Result
Rating
Continue to strive for regional security cooperation while effectively managing our differences; encourage resumption of constructive Cross-Strait
dialogue; and take steps to build
confidence and reduce tensions.

Cooperation increases while
effectively managing our differences.



Encourage resumption of Cross-
Strait dialogue.

China used diplomatic channels to urge Pakistan and India to avoid conflict and reduce tensions. China encouraged North Korea to
reform, and not to pursue a nuclear weapons capability.


Limited discussions on other regional issues, including the South
China Sea.

On Target
Chinese diplomacy helped defuse tension in South Asia and has supported a nuclear weapons-free
Korean Peninsula.



Slightly Below Target

The lack of progress on Cross-Strait dialogue prevented achievement
of the established target.

IMPLEMENTATION OF ADAPTED CONVENTIONAL
FORCES IN EUROPE (CFE) TREATY
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
Orderly CFE accession efforts underway; full implementation of
adapted treaty.
Russia in Compliance with flank limits and Final Act commitments,
allowing ratification and entry into force (EIF).
Russia has fulfilled its Istanbul
commitment on the flank issue,
reduced its flank equipment to
adapted Treaty levels, and discharged its Istanbul commitments relating to
CFE equipment in Georgia and
Moldova. However, Russia must reach agreement with Georgia on remaining issues regarding the Gudauta base and its future use and the duration of Russian presence at Batumi and Alkhalkalai. Russia also needs to continue the destruction/removal of munitions and small arms in Moldova.
Slightly Below Target
Although Russia's fulfillment of the Flank Commitment was a significant achievement, it required continued US and allied pressure at every opportunity. This was necessary in order to stress the importance NATO attaches to Russian fulfillment of all its commitments before NATO can consider ratification of the adapted CFE Treaty. Therefore, the established target was not met.
2 Target language modified slightly but is substantially consistent; reported "Result" corresponds to Revised Target as shown.

1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 3
Develop and utilize effective conflict prevention/conflict resolution tools

To avoid direct involvement in every regional dispute around the world, it benefits the United States to train and equip others to participate in peacekeeping operations. Assisting states to develop credible military tools and diplomatic skills provides them with a sense of security as well as the capability to participate in peacekeeping operations. Using these tools to prevent, resolve, or contain conflict reduces the likelihood of regional instability.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

Withdrawal of the majority of foreign forces from the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and cessation of hostilities along the disengagement line have been critical to the overall peace process and have laid the groundwork for Disarming, Demobilizing, Repatriating, Reintegrating and Resettling (DDRRR) combatants in the DRC.

Continued instability in many areas of the DRC however, has stymied full DDRRR efforts and prolonged the humanitarian crisis in the eastern DRC. Participation by U.S.-trained and equipped West African troops deployed in the UN force and by the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) has helped bring peace to Sierra Leone.

Having worked intensively for over two years through the Kimberley Process to combat the conflict diamonds trade, the United States is committed to ending the use of rough diamonds by rebel groups to fund insurrections against civilian populations. In the Interlaken Declaration of November 2002, the United States joined forty-seven other governments in pledging to eliminate conflict diamonds from international trade beginning January 1, 2003 through the implementation of a global rough diamond certification system. The US diamond industry will voluntarily issue Kimberley certificates to accompany rough diamond export shipments.

Pakistan has promised to cease support for infiltration into Kashmir, which is key to preventing war between India and Pakistan. However, continuing infiltration and high levels of election-related violence in September 2002 prevented implementation of confidence building measures (CBMs), requiring sustained US and international pressure on Pakistan to help control violence. The potential for nuclear or ballistic weapons exchanges remains unacceptably high, making continued high-level diplomatic engagement necessary.

Russian objections to the continuation of the OSCE Chechnya mandate make it unclear whether the OSCE Assistance Group (AG) in Chechnya will be extended beyond January 1, 2003. During its previous mandate, the AG maintained the sole permanent international presence in Chechnya, providing key international perspective to local officials, activists, and persons in need.
The AG facilitated both general and targeted humanitarian assistance to persons in need and provided training and equipment for local officials, educators and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). They interceded repeatedly with leading local officials regarding concerns over human rights, official mistreatment, and housing and security for returning internally displaced persons (IDPs), thus encouraging greater attention to these details. The overall impact of these activities was significant, particularly in reporting on the situation on the ground, coordinating humanitarian assistance to the region, and working closely with local officials to raise their awareness about human rights concerns.

In FY 2002, a record 122 states participated in the UN Register of Conventional Arms Transfers, meeting the participation target. China, however, still did not participate. The greater level of participation in the Register provided more transparency in the field of armaments and allowed the Register to function more effectively as an early-warning mechanism on excessive
and destabilizing accumulations of conventional arms. It is estimated that the Register captures more than 95 percent of the global transfers in the seven equipment categories covered by the Register. Efforts will continue to expand participation in the Register.

China continued to refuse to resume participation in the Register as a protest against US exports to Taiwan. As a result, one of the seven principal arms exporters is still not reporting data to the Register. The United States and other countries will continue to press China to be transparent in its conventional arms transfers and not hide behind the political issue of Taiwan.

