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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

III. Foreign Policy Papers - Western Hemispheric Region (A-F)


Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest: Joint Report to Congress
Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
March 2002
Report
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Anguilla

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMS 0 $0 1 $7,511
TOTAL 0 $0 1 $7,511

Anguilla is a non-sovereign territory of the United Kingdom in the Leeward Islands east of Puerto Rico. During FY 2002, they are projected to use FMS funding to send one student to the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center at Yorktown, VA to attend a Marine Safety Inspection course. Since Anguilla is a frequent stop for U.S.-owned yachts and some cruise ships with U.S. passengers, this training will help ensure the safety of U.S. travelers and vessels which may call at their port or transit their waters.

Antigua and Barbuda (UK)

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 5 $37,035 7 $52,500
IMET 12 $105,822 14 $121,826
Section 1004 50 $94,000 100 $174,000
TOTAL 67 $236,857 121 $348,326

Antigua and Barbuda is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of Antigua and Barbuda to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities. The planned training will assist in the development of a more professional and efficient security force. Participating in joint exercises, training in maritime search and rescue and the training of international maritime officers increase Antigua and Barbuda's ability to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic operations, search and rescue operations and other bilateral and multilateral operations. An 82-foot patrol boat, provided by the U.S. government and delivered in 1998, has been used extensively for coastal patrolling and maritime counternarcotic missions.

Argentina

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 21 $155,547 22 $165,000
EPIC 5 $17,500 9 $35,202
Exchange Training 2 $0 0 $0
FMS 30 $108,213 11 $33,398
IMET 201 $664,798 126 $859,850
Non-SA, Unified
Command
36 $89,000 0 $0
PME Exchanges 7 $0 3 $65,818
TOTAL 302 $1,035,058 171 $1,159,268

Argentina is a democratic nation and a close ally in the strategically important Southern Cone region. We have a close relationship with the GOA and the Argentine military actively participates in international peacekeeping and other multilateral efforts. The U.S. has also designated Argentina as a major non-NATO Ally (MNNA). To promote interoperability and knowledge of U.S. operations, the Argentine military participated in a number of joint exercises with U.S. forces.

IMET courses in civil-military operations, command and general staff officer training and non-commissioned officer training, as well as participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies all assist Argentina's efforts to modernize and professionalize its Armed Forces. They also help reinforce the concept of civilian control of the military and familiarize Argentine military with U.S. military doctrine and practices. Other training in helicopter maintenance and courses in logistics management also increase Argentina's ability to maintain U.S. equipment in its inventory, thus improving Argentine interoperability with U.S. forces in bilateral and multilateral activities. As South America's second largest contributor of troops to international peacekeeping operations, training in peacekeeping and humanitarian demining further encourages Argentina's participation in these activities.

Bahamas

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 1 $7,407 3 $22,500
DOT/USCG Activities 1 $20,400 0 $0
IMET 13 $109,245 44 $159,725
Section 1004 25 $100,000 254 $260,256
TOTAL 40 $237,052 301 $442,481

The Bahamas is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. IMET courses in basic military officers training and access to the Naval Staff College assist The Bahamas in the development of a more professional and efficient security force.

The Bahamas is instrumental in assisting the U.S. in combating narcotics trafficking and illegal migration in the region. Training activities therefore include instruction in operational planning and exercises with U.S. forces. Training in ship management and boarding team operations greatly enhances The Bahamas' ability to perform law enforcement and security activities. IMET training on legal issues involving military and peacekeeping operations will encourage continued Bahamian participation in other bilateral and multilateral activities. One result has been close cooperation with the U.S. Government on a combined counterdrug law enforcement effort, Operation Bahamas and Turks and Caicos (OPBAT), along with increased emphasis by the Bahamas on money laundering and asset forfeiture investigations and prosecutions.

Barbados

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 3 $22,221 3 $22,500
DOT/USCG Activities 3 $68,850 0 $0
IMET 7 $97,941 10 $117,254
INL 1 $1,848 0 $0
Section 1004 50 $325,000 85 $160,000
TOTAL 64 $515,860 98 $299,754

Barbados is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. The planned training will assist Barbados in the development of a more professional and efficient security force. Training in ship management and boarding team operations greatly enhances Barbados' ability to assist in counternarcotic efforts. Barbados has continued its leadership role in the Eastern Caribbean in passing domestic legislation to enable it to implement maritime law enforcement agreements. U.S. government training and support has facilitated execution of cooperative bilateral law enforcement efforts in the region.

