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20. Report on International Extradition Submitted to Congress Pursuant to Section 3203 of the Emergency Supplemental Act, 2000 as enacted in the Military Construction Appropriations Act, 2001, Public Law 106-246 Relating to Plan Columbia, January 17, 2001


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REPORT ON INTERNATIONAL EXTRADITION
SUBMITTED TO THE CONGRESS
PURSUANT TO SECTION 3203
OF THE EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL ACT, 2000,
AS ENACTED IN THE
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2001,
PUBLIC LAW 106-246

RELATED TO PLAN COLOMBIA

REPORT ON INTERNATIONAL EXTRADITION
PURSUANT TO SECTION 3203 OF THE EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL ACT, 2000, AS ENACTED IN PUBLIC LAW 106-246

This report is submitted by the Secretary of State to the Committee on Foreign Relations, the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate; and the Committee on International Relations, the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives in response to the requirements of section 3203 of Title III, Chapter 2 of the Emergency Supplemental Act, as enacted in the Military Construction Appropriations Act, 2001, Public Law 106-246. Title III of the Emergency Supplemental Act appropriates funds for the foreign assistance package known as "Plan Colombia." The text of section 3203 is attached hereto as Tab A.

As required by section 3203(a)(1), this Report begins with factual information about persons whose extradition has been requested from each of the following ten countries that are receiving counternarcotics assistance from the United States under Plan Colombia: Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. As discussed further below, this data was assembled at the request of the State Department by the Office of International Affairs of the Criminal Division of the Department of Justice.

As required by sections 3203(a)(2) and 3203(a)(3), this Report then discusses specific aspects of these ten countries' cooperation with the United States in the area of international extradition. Because sections 3203(a)(2) and 3203(a)(3) are linked in substance, they are discussed together below. The information in the discussion of these sections reflects the input of the Department of Justice.

Response to Section 3203(a)(1) - Persons Sought for Extradition

General Discussion

The statistical tables at Tab B were prepared by the Justice Department based on its database of international extradition requests made to Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. In preparing this information, the Justice Department used January 1, 1998 as a baseline for statistics for countries in question. This three-year period reflects the most recent experience with these ten countries, and spans a lengthy enough period of time so that the statistics meaningfully reflect that experience. In cases where at least one fugitive had been detained or surrendered during this three-year period, a detailed chart is included in Tab B reflecting the country and name of the fugitive.

The statistical tables reflect U.S. extradition requests for fugitives sought for narcotics offenses as well as for other crimes, and divide the information to reflect each category. The Justice Department was unable to provide names of fugitives still at large out of concern that disclosure could compromise the possibility of a fugitive's apprehension. In addition to this general concern, in some cases disclosure could endanger the safety of law enforcement personnel or sources, and in some cases there may be court orders prohibiting such disclosure. Because of these constraints, the first chart in Tab B provides aggregate statistics for those fugitives still at large without providing the names of the individual fugitives. For the same reasons, aggregate statistics but no names are provided for those persons who are currently detained in one of the ten countries for reasons other than extradition to the United States.

The data in Tab B is accurate based on information available to the Departments of Justice and State as of December 31, 2000, the end of the latest period for which data is available. In this connection, section 3203 requires reports to Congress every six months during the period that Plan Colombia resources are made available. The Department of State will correct or update the information set forth herein in subsequent reports as new information becomes available.

Response to Sections 3203(a)(2) and 3203(a)(3) - Efforts to Extradite to the United States, Analysis of Obstacles to Extradition, and Steps Taken to Overcome these Obstacles

General Discussion

The following general overview puts into context the discussion that follows about the U.S. Government's experiences in international extradition with Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela.

The United States has extradition treaties in force with each of the ten countries listed above. For nine of these countries, outgoing extradition requests from the United States are acted upon under the bilateral extradition treaties -- Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. The processing of U.S. extradition requests to Colombia, however, is conducted under that country's national extradition law. The Government of Colombia, unlike the United States Government, can extradite fugitives under its domestic law without reference to a treaty, and extradites fugitives to the United States on that basis.

