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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

III. Foreign Policy Papers - East Asia and Pacific (A-O)


Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest: Joint Report to Congress
Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
March 2002
Report
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Australia

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 3 $2,826 2 $1,702
FMS 707 $5,077,269 551 $6,202,021
Non-SA, Unified
Command
145 $313,000 0 $0
PME Exchanges 14 $33,582 8 $47,175
TOTAL 869 $5,426,677 561 $6,250,898

Australia represents the southern anchor of our Asia-Pacific alliance network. A high degree of interoperability between our forces is a hallmark of the U.S.-Australia alliance. This was demonstrated most recently in Australia's decision to invoke the ANZUS Treaty for the first time in its 50-year history and to provide troops, ships and aircraft in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. A robust schedule of combined military exercises and training are concrete examples of our enduring commitment to Australia's security and to our interoperability goals. In addition to sharing and promoting regional and international security goals, the U.S. and Australia work closely to advance human rights, democracy, nonproliferation and other global issues. To help strengthen Australia's combat capabilities and readiness, the U.S. provided air combat training in FY 2000 and FY 2001, and proposes to do so again in FY 2002.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by Australia in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Australia.

Brunei

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 5 $4,528 5 $4,255
FMS 9 $142,315 3 $146,583
TOTAL 14 $146,843 8 $150,838

The Royal Bruneian Armed Forces (RBAF) consist of infantry, navy and air combat units. A British Armed Forces Ghurka battalion permanently stationed in Brunei near the center of the country's oil industry aids them. Because of their country's small size, Bruneians regard a continued U.S. presence in the region as critical to their long-term security and prosperity. Since the signing of a November 1994 Memorandum of Understanding on Defense Cooperation, the RBAF have engaged in joint exercises, training programs and other military exchanges with the U.S. RBAF personnel participated in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses and in FMS training in FY 2001. Their continued participation in the Center's courses and FMS training will enable the USG to help Brunei train future leaders for its armed forces. In addition, they will increase Bruneian awareness and understanding of U.S. policies and facilitate lasting relationships between Bruneian military leaders and their counterparts from the U.S. and the Asia-Pacific region.

China (People's Republic of)

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 6 $73,544 4 $40,898
TOTAL 6 $73,544 4 $40,898

The United States seeks a constructive and cooperative relationship with China, one that contributes to peace in Asia and elsewhere. We share common interests in a number of areas, such as the maintenance of stability in Asia - permitting the continuation of that region's economic development, the maintenance of peace on the Korean Peninsula and in South Asia and the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

The U.S. considers dialogue with the PRC important to ensure a clear understanding of one another's regional security interests and concerns and to help promote responsible behavior by the PRC in the international community. We have significant differences with China. Dialogue allows us to address areas where we agree and to make clear where we do not.

As one element of a defense and security dialogue, the U.S. proposes the PRC's participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses in FY 2002, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. PRC participation in these courses will include members of Chinese "think tanks" and will be consistent with the guidelines set forth in Defense Authorization Act 2000 and OSD policy guidance.

Cook Islands

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 4 $43,141 3 $36,797
TOTAL 4 $43,141 3 $36,797

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of the Cook Islands in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from these islands.

Fiji

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 5 $53,909 3 $36,797
TOTAL 5 $53,909 3 $36,797

IMET and other security assistance were suspended in July 2000 after nationalist Fijians, including some in the military, held the Prime Minister and much of his cabinet hostage in the parliament building for 56 days. Although parliamentary elections restored democratically-elected government to Fiji in August 2001, questions about the constitutionality of the composition of the current cabinet remain to be resolved by Fiji's courts. Until that question is resolved, IMET funds will not be used to train members of the Fijian Armed Forces. Selective military-to-military engagement, under Title 10 funding, are currently being reviewed on a case by case bases to promote positive influence as Fiji continues to reestablish a democratic government.

Indonesia

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 6 $48,979 12 $147,188
IMET 0 $0 76 $353,333
Misc DOS/DOD Non-SA 3 $82,358 0 $0
TOTAL 9 $131,337 88 $500,521

The U.S. has important security, political and economic/commercial interests in Indonesia, whose location, population and natural resources give it broad strategic value. Indonesia is undergoing a wrenching transition to democracy. It is in our interest to see the Indonesian government (GOI) complete this transition, as well as undertake the economic structural reforms that will help restore economic growth and further Indonesia's integration into the global economy.

