printable banner

U.S. Department of State - Great Seal

U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

III. Foreign Policy Objectives -- Near East Region


Foreign Military Training and DoD Engagement Activities of Interest: Joint Report to Congress
Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
May 2003
Report
Share

Algeria


  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ACSS 2 $13,275 7 $40,551
FMS 0 $0 0 $0
IMET 1 $37,793 125 $470,209
NESA 1 $3,740 2 $7,300
TOTAL 4 $54,808 134 $518,060

The U.S. has a clear interest in increasing regional stability by promoting an open democracy, economic reform and peace and security in Algeria. Algeria's military, the second largest in Africa, is emerging from a decade of conflict with armed insurgents. The proposed plan is a cautious, measured approach intended to encourage reform within an Algerian military establishment gradually moving along a path toward greater pluralism and respect for civilian authority.

The IMET program helps Algerian military officers understand and increase their support for U.S. policy. IMET activities, as well as participation at the Africa Center for Strategic Studies and the Near East - South Asia Center, increase awareness of international norms of human rights and foster greater respect for the principle of civilian control of the military. In FY 2003, IMET funds will be used to send Algerian officers to key Professional Military Education (PME) courses as well as selected technical training courses. IMET training promotes professionalism and reinforces among core supporters of the regime the importance of a strong, cooperative political/military relationship with the United States. These officers will establish essential contacts with U.S. counterparts whose influence can encourage reform within the Algerian military. IMET-funded English language training will improve the Algerian military's interoperability with U.S. forces, facilitate interaction in potential future contingency operations such as peacekeeping missions, and prepare them for increased training opportunities.

The African Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) supports democratic governance in Algeria by offering senior African civilian and military leaders a practical program in civil-military relations, national security strategy and defense economics. ACSS participation also helps build and maintain long-term, continuing interaction with and amongst participants, and supports additional research, seminars, conferences and other exchange activities on relevant topics in Africa, Europe and the United States.

Bahrain

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMS 366 $5,867,317 357 $1,064,475
IMET 37 $388,259 121 $483,716
NESA 4 $25,195 4 $27,700
TOTAL 407 $6,280,771 482 $1,575,891

The United States has an enduring national security interest in maintaining its access to Bahraini military facilities in order to maintain our influence in the Persian Gulf and to conduct operations in the on-going War on Terrorism. Bahrain has hosted the U.S. Navy 5th Fleet for more than 50 years. The relatively open access to facilities, land and airspace needed to support contingency operations, including joint task force, fleet and Multinational Interception Force (MIF) operations are critical to maintaining U.S. operations in the region. In addition, Bahrain annually hosts important exercises that involve U.S. forces.

Our security and political relationship with Bahrain continues to be strong. In 2001, the President designated Bahrain a Major Non-NATO Ally. Bahrain and the United States have maintained a Defense Cooperation Agreement (DCA) since 1991. Bahrain has been a steadfast supporter of our foreign policy objectives in Iraq and Libya, not only as a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council in 1997, but also as a member of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). Bahrain has also been a critical supporter of our containment of Iranian ambitions in the region and has been a key supporter of the War on Terrorism. Bahrain responded positively to all NAVCENT and U.S. military requests for Operation Enduring Freedom, and will remain a critical hub for the U.S. presence in the Gulf and Southwest Asia. Bahrain has been an active participant in the War on Terrorism and was the only GCC country to provide a ship to the Coalition effort. Bahrain has also assumed a leadership role in regional efforts to cut off the flow of funding to terrorist groups.

Training activities funded under IMET and the approval of selected commercial and FMS arms sales promote the interoperability of the Bahrain Defense Forces with existing U.S. and GCC forces in the region. Via the IMET program Bahrain sends officers to U.S. war colleges, command and staff schools, and other key professional military education (PME) and technical courses. IMET training reinforces democratic principles of civilian control of the military, enhances interoperability with U.S. forces, promotes professionalism and reinforces among core supporters of the regime the importance of a strong, cooperative political/military relationship with the United States. In addition, Bahrain regularly sends students to U.S. service academies. By improving English language skills and understanding of our military, these training programs directly enhance the effectiveness of our bilateral and multilateral joint training programs.