Some of the U.S. Government's international extradition relationships with these countries are notably busier than others. As reflected in the charts in Tab B, for example, the United States has made many more extradition requests to Colombia than to Bolivia, El Salvador, or Panama. This disparity in experiences is reflected both in the charts at Tab B in response to section 3203(a)(1) and in the country-by-country discussions below.

All of the countries that are the subject of this report are cooperating with the United States in good faith, whether under a bilateral extradition treaty or under their domestic extradition law.

As in any extradition relationship, there are reasons why not all extradition requests (both to and from the United States) have been granted. Many of the U.S. Government's relationships with countries in the region are governed by older extradition treaties that need to be updated. The United States has embarked on an ambitious program of modernizing many of the older bilateral extradition treaties, particularly with countries with which there is, or is expected, a significant law enforcement need to carry out extraditions. In October 1998, as part of the largest group of law enforcement treaties ever heard at once, the U.S. Senate considered and approved eighteen extradition treaties -- sixteen were completely new treaties and two were protocols to existing treaties. In October 2000 the U.S. Senate considered and approved completely new extradition treaties with four additional countries.

Over time, the United States hopes to update all of the bilateral treaty relationships in the region. With respect to the ten countries covered under this report, the United States has brought into force new modern extradition treaties with Bolivia and with Trinidad and Tobago, has nearly completed negotiating a new extradition treaty with Peru, and expects to embark on extradition treaty negotiations with El Salvador in 2001. New treaties with modern features, including extradition of nationals, definition of extraditable offenses in terms of dual criminality, and the provisional arrest of fugitives, will strengthen the ability of the United States to have persons returned to face criminal charges.

The United States as a matter of policy draws no distinction between nationals and non-nationals in extradition. One of the U.S. Government's key negotiating priorities in determining new extradition treaty negotiations is to identify countries that are willing to extradite their nationals and update those treaty relationships as expeditiously as possible. In the last five years, the United States has updated its treaties in this hemisphere with Bolivia, Argentina and Paraguay after those countries agreed to include a treaty clause enabling the extradition of nationals under some or all circumstances. The United States also benefits from Colombia's December 1997 constitutional amendment to permit extraditing its nationals to the United States under its domestic law. Trinidad and Tobago has long extradited its nationals under extradition treaties applicable between the United States and that country. The U.S. Government intends to continue and expand this trend. Over time, the Departments of State and Justice would also like to update the treaties with Brazil, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Panama, Peru, and Venezuela, particularly when those countries are prepared to extradite their nationals. Peru and El Salvador have already indicated a willingness to pursue treaties that provide for extradition of nationals and the United States has embarked on the process of working with those countries to develop appropriate new treaties.

The Departments of Justice and State have been pursuing vigorous, across-the-board efforts to convince individual countries and the world community that refusal of extradition on the ground of nationality is no longer appropriate, given the ease of flight and the increasingly transnational nature of crime. In addition to pursuing this issue vigorously in treaty negotiations, U.S. diplomats and U.S. law enforcement officials, with the active personal leadership of Attorney General Reno, have made eliminating restrictions on the extradition of nationals a high priority in bilateral dialogues with other countries. These efforts have already had notable successes, beginning to achieve what the United States hopes will be an overall reversal of a well-entrenched and long-standing tradition in many countries, often enshrined in constitutions and national law.

Apart from the issue of extradition of nationals, however, it bears noting that not every request for extradition results in a fugitive being delivered to the requesting country. Frequently fugitives are not returned for very legitimate reasons which are grounded in international extradition law and practice. This is true both for requests to and from the United States.

