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U.S. Department of State

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Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT)


Bureau of Arms Control, Verification, and Compliance
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Opened for Signature on September 24, 1996

Annexes, Protocols, and Other Related Documents

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Annexes
Protocols
Other Documents Associated with the Treaty

ANNEX 1 TO THE TREATY

LIST OF STATES PURSUANT TO ARTICLE II, PARAGRAPH 28

Africa

Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome & Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zaire, Zambia, Zimbabwe.

Eastern Europe

Albania, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Georgia, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Slovakia, Slovenia, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Ukraine, Yugoslavia.

Latin America and the Caribbean

Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela.

Middle East and South Asia

Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kazakstan, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Maldives, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Yemen.

North America and Western Europe

Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Holy See, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America.

South East Asia, the Pacific and the Far East

Australia, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Fiji, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Lao People's Democratic Republic, Malaysia, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Myanmar, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Thailand, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam.

ANNEX 2 TO THE TREATY

LIST OF STATES PURSUANT TO ARTICLE XIV


List of States members of the Conference on Disarmament as at 18 June 1996 which formally participated in the work of the 1996 session of the Conference and which appear in Table 1 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's April 1996 edition of "Nuclear Power Reactors in the World", and of States members of the Conference on Disarmament as at 18 June 1996 which formally participated in the work of the 1996 session of the Conference and which appear in Table 1 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's December 1995 edition of "Nuclear Research Reactors in the World": Algeria, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Peru, Poland, Romania, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America, Viet Nam, Zaire.

PROTOCOL TO THE COMPREHENSIVE NUCLEAR TEST-BAN TREATY

PART I

THE INTERNATIONAL MONITORING SYSTEM AND INTERNATIONAL DATA CENTRE FUNCTIONS

A. GENERAL PROVISIONS

1. The International Monitoring System shall comprise monitoring facilities as set out in Article IV, paragraph 16, and respective means of communication.

2. The monitoring facilities incorporated into the International Monitoring System shall consist of those facilities specified in Annex 1 to this Protocol. The International Monitoring System shall fulfil the technical and operational requirements specified in the relevant operational manuals.

3. The Organization, in accordance with Article II, shall, in cooperation and consultation with the States Parties, with other States, and with international organizations as appropriate, establish and coordinate the operation and maintenance, and any future agreed modification or development of the International Monitoring System.

4. In accordance with appropriate agreements or arrangements and procedures, a State Party or other State hosting or otherwise taking responsibility for International Monitoring System facilities and the Technical Secretariat shall agree and cooperate in establishing, operating, upgrading, financing, and maintaining monitoring facilities, related certified laboratories and respective means of communication within areas under its jurisdiction or control or elsewhere in conformity with international law. Such cooperation shall be in accordance with the security and authentication requirements and technical specifications contained in the relevant operational manuals. Such a State shall give the Technical Secretariat authority to access a monitoring facility for checking equipment and communication links, and shall agree to make the necessary changes in the equipment and the operational procedures to meet agreed requirements. The Technical Secretariat shall provide to such States appropriate technical assistance as is deemed by the Executive Council to be required for the proper functioning of the facility as part of the International Monitoring System.

5. Modalities for such cooperation between the Organization and States Parties or States hosting or otherwise taking responsibility for facilities of the International Monitoring System shall be set out in agreements or arrangements as appropriate in each case.

B. SEISMOLOGICAL MONITORING

6. Each State Party undertakes to cooperate in an international exchange of seismological data to assist in the verification of compliance with this Treaty. This cooperation shall include the establishment and operation of a global network of primary and auxiliary seismological monitoring stations. These stations shall provide data in accordance with agreed procedures to the International Data Centre.

7. The network of primary stations shall consist of the 50 stations specified in Table 1-A of Annex 1 to this Protocol. These stations shall fulfil the technical and operational requirements specified in the Operational Manual for Seismological Monitoring and the International Exchange of Seismological Data. Uninterrupted data from the primary stations shall be transmitted, directly or through a national data centre, on-line to the International Data Centre.

8. To supplement the primary network, an auxiliary network of 120 stations shall provide information, directly or through a national data centre, to the International Data Centre upon request. The auxiliary stations to be used are listed in Table 1-B of Annex 1 to this Protocol. The auxiliary stations shall fulfill the technical and operational requirements specified in the Operational Manual for Seismological Monitoring and the International Exchange of Seismological Data. Data from the auxiliary stations may at any time be requested by the International Data Centre and shall be immediately available through on-line computer connections.

C. RADIONUCLIDE MONITORING

9. Each State Party undertakes to cooperate in an international exchange of data on radionuclides in the atmosphere to assist in the verification of compliance with this Treaty. This cooperation shall include the establishment and operation of a global network of radionuclide monitoring stations and certified laboratories. The network shall provide data in accordance with agreed procedures to the International Data Centre.

10. The network of stations to measure radionuclides in the atmosphere shall comprise an overall network of 80 stations, as specified in Table 2-A of Annex 1 to this Protocol. All stations shall be capable of monitoring for the presence of relevant particulate matter in the atmosphere. Forty of these stations shall also be capable of monitoring for the presence of relevant noble gases upon the entry into force of this Treaty. For this purpose the Conference, at its initial session, shall approve a recommendation by the Preparatory Commission as to which 40 stations from Table 2-A of Annex 1 to this Protocol shall be capable of noble gas monitoring. At its first regular annual session, the Conference shall consider and decide on a plan for implementing noble gas monitoring capability throughout the network. The Director-General shall prepare a report to the Conference on the modalities for such implementation. All monitoring stations shall fulfil the technical and operational requirements specified in the Operational Manual for Radionuclide Monitoring and the International Exchange of Radionuclide Data.

11. The network of radionuclide monitoring stations shall be supported by laboratories, which shall be certified by the Technical Secretariat in accordance with the relevant operational manual for the performance, on contract to the Organization and on a fee-for-service basis, of the analysis of samples from radionuclide monitoring stations. Laboratories specified in Table 2-B of Annex 1 to this Protocol, and appropriately equipped, shall, as required, also be drawn upon by the Technical Secretariat to perform additional analysis of samples from radionuclide monitoring stations. With the agreement of the Executive Council, further laboratories may be certified by the Technical Secretariat to perform the routine analysis of samples from manual monitoring stations where necessary. All certified laboratories shall provide the results of such analysis to the International Data Centre, and in so doing shall fulfil the technical and operational requirements specified in the Operational Manual on Radionuclide Monitoring and the International Exchange of Radionuclide Data.

D. HYDROACOUSTIC MONITORING

12. Each State Party undertakes to cooperate in an international exchange of hydroacoustic data to assist in the verification of compliance with this Treaty. This cooperation shall include the establishment and operation of a global network of hydroacoustic monitoring stations. These stations shall provide data in accordance with agreed procedures to the International Data Centre.

13. The network of hydroacoustic stations shall consist of the stations specified in Table 3 of Annex 1 to this Protocol, and shall comprise an overall network of six hydrophone and five T-phase stations. These stations shall fulfil the technical and operational requirements specified in the Operational Manual for Hydroacoustic Monitoring and the International Exchange of Hydroacoustic Data.

E. INFRASOUND MONITORING

14. Each State Party undertakes to cooperate in an international exchange of infrasound data to assist in the verification of compliance with this Treaty. This cooperation shall include the establishment and operation of a global network of infrasound monitoring stations. These stations shall provide data in accordance with agreed procedures to the International Data Centre.

15. The network of infrasound stations shall consist of the stations specified in Table 4 of Annex 1 to this Protocol, and shall comprise an overall network of 60 stations. These stations shall fulfil the technical an operational requirements specified in the Operational Manual for Infrasound Monitoring and the International Exchange of Infrasound Data.

F. INTERNATIONAL DATA CENTRE FUNCTIONS

16. The International Data Centre shall receive, collect, process, analyse, report on and archive data from International Monitoring System facilities, including the results of analysis conducted at certified laboratories.

17. The procedures and standard event screening criteria to be used by the International Data Centre in carrying out its agreed functions, in particular for the production of standard reporting products and for the performance of standard range of services for States Parties, shall be elaborated in the Operational Manual for the International Data Centre and shall be progressively developed. The procedures and criteria developed initially by the Preparatory Commission shall be approved by the Conference at its initial session.

International Data Centre Standard Products

18. The International Data Centre shall apply on a routine basis automatic processing methods and interactive human analysis to raw International Monitoring System data in order to produce and archive standard International Data Centre products on behalf of all States Parties. These products shall be provided at no cost to States Parties and shall be without prejudice to final judgements with regard to the nature of any event, which shall remain the responsibility of States Parties, and shall include:

(a) Integrated lists of all signals detected by the International Monitoring System, as well as standard event lists and bulletins, including the values and associated uncertainties calculated for each event located by the International Data Centre, based on a set of standard parameters;

(b) Standard screened event bulletins that result from the application to each event by the International Data Centre of standard event screening criteria, making use of the characterization parameters specified in Annex 2 to this Protocol, with the objective of characterising, highlighting in the standard event bulletin, and thereby screening out, events considered to be consistent with natural phenomena or non-nuclear, man-made phenomena. The standard event bulletin shall indicate numerically for each event the degree to which that event meets or does not meet the event screening criteria. In applying standard event screening, the International Data Centre shall use both global and supplementary screening criteria to take account of regional variations where applicable. The International Data Centre shall progressively enhance its technical capabilities as experience is gained in the operation of the International Monitoring System;

(c) Executive summaries, which summarize the data acquired and archived by the International Data Centre, the products of the International Data Centre, and the performance and operational status of the International Monitoring System and International Data Centre; and

(d) Extracts or subsets of the standard International Data Centre products specified in sub-paragraphs (a) to (c), selected according to the request of an individual State Party.

19. The International Data Centre shall carry out, at no cost to States Parties, special studies to provide in-depth, technical review by expert analysis of data from the International Monitoring System, if requested by the Organization or by a State Party, to improve the estimated values for the standard signal and event parameters.

International Data Centre Services to States Parties

20. The International Data Centre shall provide States Parties with open, equal, timely and convenient access to all International Monitoring System data, raw or processed, all International Data Centre products, and all other International Monitoring System data in the archive of the International Data Centre or, through the International Data Centre, of International Monitoring System facilities. The methods for supporting data access and the provision of data shall include the following services:

(a) Automatic and regular forwarding to a State Party of the products of the International Data Centre or the selection by the State Party thereof, and, as requested, the selection by the State Party of International Monitoring System data;

(b) The provision of the data or products generated in response to ad hoc requests by States Parties for the retrieval from the International Data Centre and International Monitoring System facility archives of data and products, including interactive electronic access to the International Data Centre data base; and

(c) Assisting individual States Parties, at their request and at no cost for reasonable efforts, with expert technical analysis of International Monitoring System data and other relevant data provided by the requesting State Party, in order to help the State Party concerned to identify the source of specific events. The output of any such technical analysis shall be considered a product of the requesting State Party, but shall be available to all States Parties.

The International Data Centre services specified in sub-paragraphs (a) and (b) shall be made available at no cost to each State Party. The volumes and formats of data shall be set out in the Operational Manual for the International Data Centre.

National Event Screening

21. The International Data Centre shall, if requested by a State Party, apply to any of its standard products, on a regular and automatic basis, national event screening criteria established by that State Party, and provide the results of such analysis to that State Party. This service shall be undertaken at no cost to the requesting State Party. The output of such national event screening processes shall be considered a product of the requesting State Party.

Technical Assistance

22. The International Data Centre shall, where required, provide technical assistance to individual States Parties:


(a) In formulating their requirements for selection and screening of data and products;

(b) By installing at the International Data Centre, at no cost to a requesting State Party for reasonable efforts, computer algorithms or software provided by that State Party to compute new signal and event parameters that are not included in the Operational Manual for the International Data Centre, the output being considered products of the requesting State Party; and

(c) By assisting States Parties to develop the capability to receive, process and analyse International Monitoring System data at a national data centre.

23. The International Data Centre shall continuously monitor and report on the operational status of the International Monitoring System facilities, of communications links, and of its own processing systems. It shall provide immediate notification to those responsible should the operational performance of any component fail to meet agreed levels set out in the relevant operational manual.

PART II

ON-SITE INSPECTIONS

A. GENERAL PROVISIONS

1. The procedures in this Part shall be implemented pursuant to the provisions for on-site inspections set out in Article IV.