Egypt

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ACSS 2 $14,816 2 $8,506
FMF 1372 $8,700,431 1206 $7,054,977
IMET 72 $1,476,625 98 $1,781,525
Misc DOS/DOD Non-SA 0 $0 100 $882,000
NESA 6 $15,055 5 $25,000
Service Academies 1 $170,280 1 $170,280
TOTAL 1453 $10,377,207 1412 $9,922,288

Egypt is a pivotal country in the Arab world and a key U.S. ally in the Middle East. The U.S. seeks to promote regional peace and security by encouraging Egypt's continued participation and leadership in Middle East peace efforts. Egypt has been at peace with Israel for two decades, but has potentially hostile rivals in Sudan and Libya. Egypt faces challenges to maintaining sea lines of communication as well as to the protection of its territorial waters and Nile headwaters. Egypt's strategic location and control of the Suez Canal make it a critical transit point for petroleum and for U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf and Southwest Asia.

President Mubarak was the first head of an Arab state to make a public statement of support for the strikes on Afghanistan. Egypt has been extremely cooperative in working with the U.S. to crack down on financing activities of terrorist entities. The importance of Egypt's cooperation for Suez Canal access and security, as well as overflight clearances cannot be overstated. In 2001, Egypt granted clearances for over 6,250 military overflights and for 53 U.S. Navy ship passages.

As our principal Middle East coalition partner, Egypt participates in a number of annual joint military exercises, and hosts the biennial Operation Bright Star, the largest U.S. military training exercise in the world. Last held in October-November 2001, Bright Star sends an important message to the region about U.S. and coalition capabilities to project forces into the region.

The African Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) supports democratic governance in Egypt by offering senior civilian and military leaders a practical program in civil-military relations, national security strategy and defense economics. ACSS participation also helps build and maintain long-term, continuing interaction with and amongst participants, and supports additional research, seminars, conferences and other exchange activities on relevant topics in Africa, Europe and the United States.

Egypt's replacement of outmoded Soviet-era equipment with smaller quantities of more capable and sustainable U.S. equipment is well underway. Increasing the amount of U.S.-origin equipment in the Egyptian inventory augments U.S. interoperability with Egypt, enhancing their value as a coalition partner. Egypt's U.S.-funded training program is exceptionally robust and vital to our relationship. Specifically, Egyptian training funded under the IMET and FMF programs enhances counterterrorism training, improves Egypt's maintenance and supply capabilities, increases English language skills of the Egyptian officer corps and improves pilot proficiency. Attendance at U.S. military command and staff colleges and service academies teaches advanced leadership skills and improves understanding between our militaries. All of these programs directly enhance joint training, as well as Egypt's value as a key coalition partner.

Iraq

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMS 1 $10,948 80 $482,222
Section 506 45 $173,670 101 $464,278
TOTAL 46 $184,618 181 $946,500

The Iraq Liberation Act (ILA), P.L. 105-338, Section 4 (a) (2) provides the President authority "to direct the drawdown of defense articles from the stocks of the Department of Defense, defense services of the Department of Defense, and military education and training for [Iraqi opposition] organizations."

Such training focuses on helping the Iraqi opposition improve its ability to function as a democratic opposition. Training has been offered in such areas as public affairs, strategic planning, humanitarian assistance, international law, logistics and civil reconstruction.

In December 2002, Presidential Determinations 2003-05 and 2003-06 were signed, which designated six new groups as eligible to receive training under the Iraq Liberation Act, and authorized the drawdown of the remaining $92 million available under the Act. As of December 2002, approximately 140 opposition members have been trained under the Iraq Liberation Act's authority. The Department of Defense has now determined to expand the training available under the Act. As part of this process, the U.S. has asked opposition groups to tell us who among their membership might be available for training in an expanded program. Under the plan, each group will coordinate with the Department of Defense through a committee made up of representatives of all Iraq Liberation Act designees contributing trainees to the program, and representatives of the U.S. government, chaired by the Department of Defense.