Belize (UK)

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 0 $0 1 $7,500
IMET 20 $195,075 76 $219,782
Section 1004 35 $115,000 0 $0
TOTAL 55 $310,075 77 $227,282

Belize is a democratic nation that has a good bilateral relationship with the United States. We have encouraged the military of Belize to participate more actively in counternarcotic and other multilateral efforts. Because of its proximity to the United States, its long coastline dotted with many islands and inlets, and its position linking Central American and Caribbean states, Belize is an ideal transit point for illicit drugs headed for the United States. Easy access to the United States and Mexico makes Belize an attractive staging area for other international crimes as well. It is a market for vehicles stolen in the United States, a potential site for money laundering and a point of origin for smuggled wildlife and artifacts.

IMET and other programs provide training and equipment to maintain a small but disciplined Belize Defense Force (BDF). BDF troops served with the CARICOM Battalion during peacekeeping operations in Haiti and participated in regional training exercises with U.S., British and Caribbean forces. IMET training in the areas of mid-level officers training and equipment maintenance, as well as the rule of law and discipline in military operations, greatly improves the professionalism and competence of the BDF. A number of activities were conducted to help make the BDF a more effective partner when operating with U.S. forces in joint exercises and operations, particularly in the counterdrug area.

Bolivia

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ALP 0 $0 1 $0
CHDS 17 $125,919 15 $112,500
EPIC 1 $14,858 30 $21,322
Exchange Training 2 $0 0 $0
FMF 215 $556,728 37 $53,234
IMET 85 $879,843 127 $729,502
INL 8 $28,608 4 $45,488
Misc DOS/DOD Non-SA 30 $40,000 0 $0
Section 1004 348 $1,434,345 593 $2,646,089
Section 506 2 $12,630 12 $143,524
TOTAL 708 $3,092,931 819 $3,751,659

Bolivia is a democratic nation with a strong bilateral relationship with the United States. Bolivia is heavily engaged in a major counternarcotics effort with significant support and partial funding from the United States. The Bolivian government implemented a five-year counternarcotics plan early in 1998. U.S. Government training and participation in joint exercises have enabled Bolivia to phase out individual compensation for eradication, achieve record levels of eradication, substantially reduce the amount of coca under cultivation and increase the number of arrests and chemical seizures. This effort is hampered by resistance from those who have profited from the production and trafficking of narcotics, particularly cocaine. Special counternarcotic forces and certain select units of the military are active participants in the drug war. At times there have been violent confrontations between coca growers and government forces.

Bolivia has been certified as cooperating with U.S. counternarcotics policy. IMET funds provide professional military education and NCO training to enhance the professionalism of Bolivia's Armed Forces. Programs on civil-military relations, resource management and democratic institution building help reinforce principles of democracy and civilian control of the military. Prior-year FMF funds provided improved technical training for counternarcotic operations.

Brazil

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 14 $103,698 28 $210,000
Exchange Training 2 $0 0 $0
FMS 210 $3,807,796 134 $7,813,933
IMET 31 $276,227 112 $437,619
PME Exchanges 1 $62,830 1 $65,818
TOTAL 258 $4,250,551 275 $8,527,370

As a result of its geographic size and economic power, Brazil has substantial influence over the entire South American continent and its military actively participates in international peacekeeping and other multilateral efforts. Our security relationship with this regional leader suffered a considerable decline in the late 1970s when Brazil was governed by a military regime that was displeased by our foreign policy's emphasis on human rights. This displeasure resulted in the cessation of the US-Brazil Military Assistance Accord that had been in effect since WWII. Brazil's transition to civilian government in 1985 paved the way for a closer partnership and its creation of a civilian-led Ministry of Defense in 1999 greatly facilitated our bilateral defense relationship. Today, that relationship can be characterized as mature and continually improving.

The activities listed below have multiple benefits. IMET training courses for NCOs, mid-level and senior officers, and participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies assist Brazil's efforts to modernize and professionalize its Armed Forces and help strengthen the principle of civilian control of the military. Other training in equipment maintenance and logistics also enhances Brazil's ability to maintain its inventory and further encourages Brazil's participation in international peacekeeping and humanitarian operations. Finally, participation in joint exercises strengthens interoperability with U.S. forces.

