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Strategic Goal 13


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National Interest: Humanitarian Response

Strategic Goal 13: Humanitarian Assistance
Prevent or minimize the human costs of conflicts and natural disasters.

STRATEGIC GOAL OVERVIEW/PUBLIC BENEFIT

In the wake of the events of 9/11, the importance of effective response to the humanitarian problems created by failed states and long-lasting armed conflicts has been magnified. Simply put, assistance to limit the suffering of the displaced and victims of conflict and natural disaster is good foreign policy. In FY 2002, following the United States-led ouster of the Taliban, the Department supported the largest refugee repatriation operation in recent history. The Department also responded to the continued substantial needs of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) in places such as Tanzania, Sudan, Kenya, the Middle East, Kosovo, the Caucasus, and Colombia. Through assistance to relevant multilateral organizations, the Department helped minimize the level of human suffering experienced by these populations while fostering long-term solutions to the root causes of that suffering. In FY 2002, the Department also participated actively in USG efforts to provide food aid to drought stricken Southern Africa to avert starvation and massive population movements.


STRATEGIC GOAL SUMMARY OF RESULTS ACHIEVED
Three Annual Goal and Nine Targets Represented
Four Annual Goals Represented
Number of Targets
Significantly Below Target
Slightly Below Target
On Target
Above Target
Significantly Above Target
No 2002 Data Available
TOTAL
9
0
3
2
2
1
1
Percent of Total
100%
0%
33%
22%
22%
11%
11%

Annual Performance Goal 1
Equal access to protection; effective and coordinated assistance; and promotion of durable solutions (including voluntary repatriation) for refugees and victims of conflict

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

Refugees and displaced persons suffer disproportionately from conflict and other humanitarian problems. By ensuring equal access to protection, effective and coordinated assistance, and the promotion of durable solutions for refugees and displaced victims of conflict, the United States helps meet the needs of these most vulnerable persons, thereby lessening the human cost of conflict.

During 2002, the crude mortality rate (CMR) in crisis zones did not exceed the target of 1/10,000 persons where data were available. Enhanced tracking procedures and Department-funded assistance programs prevented deaths and lowered risk in emergency refugee settings for extended periods. In a related effort, the Department and USAID developed tools to measure and track more accurately CMR and the nutritional status of children under five years of age.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

CRUDE MORTALITY RATES (CMR)
Target
Result
Rating
Crises do not exceed a crude mortality rate of
1 per 10,000 people/day for an extended period.
If necessary, take other measures to address any problems of excess mortality.
Where data were available, refugee crises did not exceed a CMR of 1/10,000 people/day.
State/PRM and USAID developed tools to better
measure and track CMR and the nutritional status of children under the age of 5; training workshop for practitioners was held in July.
On Target
NUMBER OF UNHCR REPATRIATION PROGRAMS ENDED 2 YEARS AFTER A
MAJORITY OF REFUGEES RETURN OR FIND OTHER DURABLE SOLUTIONS
Target
Result
Rating
Conclusion of one-half of the repatriation
programs where the majority of refugees have
been home for 2 years or more.
Indicator was not tracked.
No Data Available
Indicator has been discontinued and will therefore not appear in subsequent plans. It was deemed an inappropriate measure of performance progress and was never effectively tracked or utilized.

Annual Performance Goal 2
Mitigation, preparedness, and early warning of natural disasters and complex emergencies

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

The crux of this goal was the establishment of the Global Disaster Information Network (GDIN), which finds new ways to compile and disseminate operationally-valuable disaster information. To the extent that this goal is met, GDIN will reduce the loss of life and property prevalent in disasters.

Although the goal of establishing a GDIN operations center was not met in FY 2002, substantial progress was made by virtue of agreement among GDIN members to set up five specific GDIN services: conferences and workshops, infectious disease analysis, early warning and response, portal service, and pilot projects. After 2004, GDIN should be able to receive adequate private and governmental funding, to become fully operational.

