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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Illustrative Examples of Significant Achievements


FY 2003 Performance and Accountability Highlights
Bureau of Resource Management
December 2003
Report
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Strategic Goal #1: Regional Stability

Man-Portable Air-Defense Systems (MANPADS)

The State Department led the international effort to prevent terrorists from acquiring MANPADS, more commonly known as shoulder-fired missiles, that could be used to shoot down civilian airliners and government aircraft. Under U.S. leadership the G-8 agreed to: strengthen export controls (including limiting transfers to those between governments); research access controls for newly produced MANPADS; strengthen security of government stocks; and destroy those that are surplus to defense needs. The Department is leading a similar effort in the Wassenaar arrangement, which will affect most producers of MANPADS. We are also working closely with Russia to support their effort to gain control of those MANPADS in the CIS. The State Department secured commitments from six countries to destroy almost 9,500 MANPADS (approximately 1% of the MANPADS that have ever been produced). Almost 1,200 were destroyed by the end of FY 2003.

Photo showing a member of the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia detonating a controlled explosion to destroy six shoulder launched anti aircraft missiles in a remote mountain area near Sarajevo.

A member of the NATO-led peacekeeping force in Bosnia detonates a controlled explosion to destroy six shoulder launched anti aircraft missiles in a remote mountain area near Sarajevo. The United States has asked all of its friends to dispose of obsolete MANPADS because they pose a serious threat to civil and military aviation in the wrong hands. � AP Photo

Strategic Goal #2: Counterterrorism
Photo showing Philippine military officials riding on a combat boat during a demonstration in Manila Bay.

Philippine military officials ride on a combat boat during a demonstration in Manila Bay. The new boats are part of the Philippine Navy's modernization program to better fight terrorists, poachers, pirates and drug smugglers. The Philippines is one of 12 countries to partner with the United States in the Terrorist Interdiction Program. � AP Photo

Terrorist Interdiction Program (TIP)

During FY 2003, 12 nations expanded their partnership with the United States in the global fight against terrorism by agreeing to accept TIP to strengthen control of their air, land and sea ports of entry. By assisting these nations to secure their borders, TIP has enhanced the security of all Americans, including those who live and travel abroad. TIP has broadened cooperation and strengthened a shared sense of urgency between the United States and these nations in the effort to defeat international terrorism, and in several cases, has served as the cornerstone of an evolving comprehensive mutual counterterrorism strategy. Finally, the information provided by nations operating TIP has significantly broadened our understanding of terrorist movements and methods.

Strategic Goal #3: Homeland Security

Container Security Initiative

The Department spearheaded global efforts to protect transportation networks through stronger shipping and aviation security rules. Nineteen of the 20 largest world ports committed to participate in the Container Security Initiative (CSI). In addition, the program expanded to other strategic ports including Malaysia and South Africa. CSI is now operational in sixteen ports (as of September 30, 2003) and at least two countries, Canada and Japan, have utilized the reciprocal aspects of the program to have their customs officials present at U.S. ports to observe cargo bound for their countries.

A large cargo ship at sea, laden with shipping containers.
Department of State Photo

Photo of a large cargo ship at sea, laden with shipping containers.
Strategic Goal #4: Weapons of Mass Destruction
Photo of Secretary of State Colin Powell meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin.

Secretary of State Colin Powell meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin.
� AP Photo

Cooperation with Russia on New Strategic Framework

In June 2003, the U.S.-Russian Treaty on Strategic Offensive Reductions entered into force, reflecting the dramatic shift from Cold War rivalry to partnership based on the principles of mutual security, trust, openness, and cooperation. The Treaty binds the U.S. and Russia to reduce the levels of strategic nuclear warheads by the end of 2012 to between 1,700 and 2,200 - about one-third of current levels.

