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U.S. Department of State - Great Seal

U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

III. DOS Foreign Policy Objectives -- East Asia and Pacific Region


Foreign Military Training: Joint Report to Congress, Fiscal Years 2003 and 2004
Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
June 2004
Report
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Brunei

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

FMS

2

$51,661

0

$0

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

0

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

1

$1,456

3

$2,956

TOTAL

3

$53,117

3

$2,956


The Royal Bruneian Armed Forces (RBAF) consist of infantry, navy and air combat units. A British armed forces Ghurka battalion permanently stationed in Brunei near the center of the country's oil industry aids them. Because of their country's small size, Bruneians regard a continued U.S. presence in the region as critical to their long-term security and prosperity. Since the signing of a November 1994 Memorandum of Understanding on Defense Cooperation, the RBAF have engaged in joint exercises, training programs and other military exchanges with the United States. RBAF personnel have participated in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses and benefited from FMS training. Their continued participation in the Center's courses and FMS training will enable the USG to help Brunei train future leaders for its armed forces. In addition, they will increase Bruneian awareness and understanding of U.S. policies and facilitate lasting relationships between Bruneian military leaders and their counterparts from the U.S. and the Asia-Pacific region.

During the Sultan of Brunei's visit to the United States in December 2002, we agreed on a number of initiatives to enhance military cooperation. These include raising the level of the bilateral security dialogue and the resumption of the Joint Working Committee on Defense meetings. The Bruneian government is also identifying a candidate for the West Point class of '08, with the cost of training underwritten by the GOB.

As of the publication date of this report, Brunei is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance. Brunei is expected to sign an Article 98 non-surrender agreement with the United States in early 2004.

Cambodia

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

FMF

0

$0

20

$60,516

IMET

0

$0

73

$59,733

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

41

$157,808

0

$0

Regional Centers

2

$30,116

2

$31,178

TOTAL

43

$187,924

95

$151,427


U.S. military assistance to the Cambodian military ceased in 1997 because of factional fighting. Since then, the U.S. has only invited a select few Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (RCAF) representatives to attend multilateral meetings on humanitarian issues. Otherwise, support and mil-to-mil interaction have been minimal. Resumption of military assistance to Cambodia in limited areas such as academic-based or humanitarian conferences remains under case-by-case review in the office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs.

In its Congressional Budget Justification for FY 2004, the State Department has proposed use of IMET funds for human rights and rule of law training to help professionalize the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (if the political situation in the country allows and legal restrictions are lifted). Funds might also be used to provide training to officers that would help them contribute to regional stability and play an effective role in transnational issues (narcotics, human trafficking and protection of land and natural resources).It is hoped that Expanded IMET (E-IMET) training in English Language, civil-military relations, military justice and human rights would help younger officers better understand democratic concepts.

Cambodia is a State Party to the Rome Statute and has concluded an Article 98 agreement. However, because Cambodia does not otherwise receive military assistance from the United States, the prohibition in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) has not been waived.

China

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

2

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

4

$49,202

9

$86,906

TOTAL

6

$49,202

9

$86,906


The United States seeks a candid, constructive, and cooperative relationship with China (PRC), which contributes to peace in Asia and elsewhere. We share common interests in a number of areas, such as the maintenance of stability in Asia - permitting the continuation of that region's economic development - the maintenance of peace on the Korean Peninsula and in South Asia and stemming the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

Dialogue with the PRC is key to ensuring a clear understanding of one another's regional security interests and concerns and to helping promote behavior by the PRC which is in line with the norms of the international community. During the October 2003 visit to Washington by General Cao Gangchuan, PRC Minister of National Defense, the President and Secretary Powell noted the importance of military-to-military ties as a component of the overall U.S.-China bilateral relationship. Secretary Powell and General Cao agreed that military-to-military exchanges and cooperation are crucial to prevent misperceptions and to promote mutual understanding. Although we have differences with China, dialogue allows us to address areas where we agree and to make clear where we do not.

As one element of a defense and security dialogue, it is desired that during FY 2004, the PRC continues to participate in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses that are focused on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. PRC participation in these courses will include members of Chinese "think tanks" and will be consistent with the guidelines set forth in the Defense Authorization Act 2000 and OSD policy guidance.

As of the publication date of this report, China is not a State Party to the Rome Statute as it pertains to � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.).

Cook Islands

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Regional Centers

2

$28,120

3

$36,088

TOTAL

2

$28,120

3

$36,088


The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of the Cook Islands in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from these islands.