2. The on-site inspection shall be carried out in the area where the event that triggered the on-site inspection request occurred.

3. The area of an on-site inspection shall be continuous and its size shall not exceed 1000 square kilometres. There shall be no linear distance greater than 50 kilometres in any direction.

4. The duration of an on-site inspection shall not exceed 60 days from the date of the approval of the on-site inspection request in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 46, but may be extended by a maximum of 70 days in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 49.

5. If the inspection area specified in the inspection mandate extends to the territory or other place under the jurisdiction or control of more than one State Party, the provisions on on-site inspections shall, as appropriate, apply to each of the States Parties to which the inspection area extends.

6. In cases where the inspection area is under the jurisdiction or control of the inspected State Party but is located on the territory of another State Party or where the access from the point of entry to the inspection area requires transit through the territory of a State Party other than the inspected State Party, the inspected State Party shall exercise the rights and fulfil the obligations concerning such inspections in accordance with this Protocol. In such a case, the State Party on whose territory the inspection area is located shall facilitate the inspection and shall provide for the necessary support to enable the inspection team to carry out its tasks in a timely and effective manner. States Parties through whose territory transit is required to reach the inspection area shall facilitate such transit.

7. In cases where the inspection area is under the jurisdiction or control of the inspected State Party but is located on the territory of a State not Party to this Treaty, the inspected State Party shall take all necessary measures to ensure that the inspection can be carried out in accordance with this Protocol. A State Party that has under its jurisdiction or control one or more areas on the territory of a State not Party to this Treaty shall take all necessary measures to ensure acceptance by the State on whose territory the inspection area is located of inspectors and inspection assistants designated to that State Party. If an inspected State Party is unable to ensure access, it shall demonstrate that it took all necessary measures to ensure access.

8. In cases where the inspection area is located on the territory of a State Party but is under the jurisdiction or control of a State not Party to this Treaty, the State Party shall take all necessary measures required of an inspected State Party and a State Party on whose territory the inspection area is located, without prejudice to the rules and practices of international law, to ensure that the on-site inspection can be carried out in accordance with this Protocol. If the State Party is unable to ensure access to the inspection area, it shall demonstrate that it took all necessary measures to ensure access, without prejudice to the rules and practices of international law.

9. The size of the inspection team shall be kept to the minimum necessary for the proper fulfilment of the inspection mandate. The total number of members of the inspection team present on the territory of the inspected State Party at any given time, except during the conduct of drilling, shall not exceed 40 persons. No national of the requesting State Party or the inspected State Party shall be a member of the inspection team.

10. The Director-General shall determine the size of the inspection team and select its members from the list of inspectors and inspection assistants, taking into account the circumstances of a particular request.

11. The inspected State Party shall provide for or arrange the amenities necessary for the inspection team, such as communication means, interpretation services, transportation, working space, lodging, meals, and medical care.

12. The inspected State Party shall be reimbursed by the Organization, in a reasonably short period of time after conclusion of the inspection, for all expenses, including those mentioned in paragraphs 11 and 49, related to the stay and functional activities of the inspection team on the territory of the inspected State Party.

13. Procedures for the implementation of on-site inspections shall be detailed in the Operational Manual for On-Site Inspections.

B. STANDING ARRANGEMENTS

Designation of Inspectors and Inspection Assistants

14. An inspection team may consist of inspectors and inspection assistants. An on-site inspection shall only be carried out by qualified inspectors specially designated for this function. They may be assisted by specially designated inspection assistants, such as technical and administrative personnel, aircrew and interpreters.

15. Inspectors and inspection assistants shall be nominated for designation by the States Parties or, in the case of staff of the Technical Secretariat, by the Director-General, on the basis of their expertise and experience relevant to the purpose and functions of on-site inspections. The nominees shall be approved in advance by the States Parties in accordance with paragraph 18.

16. Each State Party, no later than 30 days after the entry into force of this Treaty for it, shall notify the Director-General of the names, dates of birth, sex, ranks, qualifications and professional experience of the persons proposed by the State Party for designation as inspectors and inspection assistants.

17. No later than 60 days after the entry into force of this Treaty, the Technical Secretariat shall communicate in writing to all States Parties an initial list of the names, nationalities, dates of birth, sex and ranks of the inspectors and inspection assistants proposed for designation by the Director-General and the States Parties, as well as a description of their qualifications and professional experience.

18. Each State Party shall immediately acknowledge receipt of the initial list of inspectors and inspection assistants proposed for designation. Any inspector or inspection assistant included in this list shall be regarded as accepted unless a State Party, no later than 30 days after acknowledgment of receipt of the list, declares its non-acceptance in writing. The State Party may include the reason for the objection. In the case of non-acceptance, the proposed inspector or inspection assistant shall not undertake or participate in on-site inspection activities on the territory or in any other place under the jurisdiction or control of the State Party that has declared its non-acceptance. The Technical Secretariat shall immediately confirm receipt of the notification of objection.

19. Whenever additions or changes to the list of inspectors and inspection assistants are proposed by the Director-General or a State Party, replacement inspectors and inspection assistants shall be designated in the same manner as set forth with respect to the initial list. Each State Party shall promptly notify the Technical Secretariat if an inspector or inspection assistant nominated by it can no longer fulfil the duties of an inspector or inspection assistant.

20. The Technical Secretariat shall keep the list of inspectors and inspection assistants up to date and notify all States Parties of additions or changes to the list.

21. A State Party requesting an on-site inspection may propose that an inspector from the list of inspectors and inspection assistants serve as its observer in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 61.

22. Subject to paragraph 23, a State Party shall have the right at any time to object to an inspector or inspection assistant who has already been accepted. It shall notify the Technical Secretariat of its objection in writing and may include the reason for the objection. Such objection shall come into effect 30 days after receipt of the notification by the Technical Secretariat. The Technical Secretariat shall immediately confirm receipt of the notification of the objection and inform the objecting and nominating States Parties of the date on which the inspector or inspection assistant shall cease to be designated for that State Party.

23. A State Party that has been notified of an inspection shall not seek the removal from the inspection team of any of the inspectors or inspection assistants named in the inspection mandate.

24. The number of inspectors and inspection assistants accepted by a State Party must be sufficient to allow for availability of appropriate numbers of inspectors and inspection assistants. If, in the opinion of the Director-General, the non-acceptance by a State Party of proposed inspectors or inspection assistants impedes the designation of a sufficient number of inspectors and inspection assistants or otherwise hampers the effective fulfilment of the purposes of an on-site inspection, the Director-General shall refer the issue to the Executive Council.

25. Each inspector included in the list of inspectors and inspection assistants shall receive relevant training. Such training shall be provided by the Technical Secretariat pursuant to the procedures specified in the Operational Manual for On-Site Inspections. The Technical Secretariat shall co-ordinate, in agreement with the States Parties, a schedule of training for the inspectors.

Privileges and Immunities

26. Following acceptance of the initial list of inspectors and inspection assistants as provided for in paragraph 18 or as subsequently altered in accordance with paragraph 19, each State Party shall be obliged to issue, in accordance with its national procedures and upon application by an inspector or inspection assistant, multiple entry/exit and/or transit visas and other relevant documents to enable each inspector and inspection assistant to enter and to remain on the territory of that State Party for the sole purpose of carrying out inspection activities. Each State Party shall issue the necessary visa or travel documents for this purpose no later than 48 hours after receipt of the application or immediately upon arrival of the inspection team at the point of entry on the territory of the State Party. Such documents shall be valid for as long as is necessary to enable the inspector or inspection assistant to remain on the territory of the inspected State Party for the sole purpose of carrying out the inspection activities.

27. To exercise their functions effectively, members of the inspection team shall be accorded privileges and immunities as set forth in sub-paragraphs (a) to (i). Privileges and immunities shall be granted to members of the inspection team for the sake of this Treaty and not for the personal benefit of the individuals themselves. Such privileges and immunities shall be accorded to them for the entire period between arrival on and departure from the territory of the inspected State Party, and thereafter with respect to acts previously performed in the exercise of their official functions.

(a) The members of the inspection team shall be accorded the inviolability enjoyed by diplomatic agents pursuant to Article 29 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations of 18 April 1961;

(b) The living quarters and office premises occupied by the inspection team carrying out inspection activities pursuant to this Treaty shall be accorded the inviolability and protection accorded to the premises of diplomatic agents pursuant to Article 30, paragraph 1, of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations;

(c) The papers and correspondence, including records, of the inspection team shall enjoy the inviolability accorded to all papers and correspondence of diplomatic agents pursuant to Article 30, paragraph 2, of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. The inspection team shall have the right to use codes for their communications with the Technical Secretariat;

(d) Samples and approved equipment carried by members of the inspection team shall be inviolable subject to provisions contained in this Treaty and exempt from all customs duties. Hazardous samples shall be transported in accordance with relevant regulations;

(e) The members of the inspection team shall be accorded the immunities accorded to diplomatic agents pursuant to Article 31, paragraphs 1, 2 and 3, of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations;

(f) The members of the inspection team carrying out prescribed activities pursuant to this Treaty shall be accorded the exemption from dues and taxes accorded to diplomatic agents pursuant to Article 34 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations;

(g) The members of the inspection team shall be permitted to bring into the territory of the inspected State Party, without payment of any customs duties or related charges, articles for personal use, with the exception of articles the import or export of which is prohibited by law or controlled by quarantine regulations;

(h) The members of the inspection team shall be accorded the same currency and exchange facilities as are accorded to representatives of foreign Governments on temporary official missions; and

(i) The members of the inspection team shall not engage in any professional or commercial activity for personal profit on the territory of the inspected State Party.

28. When transiting the territory of States Parties other than the inspected State Party, the members of the inspection team shall be accorded the privileges and immunities enjoyed by diplomatic agents pursuant to Article 40, paragraph 1, of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. Papers and correspondence, including records, and samples and approved equipment carried by them, shall be accorded the privileges and immunities set forth in paragraph 27 (c) and (d).

29. Without prejudice to their privileges and immunities the members of the inspection team shall be obliged to respect the laws and regulations of the inspected State Party and, to the extent that is consistent with the inspection mandate, shall be obliged not to interfere in the internal affairs of that State. If the inspected State Party considers that there has been an abuse of privileges and immunities specified in this Protocol, consultations shall be held between the State Party and the Director-General to determine whether such an abuse has occurred and, if so determined, to prevent a repetition of such an abuse.

30. The immunity from jurisdiction of members of the inspection team may be waived by the Director-General in those cases when the Director-General is of the opinion that immunity would impede the course of justice and that it can be waived without prejudice to the implementation of the provisions of this Treaty. Waiver must always be express.

31. Observers shall be accorded the same privileges and immunities accorded to members of the inspection team pursuant to this section, except for those accorded pursuant to paragraph 27 (d).

Points of Entry

32. Each State Party shall designate its points of entry and shall supply the required information to the Technical Secretariat no later than 30 days after this Treaty enters into force for it. These points of entry shall be such that the inspection team can reach any inspection area from at least one point of entry within 24 hours. Locations of points of entry shall be provided to all States Parties by the Technical Secretariat. Points of entry may also serve as points of exit.

33. Each State Party may change its points of entry by giving notice of such change to the Technical Secretariat. Changes shall become effective 30 days after the Technical Secretariat receives such notification, to allow appropriate notification to all States Parties.

34. If the Technical Secretariat considers that there are insufficient points of entry for the timely conduct of inspections or that changes to the points of entry proposed by a State Party would hamper such timely conduct of inspections, it shall enter into consultations with the State Party concerned to resolve the problem.

Arrangements for Use of Non-Scheduled Aircraft

35. Where timely travel to the point of entry is not feasible using scheduled commercial flights, an inspection team may utilize non-scheduled aircraft. No later than 30 days after this Treaty enters into force for it, each State Party shall inform the Technical Secretariat of the standing diplomatic clearance number for non-scheduled aircraft transporting an inspection team and equipment necessary for inspection. Aircraft routings shall be along established international airways that are agreed upon between the State Party and the Technical Secretariat as the basis for such diplomatic clearance.

Approved Inspection Equipment

36. The Conference, at its initial session, shall consider and approve a list of equipment for use during on-site inspections. Each State Party may submit proposals for the inclusion of equipment in the list. Specifications for the use of the equipment, as detailed in the Operational Manual for On-Site Inspections, shall take account of safety and confidentiality considerations where such equipment is likely to be used.