Canada

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ACSS 1 $5,882 0 $0
Asia-Pacific Center 3 $2,735 1 $851
CHDS 1 $7,407 2 $15,000
FMS 828 $7,806,269 610 $1,665,520
Marshall Center 8 $0 0 $0
TOTAL 841 $7,822,293 613 $1,681,371

Canada, a democracy and our largest trading partner, shares with the United States a 5,500-mile undefended border and an extraordinarily wide range of common interests. The Canadian Forces see their main tasks as the defense of Canada, contributing to the defense of North America with the United States, and contributing to international peace and security through the UN, NATO, and other multinational organizations. Canada's common vision of security with the United States is embodied not only in our mutual commitments in NATO and NORAD, but also in more than 500 bilateral agreements concerning defense and security, and in a considerable degree of integration of our defense industries. Ottawa currently supports more than a dozen international peacekeeping and humanitarian operations around the world. Canada also staunchly supports the campaign against terrorism. Canada quickly increased the number of its fighter aircraft patrolling the skies of North America with NORAD after September 11. Ottawa has sent about a third of its navy to help patrol the Arabian Sea and Persian Gulf, including one frigate completely integrated into a U.S. carrier battlegroup. Canada is also deploying elements of a light infantry battalion to serve alongside U.S. troops at Kandahar, as well as transport and patrol aircraft to support land and naval aspects of the campaign.

A large variety of FMS-funded training courses improve the operational skills of Canadian troops and sailors. They also increase the abilities of Canadian crewmembers and technicians to operate and maintain the numerous U.S.-origin vehicles, aircraft, weapons and electronic systems in Canada's inventory. This helps sustain the advanced level of interoperability with U.S. forces that Canada achieves in bilateral and multilateral activities. Interoperability and a common approach to security issues are also fostered through command and staff courses for Canadian officers at U.S. service schools under FMS, as well as separately-funded area studies at the Marshall Center, the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies and the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies.

Cayman Islands (UK)

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
Misc DOS/DOD Non-SA 2 $1,450 0 $0
TOTAL 2 $1,450 0 $0

The Cayman Islands, located between Cuba and Honduras in the Caribbean Sea, is a dependent territory of the United Kingdom. It has a population of 40,000 and a well-developed offshore financial center that is the fifth largest in the world. In 2000, the Cayman Islands reformed its counter-money-laundering regime to comply with international regulatory standards for financial systems. The Cayman Islands' record of cooperation with U.S. criminal law enforcement authorities is excellent. The territory's attraction as a financial center also makes it vulnerable to international criminals. Drug traffickers use the Cayman Islands as a transshipment point for cocaine coming from South America and ganja from Jamaica. Local fishermen have served as mules to transport illegal drugs from the north coast of Jamaica. The territory's authorities are unable to protect its borders adequately because of limited assets. The 2000 U.S.-UK/UK Overseas Territories Maritime Counternarcotics Agreement covers The Cayman Islands. Maritime-related training provided by the U.S. Coast Guard has helped the territory's small police force improve its ability to protect the islands' territorial seas and cooperate with counternarcotic and security efforts.

Chile

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 14 $103,698 23 $172,500
EPIC 30 $84,000 0 $0
Exchange Training 4 $10,000 2 $10,000
FMS 29 $296,272 7 $149,446
IMET 334 $541,685 263 $585,771
Misc DOS/DOD Non-SA 1 $0 0 $0
Non-SA, Unified
Command
175 $784,000 0 $0
PME Exchanges 3 $62,830 0 $0
TOTAL 590 $1,882,485 295 $917,717

Chile is a key partner of the United States in the Western Hemisphere and beyond. Our military training activities help to advance the U.S. interests in regional stability, interoperability with U.S. forces and the maintenance and protection of basic democratic values and human rights. As the Chilean Armed Forces have become more modern and professional, they have expanded their participation in U.S.-advocated activities such as international peacekeeping.

The IMET program has been an invaluable tool in the transition away from the Pinochet era. Technical training has supported Chile's efforts to modernize its forces, which, combined with Chile's participation in joint training exercises with American personnel, has enhanced effective interoperability with the United States. The provision of management training for non-commissioned, mid-level and senior officers has helped Chile to further professionalize its armed forces. Overall, contact between Chilean and U.S. military and civilian personnel through the IMET program has strengthened Chile's democracy and steadily eroded the historical misperceptions and prejudices that arose between our two countries.