KEY RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

CONFLICT RESOLUTION, PEACEKEEPING, AND REGIONAL
STABILITY EFFORTS IN AFRICA
Initial Target
Revised Target 3
Result
Rating
Continued participation by all of these regional and sub-regional organizations in conflict resolution, peacekeeping, and regional stability efforts in these crises and others that may arise. The Organization of African Unity
(OAU), ECOWAS, and the Southern African Development Community (SADC) continue participation in conflict resolution, peacekeeping and regional stability efforts in crises that arise.
South Africa, a member of the African Union (AU) provided leadership and
facilitation for the Democratic
Republic of the Congo (DRC) peace process and the AU provided personnel to the Joint Military
Commission responsible for working with the UN Observation Mission in
the DRC.

The war in Sierra Leone is effectively over.

Program activities such as the West Africa Stabilization Program and the African Contingency Operations Training and Assistance Program (formerly the African Crisis Response Initiative) have ensured that ECOWAS, as well as armies of individual African countries, are
better equipped to meet the demands of Peacekeeping operations.
Above Target
Numerous organizations remained committed and continue to participate in conflict resolution, peacekeeping, and regional stability operations in Africa.
REDUCTION OF TENSION IN SOUTH ASIA
Target
Result
Rating

Indian/Pakistani implementation of
CBMs and restraint regime.

 

 

 

 

Pakistan provided assurances in June that support for infiltration across the Line of Control (LOC) would cease permanently. Infiltration decreased, although
indications remain that it continues. India began to
demobilize forces following Kashmiri elections. Pakistan followed suit. Nuclear test moratoria continued; however, ballistic missile and nuclear programs
continued unrestrained.

Slightly Below Target
Although war between India and Pakistan was avoided during FY 2002, no progress was made with regard to implementing confidence building measures (CBMs). Indian initial demobilization steps, followed by similar
Pakistani moves, and coupled with Pakistani measures to halt infiltration, will enable consideration of CBMs in the future.

South Asia Task Force (SATF) actively
engaged in promoting conflictavoidance/
confidence-building
measures for the region.
Meetings on SATF cease in Spring 2002 based on a
judgment that SATF did not advance shared goals.
Significantly Below Target
Given Indian and Pakistani hostility to SATF, bilateral
approaches by the US and other concerned countries
have been more productive.
     
3 Target did not change. OAU, ECOWAS and SADC are the specific sub-regional organizations mentioned in the initial target.

IMPLEMENTATION OF OSCE SUMMIT INITIATIVES
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
Free and fair provincial elections in the Balkans. Nascent democratic
institutions in Bosnia and Kosovo develop confidence and strengthened legitimacy, tackle
increasingly difficult problems. Baltic Missions well on the way to
transformation/closure.

Kosovo elections in 2001 lead to
functioning democratic institutions.



Elections led to coalition government; functioning, multiethnic assembly.



On Target

 

 

  "Assistance Group" (AG) in
Chechnya has broader role in
political dialogue with Russia.
AG developed closer, stronger working relationships with local and federal officials and NGOs, and provided indispensable reporting on
local developments to OSCE and USG.
On Target

OAS ARMS ACQUISITION TRANSPARENCY CONVENTION
Target
Result
Rating
Four more states parties ratify the
convention, bringing it into effect. Ratifying
states parties begin compliance with
reporting requirements.
In addition to the three states that ratified the convention during FY 2001, three new states (El Salvador, Paraguay, and Peru) ratified the Convention during 2002, bringing it into effect. Many ratifying states voluntarily complied with reporting requirements prior to the Convention entering into force.
Above Target
MULTILATERAL ARMS TRANSFER CODE OF CONDUCT
Target
Result
Rating
Finalize text and achieve compliance. Several influential countries have overcome their reluctance regarding an international arms transfer code of conduct. They are preparing their own versions of a code and developing strategies for widespread adoption.
Slightly Below Target
The existence of many proposed and actual codes of conduct has made it difficult to advocate for another. More time will be required to work on
text and strategy before the target can be met.
ARMS TRANSPARENCY IN UN REVIEW AND WASSENAAR ARRANGEMENT CONTROL LISTS
Target
Result
Rating
Add further categories to Wassenaar
Arrangement Mandatory reporting.
UN Register participation increases to more than 100 states; China resumes participation.

No new categories were added, but progress was made in this multi-year effort.

 


Slightly Below Target
Resistance from several countries was overcome; future progress is expected
  In FY 2002, 122 states participated in the UN Register of Conventional Arms Transfers. China still did not participate.
Slightly Below Target
Although more than the targeted number of countries participated, creating greater
transparency in the field of armaments, China's non-participation means that one of the world's seven principal arms exporters still does not report.
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 4
Contain and resolve outstanding regional conflicts

Conflicts, whether between states or within a single state, are destabilizing. The United States advocates diplomacy as the first course of action. It views the application of military capabilities as a last resort for containing and resolving disputes so that peace, economic development, and democracy can flourish. The United States is prepared to take such steps unilaterally or in concert with other nations and international organizations.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

The 1995 Dayton Peace Accords mandated arms control agreements in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) and the surrounding region to establish confidence building and reductions in force among the former warring parties. The agreement by the Article IV parties (the BiH entities, Croatia, and the Former Republic of Yugoslavia) to reduce heavy weapons in exempted categories in excess of the allowed ceilings has been difficult to reach despite its importance. While technically legal, such
excesses are not in keeping with the intent of the agreement and amount to circumvention of the agreement. The United States and the Organization for Security and Cooperation Europe (OSCE) will continue to press the parties to follow through on this decision in FY 2003.

A key requirement for establishing permanent stability in BiH and the region and allowing for the withdrawal of international military forces is a functioning Bosnian state. This requires strengthening of state-level institutions, which the Article IV agreement has tried to support. During FY 2002, OSCE focused attention on allowing the BiH to conduct inspections equally with the other parties. The fact that the Republika Srpska (RS) opposes this indicates there is much work yet to be done to
ensure a functioning state. The United States and the OSCE will continue to press the RS on this issue.