In accordance with the President's decision, the Department will be training many more Iraqis than before, so they can play a more effective role in helping to free their country.

Israel

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMF 973 $19,779,481 268 $2,390,339
FMS 547 $4,748,156 565 $3,003,297
Marshall Center 1 $0 0 $0
NESA 12 $821 11 $0
TOTAL 1533 $24,528,458 844 $5,393,636

It is in the U.S. national interest to promote a stable, democratic and militarily strong Israel that is at peace with its neighbors. President Bush has reiterated the steadfast U.S. commitment to Israel's security, to the maintenance of its qualitative militarily edge and to strengthen Israel's ability to deter potential aggressors and defend itself. Maintaining Israel's qualitative military edge in the regional balance of power enhances Israel's security and helps prevent regional conflict. Israel remains one of the USG's most important allies in countering the threat of weapons of mass destruction in the region.

The U.S. has provided Israel with over $90 billion in economic and military assistance since 1949 and Israel continues to receive the largest share of U.S. security assistance worldwide. Foreign military training spending, both as a portion of U.S.-provided FMF and as DoD-funded non-security assistance, is an important element in maintaining Israel's qualitative military edge. Training for Israeli personnel during FY 2002 included Air, Naval, and Army War College courses, flight simulator training, and avionics systems and armament maintenance training, among other programs. By providing both technical expertise and exposure to U.S. military culture and personnel, these programs promote interoperability and contribute significantly to the strengthening of U.S.-Israel military ties.

Jordan

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
EIPC 2 $9,000 0 $0
FMF 1 $0 0 $0
IMET 209 $2,546,163 259 $2,558,150
NESA 9 $49,020 9 $51,800
Non-SA, Unified Command 0 $72,900 0 $0
PME Exchanges 8 $48,008 3 $32,040
Service Academies 3 $146,961 1 $46,791
TOTAL 232 $2,872,052 272 $2,688,781

Stability and economic prosperity in the Middle East support U.S. national security objectives. As a moderate, pro-West state, Jordan is in a position to play a pivotal role as a stabilizing influence in the region by virtue of its borders with Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Syria and Israel. Political stability and economic development in Jordan are necessary prerequisites to enhance Jordan's moderate influence in the region.

Peace in the Middle East is one of Jordan's highest priorities, especially in light of its majority Palestinian population and its peace treaty with Israel. Jordan is also in a position to contribute to collective regional security goals. The U.S. works with Jordan to assure adherence to the UN sanctions regime in Iraq, as well as strengthened border security. Jordan has been a strong supporter of the War on Terrorism and has deployed an airborne company, field hospital and demining unit to Afghanistan in support of coalition operations.

The U.S.-Jordan military-to-military relationship is excellent, and Jordan has been designated a Major Non-NATO Ally. FMF helps the Jordanian armed force address its readiness and sustainment requirements, and this program remains the only source of funds for Jordanian military modernization programs as outlined in their Five-Year Plan. FMF also supports counterterrorism and border security requirements. Jordan's successful efforts at border control are critical to prevent illicit trafficking of arms, explosives, drugs and equipment for use in the production of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. Improved security for Jordanian borders translates into enhanced domestic stability for Jordan, improved security for Israel and for the U.S. military based in Saudi Arabia, and increases the ability to hold the line on sanctions with Iraq.

Jordan has one of the largest IMET programs in the world and regularly sends officers to U.S. war colleges, command and staff schools, and other key professional military education (PME) and technical courses. IMET training reinforces democratic principles of civilian control of the military, enhances interoperability with U.S. forces, promotes professionalism and reinforces among core supporters of the regime the importance of a strong, cooperative political/military relationship with the United States. The exercise program is also robust, and Jordan participates in multiple bilateral and multilateral exercises annually.