Our E-IMET program and other normal military-to-military ties were suspended in 1999 because of human rights abuses in East Timor by pro-Indonesia militias and elements of the Indonesia military (TNI).

Language in the FY 2002 Foreign Operations Committee report authorizes the use of E-IMET for civilians. Our goal in use of E-IMET is to educate Indonesians about civilian oversight of the military, including budget audits and transparency, and human rights concerns.

Japan

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 2 $1,884 3 $2,553
Exchange Training 2 $0 0 $0
FMS 3790 $15,959,669 700 $10,591,491
Misc DOS/DOD Non-SA 1 $1,073 0 $0
Non-SA, Unified
Command
82 $139,000 0 $0
TOTAL 3877 $16,101,626 703 $10,594,044

Our security alliance with Japan is the linchpin of overall U.S. security policy in Asia. The alliance makes a fundamental and continuing contribution to the defense of Japan and to regional peace and stability, and, as demonstrated by Japan's response to the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, to our campaign against international terrorism. Our engagement with Japan in the Asia-Pacific region to promote mutual security extends beyond our military bases in Japan to encompass a comprehensive program of military-to-military contacts, combined training and exercises, and equipment interoperability. These efforts demonstrate our combined capabilities and commitments, improve readiness and promote burden sharing. Training contacts, whether in the field or in the classroom, also serve to foster and continually renew an understanding of the culture, values and habits of our most important Asian ally and vice versa.

As a means of maintaining the close defense ties outlined above, the U.S. welcomed Japanese participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses in FY 2001, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations, and in the U.S. Military Academy's semester exchange program. The U.S. proposes similar Japanese participation in Asia-Pacific Center courses in FY 2002.

Kiribati

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 4 $43,090 3 $36,797
TOTAL 4 $43,090 3 $36,797

As a means of strengthening defense ties with Kiribati, the U.S. welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Kiribati.

Korea - South (Republic of)

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 5 $4,619 4 $3,404
Exchange Training 2 $0 6 $300
FMS 1541 $3,176,547 440 $5,608,786
Misc DOS/DOD Non-SA 2429 $518,496 120 $3,632
Non-SA, Unified
Command
341 $866,000 0 $0
PME Exchanges 9 $95,850 7 $65,715
Service Academies 8 $120,286 2 $0
TOTAL 4335 $4,781,798 579 $5,681,837

Since the Korean War, the Republic of Korea (ROK) has proven a strategically important and reliable defense treaty ally. While efforts to reduce tensions on the Korean Peninsula are underway, the U.S. and the ROK continue to maintain and strengthen the three major elements of our security alliance: the 1953 Mutual Defense Treaty, strong bilateral ties and combined military forces. U.S. and ROK forces unified under the Combined Forces Command continue to enhance their capabilities to deter and, if necessary, defeat aggression. To sharpen readiness, the Command is continually refining its vigorous program of training and exercises.

A key objective of U.S. training is maintaining the strong sense of shared values and purposes that underlies the U.S.-ROK alliance. Toward that end, the U.S. and the ROK signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for Professional Military Education (PME). Currently, the PME Reciprocal Exchange Program is for the USA and USMC Command and General Staff Colleges (CGSC). The ROKA is given two slots for the USA CGSC per year in accordance with the signed MOA. The USMC CGSC allows one ROKMC student to attend each year under the same agreement. In FY 2001, USAF and ROKAF signed a similar MOA. Beginning in FY 2002, one ROKAF officer will attend the United States Air Force Command Staff College (USAFCSC) and one USAF officer will attend the ROK Command Staff College each year under the reciprocal exchange program. In addition to the reciprocal exchange program, ROKAF gets an additional USAFCSC slot (total of two per year), the ROK services get one National Defense University slot each year and the ROKA and the ROKAF each get an annual War College slot. The ROKN receives one Naval Command College and one Naval Staff College slot per year. The ROKA also gets a slot to the Sergeant Major Academy and the ROKAF gets a slot to the Squadron Officer School.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by ROK in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from the ROK.

Laos

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
IMET 0 $0 1 $17,860
TOTAL 0 $0 1 $17,860

U.S. military personnel have provided training to Lao civilians for humanitarian demining. Since the beginning of operations in FY 1994, over 815 Lao personnel have been trained as demining technicians, medics, community (mine) awareness experts, team leaders and instructors. In FY 1999, over 250 Lao participants were trained in an effort to enable Laos to develop a self-sustaining training capacity.

