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Strategic Goals 7 and 8


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National Interest: American Citizens and U.S. Borders

Strategic Goal 7: American Citizens
Protect the safety of American citizens who travel and live abroad.

STRATEGIC GOAL OVERVIEW/PUBLIC BENEFIT

The Department has no responsibility more important than the protection of U.S. citizens. Approximately 3.2 million
Americans reside abroad. Americans make about sixty million foreign trips each year. The Department's passport, which gives
Americans the freedom to travel internationally, is a symbol of the protection that the USG affords its citizens. U.S. citizens
traveling, studying, or working abroad have always been on the front lines of America's fight against terrorism and crime.
The events of 9/11 and the worldwide campaign against terrorism have placed overseas Americans in the crossfire of a
ruthless enemy; U.S. embassies and consulates are ready, willing, and able to help Americans when they encounter trouble.


STRATEGIC GOAL SUMMARY OF RESULTS ACHIEVED
One Annual Goal and Four Targets Represented
Four Annual Goals Represented
Number of Targets
Significantly Below Target
Slightly Below Target
On Target
Above Target
Significantly Above Target
No 2002 Data Available
TOTAL
4
0
1
1
2
0
0
Percent of Total
100%
0%
25%
25%
50%
0%
0%

Annual Performance Goal 1
U.S. citizens have the information, services, and protection they need to reside or travel abroad

To protect the safety of American citizens who travel and live abroad, the Department actively helps citizens avoid problems by issuing travel warnings and other information to promote safe travel. When Americans are caught up in political crises, natural disasters, and other situations that they cannot handle alone, the Department provides assistance and often engages foreign authorities to ensure that Americans get the help they need.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

To help maintain the safety of American citizens abroad, the Department issued fifty-six travel warnings, ninety-seven public announcements, and one hundred ninety-six consular information sheets on conditions in other countries. The consular website containing this information received an average of about 350,000 hits per day; 94 percent of respondents reported, via an on-line survey, that the website was helpful. The Department developed pilot software that will allow Americans to
register overseas travel itineraries through a central Internet site.

During FY 2002, the Department added on-line functionality to five passport application forms. The ability to complete the forms on-line improves the application process and reduces the incidence of processing errors. Website visitors can also obtain travel safety information.

The Department's enhancement of automated case-tracking systems during FY 2002 has improved assistance to Americans, reporting to Congress, and enhanced U.S. border security by preventing the fraudulent use of lost or stolen passports. The Department also developed case-management software to track international parental child- abduction cases, which will be deployed worldwide in 2003.

The Department's update of the American Citizens Services (ACS) case management system, which stores data on U.S. citizens who receive consular services, enabled the collection of data on mistreatment of and consular access to U.S. citizens arrested abroad. Other modifications to ACS improved the Department's ability to publish information about overseas deaths
of Americans from non-natural causes. A complete re-engineering of ACS will modernize its software and enhance information sharing among overseas posts starting in 2003.

The Department implemented an updated version of CRISIS, a case-tracking system used when Americans are involved in crises abroad. The Consular Lost and Stolen Passport System (CLASP) was deployed at all overseas posts and domestic passport agencies to track missing U.S. passports and prevent their abuse. The introduction of new software to manage international adoption cases has been delayed until 2004 so it can accommodate the Department's new responsibilities as
Central Authority under the Hague Convention on Adoptions.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

ACCURACY AND AVAILABILITY OF CONSULAR INFORMATION
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
Consular Affairs web site accommodates
250,000 hits per day. Additional features and updates are added.
Create new section
with fillable forms.

Five passport applications added to the web site for international travelers.

The web site received 128 million hits (10M more than in FY 2001), averaging 347,254 hits per day. 94.3% of users participating in an on-line survey found the web site helpful, up from 90% in the past 3 years.

Issued 56 travel warnings, 97 public announcements, and 196 consular information sheets (86% of countries updated).

Pilot software was developed for an Internet-based system that will allow Americans to register overseas travel itineraries at a central website.

A consular call center began operations in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks to handle the large volume of calls about travel safety. It received over 60,000 calls in FY 2002.

Above Target
AVAILABILITY OF AUTOMATED CASE - TRACKING
Initial Target
Result
Rating
System to track
international parental child abduction cases is pilot tested and deployed.

System to track
international adoption
cases is pilot tested and deployed. ACS system includes ata
on mistreatment of and access to arrestees and generates corresponding
report.

Case-management software was developed for international parental child-abduction cases and is in use by the Office of Children's Issues.