Kuwait

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMS 346 $5,069,148 657 $8,242,545
NESA 3 $0 6 $0
TOTAL 349 $5,069,148 663 $8,242,545

Located on the southern border of Iraq, Kuwait faces the difficult task of securing its borders from the two principal threats in the region - Iran and Iraq. A continuous U.S. presence has been key to Kuwait's security since the Gulf War. The United States also has a demonstrable interest in maintaining its access to Kuwait's facilities, land and airspace.

Kuwait hosts the forward headquarters of CENTCOM's ground forces, a significant number of U.S. and coalition military personnel and a large contingent of air forces in support of Operation Southern Watch and Operation Enduring Freedom. It has steadfastly supported U.S. initiatives in the region. Kuwait has been especially supportive of the Multinational Interception Force (MIF) and all efforts aimed at enforcing UN Security Council declared sanctions against the Saddam-led Iraqi government. The relatively open access to facilities, land and airspace needed to support contingency operations, including joint task force and fleet operations, are critical to the U.S. presence in the region and ongoing military operations there.

The continued participation of Kuwaitis in military-to-military training initiatives and joint military exercises promotes interoperability with U.S. and Gulf Cooperation Council forces, recognizes Kuwait's invaluable support for U.S. force deployments, and helps Kuwait to assume greater responsibility for its own defense and regional security by encouraging the development of its professional military command.

Lebanon

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMS 51 $17,374 0 $0
IMET 157 $527,088 267 $490,640
NESA 0 $0 1 $5,800
TOTAL 208 $544,462 268 $496,440

Lebanon is rebuilding after its 16-year civil war, which ended in 1991, but still has a long way to go. Israeli forces withdrew completely from south Lebanon in May 2000, and the United Nations Security Council and Secretary General recognized that Israel no longer occupies any Lebanese territory. However, Lebanon, under the strong influence of Syria, maintains that Israel continues to occupy Lebanese territory. The Government of Lebanon has made some progress toward rebuilding its civil institutions and reestablishing the rule of law. Still, armed militias - like Hizbollah - remain largely outside the control of the central government. The economy remains a serious question in Lebanon. As of the end of 2002, many analysts believed that Lebanon required comprehensive economic and financial reforms to overcome the dynamic that had led to the accumulation of $30 billion in public debt. U.S. interests lie in a free and independent Lebanon at peace with its neighbors, particularly Israel. A secure and independent Lebanon will seriously weaken terrorism and contribute to the fight against illegal drugs and counterfeiting.

A comprehensive Middle East peace cannot be achieved absent peace between Lebanon and Israel. Although the Lebanon track is tied to the Syrian track, we continue to use every effort to support Lebanon in efforts to reach peace with Israel and to support the development of independent institutions minimizing the influence of external players, including Iran and Syria.

IMET funding was reinstated for Lebanon in 1993. The Lebanese armed forces (LAF) have taken full advantage of the opportunity for professional military education and technical training. The country team reports that IMET graduates are employed in positions of command and responsibility and achieve proportionally higher rank and influence than their non-IMET peers. In addition, USG assistance to the LAF counters the prevailing tendency to break down society along strictly sectarian/confessional lines in one of the country's major institutions. IMET training also provides an important alternative to military training with Syria and other countries. IMET training for the LAF in FY 2002 included courses at the Air Force Command & Staff College, English language training and several Mobile Training Team deployments to give instruction on maritime environmental security, port security and maritime interdiction. In FY 2003, Lebanon will send students to various professional military education (PME) courses and continue maritime training in the areas of crisis management, environmental and port security, and search and rescue. Lebanon also continues to benefit from non-security assistance humanitarian demining training, which helps finance an on-going program to remove landmines throughout Lebanon, especially in southern Lebanon where we continue to encourage increased deployments of the armed forces in order to stabilize the border areas.