Lao inclusion in military programs outside POW-MIA operations is decided on a case-by-case basis. Programs supporting our POW-MIA accounting and recovery missions will be given the highest priority. Beginning in FY 2001, we offered the GOL an E-IMET program to teach English in Laos to a small group of Lao military. The Lao did not accept the offer for FY 2001. Representatives of the Lao government will be asked to attend at least one program at the Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies in FY 2002.

Malaysia

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 15 $172,901 9 $110,391
FMS 51 $120,084 190 $129,742
IMET 45 $822,103 81 $684,780
Non-SA, Unified
Command
129 $186,000 0 $0
Section 1004 60 $150,000 90 $265,000
TOTAL 300 $1,451,088 370 $1,189,913

The U.S. has important security interests in Malaysia, a key member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and an influential member of the Organization of the Islamic Conference. A public supporter of our forward-deployed presence in Asia and of our War on Terrorism since the September 11 attacks, Malaysia borders one of the world's most important maritime waterways. The U.S. military benefits from transit rights over Malaysian territory and access to Malaysian ports and airfields.

IMET contributes significantly to the strengthening of our military-to-military ties, and familiarizes the Malaysian military with U.S. doctrine, equipment and management techniques. IMET training also reinforces the Malaysian military's commitment to human rights and good civil-military relations, and helps expand our access to, and cooperation with, Malaysian military leaders. Malaysia is also active in multinational peacekeeping operations, which necessitate training that promotes interoperability, and has indicated willingness to send a battalion-sized force to participate in blue-helmet peacekeeping in Afghanistan. Malaysia is also engaged in training that will improve the military's ability to combat narcotics trafficking and money laundering operations.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by Malaysia in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Malaysia.

Marshall Islands

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 2 $25,049 3 $36,797
TOTAL 2 $25,049 3 $36,797

As a means of strengthening ties with the Marshall Islands, the U.S. welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from the Marshall Islands.

Micronesia

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 4 $45,369 3 $36,797
TOTAL 4 $45,369 3 $36,797

As a means of strengthening ties with Micronesia, the U.S. welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Micronesia.

Mongolia

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 8 $92,315 8 $96,702
EPIC 30 $85,823 0 $0
IMET 242 $798,158 181 $803,237
Non-SA, Unified
Command
75 $148,000 0 $0
TOTAL 355 $1,124,296 189 $899,939

It is in the U.S. national interest to support Mongolia's transformation into a secure, democratic and stable country that can contribute to the security and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific region. IMET training for Mongolia in FY 2001 was designed to further that interest by promoting civilian control of the military, military justice and law, and respect for international human rights standards. FY 2001 IMET training strengthened U.S.-Mongolia military-to-military ties and common military understanding and values by providing English language training and professional military education. Courses received included basic officer military training in intelligence, military medicine, defense and resource management, chemical officer training, personnel and finance officer basic courses and senior service schools, i.e., command and general staff colleges and the Army War College. The U.S. will provide IMET training with similar objectives in FY 2002, continuing our medical, signal and infantry officer training for its second year.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by Mongolia in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Mongolia.

Nauru

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 1 $14,559 0 $0
TOTAL 1 $14,559 0 $0

As is true for many other Pacific countries, Nauru interacts with the U.S. mainly in such Pacific organizations as the Pacific Community, the Forum Fisheries Agency and the South Pacific Regional Environment Program.

The U.S. welcomes the participation by Nauru in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Nauru.

New Zealand

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Asia-Pacific Center 3 $2,735 3 $2,553
FMS 109 $347,449 65 $318,003
TOTAL 112 $350,184 68 $320,556

New Zealand remains a valuable contributor to regional stability and peacekeeping operations in the Pacific region, including in East Timor. It also has contributed troops to Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan and shares U.S. goals in promoting democracy, human rights and political pluralism in the region. A New Zealand frigate also has participated with U.S. naval forces in enforcing the UN trade sanctions on Iraq. Allowing members of the New Zealand Armed Forces to attend professional military courses in the United States is consistent with U.S. policy following New Zealand's withdrawal from the ANZUS treaty.

The U.S. welcomes continued participation by New Zealand in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence.



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