For example, sometimes nations seeking extradition (including the United States) do not have recent specific information on where a fugitive is located and therefore might make multiple contingency requests for provisional arrest and extradition. In other cases, fugitives learn from the press or third parties they are being sought and flee or go into hiding. Extradition treaties themselves provide specific bases on which extraditions can be delayed or denied. The obligation to extradite under a bilateral extradition treaty is not absolute and protections are built in to accommodate both U.S. and foreign legal and policy interests. While the exact terms of such exceptions result from country-specific negotiations and thus vary somewhat among the treaties, legitimate limitations endorsed by the United States may include requirements that the conduct be criminalized in the requested state in addition to the requesting state; that the offenses be of a sufficiently serious character in both countries; and that evidence presented be sufficient to meet the relevant treaty's provisions or the constitutional or other legal requirements for detention of persons in the requested state. In some cases, including in the courts of the United States, extradition requests lead to lengthy judicial proceedings and challenges spanning years.

Moreover, most of the U.S. Government's modern treaties have provisions where the requested state can deny extradition absent assurances regarding the imposition of the death penalty, or if the crime in question is a political or military offense, or if extradition would present double jeopardy problems for the requested state. Many treaty relationships have provisions limiting the obligation to extradite where the statute of limitations of the requested state has run for the conduct in question. Finally, the nation where a fugitive is located is typically under no obligation to interrupt its own criminal prosecution of the same fugitive to accommodate a request for extradition from another nation, a principle that is recognized in all of the U.S. Government's modern extradition treaties.

The United States is also working with other countries in the hemisphere, including the ten countries that are the subject of this report, to promote judicial reform and respect for the rule of law. This includes extensive training programs for judges, prosecutors and police, encouragement of strong professional ethics standards, and reform of the criminal justice laws and procedures. These steps will help combat the potential for corruption, and instill public confidence in the integrity of the courts of justice. As these reforms take root, the extradition of fugitives -- along with other aspects of the criminal justice systems -- should become more transparent and efficient.

As a result of the Summits of the Americas and the initiation of regular meetings among justice ministers of the hemisphere, the 34 democratic countries of the Western Hemisphere are also engaged in a multilateral effort to improve extradition practice and procedures. At the March 1999 Justice Ministerial in Lima, Peru, the ministers endorsed a U.S. proposal to develop extradition "checklists," glossaries of commonly-used legal terms, and other instruments to provide guidance on extradition procedures that would help eliminate errors in the preparation of documents that have led in the past to the denial of extraditions that are requested. A working group has been formed at the Organization of American States to identify contact points in individual governments on extradition and to gather the necessary documentation. The March 2000 Justice Ministerial in San Jose, Costa Rica, provided an occasion for the ministers to reaffirm their interest in improving extradition practice and to bring judges into the discussion as well. There is a clear understanding by all countries slated to benefit from assistance under Plan Colombia, as reflected in commitments through the Summit of the Americas and Justice Ministerials, of the need to develop and maintain effective domestic criminal justice systems and effective systems of international cooperation in law enforcement.

Country-by-Country Analysis

With this background, the following discussion examines more specifically U.S. extradition relationships with Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Panama, Peru, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela.

BOLIVIA

In 1996, a new extradition treaty signed in 1995 which mandates the extradition of nationals for most serious offenses, including drug trafficking, entered into force between the United States and Bolivia. The negotiation of this modern treaty to replace an outdated treaty from 1900 represented a major step toward overcoming obstacles to extradition. There are no serious legal obstacles in Bolivian law which impede the extradition of persons sought by U.S. authorities. The Bolivian government's good faith efforts to extradite fugitives to the United States are demonstrated by its surrender of two fugitives since January 1998, and its detention of five others.

BRAZIL

Brazil cooperates with the United States in the extradition of non-Brazilians. The Brazilian constitution, however, prohibits the extradition of nationals. Moreover, the U.S.-Brazil extradition treaty, which was signed in 1961 and entered into force in 1964, does not include money laundering on its list of extraditable offenses. Brazil, however, is a party to the 1988 United Nations Convention Against Illicit Traffic in Narcotic Drugs and Psychotropic Substances (the 1988 United Nations Drug Convention), through which drug-related money laundering is deemed to be included as an extraditable offense under the bilateral treaty. While the United States is unable to obtain the extradition of Brazilian citizens, Brazil's good faith efforts to cooperate are demonstrated by its extradition of two non-citizen fugitives and detention of five others since January 1998. The Departments of Justice and State have continued to engage the Government of Brazil on important issues, including the extradition of nationals, in an effort to bring fugitives to justice.