37. The equipment for use during on-site inspections shall consist of core equipment for the inspection activities and techniques specified in paragraph 69 and auxiliary equipment necessary for the effective and timely conduct of on-site inspections.

38. The Technical Secretariat shall ensure that all types of approved equipment are available for on-site inspections when required. When required for an on-site inspection, the Technical Secretariat shall duly certify that the equipment has been calibrated, maintained and protected. To facilitate the checking of the equipment at the point of entry by the inspected State Party, the Technical Secretariat shall provide documentation and attach seals to authenticate the certification.

39. Any permanently held equipment shall be in the custody of the Technical Secretariat. The Technical Secretariat shall be responsible for the maintenance and calibration of such equipment.

40. As appropriate, the Technical Secretariat shall make arrangements with States Parties to provide equipment mentioned in the list. Such States Parties shall be responsible for the maintenance and calibration of such equipment.

C. ON-SITE INSPECTION REQUEST, INSPECTION MANDATE AND NOTIFICATION OF INSPECTION

On-Site Inspection Request

41. Pursuant to Article IV, paragraph 37, the on-site inspection request shall contain at least the following information:

(a) The estimated geographical and vertical coordinates of the location of the event that triggered the request with an indication of the possible margin of error;

(b) The proposed boundaries of the area to be inspected, specified on a map and in accordance with paragraphs 2 and 3;

(c) The State Party or States Parties to be inspected or an indication that the area to be inspected or part thereof is beyond the jurisdiction or control of any State;

(d) The probable environment of the event that triggered the request;

(e) The estimated time of the event that triggered the request, with an indication of the possible margin of error;

(f) All data upon which the request is based;

(g) The personal details of the proposed observer, if any; and

(h) The results of a consultation and clarification process in accordance with Article V, or an explanation, if relevant, of the reasons why such a consultation and clarification process has not been carried out.

Inspection Mandate

42. The mandate for an on-site inspection shall contain:


(a) The decision of the Executive Council on the on-site inspection request;

(b) The name of the State Party or States Parties to be inspected or an indication that the inspection area or part thereof is beyond the jurisdiction or control of any State;

(c) The location and boundaries of the inspection area specified on a map, taking into account all information on which the request was based and all other available technical information, in consultation with the requesting State Party;

(d) The planned types of activity of the inspection team in the inspection area;

(e) The point of entry to be used by the inspection team;

(f) Any transit or basing points, as appropriate;

(g) The name of the head of the inspection team;

(h) The names of members of the inspection team;

(i) The name of the proposed observer, if any; and

(j) The list of equipment to be used in the inspection area.

If a decision by the Executive Council pursuant to Article IV, paragraphs 46 to 49, necessitates a modification of the inspection mandate, the Director-General may update the mandate with respect to sub-paragraphs (d), (h) and (j), as appropriate. The Director-General shall immediately notify the inspected State Party of any such modification.

Notification of Inspection

43. The notification made by the Director-General pursuant to Article IV, paragraph 55 shall include the following information:

(a) The inspection mandate;

(b) The date and estimated time of arrival of the inspection team at the point of entry;

(c) The means of arrival at the point of entry;

(d) If appropriate, the standing diplomatic clearance number for non-scheduled aircraft; and

(e) A list of any equipment which the Director-General requests the inspected State Party to make available to the inspection team for use in the inspection area.

44. The inspected State Party shall acknowledge receipt of the notification by the Director-General no later than 12 hours after having received the notification.

D. PRE-INSPECTION ACTIVITIES

Entry Into the Territory of the Inspected State Party, Activities at the Point of Entry and Transfer to the Inspection Area

45. The inspected State Party that has been notified of the arrival of the inspection team shall ensure the immediate entry of the inspection team into its territory.

46. When a non-scheduled aircraft is used for travel to the point of entry, the Technical Secretariat shall provide the inspected State Party with a flight plan, through the National Authority, for the flight of the aircraft from the last airfield prior to entering the airspace of that State Party to the point of entry, no less than six hours before the scheduled departure time from that airfield. Such a plan shall be filed in accordance with the procedures of the International Civil Aviation Organization applicable to civil aircraft. The Technical Secretariat shall include in the remarks section of the flight plan the standing diplomatic clearance number and the appropriate notation identifying the aircraft as an inspection aircraft. If a military aircraft is used, the Technical Secretariat shall request prior authorization from the inspected State Party to enter its airspace.

47. No less than three hours before the scheduled departure of the inspection team from the last airfield prior to entering the airspace of the inspected State Party, the inspected State Party shall ensure that the flight plan filed in accordance with paragraph 46 is approved, so that the inspection team may arrive at the point of entry by the estimated arrival time.

48. Where necessary, the head of the inspection team and the representative of the inspected State Party shall agree on a basing point and a flight plan from the point of entry to the basing point and, if necessary, to the inspection area.

49. The inspected State Party shall provide for or arrange parking, security protection, servicing and fuel as required by the Technical Secretariat for the aircraft of the inspection team at the point of entry and, where necessary, at the basing point and at the inspection area. Such aircraft shall not be liable for landing fees, departure tax, and similar charges. This paragraph shall also apply to aircraft used for overflight during the on-site inspection.

50. Subject to paragraph 51, there shall be no restriction by the inspected State Party on the inspection team bringing approved equipment that is in conformity with the inspection mandate into the territory of that State Party, or on its use in accordance with the provisions of the Treaty and this Protocol.

51. The inspected State Party shall have the right, without prejudice to the time-frame specified in paragraph 54, to check in the presence of inspection team members at the point of entry that the equipment has been approved and certified in accordance with paragraph 38. The inspected State Party may exclude equipment that is not in conformity with the inspection mandate or that has not been approved and certified in accordance with paragraph 38.

52. Immediately upon arrival at the point of entry and without prejudice to the time-frame specified in paragraph 54, the head of the inspection team shall present to the representative of the inspected State Party the inspection mandate and an initial inspection plan prepared by the inspection team specifying the activities to be carried out by it. The inspection team shall be briefed by representatives of the inspected State Party with the aid of maps and other documentation as appropriate. The briefing shall include relevant natural terrain features, safety and confidentiality issues, and logistical arrangements for the inspection. The inspected State Party may indicate locations within the inspection area that, in its view, are not related to the purpose of the inspection.

53. After the pre-inspection briefing, the inspection team shall, as appropriate, modify the initial inspection plan, taking into account any comments by the inspected State Party. The modified inspection plan shall be made available to the representative of the inspected State Party.

54. The inspected State Party shall do everything in its power to provide assistance and to ensure the safe conduct of the inspection team, the approved equipment specified in paragraphs 50 and 51 and baggage from the point of entry to the inspection area no later than 36 hours after arrival at the point of entry, if no other timing has been agreed upon within the time-frame specified in paragraph 57.

55. To confirm that the area to which the inspection team has been transported corresponds to the inspection area specified in the inspection mandate, the inspection team shall have the right to use approved location-finding equipment. The inspected State Party shall assist the inspection team in this task.

E. CONDUCT OF INSPECTIONS

General Rules

56. The inspection team shall discharge its functions in accordance with the provisions of the Treaty and this Protocol.

57. The inspection team shall begin its inspection activities in the inspection area as soon as possible, but in no case later than 72 hours after arrival at the point of entry.

58. The activities of the inspection team shall be so arranged as to ensure the timely and effective discharge of its functions and the least possible inconvenience to the inspected State Party and disturbance to the inspection area.

59. In cases where the inspected State Party has been requested, pursuant to paragraph 43 (e) or in the course of the inspection, to make available any equipment for use by the inspection team in the inspection area, the inspected State Party shall comply with the request to the extent it can.

60. During the on-site inspection the inspection team shall have, inter alia:

(a) The right to determine how the inspection will proceed, consistent with the inspection mandate and taking into account any steps taken by the inspected State Party consistent with the provisions on managed access;

(b) The right to modify the inspection plan, as necessary, to ensure the effective execution of the inspection;

(c) The obligation to take into account the recommendations and suggested modifications by the inspected State Party to the inspection plan;

(d) The right to request clarifications in connection with ambiguities that may arise during the inspection;

(e) The obligation to use only those techniques specified in paragraph 69 and to refrain from activities that are not relevant to the purpose of the inspection. The team shall collect and document such facts as are related to the purpose of the inspection, but shall neither seek nor document information that is clearly unrelated thereto. Any material collected and subsequently found not to be relevant shall be returned to the inspected State Party;

(f) The obligation to take into account and include in its report data and explanations on the nature of the event that triggered the request, provided by the inspected State Party from the national monitoring networks of the inspected State Party and from other sources;

(g) The obligation to provide the inspected State Party, at its request, with copies of the information and data collected in the inspection area; and

(h) The obligation to respect the confidentiality and the safety and health regulations of the inspected State Party.

61. During the on-site inspection the inspected State Party shall have, inter alia:

(a) The right to make recommendations at any time to the inspection team regarding possible modification of the inspection plan;

(b) The right and the obligation to provide a representative to liaise with the inspection team;

(c) The right to have representatives accompany the inspection team during the performance of its duties and observe all inspection activities carried out by the inspection team. This shall not delay or otherwise hinder the inspection team in the exercise of its functions;

(d) The right to provide additional information and to request the collection and documentation of additional facts it believes are relevant to the inspection;

(e) The right to examine all photographic and measurement products as well as samples and to retain any photographs or parts thereof showing sensitive sites not related to the purpose of the inspection. The inspected State Party shall have the right to receive duplicate copies of all photographic and measurement products. The inspected State Party shall have the right to retain photographic originals and first-generation photographic products and to put photographs or parts thereof under joint seal within its territory. The inspected State Party shall have the right to provide its own camera operator to take still/video photographs as requested by the inspection team. Otherwise, these functions shall be performed by members of the inspection team;

(f) The right to provide the inspection team, from its national monitoring networks and from other sources, with data and explanations on the nature of the event that triggered the request; and

(g) The obligation to provide the inspection team with such clarification as may be necessary to resolve any ambiguities that arise during the inspection.

Communications

62. The members of the inspection team shall have the right at all times during the on-site inspection to communicate with each other and with the Technical Secretariat. For this purpose they may use their own duly approved and certified equipment with the consent of the inspected State Party, to the extent that the inspected State Party does not provide them with access to other telecommunications.

Observer

63. In accordance with Article IV, paragraph 61, the requesting State Party shall liaise with the Technical Secretariat to coordinate the arrival of the observer at the same point of entry or basing point as the inspection team within a reasonable period of the arrival of the inspection team.

64. The observer shall have the right throughout the inspection to be in communication with the embassy of the requesting State Party located in the inspected State Party or, in the case of absence of an embassy, with the requesting State Party itself.

65. The observer shall have the right to arrive at the inspection area and to have access to and within the inspection area as granted by the inspected State Party.

66. The observer shall have the right to make recommendations to the inspection team throughout the inspection.

67. Throughout the inspection, the inspection team shall keep the observer informed about the conduct of the inspection and the findings.

68. Throughout the inspection, the inspected State Party shall provide or arrange for the amenities necessary for the observer similar to those enjoyed by the inspection team as described in paragraph 11. All costs in connection with the stay of the observer on the territory of the inspected State Party shall be borne by the requesting State Party.

Inspection Activities and Techniques

69. The following inspection activities may be conducted and techniques used, in accordance with the provisions on managed access, on collection, handling and analysis of samples, and on overflights:

(a) Position finding from the air and at the surface to confirm the boundaries of the inspection area and establish coordinates of locations therein, in support of the inspection activities;

(b) Visual observation, video and still photography and multi-spectral imaging, including infrared measurements, at and below the surface, and from the air, to search for anomalies or artifacts;

(c) Measurement of levels of radioactivity above, at and below the surface, using gamma radiation monitoring and energy resolution analysis from the air, and at or under the surface, to search for and identify radiation anomalies;

(d) Environmental sampling and analysis of solids, liquids and gases from above, at and below the surface to detect anomalies;

(e) Passive seismological monitoring for aftershocks to localize the search area and facilitate determination of the nature of an event;

(f) Resonance seismometry and active seismic surveys to search for and locate underground anomalies, including cavities and rubble zones;

(g) Magnetic and gravitational field mapping, ground penetrating radar and electrical conductivity measurements at the surface and from the air, as appropriate, to detect anomalies or artifacts; and

(h) Drilling to obtain radioactive samples.