Strategic Goal #5: International Crime and Drugs

Trafficking in Persons

There are an estimated 800,000 to 4 million persons trafficked annually across and within international borders. Approximately 20,000 victims of trafficking are brought into the United States each year. The Department and a consortium of U.S. NGOs hosted an innovative international conference on best practices, bringing together 400 NGO and government representatives who are on the frontlines of the war to combat slavery. Since the conference, two countries are now working collaboratively on trafficking cases and participants from the Western Hemisphere have formed a listserv on the Internet as a means of exchanging information. The Department significantly strengthened the annual Trafficking in Persons report by adding 26 new countries, incorporating new law enforcement data, and adding new features, such as victims stories and color photographs, sections on best practices, areas for improvement, and special cases, and a special matrix of relevant international conventions. Department funding facilitated the development of a regional action plan on combating trafficking in persons that was adopted by the member states of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). ECOWAS countries are in the process of developing national action plans, revising their legislation and identifying national points of contact.

Photo showing Secretary of State Colin Powell holding up the State Department's third annual report on human trafficking during a news conference in Washington.

Secretary of State Colin Powell holds up the State Department's third annual report on human trafficking during a news conference in Washington. Fifteen countries, including U.S. allies Greece and Turkey, have made no significant efforts to stop trafficking in humans and may face sanctions, the State Department report said. � AP Photo/Charles Dharapak

Strategic Goal #6: American Citizens
Photo showing U.S. Assistant Secretary for Consular Affairs Maura Harty visiting American citizen children overseas (shown with their grandmother), on behalf of their mother in the U.S., from whom the children had been abducted at an early age by her foreign ex-husband.

U.S. Assistant Secretary for Consular Affairs Maura Harty visits American citizen children overseas (shown with their grandmother), on behalf of their mother in the U.S., from whom the children had been abducted at an early age by her foreign ex-husband. Department of State Photo

International Child Abduction

In January, Assistant Secretary for Consular Affairs Harty traveled to Saudi Arabia, Lebanon and Syria and raised the issue of international parental child abduction with senior government officials in each country. Since then ten Americans involved in such situations have been able to return to the United States from those countries. She visited Saudi Arabia again in April to emphasize the same concerns. Department officials meet regularly with Saudi officials, both in Washington and Riyadh, to seek solutions in specific cases and to find more systematic ways to address the problem of international parental child abduction. The Bureau of Consular Affairs hosted "Town Hall" meetings in February and July that were attended by over 75 left-behind parents. Parents identified ways the Department can serve them better.

Strategic Goal #7: Democracy and Human Rights

Anti-Semitism in Europe

The Department led the effort in the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe to hold a conference on Anti-Semitism. The U.S. delegation was led by Rudolph Giuliani and included members of Congress and NGO leaders. The gathering defined anti-semitism as a human rights issue and tasked the OSCE's Office for Democratic Institutions and Human Rights (ODIHR) to serve as a collection point for hate crime information and statistics and to promote best practices in the fight against intolerance. The German government will host a follow-up meeting in Berlin next April. No regional or international organization had previously treated anti-semitism as a human rights matter.

Photo showing Former New York Mayor and Chairman of the U.S. delegation Rudolph Giuliani, Federal Government Commissioner for Human rights, Policy and Humanitarian Aid Claudia Roth from Germany and Head of the Albanian Delegation Zef Mazi, participating in a conference on anti-semitism organized by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) at Vienna's Hofburg palace.

Former New York Mayor and Chairman of the U.S. delegation Rudolph Giuliani, Federal Government Commissioner for Human rights, Policy and Humanitarian Aid Claudia Roth from Germany and Head of the Albanian Delegation Zef Mazi, from left, participate in a conference on anti-semitism organized by the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) at Vienna's Hofburg palace. � AP Photo/Ronald Zak

Strategic Goal #8: Economic Prosperity and Security

Photo showing Jimmy Gurule, Under Secretary for Enforcement, U.S. Department of the Treasury, testifying during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on terrorism financing, in Washington.

Jimmy Gurule, left, Under Secretary for Enforcement, U.S. Department of the Treasury, testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on terrorism financing, in Washington. � AP Photo/Ken Lambert

Terrorism Financing

State, Treasury, Justice, FBI, the Department of Homeland Security and other agencies all work together in the fight against terrorism finance. The U.S. supported the submission by many countries of al-Qaida-linked names for inclusion in the UN asset-freeze list, requiring all countries to act against these names. We have taken action — including asset-freezing — against charities supporting terrorism, creating an incentive for charities worldwide to ensure their funds are not being diverted to terrorist organizations. In addition many essential complementary actions have also been taken. These include the building of an international alliance against terrorism, training and technical assistance to help countries develop the capacity to fight terrorist financing, the development of international standards, and the exploitation of intelligence. All of these efforts work together to protect the United States and our allies from the scourge of terrorism now and in the future.