War between Pakistan and India was avoided during FY 2002. After the autumn 2002 Kashmiri elections, India initiated troop redeployment and negotiations with the new state government on a reduced security presence, all of which would foster a positive environment for the region.

[Text version of a photo: Seated left to right are President Musharraf and Deputy Secretary Armitage. Caption/credit reads: "Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage meets Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf in Islamabad on August 24, 2002, on a visit to ease tension between India and Pakistan over the Kashmir dispute. AFP Photo/B.K. Bangash/Pool."]

KEY RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

DAYTON ACCORDS ARMS CONTROL
Target
Result
Rating
Improved implementation of Articles II and IV; Article V agreement implemented successfully.
Article II implementation continued to improve; data exchanges were better, and a new project to develop procedures allowing the two Bosnian entities' armed forces to assist one another in cases of man-made or
natural disasters begun. At the Third Review Conference in June 2002, the Article IV Parties , endorsed measures to decrease the amount of heavy armaments held in exempted categories in excess of allowed ceilings. The Bosnian-entity Republika Srpska (RS) continued to oppose state-level Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) inspections, which must occur in order to build state-level BiH institutions. The first Article V review conference took place in June 2002 and agreed to rules and procedures for succeeding review conferences. Croatia and Slovenia announced additional voluntary inspection quotas.
On Target
The progress achieved with respect to implementation of Dayton Arms Control is consistent with expectations.
THE SITUATION ALONG AND NEAR THE KASHMIR LINE OF CONTROl
Target
Result
Rating
Indo-Pakistani dialogue is
maintained and strengthened.
Major terrorist attacks brought India and Pakistan
close to war, but US and UK diplomatic intervention helped ease tensions; Pakistan took actions against Kashmiri jihadist militants. India successfully held elections in Kashmir.
Significantly Below Target
Although war between India and Pakistan was avoided,
hostilities precluded bilateral dialogue on all issues,
including Kashmir, as well as dialogue between India
and insurgent groups.

PROGRAM EVALUATIONS AND MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES

Three Program Evaluations were conducted in FY 2002 that pertained to this Strategic Goal:

1. Security Assistance Programs for New NATO and NATO-Aspirant Countries, (OMB PART)
2. Security Assistance Programs for Sub Saharan Africa, (OMB PART)
3. Peacekeeping Operations (including OSCE and East Timor Programs), (OMB PART)

Detailed information on major findings, recommendations, and actions to be taken can be found in the FY 2002 Key Program
Evaluations by Strategic Goal section of the Appendix.

National Interest: National Security


Strategic Goal 2: Weapons of Mass Destruction
Reduce the threat of weapons of mass destruction.

STRATEGIC GOAL OVERVIEW/PUBLIC BENEFIT

The chief threat to the security of the United States is no longer a rival superpower. As demonstrated by the Aum Shinrikyo attacks in Tokyo in 1995 and events of 9/11, rogue states and terrorist groups are an immediate threat to America, especially if they seek to use nuclear, biological, or chemical weapons. Preventing the proliferation of these deadly weapons and their delivery systems, and reducing the number of those already in existence, are therefore top Department priorities.
The Department is also working to strengthen agreements aimed at reducng or eliminating weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and seeking new approaches or technologies to reduce the threat of WMD and missiles. Finally, the Department is doing all this in ways that maximize verification and compliance with treaties, commitments, and agreements.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL SUMMARY OF RESULTS ACHIEVED Five Annual Goals and Thirty-Six Targets Represented
Four Annual Goals Represented
Number of Targets
Significantly Below Target
Slightly Below Target
On Target
Above Target
Significantly Above Target
No 2002 Data Available
TOTAL
36
2
5
21
7
1
0
Percent of Total
100%
6%
14%
58%
19%
3%
0%

Annual Performance Goal 1
Weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery are contained; proliferation to other countries and terrorists is prevented, contained, or reversed

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

In May 2002, the Department negotiated a new Goods Review List (GRL) as part of the new Iraq export-control regime, and is working to ensure that Iraq is fully disarmed pursuant to UN Security Council Resolution 687. The Department led active diplomatic efforts with permanent members of the UN Security Council to sustain a Security Council consensus that UN Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC) and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors
will have the unambiguous right to inspect anywhere, anytime in order to verify Iraq's disarmament.

As a supplier to Iran, Russia remains a principal concern. Moscow is deeply aware of U.S. concerns as the Department continues to raise these issues at senior levels. Despite public announcement in the summer of 2002 about the possibility of additional Russian reactor sales to Iran, momentum toward such a deal has stopped.

China appears to be following through on its 1997 commitments to limit the sale of nuclear equipment, but some interactions between Chinese and Iranian entities are of concern to the Administration. The Department continues to address those concerns with Chinese authorities. As part of a commitment made in November 2000, China promulgated missilerelated export controls in August 2002 and CBW controls in October 2002. U.S. and Chinese technical experts met to discuss China's new export controls.

In response to European Union (EU) requirements for accession, several central European countries have passed exportcontrol laws or amended current laws to strengthen export control mechanisms. U.S. training programs have worked so well that these countries will operate their own self-sustaining programs by FY 2004. Other countries, especially those of the former Soviet Union, are well on their way to adopting legislation and implementing regulations. Friends and allies concur with the United States on the threat of Iran's WMD. The EU concedes that nonproliferation must be addressed in its political dialogue with Iran. Italy, Germany, and Australia have also raised nonproliferation in dialogues with Iran.