70. Up to 25 days after the approval of the on-site inspection in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 46, the inspection team shall have the right to conduct any of the activities and use any of the techniques listed in paragraph 69 (a) to (e). Following the approval of the continuation of the inspection in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 47, the inspection team shall have the right to conduct any of the activities and use any of the techniques listed in paragraph 69 (a) to (g). The inspection team shall only conduct drilling after the approval of the Executive Council in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 48. If the inspection team requests an extension of the inspection duration in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 49, it shall indicate in its request which of the activities and techniques listed in paragraph 69 it intends to carry out in order to be able to fulfil its mandate.

Overflights

71. The inspection team shall have the right to conduct an overflight over the inspection area during the on-site inspection for the purposes of providing the inspection team with a general orientation of the inspection area, narrowing down and optimizing the locations for ground-based inspection and facilitating the collection of factual evidence, using equipment specified in paragraph 79.

72. The overflight shall be conducted as soon as practically possible. The total duration of the overflight over the inspection area shall be no more than 12 hours.

73. Additional overflights using equipment specified in paragraphs 79 and 80 may be conducted subject to the agreement of the inspected State Party.

74. The area to be covered by overflights shall not extend beyond the inspection area.

75. The inspected State Party shall have the right to impose restrictions or, in exceptional cases and with reasonable justification, prohibitions on the overflight of sensitive sites not related to the purpose of the inspection. Restrictions may relate to the flight altitude, the number of passes and circling, the duration of hovering, the type of aircraft, the number of inspectors on board, and the type of measurements or observations. If the inspection team considers that the restrictions or prohibitions on the overflight of sensitive sites may impede the fulfilment of its mandate, the inspected State Party shall make every reasonable effort to provide alternative means of inspection.

76. Overflights shall be conducted according to a flight plan duly filed and approved in accordance with aviation rules and regulations of the inspected State Party. Flight safety regulations of the inspected State Party shall be strictly observed throughout all flying operations.

77. During overflights landing should normally be authorized only for purposes of staging or refueling.

78. Overflights shall be conducted at altitudes as requested by the inspection team consistent with the activities to be conducted, visibility conditions, as well as the aviation and the safety regulations of the inspected State Party and its right to protect sensitive information not related to the purposes of the inspection. Overflights shall be conducted up to a maximum altitude of 1500 metres above the surface.

79. For the overflight conducted pursuant to paragraphs 71 and 72, the following equipment may be used on board the aircraft:

(a) Field glasses;

(b) Passive location-finding equipment;

(c) Video cameras; and

(d) Hand-held still cameras.

80. For any additional overflights conducted pursuant to paragraph 73, inspectors on board the aircraft may also use portable, easily installed equipment for:

(a) Multi-spectral (including infrared) imagery;

(b) Gamma spectroscopy; and

(c) Magnetic field mapping.

81. Overflights shall be conducted with a relatively slow fixed or rotary wing aircraft. The aircraft shall afford a broad, unobstructed view of the surface below.

82. The inspected State Party shall have the right to provide its own aircraft, pre-equipped as appropriate in accordance with the technical requirements of the relevant operational manual, and crew. Otherwise, the aircraft shall be provided or rented by the Technical Secretariat.

83. If the aircraft is provided or rented by the Technical Secretariat, the inspected State Party shall have the right to check the aircraft to ensure that it is equipped with approved inspection equipment. Such checking shall be completed within the time-frame specified in paragraph 57.

84. Personnel on board the aircraft shall consist of:

(a) The minimum number of flight crew consistent with the safe operation of the aircraft;

(b) Up to four members of the inspection team;

(c) Up to two representatives of the inspected State Party;

(d) An observer, if any, subject to the agreement of the inspected State Party; and

(e) An interpreter, if necessary.

85. Procedures for the implementation of overflights shall be detailed in the Operational Manual for On-Site Inspections.

Managed Access

86. The inspection team shall have the right to access the inspection area in accordance with the provisions of the Treaty and this Protocol.

87. The inspected State Party shall provide access within the inspection area in accordance with the time-frame specified in paragraph 57.

88. Pursuant to Article IV, paragraph 57 and paragraph 86 above, the rights and obligations of the inspected State Party shall include:

(a) The right to take measures to protect sensitive installations and locations in accordance with this Protocol;

(b) The obligation, when access is restricted within the inspection area, to make every reasonable effort to satisfy the requirements of the inspection mandate through alternative means. Resolving any questions regarding one or more aspects of the inspection shall not delay or interfere with the conduct of the inspection team of other aspects of the inspection; and

(c) The right to make the final decision regarding any access of the inspection team, taking into account its obligations under this Treaty and the provisions on managed access.

89. Pursuant to Article IV, paragraph 57 (b) and paragraph 88 (a) above, the inspected State Party shall have the right throughout the inspection area to take measures to protect sensitive installations and locations and to prevent disclosure of confidential information not related to the purpose of the inspection. Such measures may include, inter alia:

(a) Shrouding of sensitive displays, stores, and equipment;

(b) Restricting measurements of radionuclide activity and nuclear radiation to determining the presence or absence of those types and energies of radiation relevant to the purpose of the inspection;

(c) Restricting the taking of or analysing of samples to determining the presence or absence of radioactive or other products relevant to the purpose of the inspection;

(d) Managing access to buildings and other structures in accordance with paragraphs 90 and 91; and

(e) Declaring restricted-access sites in accordance with paragraphs 92 to 96.

90. Access to buildings and other structures shall be deferred until after the approval of the continuation of the on-site inspection in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 47, except for access to buildings and other structures housing the entrance to a mine, other excavations, or caverns of large volume not otherwise accessible. For such buildings and structures, the inspection team shall have the right only of transit, as directed by the inspected State Party, in order to enter such mines, caverns or other excavations.

91. If, following the approval of the continuation of the inspection in accordance with Article IV, paragraph 47, the inspection team demonstrates credibly to the inspected State Party that access to buildings and other structures is necessary to fulfil the inspection mandate and that the necessary activities authorized in the mandate could not be carried out from the outside, the inspection team shall have the right to gain access to such buildings or other structures. The head of the inspection team shall request access to a specific building or structure indicating the purpose of such access, the specific number of inspectors, as well as the intended activities. The modalities for access shall be subject to negotiation between the inspection team and the inspected State Party. The inspected State Party shall have the right to impose restrictions or, in exceptional cases and with reasonable justification, prohibitions, on the access to buildings and other structures.

92. When restricted-access sites are declared pursuant to paragraph 89 (e), each such site shall be no larger than four square kilometres. The inspected State Party has the right to declare up to 50 square kilometers of restricted-access sites. If more than one restricted-access site is declared, each such site shall be separated from any other such site by a minimum distance of 20 metres. Each restricted-access site shall have clearly defined and accessible boundaries.

93. The size, location, and boundaries of restricted-access sites shall be presented to the head of the inspection team no later than the time that the inspection team seeks access to a location that contains all or part of such a site.

94. The inspection team shall have the right to place equipment and take other steps necessary to conduct its inspection up to the boundary of a restricted-access site.

95. The inspection team shall be permitted to observe visually all open places within the restricted-access site from the boundary of the site.

96. The inspection team shall make every reasonable effort to fulfil the inspection mandate outside the declared restricted-access sites prior to requesting access to such sites. If at any time the inspection team demonstrates credibly to the inspected State Party that the necessary activities authorized in the mandate could not be carried out from the outside and that access to a restricted-access site is necessary to fulfil the mandate, some members of the inspection team shall be granted access to accomplish specific tasks within the site. The inspected State Party shall have the right to shroud or otherwise protect sensitive equipment, objects and materials not related to the purpose of the inspection. The number of inspectors shall be kept to the minimum necessary to complete the tasks related to the inspection. The modalities for such access shall be subject to negotiation between the inspection team and the inspected State Party.

Collection, Handling and Analysis of Samples

97. Subject to paragraphs 86 to 96 and 98 to 100, the inspection team shall have the right to collect and remove relevant samples from the inspection area.

98. Whenever possible, the inspection team shall analyze samples on-site. Representatives of the inspected State Party shall have the right to be present when samples are analyzed on-site. At the request of the inspection team, the inspected State Party shall, in accordance with agreed procedures, provide assistance for the analysis of samples on-site. The inspection team shall have the right to transfer samples for off-site analysis at laboratories designated by the Organization only if it demonstrates that the necessary sample analysis can not be performed on-site.

99. The inspected State Party shall have the right to retain portions of all samples collected when these samples are analysed and may take duplicate samples.

100. The inspected State Party shall have the right to request that any unused samples or portions thereof be returned.

101. The designated laboratories shall conduct chemical and physical analysis of the samples transferred for off-site analysis. Details of such analysis shall be elaborated in the Operational Manual for On-Site Inspections.

102. The Director-General shall have the primary responsibility for the security, integrity and preservation of samples and for ensuring that the confidentiality of samples transferred for off-site analysis is protected. The Director-General shall do so in accordance with procedures contained in the Operational Manual for On-Site Inspections. The Director-General shall, in any case:

(a) Establish a stringent regime governing the collection, handling, transport and analysis of samples;

(b) Certify the laboratories designated to perform different types of analysis;

(c) Oversee the standardization of equipment and procedures at these designated laboratories and of mobile analytical equipment and procedures;

(d) Monitor quality control and overall standards in relation to the certification of these laboratories and in relation to mobile equipment and procedures; and

(e) Select from among the designated laboratories those which shall perform analytical or other functions in relation to specific investigations.

103. When off-site analysis is to be performed, samples shall be analyzed in at least two designated laboratories. The Technical Secretariat shall ensure the expeditious processing of the analysis. The samples shall be accounted for by the Technical Secretariat and any unused samples or portions thereof shall be returned to the Technical Secretariat.

104. The Technical Secretariat shall compile the results of the laboratory analysis of samples relevant to the purpose of the inspection. Pursuant to Article IV, paragraph 63, the Director-General shall transmit any such results promptly to the inspected State Party for comments and thereafter to the Executive Council and to all other States Parties and shall include detailed information concerning the equipment and methodology employed by the designated laboratories.

Conduct of Inspections in Areas beyond the Jurisdiction or Control of any State

105. In case of an on-site inspection in an area beyond the jurisdiction or control of any State, the Director-General shall consult with the appropriate States Parties and agree on any transit or basing points to facilitate a speedy arrival of the inspection team in the inspection area.

106. The States Parties on whose territory transit or basing points are located shall, as far as possible, assist in facilitating the inspection, including transporting the inspection team, its baggage and equipment to the inspection area, as well as providing the relevant amenities specified in paragraph 11. The Organization shall reimburse assisting States Parties for all costs incurred.

107. Subject to the approval of the Executive Council, the Director-General may negotiate standing arrangements with States Parties to facilitate assistance in the event of an on-site inspection in an area beyond the jurisdiction or control of any State.

108. In cases where one or more States Parties have conducted an investigation of an ambiguous event in an area beyond the jurisdiction or control of any State before a request is made for an on-site inspection in that area, any results of such investigation may be taken into account by the Executive Council in its deliberations pursuant to Article IV.

Post-Inspection Procedures

109. Upon conclusion of the inspection, the inspection team shall meet with the representative of the inspected State Party to review the preliminary findings of the inspection team and to clarify any ambiguities. The inspection team shall provide the representative of the inspected State Party with its preliminary findings in written form according to a standardized format, together with a list of any samples and other material taken from the inspection area pursuant to paragraph 98. The document shall be signed by the head of the inspection team. In order to indicate that he or she has taken notice of the contents of the document, the representative of the inspected State Party shall countersign the document. The meeting shall be completed no later than 24 hours after the conclusion of the inspection.

Departure

110. Upon completion of the post-inspection procedures, the inspection team and the observer shall leave, as soon as possible, the territory of the inspected State Party. The inspected State Party shall do everything in its power to provide assistance and to ensure the safe conduct of the inspection team, equipment and baggage to the point of exit. Unless agreed otherwise by the inspected State Party and the inspection team, the point of exit used shall be the same as the point of entry.

PART III

CONFIDENCE-BUILDING MEASURES

1. Pursuant to Article IV, paragraph 68, each State Party shall, on a voluntary basis, provide the Technical Secretariat with notification of any chemical explosion using 300 tonnes or greater of TNT-equivalent blasting material detonated as a single explosion anywhere on its territory, or at any place under its jurisdiction or control. If possible, such notification shall be provided in advance. Such notification shall include details on location, time, quantity and type of explosive used, as well as on the configuration and intended purpose of the blast.