Software to manage international adoption cases was delayed to accommodate the Department's new responsibilities as Central Authority under the Hague Convention on Adoptions. The system is scheduled for completion in 2004.


American Citizens Services (ACS) case management system now collects data and can report on mistreatment of and consular access to U.S. arrestees abroad. ACS system was updated to comply with a new requirement in PL 107-228 to publish information about overseas deaths of Americans from non-natural causes. Detailed system requirement analysis for the complete re-engineering of the ACS system was completed. It will replace current software with a stateof- the-art program that enables greater information sharing among posts.

On Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were initiated. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 2
Timely and effective passport issuance, with document integrity assured

U.S. passports identify travelers as U.S. nationals entitled to USG protection while abroad. The U.S. passport is a highly secure, machine-readable, internationally recognized, and respected document that provides a basis for safe international travel. Timely and effective passport issuance ensures that Americans can depart for scheduled travel on time.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

During FY 2002, the Department issued more than seven million passports. The worldwide demand for passports was less than originally projected due to the economic downturn and concern about terrorism. The demand amounted to somewhat less than the projected target and should not be seen as a performance failure on the Department's part.

The centralized application process helped decrease average wait-times for in-person applications, which ranged from fifteen to thirty-two minutes, a significant improvement over the previous year's twenty-five to forty-six minutes.

The photo-digitized passport issuance system (TDIS-PD) was installed at the passport agencies in Washington and Chicago, finalizing the conversion of all sixteen domestic facilities. All passport issuance, except for emergencies, was shifted from U.S. embassies and consulates to the United States to take advantage of photo-digitization. The digitized photograph and data page of the photo-digitized passport make it much less vulnerable to tampering.

The Department upgraded TDIS-PD to include CLASP software and a new Social Security matrix that assists with validating social security numbers and birth data provided by applicants. The Department also modified ACS and Passport Services systems to allow direct, electronic transmission of passport data and photographs from overseas posts to the National Passport Center.

Passport Photodigitization Capability Achieved for All Domestic Passport Agencies in FY 2002:
FY 2000 -- 4 (Result)
FY 2001 -- 6 (Result)
FY 2002 -- 16 (Target)
FY 2002 -- 16 (Result)

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

PASSPORT APPLICATIONS
Target
Result
Rating
8.3 million passports issued 7.1 million passports issued Slightly Below Target Due to lower demand for
U.S. passports.
STATUS OF PASSPORT PHOTO - DIGITIZATION
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
All of the Department's
domestic facilities
operate with the new
system.
Installed at 2 more passport facilities (total
of 16.)
Photo-digitized passport issuance system (TDIS-PD) installed in Washington and Chicago, finalizing the conversion of all 16 domestic facilities. All but emergency passport issuance shifted to U.S. to take advantage of photo-digitization technology.

TDIS-PD updated to include Consular Lost and Stolen Passport System (CLASP) software and Social Security matrix to assist in validating social
security numbers and birth data provided by applicants. American Citizens Services (ACS) and Passport Services systems were modified to allow direct, electronic transmission of passport data and
photographs from overseas posts to the National Passport Center in New Hampshire, which will greatly enhance speed and security for overseas passport applicants.
Above Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

PROGRAM EVALUATIONS AND MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES

Three Program Evaluations were conducted in FY 2002 that pertained to this Strategic Goal:

1. Office of American Citizen Services and Crisis Management (IS-I-02-07 2/02), (OIG
2. Review of Domestic Passport Operations (ISP-CA-02-32 3/02), (OIG)
3. Information Management: Selected Agencies' Handling of Personal Information, (GAO)
4. Border Security (Visa and Consular Services Program), (OMB PART)

Detailed information on major findings, recommendations, and actions to be taken can be found in the FY 2002 Key Program
Evaluations by Strategic Goal section of the Appendix.

National Interest: American Citizens and U.S. Borders

Strategic Goal 8: Travel & Migration
Facilitate travel to the United States by foreign visitors, immigrants, and refugees,
while deterring entry by those who abuse or threaten our system.