Chile's EIPC-assisted peacekeeping capability supports U.S. interests by facilitating regional and international cooperation. Increased peacekeeping readiness encourages cooperation among the Chilean services, strengthens and further motivates Chile's rationale for defense modernization and promotes collaboration and exchanges with the U.S. and other regional militaries. Due in part to training programs such as these, today's Chilean military is more modern, more professional and more willing and able to support the U.S. than ever before.

Colombia

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 27 $199,989 33 $247,500
DOT/USCG Activities 1 $30,600 0 $0
Exchange Training 2 $0 0 $0
FMF 415 $4,492,628 255 $4,702,871
FMS 220 $366,227 114 $438,152
IMET 598 $1,146,565 597 $1,413,239
INL 425 $1,178,691 242 $696,531
Section 1004 4462 $7,912,894 4725 $8,917,216

Section 506

150

$199,457

30

$60,000

TOTAL

6300

$15,527,051

5996

$16,475,509

Colombia is Latin America's oldest formal democracy and a major ally of the United States in the fight against international narcotics trafficking and terrorism. As the source of most of the cocaine and much of the heroin consumed in the United States, Colombia is the focus of a significant share of the U.S. government's international counterdrug effort. The largest part of the training provided to the Colombian military is in direct support of the U.S. counterdrug strategy.

Section 1004 counterdrug training in Colombia represents a variety of United States Marine Corps and Special Operations Forces (SOF) efforts, including aviation aircrew training, Colombian Marine riverine training, and light infantry training of Colombian police and military. All training is provided in support of counterdrug eradication and interdiction efforts. In FY 2001, the major focus of SOF was training for the 2nd and 3rd counterdrug battalions and the counterdrug brigade headquarters. The overall effort trained approximately 2,600 Colombian Army personnel. Details regarding counterdrug battalion training, to include cost data, are provided in the classified volume of this report and are not reflected in the table above. Extensive sustainment training is reflected in FY 2002 planning as is the required increased support for training of helicopter mechanics, crew and pilots for the assets provided to the GOC for counternarcotic programs.

The IMET program adds to these counternarcotic training efforts, and funds a broad range of courses for the Colombian military at all levels that promote mutually beneficial military-to-military relations and increase understanding and defense cooperation between the U.S. and Colombia. Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies and IMET courses include a strong emphasis on human rights, including courses on democratic sustainment. IMET also provides technical training for NCOs and field-grade officers, as well as training in maintenance, logistics and resource management. These courses assist the Colombian military by increasing its abilities to better care for and maintain U.S.-provided equipment, thus increasing Colombia's ability to pursue its counterdrug efforts.

Costa Rica

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 5 $37,035 10 $75,000
IMET 44 $252,539 103 $504,445
INL 107 $124,158 30 $0
Non-SA, Unified
Command
60 $80,000 0 $0
Section 1004 42 $183,996 46 $65,513
TOTAL 258 $677,728 189 $644,958

Costa Rica is a democratic nation, a major ally in Central America and was the first Central American nation to sign and ratify a Maritime Counternarcotics Agreement with the United States. Costa Rica actively participates in efforts to reduce illegal migration, drug trafficking and poaching of marine fisheries in the region, and has become a staunch U.S. partner in the fight against international crime, greatly expanding and complementing our law enforcement efforts in the region.

Costa Rica is one of two countries in Latin America that does not have a military, relying on its Public Security Forces for defense. It participates in the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies, and IMET training serves to further professionalize the Coast Guard and law enforcement services through courses such as patrol craft commander training, rule of law and discipline in military operations, and NCO professional development training. Likewise, as the GOCR assumes an increasingly sophisticated counternarcotics role, other training provides access to modern, state-of-the-art law enforcement methods, as well as assistance in equipment maintenance, logistics and resource management. Counternarcotics training focuses on operational skills, as well as joint exercises to improve interoperability with U.S. forces.

Dominica

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
CHDS 0 $0 1 $7,500
IMET 5 $48,908 12 $101,070
Section 1004 0 $0 40 $80,000
TOTAL 5 $48,908 53 $188,570

Dominica is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of Dominica to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities. The planned training will assist Dominica in the development of a more professional and efficient security force and will enable Dominica to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic activities, search and rescue operations, international peacekeeping efforts and other bilateral and multilateral operations.

