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Department of State Foreign Policy Objectives: Western Hemispheric Region (G-Z)


Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest Joint Report to Congress
Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
January 2001
Report
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GRENADA

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

3

$21,957

2

$14,638

IMET

6

$47,000

9

$70,000

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

35

$19,000

0

$0

TOTAL

44

$87,957

11

$84,638

Grenada is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the U.S. We have been encouraging the Government of Grenada to participate more actively in counternarcotics efforts and other multilateral security activities. Training activities assist in the development of a more professional and efficient security force that will be able to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic operations, search and rescue operations, and other bilateral and multilateral operations. Joint training and exercises with the U.S. forces contributed to greater interoperability and baseline understanding of U.S. counterdrug operations.

GUATEMALA

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

6

$43,914

8

$58,552

Exchanges

2

$20

0

$0

IMET

19

$228,000

21

$250,000

Service Academy

2

$142,237

0

$0

*TOTAL

29

$414,171

29

$308,552

*Does not include data reported in Volume III

Guatemala is a democratic nation with a traditionally cooperative relationship with the United States. This relationship, however, has been strained by continuing impunity in cases involving alleged military participation in human rights abuses which occurred during Guatemala's 36-year civil conflict. Because of continuing concerns regarding past human rights case, Guatemala is restricted by congressional mandate to receiving Expanded IMET only.

Participation in CHDS activities, and training in civil-military relations, rule of law and discipline in military operations, and democratic sustainment helps reinforce the goal of civilian control of the military and human rights principles. Also, training in Officer Company-Grade and Command and General Staff College assists Guatemala's efforts to professionalize its armed forces. Other training activities help Guatemalan forces strengthen their drug enforcement capabilities, conduct interdiction and eradication activities, and improve their ability to integrate their planning and execution with U.S. entities in regional counternarcotics, disaster relief, or humanitarian operations.

GUYANA

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

7

$51,233

7

$51,233

IMET

16

$168,000

19

$195,000

TOTAL

23

$219,233

26

$246,233

The United States has friendly relations with Guyana, a small, poor, heavily indebted country with a wealth of natural resources. Guyana is making a slow transition to democracy and will have general elections early in 2001. Guyana has an unresolved border dispute with neighboring Suriname. Venezuela also has a long-standing claim to approximately two thirds of Guyana's territory. Neither border controversy is likely to lead to armed conflict in the immediate future.

Although Guyana has not been identified as a major drug-transit or producing country, narcotics trafficking is increasingly a concern. We have been encouraging the GOG to participate more actively in counternarcotics and other multilateral security activities. IMET training in civil affairs and crisis management, and in support of counter narcotics efforts, as well as participation in the CHDS, assists in the development of a more professional and efficient security force. Participating in joint exercises and training in maritime search and rescue increases Guyana's ability to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotics operations and other bilateral and multilateral operations.

HAITI

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

FMF

150

$35,000

0

$0

IMET

39

$222,000

0

$0

TOTAL

189

$257,000

0

$0

Restrictions on assistance to the central government of Haiti in the FY 01 Foreign Appropriations Act will impede our ability to continue to assist the Government of Haiti's efforts to rebuild the nation's political and economic infrastructure. This act also applies to previous unobligated funding. This will curtail our ability to provide training in maritime control operations, which would have helped in controlling narcotics traffic and illegal immigration. U.S. government training and support has enabled Haiti to fully cooperate with the U.S. Coast Guard Ship Rider program and demonstrate independent initiatives at sea.

HONDURAS

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

5

$36,595

5

$36,595

Exchanges

2

$20

0

$0

FMF

8

$5,320

0

$0

FMS

90

$93,995

30

$90,968

IMET

208

$548,000

200

$525,000

Misc DoD-DoS Activities

45

$91,000

0

$0

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

180

$191,008

0

$0

Service Academy

2

$140,033

0

$0

TOTAL

540

$1,105,971

235

$652,563

Honduras is a democratic country and a close ally in the Central American region. Although Honduras is not designated as a major drug-transiting country, narcotic trafficking is a growing concern. Because of its geographic location, Honduras has become a transshipment point for narcotics entering the United States.

Participation in CHDS and IMET is geared towards professional training programs that will sustain the dramatic improvement in civil-military relations and consequent improvement in the democratic climate and regional stability. Officer training at all levels, from NCO training up to command and staff colleges, and courses in civil-military relations and democratic sustainment helps reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and reinforces the principles of human rights. Prior year FMF funds provided assistance in logistics management and support related to a 44' boat transferred under EDA. Training in counternarcotics operations, resource management, logistics, and equipment maintenance, and participation in exercises with U.S. forces, provide opportunities needed to professionalize and modernize the Honduran military, and encourages its continued cooperation with U.S. counternarcotics efforts.