2. Each State Party shall, on a voluntary basis, as soon as possible after the entry into force of this Treaty provide to the Technical Secretariat, and at annual intervals thereafter update, information related to its national use of all other chemical explosions greater than 300 tonnes TNT-equivalent. In particular, the State Party shall seek to advise:

(a) The geographic locations of sites where the explosions originate;

(b) The nature of activities producing them and the general profile and frequency of such explosions;

(c) Any other relevant detail, if available;

and to assist the Technical Secretariat in clarifying the origins of any such event detected by the International Monitoring System.

3. A State Party may, on a voluntary and mutually-acceptable basis, invite representatives of the Technical Secretariat or of other States Parties to visit sites within its territory referred to in paragraphs 1 and 2.

4. For the purpose of calibrating the International Monitoring System, States Parties may liaise with the Technical Secretariat to carry out chemical calibration explosions or to provide relevant information on chemical explosions planned for other purposes.

ANNEX 1 TO THE PROTOCOL

Table 1-A List of Seismological Stations Comprising the Primary Network


# State Responsible for Station Location Latitude Longitude Type
1 Argentina PLCA
Paso Flores
40.7 S 70.6 W 3-C
2 Australia WRA
Warramunga, NT
19.9 S 134.3 E array
3 Australia ASAR
Alice Springs, NT
23.7 S 133.9 E array
4 Australia STKA
Stephens Creek, SA
31.9 S 141.6 E 3-C
5 Australia MAW
Mawson, Antarctica
67.6 S 62.9 E 3-C
6 Bolivia LPAZ
La Paz
16.3 S 68.1 W 3-C
7 Brazil BDFB
Brasilia
15.6 S 48.0 W 3-C
8 Canada ULMC
Lac du Bonnet, Man.
50.2 N 95.9 W 3-C
9 Canada YKAC
Yellowknife,
N.W.T.
62.5 N 114.6 W array
10 Canada SCH
Schefferville,
Quebec
54.8 N 66.8 W 3-C
11 Central African
Republic
BGCA
Bangui
05.2 N 18.4 E 3-C
12 China HAI
Hailar
49.3 N 119.7 E 3-C >
array
13 China LZH
Lanzhou
36.1 N 103.8 E 3-C >
array
14 Colombia XSA
El Rosal
04.9 N 74.3 W 3-C
15 Côte d'Ivoire DBIC
Dimbroko
06.7 N 04.9 W 3-C
16 Egypt LXEG
Luxor
26.0 N 33.0 E array
17 Finland FINES
Lahti
61.4 N 26.1 E array
18 France PPT
Tahiti
17.6 S 149.6 W 3-C
19 Germany GEC2
Freyung
48.9 N 13.7 E array
20 To be determined To be determined To be determined To be determined To be determined
21 Iran
(Islamic Republic of)
THR
Tehran
35.8 N 51.4 E 3-C
22 Japan MJAR
Matsushiro
36.5 N 138.2 E array
23 Kazakstan MAK
Makanchi
46.8 N 82.0 E array
24 Kenya KMBO
Kilimambogo
01.1 S 37.2 E 3-C
25 Mongolia JAVM
Javhlant
48.0 N 106.8 E 3-C >
array
26 Niger New Site To be determined To be determined 3-C >
array
27 Norway NAO
Hamar
60.8 N 10.8 E array
28 Norway ARAO
Karasjok
69.5 N 25.5 E array
29 Pakistan PRPK
Pari
33.7 N 73.3 E array
30 Paraguay CPUP
Villa Florida
26.3 S 57.3 W 3-C
31 Republic of Korea KSRS
Wonju
37.5 N 127.9 E array
32 Russian Federation KBZ
Khabaz
43.7 N 42.9 E 3-C
33 Russian Federation ZAL
Zalesovo
53.9 N 84.8 E 3-C >
array
34 Russian Federation NRI
Norilsk
69.0 N 88.0 E 3-C
35 Russian Federation PDY
Peleduy
59.6 N 112.6 E 3-C >
array
36 Russian Federation PET
Petropavlovsk-
Kamchatskiy
53.1 N 157.8 E 3-C >
array
37 Russian Federation USK
Ussuriysk
44.2 N 132.0 E 3-C >
array
38 Saudi Arabia New Site To be determined To be determined array
39 South Africa BOSA
Boshof
28.6 S 25.6 E 3-C
40 Spain ESDC
Sonseca
39.7 N 04.0 W array
41 Thailand CMTO
Chiang Mai
18.8 N 99.0 E array
42 Tunisia THA
Thala
35.6 N 08.7 E 3-C
43 Turkey BRTR
Belbashi
The array is subject to relocation at Keskin
39.9 N 32.8 E array
44 Turkmenistan GEYT
Alibeck
37.9 N 58.1 E array
45 Ukraine AKASG
Malin
50.4 N 29.1 E array
46 United States of America LJTX
Lajitas, TX
29.3 N 103.7 W array
47 United States of America MNV
Mina, NV
38.4 N 118.2 W array
48 United States of America PIWY
Pinedale, WY
42.8 N 109.6 W array
49 United States of America ELAK
Eielson, AK
64.8 N 146.9 W array
50 United States of America VNDA
Vanda, Antarctica
77.5 S 161.9 E 3-C

Key:

3-C > array: indicates that the site could start operations in the International Monitoring System as a three-component station and be upgraded to an array at a later time.

Table 1-B List of Seismological Stations Comprising the Auxiliary Network


# State Responsible for Station Location Latitude Longitude Type
1 Argentina CFA
Coronel Fontana
31.6 S 68.2 W 3-C
2 Argentina USHA
Ushuaia
55.0 S 68.0 W 3-C
3 Armenia GNI
Garni
40.1 N 44.7 E 3-C
4 Australia CTA
Charters Towers, QLD
20.1 S 146.3 E 3-C
5 Australia FITZ
Fitzroy Crossing, WA
18.1 S 125.6 E 3-C
6 Australia NWAO
Narrogin, WA
32.9 S 117.2 E 3-C
7 Bangladesh CHT
Chittagong
22.4 N 91.8 E 3-C
8 Bolivia SIV
San Ignacio
16.0 S 61.1 W 3-C
9 Botswana LBTB
Lobatse
25.0 S 25.6 E 3-C
10 Brazil PTGA
Pitinga
0.7 S 60.0 W 3-C
11 Brazil RGNB
Rio Grande do Norte
6.9 S 37.0 W 3-C
12 Canada FRB
Iqaluit, N.W.T.
63.7 N 68.5 W 3-C
13 Canada DLBC
Dease Lake, B.C.
58.4 N 130.0 W 3-C
14 Canada SADO
Sadowa, Ont.
44.8 N 79.1 W 3-C
15 Canada BBB
Bella Bella, B.C.
52.2 N 128.1 W 3-C
16 Canada MBC
Mould Bay, N.W.T.
76.2 N 119.4 W 3-C
17 Canada INK
Inuvik, N.W.T.
68.3 N 133.5 W 3-C
18 Chile RPN
Easter Island
27.2 S 109.4 W 3-C
19 Chile LVC
Limon Verde
22.6 S 68.9 W 3-C
20 China BJT
Baijiatuan
40.0 N 116.2 E 3-C
21 China KMI
Kunming
25.2 N 102.8 E 3-C
22 China SSE
Sheshan
31.1 N 121.2 E 3-C
23 China XAN
Xi'an
34.0 N 108.9 E 3-C
24 Cook Islands RAR
Rarotonga
21.2 S 159.8 W 3-C
25 Costa Rica JTS
Las Juntas de Abangares
10.3 N 85.0 W 3-C
26 Czech Republic VRAC
Vranov
49.3 N 16.6 E 3-C
27 Denmark SFJ
Sondre Stromfjord, Greenland
67.0 N 50.6 W 3-C
28 Djibouti ATD
Arta Tunnel
11.5 N 42.9 E 3-C
29 Egypt KEG
Kottamya
29.9 N 31.8 E 3-C
30 Ethiopia FURI
Furi
8.9 N 38.7 E 3-C
31 Fiji MSVF
Monasavu, Viti Levu
17.8 S 178.1 E 3-C
32 France NOUC
Port Laguerre, New Caledonia
22.1 S 166.3 E 3-C
33 France KOG
Kourou, French Guiana
5.2 N 52.7 W 3-C
34 Gabon BAMB
Bambay
1.7 S 13.6 E 3-C
35 Germany/South Africa ---
SANAE Station, Antarctica
71.7 S 2.9 W 3-C
36 Greece IDI
Anogia, Crete
35.3 N 24.9 E 3-C
37 Guatemala RDG
Rabir
15.0 N 90.5 W 3-C
38 Iceland BORG
Borgarnes
64.8 N 21.3 W 3-C
39 To be determined To be determined To be determined To be determined To be determined
40 Indonesia PACI
Cibinong, Jawa Barat
6.5 S 107.0 E 3-C
41 Indonesia JAY
Jayapura, Irian Jaya
2.5 S 140.7 E 3-C
42 Indonesia SWI
Sorong, Irian Jaya
0.9 S 131.3 E 3-C
43 Indonesia PSI
Parapat, Sumatera
2.7 N 98.9 E 3-C
44 Indonesia KAPI
Kappang, Sulawesi Selatan
5.0 S 119.8 E 3-C
45 Indonesia KUG
Kupang, Nusatenggara Timur
10.2 S 123.6 E 3-C
46 Iran
(Islamic Republic of)
KRM
Kerman
30.3 N 57.1 E 3-C
47 Iran
(Islamic Republic of)
MSN
Masjed-e-Soleyman
31.9 N 49.3 E 3-C
48 Israel MBH
Eilath
29.8 N 34.9 E 3-C
49 Israel PARD
Parod
32.6 N 35.3 E array
50 Italy ENAS
Enna, Sicily
37.5 N 14.3 E 3-C
51 Japan JNU
Ohita, Kyushu
33.1 N 130.9 E 3-C
52 Japan JOW
Kunigami, Okinawa
26.8 N 128.3 E 3-C
53 Japan JHJ
Hachijojima, Izu Islands
33.1 N 139.8 E 3-C
54 Japan JKA
Kamikawa-asahi, Hokkaido
44.1 N 142.6 E 3-C
55 Japan JCJ
Chichijima, Ogasawara
27.1 N 142.2 E 3-C
56 Jordan ---
Ashqof
32.5 N 37.6 E 3-C
57 Kazakstan BRVK
Borovoye
53.1 N 70.3 E array
58 Kazakstan KURK
Kurchatov
50.7 N 78.6 E array
59 Kazakstan AKTO
Aktyubinsk
50.4 N 58.0 E 3-C
60 Kyrgyzstan AAK
Ala-Archa
42.6 N 74.5 E 3-C
61 Madagascar TAN
Antananarivo
18.9 S 47.6 E 3-C
62 Mali KOWA
Kowa
14.5 N 4.0 W 3-C
63 Mexico TEYM
Tepich, Yucatan
20.2 N 88.3 W 3-C
64 Mexico TUVM
Tuzandepeti, Veracruz
18.0 N 94.4 W 3-C
65 Mexico LPBM
La Paz, Baja California Sur
24.2 N 110.2 W 3-C
66 Morocco MDT
Midelt
32.8 N 4.6 W 3-C
67 Namibia TSUM
Tsumeb
19.1 S 17.4 E 3-C
68 Nepal EVN
Everest
28.0 N 86.8 E 3-C
69 New Zealand EWZ
Erewhon, South Island
43.5 S 170.9 E 3-C
70 New Zealand RAO
Raoul Island
29.2 S 177.9 W 3-C
71 New Zealand UPZ
Urewera, North Island
38.3 S 177.1 E 3-C
72 Norway SPITS
Spitsbergen
78.2 N 16.4 E array
73 Norway JMI
Jan Mayen
70.9 N 8.7 W 3-C
74 Oman WSAR
Wadi Sarin
23.0 N 58.0 E 3-C
75 Papua New Guinea PMG
Port Moresby
9.4 S 147.2 E 3-C
76 Papua New Guinea BIAL
Bialla
5.3 S 151.1 E 3-C
77 Peru CAJP
Cajamarca
7.0 S 78.0 W 3-C
78 Peru NNA
Nana
12.0 S 76.8 W 3-C
79 Philippines DAV
Davao, Mindanao
7.1 N 125.6 E 3-C
80 Philippines TGY
Tagaytay, Luzon
14.1 N 120.9 E 3-C
81 Romania MLR
Muntele Rosu
45.5 N 25.9 E 3-C
82 Russian Federation KIRV
Kirov
58.6 N 49.4 E 3-C
83 Russian Federation KIVO
Kislovodsk
44.0 N 42.7 E array
84 Russian Federation OBN
Obninsk
55.1 N 36.6 E 3-C
85 Russian Federation ARU
Arti
56.4 N 58.6 E 3-C
86 Russian Federation SEY
Seymchan
62.9 N 152.4 E 3-C
87 Russian Federation TLY
Talaya
51.7 N 103.6 E 3-C
88 Russian Federation YAK
Yakutsk
62.0 N 129.7 E 3-C
89 Russian Federation URG
Urgal
51.1 N 132.3 E 3-C
90 Russian Federation BIL
Bilibino
68.0 N 166.4 E 3-C
91 Russian Federation TIXI
Tiksi
71.6 N 128.9 E 3-C
92 Russian Federation YSS
Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk
47.0 N 142.8 E 3-C
93 Russian Federation MA2
Magadan
59.6 N 150.8 E 3-C
94 Russian Federation ZIL
Zilim
53.9 N 57.0 E 3-C
95 Samoa AFI
Afiamalu
13.9 S 171.8 W 3-C
96 Saudi Arabia RAYN
Ar Rayn
23.6 N 45.6 E 3-C
97 Senegal MBO
Mbour
14.4 N 17.0 W 3-C
98 Solomon Islands HNR
Honiara, Guadalcanal
9.4 S 160.0 E 3-C
99 South Africa SUR
Sutherland
32.4 S 20.8 E 3-C
100 Sri Lanka COC
Colombo
6.9 N 79.9 E 3-C
101 Sweden HPS
Hagfors
60.1 N 13.7 E array
102 Switzerland DAVOS
Davos
46.8 N 9.8 E 3-C
103 Uganda MBRU
Mbarara
0.4 S 30.4 E 3-C
104 United Kingdom EKA
Eskdalemuir
55.3 N 3.2 W array
105 United States of America GUMO
Guam, Marianas Islands
13.6 N 144.9 E 3-C
106 United States of America PMSA
Palmer Station, Antarctica
64.8 S 64.1 W 3-C
107 United States of America TKL
Tuckaleechee Caverns, TN
35.7 N 83.8 W 3-C
108 United States of America PFCA
Piñon Flat, CA
33.6 N 116.5 W 3-C
109 United States of America YBH
Yreka, CA
41.7 N 122.7 W 3-C
110 United States of America KDC
Kodiak Island, AK
57.8 N 152.5 W 3-C
111 United States of America ALQ
Albuquerque, NM
35.0 N 106.5 W 3-C
112 United States of America ATTU
Attu Island, AK
52.8 N 172.7 E 3-C
113 United States of America ELK
Elko, NV
40.7 N 115.2 W 3-C
114 United States of America SPA
South Pole, Antarctica
90.0 S - - 3-C
115 United States of America NEW
Newport, WA
48.3 N 117.1 W 3-C
116 United States of America SJG
San Juan, PR
18.1 N 66.2 W 3-C
117 Venezuela SDV
Santo Domingo
8.9 N 70.6 W 3-C
118 Venezuela PCRV
Puerto la Cruz
10.2 N 64.6 W 3-C
119 Zambia LSZ
Lusaka
15.3 S 28.2 E 3-C
120 Zimbabwe BUL
Bulawayo
to be advised to be advised 3-C