Dominican Republic

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ALP 0 $0 1 $0
CHDS 3 $22,221 8 $60,000
DOT/USCG Activities 2 $51,000 0 $0
Exchange Training 2 $0 0 $0
FMF 80 $25,271 0 $0
FMS 15 $117,173 4 $11,714
IMET 68 $630,662 121 $739,625
Non-SA, Unified
Command
137 $80,000 0 $0
Section 1004 0 $0 200 $241,000
Service Academies 1 $60,143 0 $0
TOTAL 308 $986,470 334 $1,052,339

The Dominican Republic is a democratic nation and a close ally of the United States. We have encouraged the Dominican Republic military to participate more actively in counternarcotic operations and other multilateral efforts.

IMET training in areas such as civil-military operations and democratic sustainment will contribute to the Dominican Republic's support for the principles of human rights, democracy and civilian control of the military. Professional training and education at all levels (including NCO training and command and staff colleges) improves the professionalism of the Dominican Republic Armed Forces. Other training included technical and counternarcotics training to increase the Dominican Republic's ability to operate with U.S. forces, and joint exercises which promoted team building and provided baseline knowledge of U.S. operations.

Ecuador

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ALP 0 $0 1 $0
CHDS 11 $81,477 16 $120,000
Exchange Training 2 $0 0 $0
FMS 28 $269,612 37 $135,310
IMET 108 $565,678 76 $620,130
INL 30 $104,280 0 $0
Misc DOS/DOD Non-SA 30 $0 0 $0
Non-SA, Unified
Command
40 $353,232 0 $0
Section 1004 650 $2,041,000 1176 $2,673,887
TOTAL 899 $3,415,279 1306 $3,549,327

The U.S. has strong and friendly bilateral relations with Ecuador. Ecuador's democracy has been struggling in recent years under various pressures, including a severe financial crisis, rivalries between domestic regions, high-profile corruption and lack of support for the President. Ecuador's military has a great deal of independence and political influence, and they have some funding sources of their own which reduce their dependence on the budget process. Though Ecuador fought a brief, but hotly contested border war with Peru in February 1995, this conflict was settled by a bilateral agreement in October 1998, with the help of the United States and other guarantors of the Rio Protocol. The Ecuadorian military played a controversial role in the January 2000 political crisis, but has reaffirmed its commitment to civilian control.

Training in civil-military relations and the rule of law and discipline in military operations and participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies help reinforce the principles of civilian control of the military and strengthen the principles of human rights. Ecuador is designated as a major drug-transiting country, and many of the activities such as counternarcotic operations, officer training, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance provide training needed to professionalize and modernize Ecuador's military. Significant training efforts in counterdrug operations have also been conducted. Joint exercises with U.S. forces contributed to continued cooperation with U.S. counternarcotic efforts. In November 1999, Ecuador and the United States concluded a ten-year agreement for the access and use of Manta Air Force Base, Ecuador, as a Forward Operating Location for U.S. aircraft monitoring drug trafficking flights through the region. USSOUTHCOM provides training for humanitarian demining efforts along Peru's border with Ecuador. U.S. Military Group Ecuador has trained a number of military and civilian officials through courses funded by IMET and E-IMET.

El Salvador

  FY 2001 Actual FY 2002 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ALP 0 $0 1 $0
CHDS 12 $88,884 10 $75,000
Exchange Training 2 $0 0 $0
FMF 101 $62,934 0 $0
FMS 0 $0 2 $51,106
IMET 217 $653,488 263 $1,173,853
Non-SA, Unified
Command
750 $125,000 0 $0
Section 1004 0 $0 100 $165,000
TOTAL 1082 $930,306 376 $1,464,959

El Salvador is a democratic country that has had an historically close relationship with the United States. Bilateral military assistance has been dramatically reduced since the end of the civil war in 1992 and overall relations have flourished with the civilian government. The principal U.S. interests in El Salvador are supporting democracy, fighting international crime and illegal drugs, encouraging economic development, deterring illegal immigration to the U.S. and promoting U.S. exports.

Training is geared towards professional training programs that will sustain the dramatic improvement in civil-military relations and consequent improvement in the democratic climate and regional stability seen in recent years. Officer training at all levels, including command and staff colleges and courses in civil-military relations and democratic sustainment help reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and reinforce the principles of human rights. Training, through IMET and with prior year FMF funds, in counternarcotic operations, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance provided assistance needed to professionalize and modernize the Salvadoran military and encourage its continued cooperation with U.S. counternarcotic efforts. Joint training exercises with U.S. forces contributed to team building and exposure to U.S. counterdrug operations. Since the earthquakes of January/February 2001, emphasis has been given to helping the Salvadoran military carry out its disaster relief and reconstruction mission, as well as to building its disaster preparedness capabilities.



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