JAMAICA

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

4

$29,276

4

$29,276

INL

136

$10,251

0

$0

IMET

118

$461,000

128

$500,000

Service Academy

1

$60,143

0

$0

*TOTAL

236

$560,670

107

$529,276

*Does not include data reported in Volume III

Jamaica is a stable democracy with a relatively strong human rights record. The GOJ cooperates with the U.S. on a variety of international and regional issues, including a contribution of troops to the U.S.-led multinational force which intervened in Haiti in 1994. Jamaica is a major transit country for cocaine and the largest Caribbean producer and exporter of marijuana, but the GOJ's cooperation with U.S. counternarcotics goals has been fully certified. Jamaica has no external threats to its security and maintains a very small military.

Training in civil affairs and mid to senior-level officer professional development help maintain a professional military force subject to civilian control. Additional training in aircraft repairs, information systems, logistics, and maritime operations assists in maintaining the technical proficiencies of the Jamaican military, while continued U.S. counternarcotics training enhances Jamaica's ability to combat narcotics traffickers. U.S. government training and exercises have enabled Jamaica to improve its participation in bilateral counterdrug initiatives, strengthen its anti-drug, anti-money and anti-corruption laws, and improve its counternarcotics enforcement capabilities.

MEXICO

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

9

$65,871

11

$80,509

Exchanges

2

$20

0

$0

IMET

95

$865,000

110

$1,000,000

Section 506

8

$109,198

0

$0

Section 1004

450

$1,730,819

1242

$4,876,176

TOTAL

564

$2,770,908

1363

$5,956,685

Mexico, now our second largest trading partner, shares with the U.S. a 2,000 mile border and growing cooperation over a wide range of common interests. The Mexican military today is focused primarily on an internal security role (including containing the Chiapas insurgency), but plays a significant role in counter-narcotics activities. Despite being fully certified as cooperating with U.S. counter-narcotics policy, much of the illicit drugs intended for the U.S. market pass through or originate in Mexico. Mexico and the U.S. issued a joint counter-narcotics strategy in February 1998. Counter-narcotics cooperation is coordinated through the High Level Contact Group (HLCG).

Participation at the CHDS and IMET funded training in the rule of law and discipline in military operations provides additional expertise in civilian control of the military and the principles of human rights. Mid-to senior-level officer training helps to maintain the professionalism of the Mexican military. Resource management and equipment repairs help modernize Mexico's armed forces, and enhance their proficiency. The U.S. conducts extensive training in the counter-narcotics area, with special focus in helicopter repair and maintenance of aircraft. Technical assistance covering a broad range of counter-drug capabilities and assets help enhance Mexico's ability to combat narcotic traffickers and continue its cooperation with U.S. counter drug efforts.

NICARAGUA

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

4

$29,276

4

$29,276

Exchanges

2

$20

0

$0

IMET

135

$194,000

153

$220,000

Service Academy

3

$214,237

0

$0

TOTAL

144

$437,533

157

$249,276

The primary national interests of the United States in Nicaragua are to support and strengthen democratic institutions, to foster regional security and interdict international crime, and to promote broad based economic growth and post-Hurricane Mitch recovery. Since the return of a democratically elected government in 1990, Nicaragua has made great strides in opening its economy and in establishing legitimate, responsive democratic institutions.. In particular, the Nicaraguan National Army (EN), once the political tool of the Sandinistas, has undergone a dramatic transformation and is now one of the country's most respected democratic institutions. Continued U.S. engagement will further contribute to this process.

Training activities promote regional security and strengthen democratic institutions. IMET programs such as civil-military relations and leadership training have helped the EN make great progress in professionalizing its officer corps and supporting the leadership of a civilian president and a civilian Minister of Defense (MoD). The IMET program contains a significant English language component, as well as courses in military resource management and maritime operations. Participation at the CHDS help to stress the importance of human rights and the role of a modern military within a democratic framework.

PANAMA

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

4

$29,276

4

$29,276

FMF

0

$0

6

$21,456

IMET

12

$117,000

15

$150,000

INL

22

$12,540

0

$0

Misc. DoD-DoS Non-Security Assistance

2

$2,160

0

$0

Service Academy

1

$70,000

0

$0

*TOTAL

41

$230,976

25

$200,732

*Does not include data reported in Volume III

Panama remains important to U.S. national interests following the transfer of the Panama Canal. Approximately 60% of Canal traffic originates in or is destined for the United States. Panama's strategic location between South and North America makes it a crossroads for international commerce, and also a center for illegal activity such as drug trafficking, money laundering, arms trafficking and illegal immigration. As Panama is one of three Latin American nations without a standing military, the U.S. will need to continue cooperative efforts with Panamanian security forces to counter transnational crime and other threats. U.S. security engagement with Panama will become more crucial as Plan Colombia is implemented and Panama deals with the impact of "spillover" along its porous border with Colombia. Currently, the U.S. does not have adequate legal coverage for U.S. Armed Forces personnel (i.e. replacing our former SOFA) with Panama, which has stifled U.S. training opportunities and deployments to Panama. This enhances the importance of IMET and other funding vehicles for training Panamanian security personnel in the United States.