To date, the Department has been unsuccessful in getting India and Pakistan to restrain their nuclear and missile programs and in encouraging Indo-Pakistani dialogue on CBMs and other subjects, despite extensive efforts by senior Department officials. As a result of a U.S.-initiated nonproliferation dialogue, Pakistan is considering a U.S. offer to assist in achieving expert control goals. India has accepted a U.S. offer to collaborate on ways to strengthen its export controls.

Confirmation of the existence of a clandestine uranium enrichment program in North Korea sharply increased international concerns about that country's nuclear intentions. CY 2002 ended with a series of escalating steps by North Korea pointing toward breach of not only the US-North Korea Agreed Framework, but also of its safeguards agreement with the IAEA. The freeze under the Agreed Framework and Missile Flight Test Moratorium continued until conclusion of the FY 2002, and North Korea informed Japan that it will maintain its long-range missile flight test moratorium beyond 2003. However, North Korea's ballistic-missile exports contribute to arms races and instability in the Middle East.

In addition, negotiations with Russia were completed on implementing the agreement to cease plutonium production under the Plutonium Production Reactor Agreement (PPRA) through the shutdown of reactors rather than by core conversion. Negotiations continued on fissile material storage facility (FMSF) transparency arrangements. Bilateral meetings with Russia during FY 2002 led to decisions that specified the Russian program by January 2003. Discussions with G-8 allies and Sweden concerning plutonium disposition began in December 2002. There have been pledges of $700 million so far and additional pledges are likely by the 2003 G-8 Summit at Evian. The target date for the multilateral agreement is during the fall of 2003.

As shown in the adjacent chart [text version only], progress has been made in the effort to redirect weapons scientists in the Newly Independent States (NIS) to civilian activities (in Thousands):
FY 2000 -- 30 (Result)
FY 2001 -- 40 (Result)
FY 2002 -- 70 (Target)
FY 2002 -- 50 (Result)

KEY RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET 

IMPEDIMENTS TO ACCESS BY STATES OF CONCERN TO WMD,
MISSILE EQUIPMENT AND TECHNOLOGY
Initial Target
Revised Target 2
Result
Rating
Russia stops sensitive nuclear assistance and reduces missile cooperation with Iran; makes no new nuclear contracts with India.
Russia stops nuclear cooperation
with Iran.

Russia still exporting technology;
increased attention to problem
of Iran.
Slightly Below Target
As a supplier to Iran, Russia remains our principal concern, but
international consensus not to provide nuclear assistance to Iran has remained in place. Russia deeply aware of U.S. concerns; the
Department continues to raise these issues at senior levels.
Further progress on China's full adherence to its 1997 nuclear nonproliferation commitments. China fully abides by its missile
technology export policy and has made significant improvements to
its export control system.
Progress on China's adherence to
1997 commitments; China abides by
its export control policy and makes
improvements.

Questions remain about China's
implementation of its 1997 nuclear
commitments. China has not fully
implemented its November 2000
missile commitments.
On Target
China appears to be following
through on its 1997 nuclear
commitments, but some interactions
between Chinese and Iranian
nuclear entities are of concern to
the Administration. China
promulgated missile-related export
controls, as well as CBW controls.
North Korea does not export nuclear material or technology, and agrees to constrain missile exports.
North Korea does not export nuclear
material or technology and agrees
to constrain missile exports.

No North Korean export of nuclear
material or technology.
North Korean exports of ballistic
missile-related equipment
continued.
Slightly Below Target
North Korea has not contributed to
nuclear programs in other countries,
but ballistic missile exports
destabilize already volatile regions
of the Middle East, North Africa, and
South Asia.
Significant progress by additional
countries, particularly in the NIS, toward internationally recognized
export control standards; significant progress by additional countries in
meeting standards for having effective enforcement; additional
blocked transfers or interdictions.

NIS and other countries move
towards enforcement of export
control standards.
Central European countries
developing strengthened export
controls; some NIS countries moving
towards controls.
Above Target
In response to EU requirements for
accession, several Central European countries have passed export control laws or amended current laws to
strengthen export control and
enforcement.
2 Target language modified slightly but is substantially consistent; reported "Result" corresponds to Revised Target as shown.
STATES CONFORM TO INTERNATIONAL NON - PROLIFERATION
NORMS OF BEHAVIOR
Initial Target
Revised Target
Result
Rating
South Asia: Restraint on missile programs; continued nuclear
testing moratoria. Progress on
implementation by India and Pakistan
of effective export controls on sensitive technologies approximating
international standards.
Restraint on nuclear and missile programs in South Asia; continued nuclear testing moratoria.
No constraints on Indian and Pakistani missile programs. A nuclear testing moratorium continued, but nuclear weapons programs continue.
Slightly Below Target
South Asia: Unsuccessful to date in
getting India and Pakistan to restrain
their nuclear and missile programs,
despite substantial efforts by senior
officials. Pakistan considering U.S.
offer for assistance on export
controls. India accepted U.S. offer
for assistance on export controls to
be scheduled for spring 2003.
Middle East: Reformed Oil for Food
(OFF) program and targeted controls
do not enjoy full international
support; leakage occurs. Tehran
continues WMD development using
own technologies and help received.

Controls on Iraq receive international
support. Iraq and Iran denied WMD and missile-related technologies. Stronger export controls throughout
region.
Wide international support for pressure on Iraq to comply with
international obligations.

