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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

Illustrative Examples of Significant Achievements


FY 2004 Performance and Accountability Highlights
Bureau of Resource Management
November 2004
Report
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STRATEGIC GOAL #1: REGIONAL STABILITY

Peacekeeping Participation

Many peace support operation (PSO) recipient countries have supported coalition operations led by the U.S., such as those in Afghanistan and Iraq. For example, assistance was provided to Mongolia in FY 2000, 2001 and 2003. Prior to 2000, Mongolia did not have a national policy to deploy forces beyond its borders, yet this was the first country to offer an infantry battalion to the coalition in Iraq.


Soldiers of New York State Army National Guard stand during the closing ceremony of a multinational platoon exercise for U.N. peacekeepers at Peace Support Operation Training Institute in Kukuleganga, Sri Lanka. � AP/Wide World Photos

Photo showing Soldiers of New York State Army National Guard standing during the closing ceremony of a multinational platoon exercise for U.N. peacekeepers at Peace Support Operation Training Institute in Kukuleganga, Sri Lanka.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #2: COUNTERTERRORISM

Photo showing Iraqi Interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi asking questions about the PISCES computer system used by Iraqi border agents as he tours the Muntheria border crossing on the Iran-Iraq border. Also joining the tour are National Security Advisor Muwfak al-Rubai, Minister of Defense Hazem Sha-alam, and Interior Minister Falah al-Nakib.

Terrorist Interdiction Program

During FY 2004, the number of countries cooperating with the United States in conducting effective terrorist watch-listing at key ports of entry continued to expand beyond the 12 that were partners in FY 2003, with six additional countries indicating their interest in, and willingness to participate in the program. Initial or expanded deployments of the Personal Identification Secure Comparison and Evaluation System (PISCES) watch listing system were carried out in five countries in FY 2004. In some countries, the Terrorist Interdiction Program (TIP)/PISCES program has served as the cornerstone of the U.S. mission's counterterrorism relationship with the host government and, as a result, has fostered increased counterterrorism cooperation and action on the part of that government.


Iraqi interim Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, second from right, asks questions about the PISCES computer system used by Iraqi border agents as he tours the Muntheria border crossing on the Iran-Iraq border. Also joining the tour are National Security Advisor Muwfak al-Rubai, left, Minister Of Defense Hazem Sha-alam, second from left, and Interior Minister Falah al-Nakib, right. � AP/Wide World Photos/Maya Alleruzzo/POOL

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #3: HOMELAND SECURITY

Container Security Initiative

The Department spearheaded global efforts to protect transportation networks through stronger shipping and aviation security rules. Nineteen of the 20 largest world ports committed to participate in the Container Security Initiative (CSI). In addition, the program expanded to other strategic ports including Malaysia and South Africa. CSI is now operational in twenty-six ports and at least two countries, Canada and Japan, have utilized the reciprocal aspects of the program to have their customs officials present at U.S. ports to observe cargo bound for their countries.


A boat patrols near a ship that unloads containers in the port of Balboa in Panama City. � AP/Wide World Photos/Arnulfo Franco

Photo showing a boat patrolling near a ship that unloads containers in the port of Balboa in Panama City.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #4: WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

Photo showing President Bush talking with Jon Kreykes, manager of National Security Advanced Technology as they look over vacuum cases for centrifuges collected from Libya at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

Libya

In December 2003, Libya made a commitment to dismantle or eliminate its nuclear/chemical weapons and Missile Technology Control Regime class missile programs. Libya has since signed/ ratified IAEA additional Protocol, and is cooperating with the U.S./UK to remove equipment from its nuclear weapons program. Libya has acceded to the CWC, destroyed CW munitions, and facilitated the removal of its entire SCUD C missile inventory.


