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Strategic Goals 9, 10, and 11


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National Interest: Law Enforcement

Strategic Goal 9: Countering Terrorism
Reduce international terrorist attacks, especially on the United States and its citizens.

STRATEGIC GOAL OVERVIEW/PUBLIC BENEFIT

Since the events of 9/11, combating international terrorism has become the USG's top priority. The Department is the lead federal agency working with other nations to counter terrorism and minimize the threat of terrorist violence at home and abroad to the United States, its interests, and its allies. It has made key contributions to the worldwide campaign against terrorism in its efforts to create international coalitions that are willing and able to accomplish U.S. counterterrorism objectives.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL SUMMARY OF RESULTS ACHIEVED
One Annual Goal and Five Targets Represented
Four Annual Goals Represented
Number of Targets
Significantly Below Target
Slightly Below Target
On Target
Above Target
Significantly Above Target
No 2002 Data Available
TOTAL
5
0
0
4
1
0
0
Percent of Total
100%
0%
0%
80%
20%
0%
0%

Annual Performance Goal 1
Reduced danger of terrorist attacks on American citizens and interests; effective international cooperation and efforts curtail the capabilities of would-be terrorists and punish known offenders

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

During 2002, the Department made significant progress in creating and sustaining the international political will necessary for states to take strong, decisive action against terrorism.

Bilateral and multilateral consultations resulted in unprecedented cooperation with foreign partners in all areas of the global war on terrorism. In this context, a Joint Working Group with Pakistan was established, China agreed to an FBI Legal Attach´┐Ż Office in Beijing, and NATO invoked Article V for the first time in its history to assist the United States with countering terrorism.

In addition, 179 states have reported to the UN Security Council about their efforts to implement UN Security Council Resolution 1373 which sets the standard that terrorism is unacceptable, illegal, and is to be opposed. This is an important step towards taking practical legal and political measures to prevent and suppress terrorism. The United States provided leadership in the UN Security Council to monitor compliance with this resolution.

One hundred and sixty anti-terterrorism assistance (ATA) training courses that the Department provided to fortyone priority states have improved counterterrorism capabilities. Officials who received U.S.-sponsored counterterrorism training included police officers who dismantled the November 17 terrorist organization in Greece, Turkish officials who successfully negotiated a hostage situation at an Istanbul luxury hotel, and Tanzanian police who apprehended the perpetrator of an armed attack against a Peace Corps volunteer in southwestern Tanzania.

During FY 2002, the Department designated five organizations as Foreign Terrorist Organizations (FTOs), over two hundred persons and entities associated with terrorist financing under Executive Order 13224, and forty-eight organizations under the Terrorist Exclusion List (TEL). This made it more difficult for terrorists to raise and move money, increased the amount of terrorist assets blocked, prevented designated persons from gaining entry to the United States, and heightened international attention to the need for aggressive action to combat terrorist financing. The United States also worked through the UN Security Council's Counter Terrorism Committee to designate terrorist entities and individuals for assets freezes.

The Department installed the Terrorist Interdiction Program at sites in Pakistan and Yemen, allowing security and border officials to check travelers against a list of individuals of concern. The Department also spearheaded work on the USG-initiated G-8 Cooperative Action on Transport Security, which will enhance security for people and cargo; aircraft, ships, trucks, and
containers; and airports and seaports. The Department also encouraged multilateral organizations such as the International
Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and the International Maritime Organization (IMO) to develop new global standards for aviation and maritime security.

The Department has also led USG efforts to develop a strong response by Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders to the President's call for a worldwide coalition to defeat terrorism. The leaders issued statements that condemned terrorist attacks in the strongest terms, and committed the Asia-Pacific region to a series of concrete actions to enhance the security of international trade, information, and financial systems to prevent their use by terrorists.

One hundred and sixty ATA courses provided to priority states:
FY 2000 -- 117 (Result)
FY 2001 -- 135 (Result)
FY 2002 -- 160 (Target)
FY 2002 -- 160 (Result)

Five additional organizations designated as FTOs in FY 2002:
FY 2000 -- 29 (Result)
FY 2001 -- 31 (Result)
FY 2002 -- 34 (Target)
FY 2002 -- 36 (Result)
 

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET 5

NUMBER OF BILATERAL AND MULTILATERAL CT CONSULTATIONS COMPLETED
Target
Result
Rating
13
13
On Target
NUMBER OF STATES THAT HAVE REPORTED TO THE UN SECURITY COUNCIL
ON THEIR EFFORTS TO IMPLEMENT UNSCR 1373
Target
Result
Rating
157
179
Above Target
ANTI - TERRORISM TRAINING ASSISTANCE (ATA) COURSES
AND PROGRAM REVIEWS PROVIDED TO PRIORITY STATES
Target
Result
Rating
Provide 160 courses to 41 states; 160 reviews. Provided 160 courses to 41 states;160 reviews. On Target
DEGREE OF SUPPORT FOR COMBATANT COMMANDERS ' C T E XERCISE PROGRAMS
Target
Result
Rating
No exercises scheduled because of Operation Enduring Freedom.