COLOMBIA

Over the last two decades, the U.S.-Colombian extradition relationship has experienced both frustrating times and periods of extraordinary cooperation. At this time, the level of cooperation in extradition matters is as high as ever, and is particularly noteworthy in view of the complex political and public security concerns facing the Colombian authorities. Moreover, this cooperation has come at an enormous cost to the Colombian government, a large number of whose police, prosecutors, and judges, and their families, have been killed, injured, or threatened by members of drug trafficking organizations. Nonetheless, the number of fugitives extradited and currently detained at U.S. request is extraordinarily high. This development is particularly significant because of the prominent role of many of these fugitives in international criminal activities, including illegal narcotics trafficking.

For the purpose of background, in 1982, a new U.S.-Colombian extradition treaty, signed in 1979, which mandated the extradition of nationals for narcotics trafficking and other transnational crimes, entered into force. From 1982 through 1990, the Colombian government extradited a number of Colombian drug traffickers to the United States, at first pursuant to the treaty (which was ruled invalid under Colombian law by the Colombian Supreme Court in 1986), and afterwards pursuant to executive decree. In July 1991, however, a new Colombian Constitution, which expressly prohibited the extradition of Colombian nationals by birth, entered into force. Thereafter, extradition of non-Colombians continued pursuant to Colombian domestic law.

On December 17, 1997, Colombia enacted a constitutional amendment to allow for the extradition of nationals. Since then, Colombia has extradited to the United States 21 fugitives, 12 of whom are Colombian nationals and most of whom are wanted for major drug trafficking offenses. In addition, the Government of Colombia has detained 58 other fugitives who currently are in custody pending extradition to the United States and most of whom are Colombian nationals wanted for drug trafficking.

The 1997 constitutional change represented a vital step by the Colombian government to overcome the most significant barrier to extraditing criminals from Colombia, and this action ushered in a new era of bilateral cooperation on extradition matters. In addition, the number of fugitives arrested for extradition and surrendered to the United States amply demonstrates Colombia's good faith efforts to ensure that criminals are brought to justice in the United States. Nevertheless, some obstacles to extradition remain. For example, the constitutional amendment expressly applies only to crimes committed after its effective date, thereby continuing to bar extradition of a number of drug traffickers for crimes committed before December 1997. In addition, the Colombian domestic extradition law authorizes extradition only for a limited scope of offenses. As a result, the United States is unable to obtain the extradition of persons, regardless of their nationality, for a number of serious offenses including certain violent and financial crimes for which the minimum penalty under Colombia law may be less than four years imprisonment. The Departments of Justice and State continue to engage the Colombian government in an effort to overcome obstacles to, and otherwise facilitate, extradition.

COSTA RICA

The current U.S.-Costa Rican extradition treaty, signed in 1982, entered into force in 1991, and, at this time, our bilateral extradition relations are good, despite a Costa Rican constitutional prohibition against the extradition of its nationals. Since January 1998, Costa Rica has extradited twelve fugitives to the United States, including nine in 2000, and has detained four others whose extradition to the United States is pending. The Departments of Justice and State will continue to engage the Government of Costa Rica on important issues to ensure that fugitives are brought to justice.

ECUADOR

The current extradition treaty between the United States and Ecuador was signed in 1872, and supplemented in 1939. It remains in serious need of updating. The current extradition treaty does not provide for the mandatory extradition of nationals, contains a very limited list of extraditable crimes, and does not authorize the provisional arrest of fleeing fugitives prior to the presentation of a fully-documented formal extradition request. Narcotics trafficking and related money laundering are covered as extraditable offenses under the 1939 supplementary treaty between the U.S. and Ecuador and by operation of the 1988 UN Drug Convention, to which both the United States and Ecuador are parties.