Table 2-A List of Radionuclide Stations


# State Responsible for Station Location Latitude Longitude
1 Argentina Buenos Aires 34.0 S 58.0 W
2 Argentina Salta 24.0 S 65.0 W
3 Argentina Bariloche 41.1 S 71.3 W
4 Australia Melbourne, VIC 37.5 S 144.6 E
5 Australia Mawson, Antarctica 67.6 S 62.5 E
6 Australia Townsville, QLD 19.2 S 146.8 E
7 Australia Macquarie Island 54.0 S 159.0 E
8 Australia Cocos Islands 12.0 S 97.0 E
9 Australia Darwin, NT 12.4 S 130.7 E
10 Australia Perth, WA 31.9 S 116.0 E
11 Brazil Rio de Janeiro 22.5 S 43.1 W
12 Brazil Recife 8.0 S 35.0 W
13 Cameroon Douala 4.2 N 9.9 E
14 Canada Vancouver, B.C. 49.3 N 123.2 W
15 Canada Resolute, N.W.T. 74.7 N 94.9 W
16 Canada Yellowknife, N.W.T. 62.5 N 114.5 W
17 Canada St. John's, N.L. 47.0 N 53.0 W
18 Chile Punta Arenas 53.1 S 70.6 W
19 Chile Hanga Roa, Easter Island 27.1 S 108.4 W
20 China Beijing 39.8 N 116.2 E
21 China Lanzhou 35.8 N 103.3 E
22 China Guangzhou 23.0 N 113.3 E
23 Cook Islands Rarotonga 21.2 S 159.8 W
24 Ecuador Isla San Cristóbal, Galápagos Islands 1.0 S 89.2 W
25 Ethiopia Filtu 5.5 N 42.7 E
26 Fiji Nadi 18.0 S 177.5 E
27 France Papeete, Tahiti 17.0 S 150.0 W
28 France Pointe-á-Pitre, Guadeloupe 17.0 N 62.0 W
29 France Réunion 21.1 S 55.6 E
30 France Port-aux-Francais, Kerguelen 49.0 S 70.0 E
31 France Cayenne, French Guiana 5.0 N 52.0 W
32 France Dumont d'Urville, Antarctica 66.0 S 140.0 E
33 Germany Schauinsland/Freiburg 47.9 N 7.9 E
34 Iceland Reykjavik 64.4 N 21.9 W
35 To be determined To be determined To be determined To be determined
36 Iran (Islamic Republic of) Tehran 35.0 N 52.0 E
37 Japan Okinawa 26.5 N 127.9 E
38 Japan Takasaki, Gunma 36.3 N 139.0 E
39 Kiribati Kiritimati 2.0 N 157.0 W
40 Kuwait Kuwait City 29.0 N 48.0 E
41 Libya Misratah 32.5 N 15.0 E
42 Malaysia Kuala Lumpur 2.6 N 101.5 E
43 Mauritania Nouakchott 18.0 N 17.0 W
44 Mexico Baja California 28.0 N 113.0 W
45 Mongolia Ulaanbaatar 47.5 N 107.0 E
46 New Zealand Chatham Island 44.0 S 176.5 W
47 New Zealand Kaitaia 35.1 S 173.3 E
48 Niger Bilma 18.0 N 13.0 E
49 Norway Spitsbergen 78.2 N 16.4 E
50 Panama Panama City 8.9 N 79.6 W
51 Papua New Guinea New Hanover 3.0 S 150.0 E
52 Philippines Quezon City 14.5 N 121.0 E
53 Portugal Ponta Delgada, São Miguel, Azores 37.4 N 25.4 W
54 Russian Federation Kirvov 58.6 N 49.4 E
55 Russian Federation Norilsk 69.0 N 88.0 E
56 Russian Federation Peleduy 59.6 N 112.6 E
57 Russian Federation Bilibino 68.0 N 166.4 E
58 Russian Federation Ussuriysk 43.7 N 131.9 E
59 Russian Federation Zalesovo 53.9 N 84.8 E
60 Russian Federation Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy 53.1 N 158.8 E
61 Russian Federation Dubna 56.7 N 37.3 E
62 South Africa Marion Island 46.5 S 37.0 E
63 Sweden Stockholm 59.4 N 18.0 E
64 Tanzania Dar es Salaam 6.0 S 39.0 E
65 Thailand Bangkok 13.8 N 100.5 E
66 United Kingdom BIOT/Chagos Archipelago 7.0 S 72.0 E
67 United Kingdom St. Helena 16.0 S 6.0 W
68 United Kingdom Tristan da Cunha 37.0 S 12.3 W
69 United Kingdom Halley, Antarctica 76.0 S 28.0 W
70 United States of America Sacramento, CA 38.7 N 121.4 W
71 United States of America Sand Point, AK 55.0 N 160.0 W
72 United States of America Melbourne, FL 28.3 N 80.6 W
73 United States of America Palmer Station, Antarctica 64.5 S 64.0 W
74 United States of America Ashland, KS 37.2 N 99.8 W
75 United States of America Charlottesville, VA 38.0 N 78.0 W
76 United States of America Salchaket, AK 64.4 N 147.1 W
77 United States of America Wake Island 19.3 N 166.6 E
78 United States of America Midway Islands 28.0 N 177.0 W
79 United States of America Oahu, HI 21.5 N 158.0 W
80 United States of America Upi, Guam 13.7 N 144.9 E

Table 2-B List of Radionuclide Laboratories


# State Responsible for Laboratory Name and place of laboratory
1 Argentina National Board of Nuclear Regulation
Buenos Aires
2 Australia Australian Radiation Laboratory
Melbourne, VIC
3 Austria Austrian Research Center
Seibersdorf
4 Brazil Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry
Rio de Janeiro
5 Canada Health Canada
Ottawa, Ont.
6 China
Beijing
7 Finland Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety
Helsinki
8 France Atomic Energy Commission
Montlhéry
9 Israel Soreq Nuclear Research Centre
Yavne
10 Italy Labortory of the National Agency for the Protection of the Enivironment
Rome
11 Japan Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute
Tokai, Ibaraki
12 New Zealand National Radiation Laboratory
Christchurch
13 Russian Federation Central Radiation Control Laboratory, Ministry of Defense Special Verification Service
Moscow
14 South Africa Atomic Energy Corporation
Pelindaba
15 United Kingdom AWE Blacknest
Chilton
16 United States of America McClellan Central Laboratories
Sacramento, CA

Table 3 List of Hydroacoustic Stations


# State Responsible for Station Location Latitude Longitude Type
1 Australia Cape Leeuwin, WA 34.4 S 115.1 E Hydrophone
2 Canada Queen Charlotte Islands, B.C. 53.3 N 132.5 W T-phase
3 Chile Juan Fernández Island 33.7 S 78.8 W Hydrophone
4 France Crozet Islands 46.5 S 52.2 E Hydrophone
5 France Guadeloupe 16.3 N 61.1 W T-phase
6 Mexico Clarión Island 18.2 N 114.6 W T-phase
7 Portugal Flores 39.3 N 31.3 W T-phase
8 United Kingdom BIOT/Chagos Archipelago 7.3 S 72.4 E Hydrophone
9 United Kingdom Tristan da Cunha 37.2 S 12.5 W T-phase
10 United States of America Ascension 8.0 S 14.4 W Hydrophone
11 United States of America Wake Island 19.3 N 166.6 E Hydrophone