Iraq denied some technologies
necessary for WMD and missiles. While some shipments blocked and
procurement impeded proliferative
programs continue to acquire some
needed items.

Unanimous UN Security Council
approval of Resolution 1441.

Above Target
In May 2002, the UNSC unanimously
adopted resolution 1409,
implementing the new UN export
control system based on the Goods
Review List for Iraq. Growing
international support for the
unconditional return of UN inspectors
to Iraq; culminated in unanimous
passage of UNSCR 1441:
UNMOVIC/IAEA pursuing inspections to uncover WMD and missile
programs.


Notable increase in consultations
with friends and allies on the threat
of Iran's WMD and missiles.
Numerous shipments destined for
proliferation successfully blocked;
sanctions imposed on various
proliferative entities.

Successful interdiction of thirdcountry
suppliers of WMD and
missile-related technologies and
equipment to Iraq.

North Korea
Missile Policy
Progress on verifiable constraints on
North Korea's missile program.

Agreed Framework
Negotiations on improved
implementation of Agreed
Framework.
North Korean freeze under the Agreed
Framework and missile flight
moratorium continued.

North Korea admitted to secret
uranium enrichment program for
nuclear weapons.
Significantly Below Target
PROGRESS TOWARD IMPLEMENTING FISSILE MATERIAL PROJECTS
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating

Cooperation toward implementing
fissile material projects.

 

 

 

 


Russian plutonium stockpile capped.













Progress made on implementation and transparency issues.













On Target
Negotiations completed on
replacement implementing
agreement to cease plutonium production under the Plutonium Production Reactor Agreement (PPRA) through shutdown of
reactors rather than core conversion. Procedures completed for first-phase PPRA plutonium monitoring and first visit conducted. Negotiations continued on fissile material storage facility (FMSF) ransparency arrangements.
Cooperation underway under U.S.- Russian Plutonium Disposition
Agreement. Multilateral agreement and financing structures for assistance to Russian program
completed by end of FY 2002.
U.S.-Russian Plutonium Disposition
underway.
Preparations for negotiations of
plutonium-disposition multilateral
framework are on track.
On Target
Meetings held bilaterally with Russia during FY 2002 are leading to decisions on specifics of the Russian program by January 2003. G-8 allies and Sweden began negotiations in December 2002 on plutonium disposition multilateral framework and financing.
RUSSIAN AND NEWLY INDEPENDENT STATES (NIS) WEAPONS SCIENTISTS REDIRECTED IN CIVILIAN ACTIVITIES; PROGRESS IN DEVELOPING CIVILIAN ALTERNATIVE EMPLOYMENT
Target
Result
Rating
Up to an estimated 70,000 Soviet WMD
scientists engaged in civilian R&D; institute industry partnerships expanded; more
technologies taken to commercial and
government markets.

Engaged cumulative total of 50,000 scientists, of whom, about 26,000 were former WMD scientists.

Eight new U.S. industry partners recruited.

Three new technological applications brought to market, including Neurok TechSoft (linear
differential equation solver), a laser-based
flourocarbon detector and the Animatek
(computer animation) technology.
Above Target
Industry funding for joint projects has increased to approximately 8% of total science center projects.

New engagement of former CW R&D institute in Russia; increased number of projects with newly engaged Uzbek biological institutes; continued antiviral and TB vaccine research in Russian biological institutes.

Increased number of project audits from 40 to 50; new computer-based financial accounting/project monitoring systems developed.
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 2
Reduction of weapons of mass destruction stockpiles, materials, infrastructure;
essential foreign support or toleration for U.S. weapons development

Given the real and increasing threat posed by rogue states and terrorists seeking WMD capabilities and the means for their delivery, the United States is developing and will deploy missile defenses for the protection of U.S. and NATO deployed military forces, territory, and population centers. Reducing the number of U.S. and Russian strategic weapons continues to be a key vehicle for reducing the threat of WMD. The United States has decided to decrease its number of nuclear warheads and
desires that Russia do the same in a transparent and verifiable manner. The Department is also working to establish a strategic dialogue with China that supports U.S. approaches to reducing the threat of WMD.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

All parties completed the final START I Treaty reductions by the December 2001 deadline. Completion of the START reductions demonstrates the success of this unprecedented, five-country effort to reduce strategic offensive arms significantly, from over 10,000 warheads to fewer than 6,000. The treaty will serve as the foundation for future, deeper strategic arms reductions.

Further offensive reductions were codified in the Moscow Treaty of May 2002, which built on the success of the START Treaty by requiring deeper reductions in strategic offensive arms by the United States and Russia. Each country agreed to no more than 1,700-2,200 strategic offensive arms, demonstrating their commitments to reducing strategic offensive arms to the lowest possible level.

[Text version of a photo: Left to right (standing) unidentified aide, (seated) President Putin and President Bush. Caption/credit reads: "President George W. Bush looks on as Russian President Vladimir Putin signs the "Treaty of Moscow", a 10-year treaty binding the nations to reduce their nuclear stockpiles by about two-thirds - to a range of 1,700 to 2,200. The ceremony took place on May 24, 2002, in St. Catherine's Room, the Kremlin in Moscow. AFP photo/Tim Sloan."]