Morocco

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ACSS 2 $15,055 8 $40,551
FMF 63 $115,939 2 $33,677
IMET 77 $1,172,714 145 $1,555,913
NESA 3 $10,323 4 $21,200
Non-SA, Unified Command 135 $483,600 0 $0
Service Academies 1 $50,085 0 $0
TOTAL 281 $1,847,716 159 $1,651,341

A strategic anchor at the cusp of Africa, Europe and the Arab world, Morocco sits on the south side of the Straits of Gibraltar. In July 1999, Mohamed VI became King upon the death of his father, Hasan II. From the start, King Mohamed has shown himself to be a progressive monarch. He has voiced strong support for human rights and economic and political reform. However, he has inherited a kingdom that is poor - a middle-ranked developing country - and a political system whose reform is real but far from complete. The United States seeks to support this democratic and free-market opening to encourage a Morocco that is stable, prosperous and free. The U.S. has selected Morocco to be its second free trade partner in the Arab world after Jordan, and negotiations on a bilateral Free Trade Agreement will begin in early 2003.

Morocco is pro-U.S. in its international orientation and continues to provide strong support for the War on Terrorism. Morocco's moderate policies on the Arab-Israeli conflict have proven helpful to our regional peace efforts. It is strongly in the U.S. interest to support stability in Morocco and to support the continuance of Morocco's friendly foreign policy. As the dialogue between NATO and several Middle East states affirms, stability in Morocco and the Maghreb is of vital importance to our Southern European NATO allies.

The African Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) supports democratic governance in Morocco by offering senior civilian and military leaders a practical program in civil-military relations, national security strategy and defense economics. ACSS participation also helps build and maintain long-term, continuing interaction with and amongst participants, and supports additional research, seminars, conferences and other exchange activities on relevant topics in Africa, Europe and the United States.

The IMET program increases awareness of international norms of human rights, fosters greater respect for the principle of civilian control of the military and helps Moroccan military officers understand U.S. foreign policies. Morocco sends students to professional military education (PME) courses including U.S. service war colleges, command and staff colleges and other key PME courses. Moroccan attendance at key PME courses fosters one-to-one relationships that pay invaluable rewards in the form of interoperability, coordination and mutual understanding. Also, IMET-funded maintenance and logistics, technical and specialist, as well as English language training enhances Morocco's value as a partner in multinational training exercises, peacekeeping missions and potential future coalition contingency actions.

Oman

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMS 1 $46,481 187 $796,700
IMET 70 $494,551 147 $678,397
NESA 10 $66,712 9 $58,500
Non-SA, Unified Command 15 $133,000 0 $0
Section 1004 100 $185,000 0 $57,000
Service Academies 1 $50,085 0 $0
TOTAL 197 $975,829 343 $1,590,597

Oman's location on the southern shore of the Strait of Hormuz makes our relationship with the Sultanate critical to U.S. commitments to defend national, regional and global interests in the Gulf. Access to Oman's military bases through a bilateral agreement provides an important anchor for our regional political-military strategy. Security cooperation has been the bedrock upon which our bilateral relationship with Oman rests. Since 1980, Oman has provided the U.S. access to key bases. Oman has been a strong supporter of the War on Terrorism, and access to Omani bases was critical to the successful campaign against terrorist forces in Afghanistan. The relatively open access to facilities, land and airspace are critical to the U.S. presence in the region, the War on Terrorism and any future contingencies in Southwest Asia. Additionally, for the past twenty years, we have been able to count on Oman's support for U.S. regional policy initiatives, including peace efforts and U.S.-Iraq policy.

Oman's long-term domestic political stability improves prospects for continued policy support and military access. The USG is providing technical assistance for the Sultan's political and legal reform program. It is also working closely with Oman, both bilaterally and through the World Trade Organization (Oman became a member of the WTO in October 2000), to encourage a more transparent regulatory environment that will attract increased investment and trade.

The U.S. should actively support the Omanization of the Sultan's armed forces through professional military education (PME) and technical training. IMET training provided to Oman covers a broad range of areas, including professional military education, English language, technical and logistics training, medical corps development, demining efforts and maritime operations. IMET training reinforces democratic principles of civilian control of the military, enhances interoperability with U.S. forces, promotes professionalism and reinforces among core supporters of the regime the importance of a strong, cooperative political/military relationship with the United States. Oman has also participated in joint military exercises to improve its interoperability with U.S. and Coalition forces.