Co-chair the CSG Exercise Sub-Group and develop the next 18-month, national and international-level exercise schedule.



Finalize Exercise Sub-Group's Operating Charter.
No exercises scheduled because of Operation Enduring Freedom.

Co-chaired the CSG Exercise Sub-Group and developed the next 18-month, national and international-level exercise schedule.

Finalized Exercise Sub-Group's Operating Charter.
On Target
TIMELINESS OF THE REVIEW OF GROUPS DESIGNATED AS FOREIGN TERRORIST ORGANIZATIONS (FTO's) PURSUANT TO U.S.LAW
Target Result Rating
Three additional organizations designated as FTOs. One additional group due for periodic review awaiting other agency action. Two additional groups in the process for first-time designation and awaiting other agency action. Seven groups under review for possible designation.
Five additional organizations designated as FTOs. One additional group was redesignated. Five groups were under review for possible FTO designation.
On Target
5 The indicators specified in the FY2001/2002 Performance Plan are not shown in this report. The original indicators were dropped from this goal because the events of 9/11 caused the Department to reformulate completely its counterterrorism policies and priorities in order to respond to a radically new situation in which substantial new responsibilities were added to the Department's counterterrorism programs. The new indicators in this report accurately reflect the Department's current counterterrorism policy and programs, and better measure the Department's progress in the post-9/11 environment.

National Interest: Law Enforcement

Strategic Goal 10: International Crime
Minimize the impact of international crime on the United States and its Citizens.

STRATEGIC GOAL OVERVIEW/PUBLIC BENEFIT

Like terrorism and drug trafficking, international crime simutaneously targets domestic and external U.S. interests, affecting a wide range of U.S. citizens daily. Trafficking in women and children, migrant smuggling, contraband smuggling, money laundering, credit card fraud, cybercrime, theft of intellectual property rights (IPR), vehicle theft, public corruption, environmental crimes, and trafficking in illegal firearms cost U.S. taxpayers and businesses billions of dollars each year. International crime groups threaten the rule of law and stability.

Following the events of 9/11, the Department refocused its anti-crime efforts to emphasize counterterrorism. To that end, the Department obtained supplemental funds to initiate or expand border security, identified and engaged countries whose financial sectors were most closely involved with the financing of terrorist groups, and revamped the curricula of International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEAs) and other training courses.



STRATEGIC GOAL SUMMARY OF RESULTS ACHIEVED
One Annual Goal and Ten Targets Represented
Four Annual Goals Represented
Number of Targets
Significantly Below Target
Slightly Below Target
On Target
Above Target
Significantly Above Target
No 2002 Data Available
TOTAL
10
1
1
5
2
1
0
Percent of Total
100%
10%
10%
50%
20%
10%
0%

Annual Performance Goal 1
More effective criminal justice institutions and law enforcement in targeted countries

Transnational crime groups often operate from or through countries with weak criminal justice and banking systems that lack the resources, ability, and often the political will to confront organized crime. Department programs in targeted countries help strengthen criminal-justice and law-enforcement institutions, which are necessary for detecting, investigating, arresting, and convicting transnational crime figures and breaking up their operations. This not only improves foreign governments'
abilities to act directly against crime groups but also enables these countries to cooperate with the United States and the international community. Department training programs also improve enforcement of regulatory regimes in such areas as international property protection.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

The Department signed an agreement with Costa Rica to establish a regional ILEA there, the fifth such academy to be established worldwide. During FY 2002, the ILEA program trained 2,200 students; other programs trained an additional 9,500 students, thereby upgrading the skills and professionalism of justice sector and law enforcement officials. ILEA training focuses specifically on regional issues and problems. U.S.-trained officials are more likely to apply U.S. standards and methods in their daily operations and training curricula, and are more willing and able to cooperate with the United States. During FY 2002, the number of students trained through bilateral programs dropped drastically as U.S. training agencies redirected training resources to counterterrorism operations and programs, but by the end of the year, those numbers began to rebound.