The United States and Russia have also started addressing the threat of rogue states developing WMD and their means of delivery. Due in large part to the Department's diplomatic and public diplomacy efforts, U.S. withdrawal from the ABM Treaty did not incur negative repercussions. Russia acquiesced, and its moderate reaction, in turn, muted the reactions of U.S. allies and China. The United States is now free to develop and deploy missile defenses. The Department will continue to work with U.S. allies, Russia, and others to address common threat perceptions and appropriate responses, as well as to establish joint cooperative missile defense development programs.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

STRATEGIC ARMS REDUCTIONS
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
START I final reductions completed early, resulting in 1600/6000 Russian strategic offensive arms.


START I final reductions completed early. All parties completed the final START I reductions by required deadline of 12/05/01. On Target
A process is agreed for further
reductions in U.S. and Russian strategic nuclear arms.


Process agreed for further reductions. Ratification of START II Treaty never completed; superseded by the Administration's New Strategic Framework with Russia, including strategic offensive reductions and missile defense. Further offensive
reductions, codified in the Moscow Treaty (MT) of May 2002, will achieve deeper nuclear warhead reductions than START II would have and provide greater flexibility in making reductions.
Significantly Above Target
MISSILE DEFENSE
Target
Result
Rating
Undertake appropriate actions to implement USG decisions on missile
defense.
Established the foundation for a "New Strategic Framework" for the U.S. security relationship with Russia that includes a new approach to deterrence that relies on both offensive and defensive means. The U.S. exercised its right to withdraw from the ABM Treaty, thus removing the principal legal obstacle to pursuing alternative approaches to developing an effective missile defense system. The Department also actively engaged U.S. allies and friends in consultations on cooperative missile defense development programs, and instituted a regular dialogue with Russia designed to increase transparency and openness in missile
defense endeavors.
Above Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 3
Foreign governments work with the United States to strengthen existing agreements and negotiate new multilateral nonproliferation and arms control commitments to reduce the weapons of mass destruction threat

The Department pursues its WMD objectives by strengthening and promoting adherence to a wide variety of treaties, regimes, and agreements to which the United States is a party. The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), a key treaty, and the IAEA, its implementing organization, establish norms of behavior concerning nuclear weapons, materials and capabilities. Other agreements, such as the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), aim to eliminate an entire class of weapons of mass
destruction. Strengthening these multilateral agreements is a key factor in the struggle to reduce the WMD threat to the United States and its allies.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. Cuba announced in September 2002 that it would accede to the NPT. It confirmed this decision during its plenary statement to the IAEA General Conference.

The International Atomic Energy Agency. Consultations began with a U.S. initiative in support of a phased increase of the IAEA safeguards budget for the 2004/05 biennium. Integrated safeguards adopted by the IAEA Board adequately reflected U.S. views, and should lead to effective implementation of the Additional Protocols.

Chemical Weapons Convention. Announcement by Libya and Thailand of their intent to join the CWC is very welcome. Monitoring the civilian chemical industry is a key element of the CWC. As shown in the adjacent below, through FY 2002, 148 nations have joined the CWC.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW), the implementing body of the CWC, has been in serious financial and administrative crisis. The United States succeeded in bringing about a change of leadership of the OPCW's Technical Secretariat that will help improve CWC operations, especially in conducting inspections of civilian chemical industries around the world. As the United States has the largest civilian chemical industry in the world, it will require extra ordinary effort to ensure that the United States fully implements these obligations. Russia has the largest declared CW stockpile and needs financial assistance to build destruction facilities in order to meet its CWC obligations. Resolving congressional conditions for U.S. financial assistance is a difficult and lengthy process; significantly, three such conditions have been resolved. Due to successful international fundraising, the Gorniy facility will be the first fixed operational CW destruction facility in Russia. Destruction operations were scheduled to begin in December 2002.

International Monitoring System (IMS). Detecting and identifying nuclear explosions is key to U.S. ability to monitor compliance with nuclear testing moratoria agreements, and illicit programs to develop nuclear capabilities. The IMS will supplement existing U.S. capabilities to monitor nuclear explosions. When its 321 stations are completed, they will provide global coverage for seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound, and radionucleide monitoring. With these FY 2002 results, over 40 percent of the system has been installed.

Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT). China continued to block the resumption of FMCT negotiations in the Conference on Disarmament (CD) by linking them to negotiations on outer space arms control, which the United States opposes, and has refused all attempts at reasonable compromise. The continuing deadlock is undermining the credibility of the CD as the principal forum of the international community to negotiate formal multilateral arms control agreements and issues. The fact that the UN General Assembly passed a consensus resolution calling for FMCT negotiations in the CD demonstrates continued international desire for these negotiations.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

NON-PROLIFERATION TREATY (NPT)
Initial Target
Revised Target 4
Result
Rating

2005 NPT review process begins with strong international consensus
to preserve and strengthen the NPT; no withdrawals threatened.

NPT review process leading to 2005 Conference begins smoothly. Five to ten more states take action on IAEA safeguards protocol. IAEA
strengthens anti-nuclear terrorism programs.

The first preparatory conference (PREPCON) for the 2005 NPT Review
Conference (REVCON) concluded smoothly.

Above Target
2000 NPT REVCON outcome
received general support from all PrepCom participants.


Cuba announced on September 14 that it would accede to the NPT and
confirmed this decision during its September 16 plenary statement to the IAEA General Conference.

IAEA implements specific measures to improve safeguards; more states
sign or ratify the safeguards
protocol; United States submits safeguards protocol to Senate for ratification.
 

IAEA Safeguards
IAEA took action on integrated safeguards and emphasized financial
needs; 9 more states joined, bringing the total to 67; 28 have brought their protocols into force.