Qatar

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMF 8 $268,190 5 $124,420
FMS 46 $1,194,474 61 $1,047,111
NESA 6 $109 6 $0
TOTAL 60 $1,462,773 72 $1,171,531

Our military relationship with Qatar is strong and vital. Emir Hamad is pursuing democratic principals and working to strengthen the U.S. relationship, particularly military ties. The U.S.-Qatar Defense Cooperation Agreement, which was signed in 1992, established the basis for our growing military-to-military relationship. Over the last several years, Qatar has hosted a number of Air Expeditionary Forces (AEF) and related deployments. Qatari support to Operation Enduring Freedom has been outstanding and vital to our efforts in the region. Qatar has, without question, the most impressive preposition infrastructure in the Middle East, if not the world. Of particular significance, the U.S. and Qatar recently concluded an Implementing Agreement outlining use of Al Udeid facilities. The Al Udeid Air Base features one of the longest and most capable runways in the region. In addition, Qatar is hosting joint/combined exercise Internal Look with U.S., Qatar and other forces.

Strategically located in the Gulf, it is vital that the U.S. continues to support military-to-military initiatives and training as well as joint training exercises. The relationships, principles and doctrine future leaders of Qatar's military develop in this bilateral engagement will enhance future coalition understanding, capabilities and interoperability.

Saudi Arabia

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMS 1106 $57,392,001 2089 $19,032,374
NESA 4 $16,653 5 $29,800
Section 1004 1 $8,194 0 $0
TOTAL 1111 $57,416,848 2094 $19,062,174

Saudi Arabia is a key ally in the War on Terrorism and would play a central logistical and political role in any potential military action against Iraq. Saudi Arabia provides support for important regional security initiatives like Operation Southern Watch, and provided crucial assistance for Operation Enduring Freedom. Military-to-military relations remain positive, based on decades of cooperation and close consultation, as well as years of U.S. support to Saudi Arabia's military programs including training, joint exercises and FMS and commercial arms sales. Continued military-to-military contacts and joint military exercises will encourage the development of a professional military command and armed force compatible to, and favorably disposed towards, its U.S. counterparts. This continued cooperation will allow the Kingdom to assume a greater role in self-defense, assist the U.S. in achieving its policy goals in the region and support our efforts to promote security cooperation among the Gulf Cooperation Council members.

Tunisia

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ACSS 4 $30,548 7 $40,551
ALP 3 $4,141 3 $836
IMET 84 $1,619,867 204 $1,437,231
NESA 9 $37,226 6 $32,500
Non-SA, Unified Command 150 $63,000 0 $0
PME Exchanges 0 $0 30 $0
TOTAL 250 $1,754,782 250 $1,511,118

Tunisia is a stable democratic state in a troubled Middle East region, where the U.S. national interest in maintaining access to crucial energy supplies remains high. Located at the Africa-Sicily chokepoint of the Mediterranean, it is a natural economic and strategic bridge to Europe. A close regional ally of the United States, Tunisia considers the U.S. to be its closest military partner. Our interest is to ensure a strong, durable fabric of bilateral relations which include: active Tunisian participation in efforts to promote regional stability, particularly in Middle East peace efforts; bilateral military cooperation; peacekeeping operations; and continued access of U.S. forces to Tunisian facilities.

Joint training exercises are an important feature of our relationship, as Tunisian troops typically engage in 10-12 combined exercises with U.S. forces annually. With over 70% of the Tunisia military equipment of U.S.-origin, the Tunisian Army and Air Force have based their structure and operational doctrine on the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force. This greatly enhances the ability to integrate Tunisian forces into operations with U.S. forces. Tunisian training with U.S. forces enhances their value as a potential coalition partner and recently proved instrumental to Tunisia's participation in Kosovo in support of UN humanitarian efforts. In fact, Tunisia currently has almost 300 troops deployed in UN peacekeeping missions in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MUNOC), Eritrea (UNMEE), and Kosovo (UNMIK).