President Bush talks with Jon Kreykes, manager of National Security Advanced Technology as they look over vacuum cases for centrifuges collected from Libya at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. � AP/Wide World Photos/Susan Walsh

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #5: INTERNATIONAL CRIME AND DRUGS

Andean Counterdrug Initiative

The Andean Counterdrug Initiative has begun paying high dividends in the fight against illegal cocaine and heroin from the Andean region of South America. In 2003, the Andean coca crop dropped to its lowest levels since the USG estimates began back in 1986. Total cultivation was down 16 percent in 2003. The U.S.-backed aerial eradication program in Colombia, the primary source of cocaine coming to the United States, was particularly effective, reducing coca cultivation by 21 percent in 2003 and by 33 percent over the past two years. Opium poppy cultivation in Colombia, which, along with Mexico, provides 90 percent of the illegal heroin consumed in the United States, also declined by 10 percent. For 2004, the aerial eradication operation is on a glide path for a third straight year of reduced coca and opium poppy cultivation. During this same period, the U.S.-helped Colombia establish a security presence in 158 municipalities formerly left to narco-terrorists, leading to a dramatic fall in violent crime and displaced people.


Anti-narcotics police officers disembark at a coca field in the rural area of Sotomayor in the southern Narino state. The police destroyed two labs as part of their counternarcotics effort in that area of the country. According to a United Nations report, land under cultivation for coca in Colombia has declined 16 percent last year. � AP/Wide World Photos/Javier Galeano

Photo showing anti-narcotics police officers disembarking at a coca field in the rural area of Sotomayor, in the southern Narino state.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #6: AMERICAN CITIZENS

Photo showing an American couple that the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs assisted with the intercountry adoption of their infant daughter.

International Child Adoption

The Department's Adoption Unit in the Office of Children's Issues protects and promotes the option of intercountry adoption as a way to provide a permanent family placement for a child who cannot find one in his or her home country. The Department coordinates policies on intercountry adoption with other countries and the international community, and promotes Convention-compliant national adoption legislation and policies. The Department firmly supports intercountry adoption within the context of strong safeguards for the interests of children, birth parents and adoptive parents, as embodied in the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Cooperation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption.


The Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs assisted this American couple with the intercountry adoption of their infant daughter. Department of State Photo

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #7: DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS

Equality in Iraq

Iraqi women occupy numerous positions in the new government. The Iraqi cabinet, announced in May 2004, includes six women ministers of a total of 33 individuals. In addition, seven women were appointed to hold deputy minister positions, women occupy six of the 37 seats on the Baghdad City Council, 81 serve on neighborhood and district councils around the capital, and many women have also been elected to district, local, and municipal councils in most other regions of Iraq. The Department also backed the successful efforts to persuade the Iraqi Governing Council to repeal Resolution 137, which would have imposed Shari'ah family law on Iraqi women.


Iraqi Governing Concil member Younadem Kana raises the newly-signed Iraqi interim constitution as other members applaud in the background during signing ceremony on March 8, 2004 in Baghdad, Iraq. � AP/Wide World Photos/Peter Andrews

Photo showing Iraqi Governing Concil member Younadem Kana raising the newly-signed Iraqi interim constitution as other members applaud in the background during signing ceremony on March 8, 2004 in Baghdad, Iraq.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #8: ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

Photo showing U.S. Ambassador to Iraq John Negroponte shaking hands with National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice during a ceremony at the State Department in Washington.

Recovering Iraqi Assets

The Department worked with Treasury to recover from non-U.S. sources more than $800 million in assets of Saddam Hussein and the former Government of Iraq, which will be used to fund Iraq's reconstruction. The successful effort built on the unique asset recovery provisions of UN Security Council Resolution 1483 previously negotiated by the Department, which required all UN Member States to freeze and transfer these assets to the Development Fund for Iraq (DFI). Iraqi ministries used DFI funds for purposes that directly benefited the people of Iraq, such as Iraqi government operations, including salaries for teachers, health workers, security, etc. The DFI also funded the repair of electrical infrastructure and the refurbishing of water plants, as well as for Iraqi defense and police forces that are today taking on more of the fight against insurgents.