Participation at the CHDS and IMET funded training in the rule of law and discipline in military operations enhance the principles of human rights. IMET courses in maritime operations and ship transfer operations will enhance Panama's ability to interdict transnational criminal activity and to ensure the security and continued smooth operation of the Canal.

Training in counternarcotics operations, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance provides assistance needed to professionalize and modernize the Panamanian security forces and improve their counterdrug and canal security capabilities.

PARAGUAY

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

6

$43,914

7

$51,233

Exchanges

2

$20

0

$0

IMET

42

$210,000

40

$200,000

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

86

$133,000

0

$0

*TOTAL

136

$386,934

47

$251,233

*Does not include data reported in Volume III

 Paraguay now has a democratic form of government after decades of semi-isolation under the 1954-89 rule of military dictator Alfredo Stroessner. Bilateral relations between the U.S. and Paraguay are deepening quickly, but many of Paraguay's democratic institutions are in an early stage of development. There is no external threat to Paraguay's security, and the Paraguayan military is struggling to define its modern mission.

Participation at the CHDS, and U.S. training funded through IMET in civil-military affairs, democratic sustainment, and the rule of law and discipline in military operations, will help instill civilian control of the military and support the principles of human rights. Training of NCOs, field-grade and flag officers assists in professionalizing Paraguay's military, while training in logistics, maintenance, and aircraft and helicopter repairs helps to maintain the technical proficiencies of Paraguay's armed forces and helps Paraguay's counternarcotics efforts. Participation in joint counterdrug and other operational training exercises improves interoperability with U.S. forces.

PERU

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

13

$95,147

13

$95,147

Exchanges

5

$20

0

$0

FMS

11

$26,150

0

$0

IMET

55

$455,000

57

$475,000

INL

8

$32,337

12

$30,068

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

182

$576,000

40

$450,000

Section 1004

404

$809,441

39

$967,388

Section 506

15

$823,356

48

$69,368

Service Academy

2

$130,176

0

$0

*TOTAL

695

$2,947,627

209

$2,086,971

*Does not include data reported in Volume III

Peru is one of the largest countries in South America and has a strong bilateral relationship with the United States. The U.S. seeks to strengthen democratic institutions in Peru and to strengthen the GOP's ability to interdict and disrupt narcotics production and distribution. The U.S. has enjoyed excellent cooperation from the GOP in counternarcotics activities.

Training in civil-military relations and the rule of law and discipline in military operations helps reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and reinforce support for the principles of human rights. Training in counternarcotic operations, professional military education, resource management, logistics, and equipment maintenance provide training needed to professionalize and modernize Peru's military and enhance its capabilities in air operations, search and rescue and demining operations. This training is particularly important to the demining efforts along Peru's border with Ecuador in support of the peace settlement. Finally, significant training efforts in the area of counterdrug operations are underway. These activities include training to improve helicopter and other aircraft capabilities, as well as participation in training exercises with U.S. forces to improve interoperability.

ST. KITTS and NEVIS

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

2

$14,638

2

$14,638

IMET

9

$67,000

10

$75,000

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

35

$65,000

0

$0

TOTAL

46

$146,638

12

$89,638

St. Kitts and Nevis is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the U.S. We have been encouraging the Government of St. Kitts and Nevis to participate more actively in counternarcotics efforts and other multilateral security activities. IMET courses in maritime operations, officer development, logistics, and equipment maintenance assists in the development of a more professional and efficient security force which will be able to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotics operations, search and rescue operations, and other bilateral and multilateral operations. Participation in training exercises with U.S. forces augments counterdrug capabilities and enhances interoperability in maritime operations.

ST. LUCIA

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

DoT/USCG Activities

2

$30,000

0

$0

IMET

9

$79,000

8

$70,000

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

35

$19,000

0

$0

TOTAL

46

$128,000

8

$70,000

St. Lucia is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the U.S. We have been encouraging the Government of St. Lucia to participate more actively in counternarcotics efforts and other multilateral security activities. Training in officer development, maritime safety and equipment maintenance assists in the development of a more professional and efficient security force which will be able to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotics operations, search and rescue operations, and other bilateral and multilateral operations. Joint training exercises with U.S. forces improve counterdrug capabilities and experience in marine operations.