IMET provides basic and advanced English language training for Tunisian military officers and noncommissioned officers. Tunisian officers have attended U.S. service war colleges, staff colleges, major professional military education (PME) courses and have participated at the Africa Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) programs in civil-military affairs and at the Near East South Asia Center for Strategic Studies. These opportunities promote U.S. goals of stability and democracy, and increase the Tunisian officer corps's familiarity with U.S. values and military practices. This reinforces the fact that the Tunisian military is a highly professional and totally apolitical force, a significant exception in Middle East and African countries. IMET-funded maintenance, logistics and specialist training will enhance Tunisia's value as a training and potential coalition partner.

The African Center for Strategic Studies (ACSS) supports democratic governance in Tunisia by offering senior civilian and military leaders a practical program in civil-military relations, national security strategy and defense economics. ACSS participation also helps build and maintain long-term, continuing interaction with and amongst participants, and supports additional research, seminars, conferences and other exchange activities on relevant topics in Africa, Europe and the United States.

United Arab Emirates

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
FMS 450 $48,653,456 234 $23,145,552
NESA 10 $109 10 $0
Non-SA, Unified Command 50 $109,000 0 $0
TOTAL 510 $48,762,565 244 $23,145,552

The United States has an excellent security relationship with the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The UAE is a strong U.S. ally in the Gulf region and has supported U.S. policy initiatives in the Gulf. They are a major procurer of advanced U.S. military technology and strive toward interoperability with U.S. forces. Therefore, military-to-military education opportunities are a top priority for the UAE. At the same time, attendance at these schools by UAE officers supports the Central Command's objective of forward engagement and interoperability. Finally, the officers who attend these schools are the future leaders of the UAE military. It is to our utmost advantage if they understand U.S. military doctrine and policy perspectives. We support the UAE's recent decision to construct a joint air warfare center for regional cooperative training.

Yemen

  FY 2002 Actual FY 2003 Planned
Type of Activity Number of
Students
Trained
Dollar
Value
Number of
Projected
Students
Dollar
Value
ALP 2 $5,675 2 $16,608
FMF 120 $114,604 6 $33,799
FMS 34 $114,765 17 $135,614
IMET 18 $421,415 88 $867,867
NESA 11 $38,016 10 $60,400
TOTAL 185 $694,475 123 $1,114,288

Yemen is an ally in the War on Terrorism, and is fighting a campaign against terrorist elements inside its borders. U.S. support for that campaign is essential to help ensure its success. Because of Yemen's location adjacent to the Bab-al-Mandab, one of the world's most important shipping routes, as well as its proximity to U.S. allies Saudi Arabia and Oman, Yemen can affect U.S. interests in the region. Yemen is the most populous and poorest nation on the Arabian Peninsula, and is undergoing a slow process of political and social reform under President Saleh aimed at making it the first fully functioning democracy in the region. Support for Yemen's democratic and economic reform programs, professional military training and a humanitarian demining program not only promote our national values in Yemen, but also further our national interests, particularly with regard to the international War on Terrorism. IMET will fund U.S. training and education for Yemeni military personnel, particularly in the vital areas of counterterrorism and training for Yemen's nascent Coast Guard. The IMET program will help military leaders in Yemen understand U.S. policies, increase awareness of international norms of human rights and foster greater respect for the principle of civilian control of the military. Sending Yemenis to professional military education (PME) in the U.S. helps establish one-to-one relationships with counterparts that pay invaluable rewards later in the form of interoperability, coordination and mutual understanding. Increased IMET-funded English language training will also improve the Yemeni military's interoperability with U.S. forces and prepare them for increased training opportunities.



Back to Top
Sign-in

Do you already have an account on one of these sites? Click the logo to sign in and create your own customized State Department page. Want to learn more? Check out our FAQ!

OpenID is a service that allows you to sign in to many different websites using a single identity. Find out more about OpenID and how to get an OpenID-enabled account.