[Text version of a photo: Two views of the outside of academy building; Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, U.S. Department of State photo. Caption reads: "The International Law Enforcement Academy in Gaborone, Botswana."]

The Number of Law Enforcement Officials Receiving Counternarcotics Training Has Increased by 75% Since 2000:
FY 2000 -- 1,200 (Result)
FY 2001 -- 1,662 (Result)
FY 2002 -- 1,800 (Target)
FY 2002 -- 2,200 (Result)

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

NUMBER OF ILEAS ESTABLISHED
Target

Result
Rating
5
4
Slightly Below Target
NUMBERS OF ILEA AND OTHER PROGRAMS ' STUDENT STRAINED
Initial Target
Revised Target1
Result
Rating
ILEA: 4,100
Other: 4,400
ILEA: 1,800
Other: 15,000
ILEA: 2,200 (estimated)
Other: 9,500 (estimated)
Significantly Above Target
Significantly Below Target
ASSESSMENTS FOR AFRICAN ANTI-CRIME PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
Target
Result
Rating
6
6
On Target
NUMBER OF MIGRANT SMUGGLING AND TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS COORDINATION
CENTER (MSTCC) ANTI-SMUGGLING/TRAFFICKING OPERATIONS
Initial Target
Revised Target 6
Result
Rating
4
0
The MSTCC has begun monitoring international smuggling and trafficking operations but has not yet provided support for any
disruption operations.
On Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.
6 Target was revised because of a delay in opening the MSTCC.

Annual Performance Goal 2
Transnational cooperation and action to counter crime

Regional and international cooperation among governments is essential for combating transnational crime. Working together, members of the international community set standards and agree on collective actions, thereby paving the way for operational cooperation and allowing the United States to share the financial and political burden of fighting international crime.

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

The UN Convention on Transnational Organized Crime, which defines standards for combating transnational organized crime, has now been signed by 143 countries and ratified by two dozen states. This progress represents a major step toward forging an international response to the growing threat of transnational crime. The treaty will enter into force when forty states have ratified it; meanwhile, all signatories are obliged not to take steps contrary to the Convention.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

STATUS OF CONVENTION AGAINST TRANSNATIONAL ORGANIZED
CRIME (TOCC) AND SUPPLEMENTAL PROTOCOLS
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
A strategy and an
action plan developed
for implementation of
TOCC & Protocols.
20 states ratify the main convention;
implementation plan developed.
143 states had signed and 24 states had ratified. 107 had signed
trafficking in persons protocol; 14 had ratified. 103 states had signed
migrant smuggling protocol; 13 had ratified. 35 states had signed the firearms protocol; 2 had ratified.
Above Target
STATUS OF CONVENTION AGAINST CORRUPTION
Target
Result
Rating
Negotiations to establish an international corruption instrument begin.
Three rounds of negotiations completed. On Target
OVERALL LEVEL AND SOURCES OF FUNDING OF UNCENTER
FOR INTERNATIONAL CRIME PREVENTION (CICP)
Target
Result
Rating
Voluntary contributions to CICP continue to increase.

Two countries which have not previously contributed
make voluntary contributions.
2002 contribution target will likely be reached; final data not yet available.

Two additional countries became donors.
On Target


On Target
LEVEL OF U.S. FUNDING TO UNCENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL
CRIME PREVENTION (CICP)
Target
Result
Rating
$1.5 million U.S. contributed $1.7 million to CICP. Above Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Results" reported for both sets of targets.

National Interest: Law Enforcement

Strategic Goal 11: Countering Illegal Drugs
Reduce the entry of illegal drugs into the United States.

STRATEGIC GOAL OVERVIEW/PUBLIC BENEFIT

Illegal drugs, most of which originate abroad, impose a staggering toll on the American people, killing thousands of Americans annually and costing more than $160 billion in terms of law enforcement, health care, and lost productivity. In the President's words, "Illegal drug use threatens everything that is good about our country." Drug traffickers, many with links to terrorists groups, threaten the rule of law, political and economic stability, and even the sovereignty of many countries, including some key allies and friends. No country is immune.