Ecuador has a constitutional prohibition against the extradition of its citizens. In recent years, representatives of the Departments of Justice and State have traveled to Ecuador for preliminary talks on extradition issues and to offer appropriate assistance. However, the negotiation of a new extradition treaty depends on whether Ecuador is ready to amend its constitution to permit the extradition of Ecuadorian citizens. Despite difficulties in obtaining the extradition of fugitives from Ecuador, Ecuadorian authorities have been cooperative, when possible, in arranging for the deportation or expulsion of non-Ecuadorians to the United States or to third countries from where they can be extradited.

EL SALVADOR

In July 2000, El Salvador took a very important step to remove a serious obstacle to extradition by enacting a constitutional amendment to permit the extradition of Salvadoran nationals. The constitutional change has been an important policy goal of the Departments of Justice and State over the past several years. At this time, there are a number of fugitives who are wanted in the United States for murder and other serious offenses and are believed to be living in El Salvador but who, to date, have enjoyed impunity because of their Salvadoran nationality.

The constitutional amendment, as enacted, allows for the extradition of Salvadoran nationals when expressly provided for by an extradition treaty. Because the current U.S.-El Salvador extradition treaty, which was signed in 1911, does not contain an affirmative obligation for either party to extradite its nationals, a new treaty must be negotiated, ratified, and enter into force before the United States can seek the extradition of a Salvadoran national. The Departments of Justice and State are preparing for negotiations in 2001.

PANAMA

The current extradition treaty between the United States and Panama was signed in 1904, and the Panamanian Constitution prohibits the extradition of Panamanian nationals. Although the 1904 treaty contains a limited list of extraditable offenses, Panama is a party to the 1988 United Nations Drug Convention, through which narcotics trafficking and related money laundering are deemed to be included as extraditable offenses under the bilateral extradition treaty.

Despite its bar to extradition of nationals and an old treaty, Panama has continually demonstrated good faith efforts to surrender fugitives to the United States. Most of all, Panama has shown a willingness on numerous occasions to make use of legal alternatives to extradition (which are not reflected on the appended charts) in order to effect the return of non-Panamanians to the United States to face trial. For example, in May 1998, the Government of Panama expelled Colombian drug trafficker Jose Castrillon Henao to the United States in accordance with newly-passed legislation allowing the expulsion of foreign nationals under certain circumstances, even if the person is facing a Panamanian prosecution at the time. The Departments of Justice and State have continued to engage the Government of Panama on important issues to ensure that fugitives are brought to justice.

PERU

Peru's good faith efforts to extradite fugitives to the United States are demonstrated by the surrender of two persons to the United States since January 1998. Recognizing the need to update the current extradition treaty, which was signed in 1899, the United States and Peru have substantially completed the negotiation of a new treaty that would obligate the parties to extradite persons for a broad range of offenses, regardless of their nationality. The United States hopes to complete the negotiations as soon as possible.

TRINIDAD & TOBAGO

The United States enjoys an excellent law enforcement relationship with Trinidad, which plays a leadership role in regional and multilateral organizations and initiatives. Trinidad has been very cooperative in extradition matters and has exhibited the political will to expeditiously extradite several large-scale narcotics traffickers and murderers in the past few years. On November 29, 1999, a new extradition treaty came into force between the United States and Trinidad. The new treaty provides for the extradition of nationals and extradition for all offenses that are punishable by more than a year in prison. No problems have yet been identified in the period that the new treaty has been in effect. However, should any problems arise, it is expected that they would be resolved quickly through consultation.

VENEZUELA

The current extradition treaty between the United States and Venezuela was signed in 1922. The treaty contains a limited list of extraditable offenses, and narcotics trafficking is not one of the listed offenses, but Venezuela is a party to the 1988 UN Drug Convention, and by the terms of the Convention narcotics trafficking and related money laundering are deemed extraditable under the bilateral extradition treaty. Venezuela's 1999 Constitution expressly prohibits the extradition of Venezuelan nationals. Previously, Venezuela only had a statutory bar to the extradition of nationals. Despite this obstacle, Venezuela has demonstrated good faith in extraditing non-Venezuelans to the United States. On other occasions, the Venezuelan authorities have arranged for the deportation or expulsion of non-citizens to stand trial in the United States. Recently, continued progress in U.S.-Venezuelan extradition relations has been slowed by the transition of Venezuelan political institutions and large-scale personnel changes in all branches of government.