Strategic Goal #9: Social and Environmental Issues

The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief

President Bush announced his Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief in January 2003. It will provide $15 billion, including nearly $10 billion in new funding, to fight the HIV/AIDS pandemic over the next five years, focusing on 14 of the hardest hit countries. The Emergency Plan pledges $1 billion to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) over the next 5 years, increasing the total U.S. commitment to over $1.6 billion since the Fund's inception. The U.S. Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Act, authorizing the initiative, was passed in May 2003. Ambassador Randall Tobias was confirmed in October as Global AIDS Coordinator to administer the Emergency Plan.

President Bush and Secretary Powell at a State Department Bill signing ceremony for the U.S. Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Act of 2003. State Department photo by Michael Gross

Photo showing President Bush and Secretary Powell at a State Department Bill signing ceremony for the U.S. Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Act of 2003.
Strategic Goal #10: Humanitarian Response
Photo showing malnourished children in a refugee camp near Lobito, Angola, waiting for a plate of corn porridge, their only daily meal, supplied by Jesus Alive Ministeries, a South African based Christian group. The children are showing signs of malnutrition such as thinning and yellowing hair, flaking skin, and potbellies.

Malnourished children in a refugee camp near Lobito, Angola, wait for a plate of corn porridge, their only daily meal, supplied by Jesus Alive Ministeries, a South African based Christian group. The children show signs of malnutrition such as thinning and yellowing hair, flaking skin, and potbellies. � AP Photo/ Pieter Malan

Angola Repatriation

The end of civil war in Angola has made it possible for hundreds of thousands of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs) to return home, many of whom were displaced as long ago as 1965. In June 2003, the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) launched a major repatriation operation to facilitate the return of some 400,000 Angolan refugees from neighboring countries. The Department contributed over $12.6 million in support of Angolan repatriation, which includes return transportation and reintegration assistance such as identification and registration, transit centers, food aid, health services, mine risk education and HIV/AIDS awareness.

Strategic Goal #11: Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs

Educating the Public About Terrorism

In an exciting new outreach initiative, the Bureau of Public Affairs produced a high-quality historical video and curriculum package on terrorism for use in high school classrooms around the country. A War Without Borders was designed to give students a brief overview of the history and impact of terrorism and help them understand its relationship to their own lives. Distributed to nearly 13,000 social studies teachers, A War Without Borders reached more American students than any other post-9/11 curriculum package, according to an independent university study. Feedback has been overwhelmingly positive, and many teachers have decided to re-use the package annually. The video is the first in a series created especially for students to help them understand both the complexities and opportunities of the world in the 21st century.

In the Department-produced video and curriculum package Terrorism: A War Without Borders (pictured at right), students around the country were challenged to answer the question, "What do you think?" The classroom-ready package fully supports the curriculum standards of the National Council for the Social Studies. Department of State Photo

Image showing the cover of the Department-produced video and curriculum package Terrorism: A War Without Borders.
Strategic Goal #12: Management and Organizational Excellence
Photo showing U.S. Marines raising the American flag during the inauguration of the new U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya.

U.S. Marines raise the American flag during the inauguration of the new U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya. Al-Qaida operatives planned to destroy the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi in June with a truck bomb and a hijacked small plane loaded with explosives. � AP Photo/ Khalil Senosi

Strengthening Embassy Compounds

The Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations (OBO) completed seven capital construction projects in FY 2003. These include new embassy compounds (NECs) in Tunis, Dar es Salaam, Zagreb, Istanbul; the USAID facility in Dar es Salaam; and the Bogota USAID/NAS Annex. These facilities were accomplished on time and within budgets based on their construction contracts. In addition, OBO had 17 capital projects under construction and another 9 projects awarded at the end of FY 2003. These, plus 81 new embassy compound (NEC) capital projects currently in planning, will significantly strengthen embassy and consulate compounds to provide secure, safe, and functional facilities for U.S. Government employees serving the nation's interests overseas. The Department's overseas buildings plan is in high gear as evidenced by the number of fine new facilities being completed and those on the way.

 



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