U.S. Ambassador to Iraq John Negroponte, left, shakes hands with National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice during a ceremony at the State Department in Washington. � AP/Wide World Photo/Ron Edmonds

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #9: SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief

The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief is the largest commitment ever by a single nation toward an international health initiative. It is a five-year, $15 billion effort to combat HIV/AIDS in more than 100 countries around the world. In 15 of the hardest-hit countries, the Emergency Plan will prevent seven million new HIV infections, provide antiretroviral treatment to two million HIV-infected individuals, and provide care for ten million individuals infected and affected by HIV/AIDS, including orphans and vulnerable children. In July 2004, just six months after the Emergency Plan received its first appropriation from Congress, preliminary reports from nine of the fifteen focus countries indicated that the Emergency Plan was supporting antiretroviral therapy for at minimum, 24,900 HIV-infected men, women and children. With this early success and continued work to rapidly expand capacity, the President's Emergency Plan is on track to have over 200,000 people on treatment by June 2005 - a number that will be approximately double the number of persons receiving treatment in sub-Saharan Africa.


U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, Ambassador Randall Tobias, looks on at his results after taking an HIV test during his visit to a provincial hospital in Xai Xai northeast of Maputo, Mozambique. Tobias underwent a public HIV test to help fight the stigma associated with AIDS. � AP/Wide World Photos/Themba Hadebe

Photo showing U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator, Ambassador Randall Tobias, looking on at his results after taking an HIV test during his visit to a provincial hospital in Xai Xai northeast of Maputo, Mozambique.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #10: HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE

Photo showing Constance Berry Newman, Assistant Secretary of State for African affairs, listening to a USAID official as she visits Abu Shouk camp, in North Darfur, Sudan.

Response to Humanitarian Crisis in Chad and Darfur

The USG has led the international response to the humanitarian emergency resulting from the ongoing conflict in Darfur, Sudan. Working closely together, the Department and USAID have provided over $200 million in FY 2004 to meet the urgent humanitarian needs of 200,000 Sudanese refugees in Chad and 1.2 million internally displaced persons in Darfur. The Department and USAID are actively engaged with multilateral and non-governmental organizations to ensure strong management of assistance programs under challenging conditions. The USG is also a leading advocate for the protection of civilians affected by the conflict.


Constance Berry Newman, Assistant Secretary of State for African affairs, listens to a USAID official as she visits Abu Shouk camp, in North Darfur, Sudan, where more than 40,000 displaced Sudanese receive food and shelter from international aid agencies. � AP/Wide World Photos/Amr Nabil

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #11: PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Former Exchange Participants Lead "Revolution of Roses" in Georgia

Ten years of individual and institutional exchange programming in Georgia reached a critical mass as exchange alumni led the opposition in democratic ferment. The backbone of a new Georgian era is a network of participants in U.S. visits for students and young government officials, professionals, and experts in a variety of fields, who were introduced to U.S. counterparts in carefully designed programs on themes ranging from "Human Rights Protection" to "U.S. Democratic Principles." In the new Georgian government, exchange alumni include: The President (FSA Muskie 2-year graduate program, International Visitor), the Prime Minister (International Visitor), Head of National Security (International Visitor), Minister of Foreign Affairs (Voluntary Visitor), Minister of Defense (Muskie Fellowship), Minister of Infrastructure and Development (Fulbright), and members of parliament and leaders of major political parties and voluntary associations.


Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili, right, and the U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell seen during their meeting in Tbilisi, Georgia in early 2004. � AP/Wide World Photos/Giorgi Abdaladze

Photo showing Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili and the U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell at their meeting in Tbilisi, Georgia in early 2004.

 

STRATEGIC GOAL #12: MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATIONAL EXCELLENCE

Photo showing an U.S.-Swiss airship flying behind the Parthenon temple on the ancient Acropolis hill in Athens to help provide security at the Olympic Games.

Protecting the American Public

Diplomatic Security was on the front lines supporting the Department in the Global War on Terrorism, particularly in the overseas environment, and protecting the American public. Agent deployment to highly non-permissive environments continued at an increased rate. The Regional Security Office in Baghdad remains fully engaged in security operations throughout Iraq while transition planning proceeds full force. Dignitary protection was provided for Afghan President Karzai and the interim President and Prime Minister of Haiti. Diplomatic Security was also a part of a massive USG-wide effort to assist the Greek security authorities in preparation for the 2004 Summer Olympics.


An U.S.-Swiss airship flies behind the Parthenon temple on the ancient Acropolis hill in Athens to help provide security at the Olympic Games. � AP/Wide World Photos/Petros Karadjias

 


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