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET

GLOBAL DISASTER INFORMATION NETWORK (GDIN) MEMBERSHIP
Initial Target
Revised Target 1
Result
Rating
An international agreement is reached on GDIN physical
infrastructure.
An operations center is established and the number of data-sharing
partners is increased. GDIN members determine status of the entity.
GDIN community agreed on a new approach to set up five specific services in the 2002-2004 time frame.
Slightly Below Target
GDIN members would determine status of the entity.
N/A GDIN membership agreed to incorporate the funding mechanism as a 501(c)(3) and to retain the rest of the project as an unincorporated partnership until 2004.
On Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

Annual Performance Goal 3
Elimination of deployed landmines and reduction of civilian casualties in mine-affected countries

SUMMARY OF KEY RESULTS AND IMPACT

The elimination of deployed landmines saves lives and prevents civilian injuries. Mine-risk education also reduces civilian casualties, preventing death and debilitating injury in conflict-affected areas.

Thirty-two countries received funding through U.S. Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining and Related appropriations (NADR). Although slightly below the target level, these programs contributed to a decrease in the number of civilian landmine casualties and aided the return of agricultural land and infrastructure to productive use. The target was not met because countries that had shown interest in obtaining U.S. assistance did not make a formal request.

In countries where Humanitarian Mine Action programs exist, there was a fourteen-percent reduction of reported civilian casualties, which surpassed the goal of ten percent. In addition to saving lives and preventing injuries, the programs promote economic development by raising the overall health of the workforce.

In 2002, 100,000 landmines and unexploded ordnance were cleared, far surpassing the goal of 35,000. This resulted in more civilians in affected areas being able to use the cleared land safely, thus promoting food security and economic development.

[Text version of a photo: Mine clearing machine; National Imagery and Mapping Agency photo. Caption reads: "Rear side view of Locust 750 mini-flail mine clearing system."]

[Text version of a photo: Deputy Secretary Armitage and others standing next to table holding equipment. Caption/credit reads: "Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage being shown demining equipment as he visits the embattled village of Sarasalai in the northern peninsula of Jaffna, Sri Lanka, on August 22, 2002. A U.S.-funded demining team unearthed 772 anti-personnel mines in a 50,000 square meter area from the period May to August 2002. AFP Photo/Sena Vidanagama."]

The number of Land Mines and Unexploded Ordnance Removed Has Increased 10-Fold Since 2000 (in Thousands):
FY 2000 -- 10 (Result)
FY 2001 -- 20 (Result)
FY 2002 -- 35 (Target)
FY 2002 -- 100 (Result)

PERFORMANCE RESULTS BY INDICATOR AND TARGET 

NUMBER OF COUNTRY PROGRAMS FUNDED BY U.S. NADR APPROPRIATIONS
Target
Result
Rating
40
32
Slightly Below Target
NUMBER OF U.S. FUNDED HOST NATION PROGRAMS ACHIEVING MINE-SAFE STATUS
Target
Result
Rating
2
1
Slightly Below Target
REDUCTION OF CIVILIAN CASUALTIES IN COUNTRIES WHERE
HUMANITARIAN DEMINING PROGRAMS EXIST
Target
Result
Rating
10%
14%
Above Target
HECTARES/SQUARE KILOMETERS OF LAND RETURNED TO PRODUCTIVE USE
Target
Revised Target2
Result
Rating
3,500 sq. km
8,000 sq. km
8,897 sq. km
Above Target
NUMBER OF LANDMINES AND AMOUNT OF UNEXPLODED ORDNANCE REMOVED
Target
Result
Rating
35,000
100,000
Significantly Above Target
1 Target was modified; activities related to achieving both initial and revised targets were undertaken. "Result" reported for both sets of targets.

PROGRAM EVALUATIONS AND MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES

Five Program Evaluations were conducted in FY 2002 that pertained to this Strategic Goal:

1. Humanitarian Response Efforts for Women and Conflict Victims (OIG)
2. UNHCR Policy on Refugee Women and Guidelines on Their Protection: An Assessment of Ten Years of Implementation (Women's Commission on Refugee Women and Children)
3. Independent Evaluation of the Kosovo Women's Initiative (UNHCR Evaluation and Policy Analysis Unit)
4. Refugee Admissions to the U.S. (OMB PART)
5. Refugees to Israel (OMB PART)

Detailed information on major findings, recommendations, and actions to be taken can be found in the FY 2002 Key Program Evaluations by Strategic Goal section of the Appendix.

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