ST. VINCENT and GRENADINES

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

1

$7,319

1

$7,319

DoT/USCG Activities

2

$60,000

0

$0

IMET

5

$52,000

7

$70,000

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

55

$89,000

0

$0

TOTAL

63

$208,319

8

$77,319

St. Vincent and the Grenadines is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the U.S. We have been encouraging the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadinesto participate more actively in counternarcotics efforts and other multilateral security activities. Training in officer development, maritime operations and equipment maintenance assists in the development of a more professional and efficient security force which will be able to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotics operations, search and rescue operations, and other bilateral and multilateral operations. Joint training exercises with U.S. forces improve counterdrug capabilities and experience in marine operations.

SURINAME

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

4

$29,276

4

$29,276

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

78

$500,000

127

$1,050,000

IMET

72

$102,000

100

$100,000

TOTAL

154

$631,276

231

$1,179,276

U.S. Security Assistance objective is to assist the GOS in reforming its Armed Forces by helping mold it into a professional, apolitical body subordinate to civilian control as the country continues consolidating its democratic system. Also, the U.S. will aggressively work to help the GOS professionally develop and sustain its newly acquired counter drug capability (i.e. a recent purchase of eight new patrol boats from Spain -- in essence a 'new fleet' as well as two new CASA 212 aircraft.

TRINIDAD-TOBAGO

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

3

$21,957

3

$21,957

DoT/USCG Activities

1

$30,000

0

$0

IMET

12

$132,000

11

$125,000

INL

5

$0

0

$0

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

35

$19,000

0

$0

Section 1004

6

$188,611

0

$0

Service Academy

5

$336,760

0

$0

*TOTAL

67

$728,328

14

$146,957

*Does not include data reported in Volume III

Trinidad and Tobago is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the U.S. We have been encouraging the GOTT to participate more actively in counternarcotics efforts and other multilateral security activities. U.S. training in civil-military affairs helps reinforce civilian control of the military and the principles of human rights. Officer training assists in professionalizing the military, while training in logistics, maintenance and equipment repairs help maintain the technical proficiencies of the armed forces of Trinidad and Tobago. Training in ship handling and maritime control operations help strengthen Trinidad and Tobago's counternarcotics efforts.

Trinidad and Tobago continues to support its interagency coordination center that gathers narcotics related information from multiple sources which it disseminates to military and enforcement agencies involved in drug interdiction operations. U.S. government training and support have enables Trinidad and Tobago to improve its ability to interdict illegal drug shipments, strengthen anti-drug trafficking laws, and participate in bilateral maritime exercises.

URUGUAY

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

10

$73,190

11

$80,509

EIPC

6

$4,602

0

$0

Exchanges

2

$20

0

$0

FMS

2

$4,320

0

$0

IMET

74

$326,000

79

$350,000

TOTAL

94

$408,132

90

$430,509

The U.S has good relations with the Government of Uruguay. A small nation bordered by the much larger nations of Brazil and Argentina, Uruguay has been relatively quiet and stable since military rule ended in 1985. The democratic government has been supportive of regional and international policy initiatives fostered by the U.S. and appreciates our strong bilateral relationship.

Participation at the CHDS and IMET programs in civil-military affairs, democratic sustainment and the rule of law and discipline in military operations, help instill civilian control of the military and the principles of human rights. Training of NCOs, field-grade and flag officers assists in professionalizing Uruguay's military, while training in logistics, maintenance, and aircraft and helicopter repairs helps to maintain the technical proficiencies of the Uruguayan armed forces. Training in peacekeeping, and participation in joint training exercises in counterdrug operations, enhance interoperability with U.S. forces.

VENEZUELA

 

FY 2000 Actual

FY 2001 Planned

Type of Activity

Number of Students Trained

Dollar Value

Number of Projected Students

Dollar Value

CHDS

8

$58,552

11

$80,509

Exchanges

5

$20

0

$0

FMS

194

$1,450,432

18

$232,740

IMET

93

$384,000

97

$400,000

Non-Security Assistance, Unified Command Engagement Activities

40

$142,000

0

$0

*TOTAL

340

$2,035,004

126

$713,249

*Does not include data reported in Volume III

Venezuela traditionally has had strong democratic traditions and good relations with the United States. However, Venezuela has entered into a new political which may see increased tensions as various aspects of the relationship between Venezuela and the United States are being refined. The GOV has been turning down military training missions in the past year, claiming budget concerns. There have also been skirmishes along both Venezuela's maritime and land border with Colombia, where narcotics traffickers, guerrillas and common criminal gangs operate.

Participation at the CHDS and programs funded by IMET in civil-military affairs training help instill civilian control of the military and the principles of human rights. Training of NCOs, field-grade and flag officers assists in professionalizing the Venezuelan military, while schooling in logistics, equipment maintenance and repairs helps maintain the technical proficiencies of Venezuela's armed forces. Extensive training in counterdrug operations is conducted with the Venezuelan military, including joint training exercises with U.S. forces and training in maritime interdiction operations.



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