Tab A


Excerpt from the Emergency Supplemental Act, 2000,
as enacted in the Military Construction Appropriations Act, 2001 (P.L. 106-246)

Section 3203. Report on Extradition of Narcotics Traffickers.—

  1. Not later than 6 months after the date of the enactment of this title, and every 6 months thereafter, during the period Plan Colombia resources are made available, the Secretary of State shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations, the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate; and the Committee on International Relations, the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report setting forth—
  1. a list of the persons whose extradition has been requested from any country receiving counternarcotics assistance from the United States, indicating those persons who— (A) have been surrendered to the custody of United States authorities; (B) have been detained by the authorities and who are being processed for extradition; (C) have been detained by the authorities and who are not yet being processed for extradition; or (D) are at large;
  1. a determination whether authorities of each country receiving counternarcotics assistance from the United States are making good faith efforts to ensure the prompt extradition of each of the persons sought by United States authorities; and
  1. an analysis of— (A) any legal obstacles in the laws of each country receiving counternarcotics assistance from the United States regarding prompt extradition of persons sought by United States authorities; and (B) the steps taken by authorities of the United States and the authorities of each country receiving counternarcotics assistance from the United States to overcome such obstacles.


Tab B
PLAN COLOMBIA:

Summary of Extradition Information

December 31, 2000

COUNTRY

AT LARGE

DETAINED

SURRENDERED

Narcotics Charges
Non-Narcotics

Charges

PURSUANT TO U.S. EXTRADITION REQUEST

FOR OTHER REASONS

Bolivia

1

2

5

1

2


Brazil
0
4
5
0
2

Colombia
20
3
58
0
21

Costa Rica
11
3
4
1
12

Ecuador
1
3
0
1
0

El Salvador
0
0
0
0
0

Panama
5
9
0
2
1

Peru
1
1
0
0
2

Trinidad & Tobago
1
0
1
0
6

Venezuela
9
3
2
0
1

TOTAL
49
28
75
5
47


BOLIVIA: Fugitives Detained for Extradition


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

ARREST DATE

Pacheco Abraham, Luis Amado

Narcotics

09-15-1995

Gutierrez Parada, Mario

Narcotics

06-17-1997

Antelo Rojas, Fernando

Narcotics

06-21-1997

Vargas Campero, Gonzalo Rolando

Narcotics

04-08-2000

Grajales Passo, Eduardo Marino

Narcotics

11-29-2000


BOLIVIA: Fugitives Surrendered


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

SURRENDER DATE

Kline, Andrew Martin

Narcotics

09-25-1998

Alconini-Flores, Monica

Narcotics

07-21-1999

BRAZIL: Fugitives Detained for Extradition


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

ARREST DATE

Lech, Robert

Fraud

07-09-1998

Ponden, William Edward

Fraud

04-25-2000

Bradley, James Crane

Narcotics

05-09-2000

Toscano, Bruno

Fraud; Money Laundering

05-06-1999

Stern, Tuvia

Fraud; Theft

12-12-2000


BRAZIL: Fugitives Surrendered


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

SURRENDER DATE

Valencia, Mery S.