Above Target
Consultations have begun with major donor nations on U.S. initiative to support a phased increase of the
IAEA safeguards budget for the 2004/05 biennium.
IAEA strengthens anti-nuclear terrorism programs.   IAEA Anti-Terrorism
IAEA Board approved multi-year program with a substantial increase in funding to $11 million annually.
On Target
IAEA providing enhanced assistance to states on preventing, detecting,
and responding to nuclear terrorism.

Assistance includes developing guidance and providing training and
advisory services.

Program gaining widespread
financial, in-kind, and political
support.
4 Target modification incorporates clarifications and more specifics. Some additional substance was added. "Result" reflects both targets.

CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION (CWC )
Initial Target
Revised Target
Result
Rating

At least 5 additional states parties adopt CWC.

  Four additional states parties join; two others voiced intent to join. On Target

United States continues to implement industry and other obligations.

U.S. fully implements industry obligations. U.S. fully implemented CWC industry obligations.
On Target
Progress is made toward Russian stockpile destruction. Identifiable progress made toward Russian stockpile destruction.

Three of six congressional conditions for U.S. financial assistance resolved; limited progress on other three.
Significant international assistance provided.
On Target.
Unlike previous years, reportable
progress was made regarding the
Russian CW destruction program.
  U.S. makes timely payments to OPCW; OPCW gets out of financial
crisis.
In summer 2002, the U.S. succeeded in bringing about a change in the leadership of the OPCW's Technical
Secretariat and called for voluntary donations to get the OPCW out of immediate financial crisis. U.S. set
example by making $2-million
voluntary contribution.
Above Target.
Significant progress was made
toward putting the OPCW on a
sound financial footing; new
management installed.
INTERNATIONAL MONITORING SYSTEM (IMS) FOR COMPREHENSIVE
TEST BAN TREATY (CTBT) AND FISSILE MATERIALS CUTOF F TREATY (FMCT)
Initial Target
Result
Rating

Activation of the international
monitoring regime.

 







During FY 2002, the Provisional Technical Secretariat certified 20 additional IMS stations, bringing the total to 34. The number of completed installations (many of which will soon be ready for certification) is now about 140. Of the 50-station primary seismic network, the most important part of the IMS for detection of underground nuclear explosions, 28 have been completed and 13 have been certified.


On Target
The plans for activation of the IMS are proceeding
according to plan.




Ongoing FMCT negotiations.
IMS
FMCT
The Conference on Disarmament (CD) failed to agree to resume FMCT negotiations in FY2002. The 57th UN General Assembly passed a consensus resolution calling for the CD to resume FMCT negotiations.
Significantly Below Target
Progress blocked by China.
Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 4
Effective verification practices are in place; compliance with arms control and nonproliferation treaties, agreements, and commitments is verified

In an age when tyrants and terrorists seek to obtain weapons of mass destruction, there is an urgent need to ensure that arms control and nonproliferation agreements and commitments are tough, effective, and enforced. The Department must let the public know when states violate their commitment not to acquire or transfer the tools and materials necessary for making weapons of mass destruction and when they violate their arms control and nonproliferation commitments. As such, U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policies rest on strict compliance with agreements and commitments, such as the
Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT), the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC), the START Treaty, nuclear testing obligations, and the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR). These commitments are only as good as the extent to which they are upheld.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

Verification and transparency measures have been identified to monitor North Korea's missile regime. While similar measures have also been identified to verify the dismantling of its nuclear weapons capability, recent steps by North Korea to breach its nuclear nonproliferation commitments have put into question the progress made in recent years on improving verification.

The Department prepared the Presidential Report to the Congress on Adherence to and Compliance with Arms Control and Nonproliferation Agreements and Commitments. The report for calendar year 2001 was submitted to the NSC in the spring of 2002, and is now in the process of being revised to address congressional requirements.

Countering the threat of biological weapons (BW) has become a priority. Effective measures to respond to the BW threat have obtained international support and are being adopted in various fora. The USG explored ways to enhance support for initiatives at the BWC Review Conference in November 2002. U.S. compliance concerns have been reiterated and additional concerns raised publicly. The United States has pursued compliance concerns regarding the BWC and the CWC on a bilateral basis with several countries.

The Department worked closely with the Department of Defense (DoD) and the intelligence community to initiate a program office and to advocate funding the replacement of the COBRA JUDY radar, critical for START verification and missile proliferation. The Department provided $400,000 to support this effort and co-chaired the interagency Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technology Working Group (NPAC TWG), which acts as a central coordinator for verification technology and
identifies shortfalls in funding for critical arms control and nonproliferation R&D projects.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

EFFECTIVE VERIFICATION MEASURES FOR NEW TREATIES AND COMMITMENTS
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
Negotiating mandate for FMCT
agreed; support for key U.S.
verification provisions in potential
FMCT: effective measures to
investigate compliance concerns
related to the BWC and CWC:
enhanced verification measures
developed for U.S. Government
strategic offense and missile defense
policy.


Effective measures to investigate
compliance for all conventions
established.


Design and begin implementation
of independent nuclear testing
monitoring system.

Other nations' noncompliance with
proliferation commitments assessed.
On Target
COMPLIANCE WITH EXISTING TREATIES AND COMMITMENTS
Target
Result
Rating

Congressionally mandated reports submitted on time.

Reinvigorated the process for preparing and
vetting congressionally mandated arms control and nonproliferation reports.
Slightly Below Target

Demarches that seek resolution of CWC compliance issues delivered.