Table 4 List of Infrasound Stations


# State Responsible for Station Location Latitude Longitude
1 Argentina Paso Flores 40.7 S 70.6 W
2 Argentina Ushuaia 55.0 S 68.0 W
3 Australia Davis Base, Antarctica 68.4 S 77.6 E
4 Australia Narrogin, WA 32.9 S 117.2 E
5 Australia Hobart, TAS 42.1 S 147.2 E
6 Australia Cocos Islands 12.3 S 97.0 E
7 Australia Warramunga, NT 19.9 S 134.3 E
8 Bolivia La Paz 16.3 S 68.1 W
9 Brazil Brasilia 15.6 S 48.0 W
10 Canada Lac du Bonnet, Man. 50.2 N 95.9 W
11 Cape Verde Cape Verde Islands 16.0 N 24.0 W
12 Central African Republic Bangui 5.2 N 18.4 E
13 Chile Easter Island 27.0 S 109.2 W
14 Chile Juan Fernández Island 33.8 S 80.7 W
15 China Beijing 40.0 N 116.0 E
16 China Kunming 25.0 N 102.8 E
17 Côte d'Ivoire Dimbokro 6.7 N 4.9 W
18 Denmark Dundas, Greenland 76.5 N 68.7 W
19 Djibouti Djibouti 11.3 N 43.5 E
20 Ecuador Galápagos Islands 0.0 N 91.7 W
21 France Marquesas Islands 10.0 N 140.0 W
22 France Port LaGuerre, New Caledonia 22.1 S 166.3 E
23 France Kerguelen 49.2 S 69.1 E
24 France Tahiti 17.6 S 149.6 W
25 France Kourou, French Guiana 5.2 N 52.7 W
26 Germany Freyung 48.9 N 13.7 E
27 Germany Georg von Neumayer, Antarctica 70.6 S 8.4 W
28 To be determined To be determined To be determined To be determined
29 Iran (Islamic Republic of) Tehran 35.7 N 51.4 E
30 Japan Tsukuba 36.0 N 140.1 E
31 Kazakstan Aktyubinsk 50.4 N 58.0 E
32 Kenya Kilmanbogo 1.3 S 36.8 E
33 Madagascar Antananarivo 18.8 S 47.5 E
34 Mongolia Javhlant 48.0 N 106.8 E
35 Namibia Tsumeb 19.1 S 17.4 E
36 New Zealand Chatham Island 44.0 S 176.5 W
37 Norway Karasjok 69.5 N 25.5 E
38 Pakistan Rahimyar Khan 28.2 N 70.3 E
39 Palau Palau 7.5 N 134.5 E
40 Papua New Guinea Rabaul 4.1 S 152.1 E
41 Paraguay Villa Florida 26.3 S 57.3 W
42 Portugal Azores 37.8 N 25.5 W
43 Russian Federation Dubna 56.7 N 37.3 E
44 Russian Federation Petropavlovsk-Kamchatskiy 53.1 N 158.8 E
45 Russian Federation Ussuriysk 43.7 N 131.9 E
46 Russian Federation Zalesovo 53.9 N 84.8 E
47 South Africa Boshof 28.6 S 25.4 E
48 Tunisia Thala 35.6 N 8.7 E
49 United Kingdom Tristan da Cunha 37.0 S 12.3 W
50 United Kingdom Ascension 8.0 S 14.3 W
51 United Kingdom Bermuda 32.0 N 64.5 W
52 United Kingdom BIOT/Chagos Archipelago 5.0 S 72.0 E
53 United States of America Eielson, AK 64.8 N 146.9 W
54 United States of America Siple Station, Antarctica 75.5 S 83.6 W
55 United States of America Windless Bight, Antarctica 77.5 S 161.8 E
56 United States of America Newport, WA 48.3 N 117.1 W
57 United States of America Piñon Flat, CA 33.6 N 116.5 W
58 United States of America Midway Islands 28.1 N 177.2 W
59 United States of America Hawaii, HI 19.6 N 155.3 W
60 United States of America Wake Island 19.3 N 166.6 W

ANNEX 2 TO THE PROTOCOL

List of Characterization Parameters for International Data Centre Standard Event Screening

1. The International Data Centre standard event screening criteria shall be based on the standard event characterization parameters determined during the combined processing of data from all the monitoring technologies in the International Monitoring System. Standard event screening shall make use of both global and supplementary screening criteria to take account of regional variations where applicable.

2. For events detected by the International Monitoring System seismic component, the following parameters, inter alia, may be used:

  • location of the event;
  • depth of the event;
  • ratio of the magnitude of surface waves to body waves;
  • signal frequency content;
  • spectral ratios of phases;
  • spectral scalloping;
  • first motion of the P-wave;
  • focal mechanism;
  • relative excitation of seismic phases;
  • comparative measures to other events and groups of events; and
  • regional discriminants where applicable.

3. For events detected by the International Monitoring System hydroacoustic component, the following parameters, inter alia, may be used:

  • signal frequency content including corner frequency, wide-band energy and mean centre frequency and bandwidth;
  • frequency-dependent duration of signals;
  • spectral ratio; and
  • indications of bubble-pulse signals and bubble-pulse delay.

4. For events detected by the International Monitoring System infrasound component, the following parameters, inter alia, may be used:

  • signal frequency content and dispersion;
  • signal duration; and
  • peak amplitude.

5. For events detected by the International Monitoring System radionuclide component, the following parameters, inter alia, may be used:

  • concentration of background natural and man-made radionuclides;
  • concentration of specific fission and activation products outside normal observations; and
  • ratios of one specific fission and activation product to another.

OTHER DOCUMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE TREATY

CTBT RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY

September 10, 1996

Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolution 50/65 of 12 December 1995, in which the Assembly declared its readiness to resume consideration of the item "Comprehensive test-ban treaty", as necessary, before its fifty-first session in order to endorse the text of a comprehensive nuclear-test-ban treaty,

1. Adopts the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, as contained in document A/50/1027;

2. Requests the Secretary-General, as depositary of the Treaty, to open it for signature, at United Nations Headquarters, at the earliest possible date;

3. Calls upon all States to sign and, thereafter, according to their respective constitutional processes, to become parties to the Treaty at the earliest possible date;

4. Also requests the Secretary-General, as depositary of the Treaty, to report to the General Assembly at its fifty-second session on the status of signature and ratifications of the Treaty.

RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING THE PREPARATORY COMMISSION FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE NUCLEAR TEST-BAN TREATY ORGANIZATION

Adopted by the States Signatories, November 19, 1996


The States Signatories of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty, adopted by the General Assembly at New York on 10 September 1996,

Having decided to take all necessary measures to ensure the rapid and effective establishment of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization,

Having decided to this end to establish a Preparatory Commission,

1. Approve the Text on the Establishment of a Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization, as annexed to the present resolution;

2. Request the Secretary-General of the United Nations, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 50/245, of 10 September 1996, on the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty, to provide the services required to initiate the work of the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization, including the Meeting of States Signatories and the First Session of the Preparatory Commission.

ANNEX

Text on the Establishment of a Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization

1. There is hereby established the Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (hereinafter referred to as "the Commission") for the purpose of carrying out the necessary preparations for the effective implementation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty, and for preparing for the first session of the Conference of the States Parties to that Treaty.

2. The Secretary-General of the United Nations shall convene the Commission for its first session as soon as possible, but not later than 60 days after the Treaty has been signed by 50 States.

3. The seat of the Commission shall be at the seat of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization.

4. The Commission shall be composed of all States which sign the Treaty. Each State Signatory shall have one representative in the Commission, who may be accompanied by alternates and advisers.

5.

(a) The costs of the Commission and its activities, including those of the provisional Technical Secretariat, shall be met annually by all States Signatories, in accordance with the United Nations scale of assessment adjusted to take into account differences between the United Nations membership and States Signatories and timing of signature. The Commission and the provisional Technical Secretariat may also benefit from voluntary contributions;

(b) A State Signatory which has not discharged in full its financial obligations to the Commission within 365 days of receipt of the request for payment shall have no vote in the Commission, until such payment is received. The Commission may, nevertheless, permit such a member to vote if it is satisfied that the failure to pay is due to conditions beyond the control of the member;

(c) The Commission shall, between the time the Treaty is opened for signature and the conclusion of the initial session of the Conference of the States Parties, use funds provided by the States Signatories to meet the necessary costs arising from its functions and purposes, including the capital investments and operating and maintenance costs to establish and, pending their formal commissioning, to operate provisionally as necessary the International Data Centre and the International Monitoring System networks provided for in the Treaty. The funding by the Commission shall be regulated in accordance with the provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty, adjusted to take into account the organizational differences between the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization and the Commission. The Preparatory Commission shall develop the funding procedures in cases not covered by the Treaty.

6. All decisions of the Commission should be taken by consensus. If, notwithstanding the efforts of representatives to achieve consensus, an issue comes up for voting, the Chairman of the Commission shall defer the vote for 24 hours and during this period of deferment shall make every effort to facilitate achievement of consensus, and shall report to the Commission before the end of the period. If consensus is not possible at the end of 24 hours, the Commission shall take decisions on questions of procedure by a simple majority of the members present and voting. Decisions on matters of substance shall be taken by a two-thirds majority of the members present and voting. When the issue arises as to whether the question is one of substance or not, that question shall be treated as a matter of substance unless otherwise decided by the commission by the majority required for decisions on matters of substance.

7. The Commission shall have standing as an international organization, authority to negotiate and enter into agreements, and such other legal capacity as necessary for the exercise of its functions and the fulfilment of its purposes.

8. The Commission shall:

(a) Elect its Chairman and other officers, adopt its rules of procedure, meet as often as necessary and establish such committees as it deems useful;

(b) Appoint its Executive Secretary;

(c) Establish a provisional Technical Secretariat to assist the Commission in its activity and to exercise such functions as the Commission may determine, and appoint the necessary staff in accordance with the principles established for the staff of the Technical Secretariat pursuant to Article II, paragraph 50, of the Treaty. Only nationals of States Signatories shall be appointed to the provisional Technical Secretariat;

(d) Establish administrative and financial regulations in respect of its own expenditure and accounts, providing for, inter alia:

(i) Proper financial control and accounting by the Commission;

(ii) Preparation and approval of periodic financial statements by the Commission;

(iii) Independent audit of the Commission's financial statements;

(iv) Annual presentation of the audited financial statements to a regular session of the plenary of the States Signatories for formal acceptance.

9. The Commission shall make arrangements for the initial session of the Conference of the States Parties, including the preparation of a draft agenda and draft rules of procedure.

10. The Commission shall undertake, inter alia, the following tasks concerning the organization and work of the Technical Secretariat and requiring immediate attention after the entry into force of the Treaty:

(a) Elaboration of a detailed staffing pattern of the Technical Secretariat, including delegation of authority and the process of decision-making;

(b) Assessments of personnel requirements;

(c) Development of staff rules for recruitment and service conditions;

(d) Recruitment and training of technical personnel and support staff;

(e) Organization of office and administrative services.

11. The Commission shall undertake, inter alia, the following tasks on matters of the Organization requiring immediate attention after the entry into force of the Treaty:

(a) Preparation of program of work and budget of the first year of activities of the Organization;

(b) Preparation of detailed budgetary provisions for the Organization;

(c) Preparation of the scale of financial contributions to the Organization;

(d) Preparation of administrative and financial regulations for the Organization providing for, inter alia:

(i) Proper financial control and accounting by the Organization;

(ii) Preparation and approval of periodic financial statements by the Organization;

(iii) Independent audit of the Organization's financial statements;

(iv) Annual presentation of the audited financial statements to a regular session of the Conference of the States Parties for formal acceptance;

(e) Development of arrangements to facilitate the designation and election in accordance with Article II, paragraph 29 of the Treaty for the first election of the Executive Council.

12. The Commission shall develop, inter alia, the following draft agreements, arrangements and guidelines for approval by the Conference of the States Parties in accordance with the Treaty and Protocol:


(a) Standard model agreements or arrangements, where relevant, to be concluded by the future Organization with States Parties, other States and international organizations;

(b) Agreements or arrangements negotiated in accordance with the above models by the provisional Technical Secretariat with relevant States, in particular with those prospectively hosting or otherwise taking responsibility for International Monitoring System facilities;

(c) The Headquarters Agreement with the Host Country pursuant to Article II, paragraph 56, of the Treaty.

13. The Commission shall undertake all necessary preparations to ensure the operationalization of the Treaty's verification regime at entry into force, pursuant to Article IV, paragraph 1, and shall develop appropriate procedures for its operation, presenting a report on the operational readiness of the regime, together with any relevant recommendations, to the initial session of the Conference of the States Parties.

14. The Commission shall supervise and coordinate, in fulfilling the requirements of the Treaty and its Protocol, the development, preparation, technical testing and, pending their formal commissioning, provisional operation as necessary of the International Data Centre and the International Monitoring System, together with assuring appropriate support of the System by certified laboratory facilities and by respective means of communication. Inter alia, the Commission shall:


(a) At its second plenary session, taking into consideration all relevant reports, including those prepared in the course of the CTBT negotiation and by the Conference on Disarmament's Group of Scientific Experts:

(i) Establish an initial plan for the progressive commissioning of the International Data Centre and the International Monitoring System, and for the implementation of related responsibilities;

(ii) Assume responsibility for relevant technical tests, including the work begun under the Group of Scientific Experts' Technical Test 3, and for the development and management of any arrangements required to provide an uninterrupted transition from such technical tests to the future International Monitoring System;

(iii) Constitute appropriate structures for the regular provision to the Commission of expert and integrated technical advice on monitoring, data communications and analysis issues, and for technical supervision of International Monitoring System and International Data Centre implementation;

(b) Develop in accordance with the Treaty and Protocol, and prepare for adoption by the initial session of the Conference of the States Parties, operational manuals for:

(i) Seismological Monitoring;

(ii) Radionuclide Monitoring;

(iii) Hydroacoustic Monitoring;

(iv) Infrasound Monitoring; and

(v) The International Data Centre.