Narcotics

04-20-1998

Galo, Manuel

Customs Violations/ Wildlife Smuggling

02-17-2000



COLOMBIA: Fugitives Detained for Extradition


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

ARREST DATE

Cipriano Jo, Julio

Narcotics

03-15-1995

Amaro, Luis

Narcotics

01-12-1999

Morales, Jorge Orlando

Narcotics

04-16-1999

Ferrario Pozzi, Roberto Angelo

Money Laundering

05-16-1999

Franco Saavedra, Hernando

Narcotics

07-07-1999

Gomez Maya, Gustavo Adolfo

Narcotics

07-07-1999

Gomez-Maya, Hugo Carlos

Narcotics

07-07-1999

Prado-Arregoces, Omar Del

Narcotics

07-07-1999

Arboleda-Saldarriaga, Marco Antonio

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Barrera Garces, Carlos David

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Bernal Madrigal, Alejandro

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Betancourt-Rios, Hermis De Jesus

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Cardenas, Carlos

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Castiblanco Cabalcante, Jaime Gonzalo

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Gallego, Alberto De Jesus

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Giraldo-Palacio, Nelson Alberto

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Gomez-Moreno, Hernan Abelardo

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Gomez-Moreno, Oscar Alonso

Money Laundering

10-13-1999


COLOMBIA: Fugitives Detained for Extradition


Gonzalez Arbelaez, Edwin

Narcotics

10-13-1999

London-Botero, Carlos Mario

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Lopez-Cardona, Mario Herman

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Mejia-Toro, Mauricio

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Mesa-Sanin, Jairo De Jesus

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Moreno-Uribe, Horacio De Jesus

Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Nubia Restrepo, Martha

Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Ochoa Ruiz, Ricardo Pastor

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Ochoa Vasquez, Fabio

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Ochoa-Mejia, Fredy Ivan

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Perdomo-Lievan, Sergio

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Rebellon-Arcila, Luis Fernando

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Sanchez Cristancho, Jairo

Narcotics

10-13-1999

Sanchez-Vidal, Jorge Mauricio

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Tascon Aguirre, Alfredo

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Vacca-Bojaca, Adriana Marcela

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Velez-Velasquez, Santiago

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999


COLOMBIA: Fugitives Detained for Extradition


Villafane-Martinez, Ever

Narcotics; Money Laundering

10-13-1999

Garcia, Jorge

Homicide; Robbery; Theft

12-01-1999

Miranda, Pepe

Homicide; Robbery; Theft

12-01-1999

Restrepo, Paola

Homicide; Robbery; Theft

12-01-1999

Rugge, Luz Marina

Narcotics

01-11-2000

Rodriguez, Gumaro, Jr.

Narcotics

01-22-2000

Aristizabal Palacio, Alvaro Jose

Narcotics

02-11-2000

Ayala, Jorge Alfonso

Narcotics

02-15-2000

Botero Arroyave, Hector Fabio

Narcotics; Money Laundering

02-17-2000

Mogollon Barreto, Armando

Narcotics; Money Laundering

02-18-2000

Tamayo, Carlos Omar

Narcotics

02-18-2000

Ochoa, Oscar Jaime

Narcotics

02-21-2000

Doglioni Vallejo, Cesar Lorenzo Stefano

Narcotics

03-01-2000

Higuera Moreno, Dessy

Narcotics

03-17-2000

Santana Ortiz, Milton Enrique

Narcotics

03-17-2000

Martinez-Gallego, Luis Fernando

Narcotics; Money Laundering

04-29-2000

Garcia-Lozano, Jairo

Narcotics; Money Laundering

05-17-2000

Paez, Hector

Homicide; Robbery

07-06-2000


COLOMBIA: Fugitives Detained for Extradition


Franco Labrador, William Jose

Narcotics

08-20-2000

Tovar Leyva, Didier Antonio

Narcotics

08-20-2000

Velasquez Zapata, Carlos Mario

Narcotics

08-20-2000

Pelaez Marin, Gabriel Antonio

Narcotics

09-22-2000

Franky-Zapata, Alvaro

Money Laundering; Official Corruption

10-12-2000



COLOMBIA: Fugitives Surrendered


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

SURRENDER DATE

Dubois, Sergio

Narcotics; Escape

06-12-1998

Ebright, Martin Allen

Narcotics

07-17-1998

Stofenmacher, Sergio

Conspiracy; Embezzlement; Money Laundering

08-19-1998

Milanes, Jacome Tomas

Narcotics

12-10-1998

Bynoe, Jamie L.