Process overhaul has resulted in some reports not being submitted on time; expect dramatic improvement in FY 2003. On Target
Strengthen BWC and respond to BW threat.
Consultations conducted and demarches
delivered to countries of concern.
On Target
START, INF, and Moscow Treaty verification developed. Development of effective measures continued. Implementation of START verification regime continued. On Target
Timely development of improvements to nuclear test detection capability. Interagency Verification and Monitoring Task Force (VMTF) develops U.S. verification policy related to nuclear testing. Designed and began implementation (beta version installed at State) of independent Nuclear Testing Verification Information System. On Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

AVAILABILITY OF NEEDED VERIFICATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY
Target
Result
Rating

Collection resources preserved; permanent funding line established for some assets.





V Fund used to preserve critical assets; TWG report issued April 2002; V Fund supports TWG-recommended projects.

While minimally funded, the V Fund, established by the Congress to preserve critical assets and to identify and develop new R&D verification projects, was used to support the COBRA JUDY radar and an additional key project.




Assessed impact on verifiability of agreements and
commitments to changes in asset coverage.
Slightly Below Target
TIMELY TREATY-MANDATED COMMUNICATIONS
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
Successful exchanges with
Kazakhstan and Ukraine; START partners consider completed U.S. proposal for Government-to- Government Communications Links (GGCL) architecture; CWC network
enables full U.S. Government support of treaty implementation.

(Note: Indicator has been revised. More specific indicators now measure tangible progress toward the performance goal in accordance with the priorities of the current
Administration.)

Sign agreement with Kazakhstan; successful exchanges with Kazakhstan and Ukraine; chemical weapons network enables full support of treaty implementation.
START partners (former Soviet nuclear states) consider completed U.S. proposal for replacement of the current GGCL system.

Link Agreement with Ukraine signed in September 2001.

Link Agreement with Kazakhstan signed in December 2001.
On Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 5
International nuclear cooperation is promoted under stringent nonproliferation and safety standards

The Department strives to promote the role of safe nuclear energy in sustainable development and ensure that the United States is seen as a reliable and valuable partner in international nuclear cooperation. By ensuring that the United States is viewed as a dependable and beneficial partner in this area, the Department intends to promote the adoption of high safety standards, prevent significant environmental damage (especially from operating unsafe Soviet-era reactors) and encourage
the U.S. civilian nuclear industry in its endeavors.

SUMMARY OF RESULTS AND IMPACT

Armenia is currently negotiating a date for closing a Soviet-era nuclear power plant. European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) loans for K2R4 reactors in Ukraine are on hold until Ukraine accepts EBRD conditions. Ukraine is moving forward in power sector restructuring with experts from the G-8, EU, Ukrainian government, EBRD, and the World Bank working to make the power sector attractive to potential lenders and investors.

During the ninth session of the UN Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD), the Department convinced participants that nuclear power contributes to sustainable development. In the wake of the events of 9/11, the Department also reviewed and approved the Japanese transport plan for shipping mixed-oxide fuel to the United Kingdom, and promoted the Department of Energy's enhanced physical protection cooperation program.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

REACTOR CLOSURES AND NUCLEAR WASTE IMPROVEMENTS
Initial Target
Revised Target 2
Result
Rating
Complete long-term closure of Chernobyl. Ignalina 1 closure. Bulgaria closes units 1& 2 of its Kozloduy Plant.

International community funds programs to deal with Russian
nuclear waste problems.

More plants closed.




International community funds programs to deal with Russian nuclear waste problems.
Mixed results in Lithuania; Armenia and Ukraine positive; Bulgaria questioned its commitment to closure.

Liability agreement reached with Russia allowing U.S. participation in waste cleanup. Implementing agreements negotiated.
On Target




On Target
Russia determined that it no longer wanted the 80-ton cask; focus will
be on the 40-ton cask instead.
EXTENSION OF BENEFITS OF NUCLEAR COOPERATION TO U.S. PARTNERS
AND IMPLEMENTATION OF EXISTING AGREEMENTS
Initial Target
Result
Rating

Peaceful nuclear cooperation with China proceeds smoothly.

U.S.-China Agreement for Cooperation being implemented successfully.

U.S.-China discussions on retransfer consents concluded, but agreement not yet in force.

On Target
Generation IV International Forum (GIF) proceeds as a viable forum for reactor cooperation.

The GIF has developed a list of new technologies for international development, and continued as a leading forum for international cooperation in advanced reactor development for safety, sustainability, and proliferation resistance.

On Target
No security problems arise with U.S.- origin nuclear material.

No security problems arose with U.S.-origin
nuclear material

On Target
Other cooperation programs proceed
normally.
U.S. continued as reliable partner in nuclear
cooperation. Extended agreement with
Morocco, but not Indonesia; other
agreements remained in force.
On Target
2 Target language modified slightly but is substantially consistent; reported "Result" corresponds to Revised Target as shown.

PROGRAM EVALUATIONS AND MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES

Two Program Evaluations were completed in FY 2002 and one Management Challenge was identified that pertained
to this Strategic Goal:

  • 1. Nuclear Nonproliferation: U.S. Efforts to Help Other Countries Combat Nuclear Smuggling Need Strengthened Coordination and Planning, (GAO)
  • 2. Chemical Weapons: Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons Needs Comprehensive Plan to Correct Budgeting Weaknesses, (GAO)

Detailed information on major findings, recommendations, and actions to be taken can be found in the FY 2002 Key Program Evaluations by Strategic Goal section of the Appendix.

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