15. The Commission shall make all necessary preparations, in fulfilling the requirements of the Treaty and its Protocol, for the support of on-site inspections from the entry into force of the Treaty. It shall, inter alia:


(a) Develop and prepare for the approval of the initial session of the Conference of the States Parties:

(i) An operational manual containing all appropriate legal, technical and administrative procedures; and

(ii) A list of equipment for use during on-site inspections;

(b) Develop a programme for the training of inspectors; and

(c) Acquire or otherwise make provision for the availability of relevant inspection equipment, including communications equipment, and conduct technical tests of such equipment as necessary.

16. The Commission shall develop guidelines and reporting formats for the implementation of confidence-building measures.

17. An indicative list of verification tasks to be carried out by the Preparatory Commission, as specified in paragraphs 12 to 16, is attached as the appendix to the present text.

18. The Commission shall:

(a) Facilitate the exchange of information between States Signatories concerning legal and administrative measures for the implementation of the Treaty and, if requested by States Signatories, give advice and assistance to them on these matters;

(b) Follow the ratification process and, if requested by States Signatories, provide them with legal and technical information and advice about the Treaty in order to facilitate its ratification process; and

(c) Prepare such studies, reports and records as it deems necessary.

19. The Commission shall prepare a final report on all matters within its mandate for the first session of the Conference of the States Parties.

20. Rights and assets, financial and other obligations and functions of the Commission shall be transferred to the Organization at the first session of the Conference of the States Parties. The Commission shall make recommendations to the Conference of the States Parties on this matter, including on effecting a smooth transition.

21. The Commission shall remain in existence until the conclusion of the first session of the Conference of the States Parties.

22. The Commission as an international organization, its staff, as well as the delegates of the States Signatories shall be accorded by the Host Country such legal status, privileges and immunities as are necessary for the independent exercise of their functions in connection with the Commission and the fulfilment of its object and purpose.

APPENDIX

Indicative List of Verification Tasks of the Preparatory Commission

The following indicative list is illustrative of the verification-related tasks the Preparatory Commission might need to undertake in implementing the relevant provisions of the Treaty and of the resolution establishing the Commission.

Preparatory Commission Text paragraph 12: Draft agreements, arrangements and guidelines

In addition to those items mentioned in the illustrative and explicitly non-exhaustive listing contained in paragraph 12, the following tasks might also be necessary:

  • Procedures for the conduct of consultation and clarification including for use of data from cooperating national facilities if agreed (Article IV, paragraphs 27 and 28, and paragraphs 29 to 33 of the Treaty);
  • Procedures for the Technical Secretariat's monitoring, assessment and reporting on the overall performance of the IMS and the IDC (Article IV, paragraph 14 (1) of the Treaty);
  • Guidelines for CTBT Organization funding of IMS and OSI activities including for funding of IMS operational and maintenance costs, and for recognition of credit against assessed contributions if agreed (Article IV, paragraphs 19 to 22 of the Treaty);
  • Confidentiality procedures (Article II, paragraph 7 and Article IV, paragraph 8 of the Treaty).

For those items already specifically listed under paragraph 12, it is envisaged that verification agreements or arrangements (either generic model agreements or arrangements, or the draft agreements or arrangements negotiated with States in accordance with these models) would include, pursuant to Part I, Section A of the Protocol to the Treaty:

  • Procedures for specifying a particular State's acceptance pursuant to the CTBT of responsibility for particular monitoring facilities;
  • Responsibilities for operation, maintenance and upgrading in accordance with the Operational Manuals;
  • Procedures to be followed in establishment of new or upgrading of existing facilities, or for more substantive changes to IMS facilities;
  • Procedures for temporary arrangements which might apply (Article IV, paragraph 26 of the Treaty);
  • Provisions for funding IMS activities and data transmission (Article IV, paragraph 22 of the Treaty);
  • Assistance to the Organization in inspecting an area beyond the jurisdiction or control of any State (Part II, paragraph 107 of the Protocol to the Treaty); or,
  • Availability of OSI equipment from a State Party, and for the maintenance and calibration of such equipment (Part II, paragraph 40 of the Protocol to the Treaty).

Preparatory Commission Text paragraph 13: Preparatory Commission verification regime responsibilities

The report referred to in this paragraph reflects a negotiating understanding that the task of compiling such a report -- implicit in Article II, paragraph 26 (h) of the Treaty -- would be explicitly mentioned in the resolution establishing the Preparatory Commission. The report and associated recommendations from the Commission will be essential prerequisites for the initial Conference of States Parties to take the steps necessary to formalize the establishment of the IMS and other elements of the Treaty's verification regime. The Preparatory Commission would as a consequence need, inter alia, to:

  • Develop recommendations for any changes to the IMS facility lists which experience during the Preparatory Commission may dictate be put to the initial Conference of the States Parties; and
  • Agree on related recommendations, including where relevant recommendations relating to the deployment of particular technologies and aspects thereof such as noble gas (Part I, paragraph 10 of the Protocol to the Treaty).

Preparatory Commission Text paragraph 14: Preparatory Commission IMS preparation responsibilities

This chapeau includes, inter alia, references to the responsibility of the Preparatory Commission for families of tasks related to:

  • The establishment of international communications channels for the transmission and receipt of IMS data and reporting products (Article IV, paragraph 14 (a) of the Treaty); and
  • Developing procedures and a formal basis for the provisional operation and funding of the provisional IMS.

Preparatory Commission Text paragraph 14 (b): development of Operational Manuals

Drafts of all Operational Manuals, approved by the Preparatory Commission, are required to be adopted by the initial Conference of the States Parties (Article II, paragraph 26 (h) of the Treaty). The compilation of the Operational Manual for each monitoring technology will require the Preparatory Commission to develop, spell out and approve all necessary technical and operational detail required to ensure the effective operation of the International Monitoring System, inter alia;

  • The technical specifications and operational requirements for the relevant facilities in each global monitoring network (Part I, paragraphs 2, 7, 8, 10, 11, 13 and 15, of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for the provision of data to the IDC, including transmission formats and modalities (Part I, paragraphs 6, 8, 9, 12 and 14 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for facility security and for data authentication (Part I, paragraph 4 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for checking of monitoring facility equipment and communications links by the Technical Secretariat, and for facility certification (including for cooperating national facilities and for their designation as such) (Article IV, paragraphs 27 and 28 of the Treaty and Part I, paragraph 4 of the Protocol to the Treaty).

Preparatory Commission Text paragraph 14 (b) (ii): Operational Manual for Radionuclide Monitoring

In addition to the generic points listed above, the Operational Manual for Radionuclide Monitoring will require the Preparatory Commission to develop:

  • Procedures for the processing and handling of samples of associated data flowing from monitoring facilities (Part I, paragraph 11 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Specifications and procedures for the certification and ongoing calibration of laboratories used by the CTBTO in support of the radionuclide monitoring network (Part I, paragraph 11 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Special procedures for the transmission of samples to certified laboratories, for additional analysis, and for their storage or archiving as appropriate (Part I, paragraph 11 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for the integration of relevant meteorological data if appropriate (Part I, paragraph 9 of the Protocol to the Treaty); and,
  • Guidelines for the striking of contracts with specific certified laboratories to provide for fee-for-service analysis of samples (Part I, paragraph 11 of the Protocol to the Treaty).

Preparatory Commission Text paragraph 14 (b) (iii): Operational Manual for Hydroacoustic Monitoring

In addition to generic points listed above, in order to prepare the Operational Manual for Hydroacoustic Monitoring, the Preparatory Commission will need to:

  • Develop the different technical specifications and operational requirements for the two different types of facilities envisaged (hydrophone stations and T-phase stations) (Part I, paragraph 13 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Develop procedures for the storage or archiving IMS data at the monitoring station if so decided.

Preparatory Commission Text paragraph 14 (b) (v): Operational Manual for the International Data Centre

In developing the Operational Manual for the International Data Centre and producing its content, the Preparatory Commission will need to:

  • Develop the procedures to be used by the IDC in receiving, collecting, processing, analyzing, reporting on and archiving data from the IMS, and for carrying out its agreed functions, in particular for the production of standard reporting products and for the performance of the standard range of services to be offered to States Parties (Part I, paragraphs 16 and 17 of the Protocol to the Treaty and passim);
  • In this context, it will need to give special attention to developing
    • Agreed standard event screening criteria and related operational procedures and formats in accordance with Protocol provisions (Part I, paragraphs 17 and 18 (b) of, and Annex 2 to the Protocol to the Treaty);
    • Agreed formats and procedures for assisting States Parties with expert technical analysis (Part I, paragraph 20 (c) of the Protocol to the Treaty);
    • Specification of the volumes and formats of data services to be provided by the IDC to States Parties at no cost (Part I, paragraph 20 of the Protocol to the Treaty), and procedures for the recovery of costs from States Parties requesting products or services in excess of these specifications;
    • Guidelines for the establishment of national event screening procedures (Part I, paragraph 21 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
    • Procedures for the provision of technical assistance to individual States Parties (Part I, paragraph 22 of the Protocol to the Treaty); and
    • Procedures for monitoring and reporting on the operational status of the International Monitoring System (Part I, paragraph 23 of the Protocol to the Treaty).

Preparatory Commission Text paragraph 15: On-Site Inspection

The Treaty and Protocol text are separately explicit that the Operational Manual for OSI and the list of approved inspection equipment must be approved by the Conference of States Parties at its initial session (Part II, paragraph 13 of the Protocol to the Treaty, Article II, paragraph 26 (h) of the Treaty and Part II, paragraph 36 of the Protocol to the Treaty).

In order to compile the Operational Manual for OSI, the Preparatory Commission will in all likelihood need to develop or consider, inter alia:

  • Procedures and formats for the nomination and designation of inspectors and inspection assistants (Part II, paragraphs 14 to 25 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for the training and qualification of inspectors;
  • Procedures and formats for designating, recording and consulting on points of entry (Part II, paragraphs 32 to 34 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for use of non-scheduled aircraft and agreement on routings (part II, paragraph 35 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • A list of core and auxiliary inspection equipment and detailed specifications therefor; procedures for documentation, and sealing to authenticate certification of inspection equipment; and procedures to calibrate, maintain, protect and retain custody over the approved inspection equipment (Part II, paragraphs 36 to 40 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Formats and communications procedures for OSI requests, mandates and notifications, and procedures for drawing up the inspection mandate (Part II, paragraphs 35 and 41 to 43 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for the reimbursement of inspected State Party costs associated with OSI (including for the itemization of expenses and of payments) and for other administrative arrangements (Part II, paragraphs 11 to 13 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for the checking, and if necessary, storing of inspection equipment at point of entry (Part II, paragraph 51 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures covering OSI team safety and health, and confidentiality issues (Part II, paragraph 60 (h) of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures related to the implementation of the inspected States Parties' rights during the OSI (Part II, paragraph 61 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for communications by the inspection team, including for the due approval and certification of communications equipment (Part II, paragraph 62 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for participation of observers (nomination, acceptance, non-acceptance, and notifications) (Article IV, paragraph 61 of the Treaty and Part II, paragraphs 63 to 68 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for implementation of inspection activities and techniques in the conduct of an OSI (Part II, paragraphs 69 and 70 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for overflights and the use of inspection equipment during overflights (Part II, paragraphs 71 to 85 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for the collection, handling and analysis of samples as per the requirements of the Treaty, including relevant scientific criteria and guidelines (Part II, paragraphs 97 to 104 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for the certification of laboratories designated to perform different types of OSI-related analysis (Part II, paragraph 102 of the Protocol to the Treaty);
  • Procedures for inspection of areas beyond the jurisdiction or control of any state (Part II, paragraphs 105 to 108 of the Protocol to the Treaty); and
  • Formats for OSI team's preliminary findings report (Part II, paragraph 109 of the Protocol to the Treaty) and formats and procedures for handling the inspection report (Article IV, paragraphs 62 to 64 of the Treaty).
  • Procedures for storing and handling the OSI data and samples after the completion of the inspection.

[Go to: Text of Treaty]



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