Narcotics

12-17-1998

Brown-Valencia, Alfreida

Narcotics

03-18-1999

Menendez, Norberto

Narcotics

06-05-1999

Lara, Jaime Orlando

Narcotics

11-21-1999

Flores-Garmendia, Fernando Jose

Narcotics; Money Laundering

11-24-1999

Garcia-Cleves, Orlando

Narcotics

07-13-2000

Orlandez-Gamboa, Alberto

Narcotics

08-18-2000

Baez, Nelson

Homicide; Robbery; Theft

09-25-2000

Diaz Gomez, Carlos Alberto

Narcotics

10-12-2000

Asprilla-Perea, Jorge Eliecer

Narcotics

10-21-2000

Perlaza-Ortiz, Milton

Narcotics

10-27-2000

Restrepo, Alex

Homicide; Robbery; Theft

10-27-2000

COLOMBIA: Fugitives Surrendered


Escaf de Saldarriaga, Ivonne Maria

Narcotics

11-09-2000

Montoya, Juan Arturo

Narcotics; Money Laundering

11-09-2000

Castano-Bedoya, Lina Maria

Narcoticx

11-18-2000

Londono Vasquez, Hector Mario

Narcotics

12-19-2000


Echeverry Monsalve, Dario

Narcotics

12-28-2000


COSTA RICA: Fugitives Detained for Extradition


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

ARREST DATE

Hovis, Daniel Webster

Sex Crimes

08-06-1999

Young, Raymond David

Fraud

03-10-2000

Garcia, Jose Antonio

Narcotics

04-14-2000

Suarez, Eleades

Narcotics

05-08-2000


COSTA RICA: Fugitives Surrendered


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

SURRENDER DATE

Stoecker, Ronald Lee

Homicide; Sex Crimes

01-15-1998

Webber Britt, Teresa Elaine

Child Molestation

04-23-1999

Waldrop, Patrick Morgan

Narcotics

08-31-1999

Lacy, Ronald Allan

Sex Crimes

01-28-2000

White, Theodore William, Jr.

Sex Crimes; Rape

01-31-2000

Brown, Calvin F.

Fraud; Contraband/Stolen Property; Money Laundering

02-03-2000

Kalteux, William P.

Attempted Murder; Assault

03-10-2000

Gardner, Richard Van

Narcotics

03-17-2000

Knox, Tammy Lynn

Narcotics

03-17-2000

Miranda, Carlos

Arson/Destruction of Property; Homicide

05-16-2000

Freeman, William Warren

Narcotics

08-11-2000

Bauer, Samuel Richard

Narcotics

10-06-2000

PANAMA: Fugitives Surrendered


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

SURRENDER DATE

Mejia Martinez, Luis Alfonso

Narcotics

12-31-1998



PERU: Fugitives Surrendered


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

SURRENDER DATE

Trujillo, Nelson William

Homicide; Narcotics

04-15-1999

Tolosa, Fernando A.

Narcotics; Escape

05-05-2000



TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: Fugitives Detained
for Extradition


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

ARREST DATE

Williams, Leon Paul

Narcotics

11-10-2000



TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO: Fugitives Surrendered


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

SURRENDER DATE

Ash, Gary S.

Narcotics

08-28-1998

Henry, Kwame

Homicide; Kidnaping; Assault

11-09-1998

Bernardo, Rayon

Homicide; Robbery; Burglary

08-18-1999

Gajadahar, Winston

Homicide

12-10-1999

Roberts, Marvin

Narcotics

01-11-2000

Choonoo, Franklin

Homicide; Weapons/Explosives; Obstruction of Justice/Perjury

03-24-2000


VENEZUELA: Fugitives Detained


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

ARREST DATE

Rodriguez, Oscar

Narcotics

11-19-1999

Borja Ojeda, Lacides

Narcotics

9-11-2000


VENEZUELA: Fugitives Surrendered


FUGITIVE NAME

CRIME

SURRENDER DATE

Rodriguez Benitez, Cristobal

Homicide

08-28-1998



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