STRATEGIC GOAL OVERVIEW/PUBLIC BENEFIT

In accordance with U.S. law, the Department's consular officers are responsible for determining whether foreign nationals are eligible to receive visas, thereby protecting the security of the United States and its citizens. Consular officials also facilitate admission to the United States of millions of legitimate travelers every year, including tourists, businesspeople, students, and refugees.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL SUMMARY OF RESULTS ACHIEVED
One Annual Goal and Two Targets Represented
Four Annual Goals Represented
Number of Targets
Significantly Below Target
Slightly Below Target
On Target
Above Target
Significantly Above Target
No 2002 Data Available
TOTAL
2
0
1
1
0
0
0
Percent of Total
100%
0%
50%
50%
0%
0%
0%

Annual Performance Goal 1
Timely and effective visa issuance; reduction of visa fraud

Timely and effective visa issuance facilitates the travel of foreigners who seek to enter the United States for legitimate purposes, either temporarily or as immigrants. Screening all visa applicants using consular, intelligence, and law enforcement information helps identify fraudulent applications and impede the travel of terrorists, criminals, and other undesirables by flagging their applications for visa denial.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

During FY 2002, the Department's consular officials processed over 600,000 immigrant visa cases, reuniting families and bringing workers to U.S. employers. The Department expected that there would be demand for 715,000 immigrant visas (IVs). However, the actual goal in any year is to process in a timely manner all applications presented. Actual demand for IVs was somewhat less than the target; this is not a performance failure, but reflects a reduction in demand for visa services.

Officials processed more than eight million non-immigrant visa cases, enabling non-immigrants using valid visas to visit family and friends, study at U.S. colleges and universities, perform at cultural events, provide skills and services needed by U.S. employers, and benefit the U.S. economy. This work was done in conjunction with the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) and other USG agencies involved in homeland security.

According to U.S. Department of Commerce projections, spending on travel expenses by international visitors within the United States is expected to total over $93.4 billion during 2002, $12 billion more than U.S. travelers were projected to spend abroad. In addition, international visitor expenditures directly supported more than one million jobs in the United States, according to travel industry sources.

During FY 2002, the Department continued to design, deploy, and improve the systems that help identify terrorists and criminals among visa applicants. To improve homeland security, it issued a supplemental visa application form for all men aged sixteen to forty-five from all countries, and tightened visa interview requirements for applicants whose home countries are state sponsors of terrorism. In conjunction with other USG agencies, the Department required more security checks for
groups of visa applicants from specific countries. The Department provided INS with access to data on issued visas, including applicants' photos from consular offices worldwide replicated in near real-time, which enables immigration inspectors to verify the link between a traveler and the travel document presented.

Records from the FBI's National Crime Information Center expanded the Consular Lookout and Support System (CLASS) by more than seven million records. The intelligence community provided a threefold increase in CLASS namecheck records through the INR's TIPOFF office. The Department introduced better training to help consular officers use the CLASS system, especially linguistically-based namecheck returns. It also expanded Intranet resources to assist officers with reading
entry/exit cachets in Arabic or Persian script.

As part of a strengthened U.S. border security program, the Department also:

  • Created a new Lincoln non-immigrant visa (NIV) to prevent alteration and duplication
  • Heightened security for canceling machine-readable visas to deter "visa washing"
  • Electronically verified the legitimate entry of foreign students and exchange visitors through the Interim Student and exchange Authentication System
  • Expanded the Foreign Lost and Stolen Passport Database
  • Began cooperation with the Virginia DMV to share information on fraudulent foreign documents
  • Improved document fraud training provided to Diplomatic Security agents and Social Security Administration investigators.
  • Compiled a "Law Enforcement Package" that Diplomatic Security field offices, Passport Agency offices and other Department offices may provide to state and local law enforcement contacts and banks or other businesses that request general guidance on assessing U.S. visas and passports as identity documents.
  • Began participation in the EU fraudulent documents working group, sharing information on smuggling trends, fraud patterns, and document fixers.
  • Provided over one million photographs of visa applicants to the National Institute of Standards and Technology to use in their facial recognition evaluation tests and continued work on biometric identifier standards andelectronic systems.
  • Worked more closely with law enforcement and intelligence agencies to share information on a timely basis.

Finally, working with the INS, U.S. Customs, and the Department of Transportation, the Department approved an Entry-Exit Project Charter that sets the parameters for an automated system, which records visitor arrivals, departures, and activities while in the United States.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

NUMBER OF NON-IMMIGRANT VISA CASES PROCESSED
Target
Result
Rating
715,000
608,133
Slightly Below Target
NUMBER OF IMMIGRANT VISA CASES PROCESSED
Initial Target
Revised Target
Result
Rating
10,300,000
7,600,000
8,367,861
On Target

PROGRAM EVALUATIONS AND MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES

Two Program Evaluations were conducted in FY 2002 that pertained to this Strategic Goal:

1. Consular Affairs Information Security Program (IT-A-02-04 9/02), (OIG)
2. Border Security (Visa and Consular Services Program) (OMB PART)

Detailed information on major findings, recommendations, and actions to be taken can be found in the FY 2002 Key Program Evaluations by Strategic Goal section of the Appendix.

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