The primary focus of the Department's counternarcotics efforts during FY 2002 was a multifaceted program aimed at destroying the coca crop and breaking up trafficking organizations in Colombia, the source of 90 percent of the cocaine entering the United States, and preventing spillover of trafficking activities into Colombia's neighbors. The Department also worked with the United Kingdom and other key allies to combat the resurgence in opium poppy trafficking in post-Taliban Afghanistan and elsewhere in Central Asia destined for Russia and Europe. The fight against drug trafficking and the traffickers themselves is also an attack on the terrorist groups that feed off drug trafficking; in some cases, they are the same groups.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL SUMMARY OF RESULTS ACHIEVED
Two Annual Goal and Six Targets Represented
Four Annual Goals Represented
Number of Targets
Significantly Below Target
Slightly Below Target
On Target
Above Target
Significantly Above Target
No 2002 Data Available
TOTAL
6
1
2
3
0
0
0
Percent of Total
100%
17%
33%
50%
0%
0%
0%

Annual Performance Goal 1
Reduced foreign cultivation of opium poppies, coca and marijuana

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

Targeting coca, opium poppies, and marijuana during cultivation is the single most effective means of reducing the quantity of such drugs entering the international market and the United States. In recent years, aggressive eradication programs in Pakistan (opium poppy), Bolivia (coca), and Peru (coca) reduced illicit cultivation in those countries by more than 90 percent.

Although the number of hectares of coca under cultivation in Colombia apparently increased to about 210,000, actual production of cocaine likely decreased because 122,000 hectares were sprayed.

The Department worked with the United Kingdom and others to coordinate an eradication/alternative development assistance program that reduced opium production in Afghanistan by up to 25 percent. The United States and its partners are looking for ways to increase the effectiveness and speed the implementation of this initiative.

Under pressure from the United States and other countries, the new government of Afghanistan officially banned poppy cultivation and trafficking in January 2002, and declared counternarcotics a national priority. Nevertheless, post-war cultivation surged as the new government struggled to extend its authority and control throughout the country.

Mexico, the primary source of foreign marijuana entering the United States, continues to reduce the number of hectares under cultivation through its sustained long-term eradication program.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

NUMBER OF HECTARES OF ILLICIT COCA UNDER CULTIVATION
Target
Result
Rating
167,760 210,000 (estimated) Slightly Below Target
Production destroyed was at or above target level, despite the increased area of cultivation.
NUMBER OF HECTARES OF ILLICIT OPIUM UNDER CULTIVATION
Target
Result
Rating
131,495 161,000 (estimated) Significantly Below Target
Post-war Afghan crop was unexpected.
NUMBER OF HECTARES OF MARIJUANA UNDER CULTIVATION
Target
Result
Rating
6,500 6,500 (estimated) On Target
NUMBER OF REGIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL PREVENTION SUMMITS
Target
Result
Rating
2
0
Significantly Below Target
Shift of attention to terrorism decreased ability/priority to organize such conferences at the summit level.

Annual Performance Goal 2
Criminal justice sectors of foreign governments break up major drug trafficking organizations and effectively investigate, prosecute and convict major narcotics criminals

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

The United States depends on the cooperation and assistance of foreign governments to combat international drug trafficking and traffickers. Most source-and transit-zone states are developing countries with weak criminal justice systems. Thus, in coordination with other USG agencies, the United Nations and other international organizations, the Department assists these countries with equipment, training, institutional development, and operational cooperation essential for mounting effective counternarcotics programs and operations.

During FY 2002, the number of parties to the 1988 UN Drug Convention rose to 165, further increasing the number of states legally committed to undertake various counternarcotics programs and activities.

The Department provided counternarcotics training to 1,800 law enforcement officials, thereby upgrading specific skills and general professionalization among foreign counterdrug forces. These officials are better able to cooperate with the United States at an operational level, and employ U.S. standards and methods in their work and local training.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

PARTIES TO THE 1988 UN DRUG CONVENTION
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
157
165
165
On Target
NUMBER OF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICIALS RECEIVING
COUNTERNARCOTICS TRAINING
Target
Result
Rating
1,800
1,800
On Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Results" reported for both sets of targets.

PROGRAM EVALUATIONS AND MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES

Two Program Evaluations were conducted in FY 2002 that pertained to this Strategic Goal:

1. Evaluation of Model Programs for Drug Abusing High Risk Youth in Brazil and Peru, (Outside contractors)
2. Drug Abuse Treatment Training in Peru (Outside contractors)

Detailed information on these evaluations' major findings, recommendations, and actions to be taken can be found in the the FY 2002 Key Program Evaluations by Strategic Goal section of the Appendix.

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