As of the publication date of this report, the Cook Islands is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

East Timor

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

83

$80,909

13

$55,380

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

38

$57,112

0

$0

Regional Centers

1

$14,666

0

$0

TOTAL

122

$152,687

13

$55,380


East Timor is in the process of standing up a modest East Timor Defense Force (ETDF) of 1,500 active duty and 1,500 reserve personnel to meet the country's security needs. Although East Timor's security will ultimately depend on good relations with neighboring countries, the new nation still needs an ETDF with basic equipment for defense, support, communication and transportation. The ETDF will also need training for its new officers and funds for a small International Military Education and Training (IMET) program have been included as well. The use of training funds and participating with institutions like the Asia-Pacific Center will support the U.S. objectives of East Timor's self-sufficiency, disaster management and humanitarian assistance relief, as well as of developing a professional, effective defense force.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to East Timor, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Fiji

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

0

$0

10

$253,714

Regional Centers

10

$114,775

6

$72,176

TOTAL

10

$114,775

16

$325,890


IMET and other security assistance programs were suspended in July 2000 after nationalist Fijians, including some in the military, held the Prime Minister and much of his cabinet hostage in the parliament building for 56 days. Parliamentary elections restored democratically elected government to Fiji in August 2001, and the Fiji High Court has ruled in favor of the constitution on questions about the composition of the current cabinet. In October 2003, military-to-military restrictions with Fiji were lifted.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of Fiji in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from these islands.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Fiji, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Indonesia

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

CTFP

87

$1,223,644

25

$500,000

IMET

36

$399,734

81

$667,912

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

2

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

18

$224,692

16

$185,350

TOTAL

143

$1,848,070

122

$1,353,262


As the world's fourth most populous nation, and the country with the highest number of Muslim adherents, Indonesia has considerable influence in Southeast Asia. Indonesia is undergoing a historic transition to democracy while attempting to foster economic recovery and reform. Indonesia's future political and economic path, will have profound implications for U.S. strategic interests in the region such as combating terrorism, preserving regional stability in Southeast Asia, strengthening democracy and respect for human rights, and expanding access for U.S. exports and investment. Our IMET program and other engagement activities are designed to enhance military professionalism and provide opportunities for Indonesian military and civilian personnel to attend courses in, and have other exposure to our norms of civil-military relations, defense budget formulation, military reform and respect for internationally recognized human rights.

The Counter Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) is providing important training and education to assist Indonesia in integrating its interagency approach to combating terrorism. This program brings together counterparts from different countries and agencies across the counter terrorism (CT) spectrum. Through this cross-fertilization Indonesia is building a more comprehensive approach to addressing its particular concerns in combating terrorism; other countries in the region are gaining an understanding of the challenges, successes and failures of CT efforts in Indonesia; and the US is building Indonesia's long-term CT capacity.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of Indonesia in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from these islands.

As of the publication date of this report, Indonesia is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Kiribati

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Regional Centers

4

$50,675

3

$36,088

TOTAL

4

$50,675

3

$36,088


As a means of strengthening defense ties with Kiribati, the U.S. welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Kiribati.

As of the publication date of this report, Kiribati is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Korea - South

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Exchange Training

1

$30,217

1

$31,633

FMS

698

$2,479,379

752

$11,764,032

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

115

$0

0

$0

Non-SA, Combatant Command

607

$657,363

0

$0

PME Exchanges

8

$26,668

6

$0

Regional Centers

7

$10,214

6

$7,390

Service Academies

10

$50,085

0

$0

TOTAL

1446

$3,253,926

765

$11,803,055


Since the Korean War, the Republic of Korea (ROK) has proven a strategically important and reliable defense treaty ally. While efforts to reduce tensions on the Korean Peninsula are underway, the U.S. and the ROK continue to maintain and strengthen the three major elements of our security alliance: the 1953 Mutual Defense Treaty, strong bilateral ties and combined military forces. U.S. and ROK forces unified under the Combined Forces Command continue to enhance their capabilities to deter and, if necessary, defeat aggression. To sharpen readiness, the Command is continually refining its vigorous program of training and exercises.

A key objective of U.S. training is maintaining the strong sense of shared values and purposes that underlies the U.S.-ROK alliance. Toward that end, the U.S. and the ROK signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for Professional Military Education (PME). The PME Reciprocal Exchange Program is comprised of an annual exchange with the USA Command and General Staff College (CGSC) and USMC Command and Staff College and a bi-annual exchange with the USAF Air Command and Staff College (ACSC).In addition to these programs, the ROKAF receives an additional annual slot at the AFSC. The ROK services receive one National Defense University slot each year and the ROKA and the ROKAF each receive an annual War College slot. The ROKN receives one Naval Command College and one Naval Staff College slot per year.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by ROK in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from the ROK.

By its own terms, � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) does not prohibit the provision of military assistance to the Republic of Korea.

Laos

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

3

$27,165

5

$86,508

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

0

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

2

$30,471

2

$31,178

TOTAL

5

$57,636

7

$117,686


U.S. military personnel have provided training to Lao civilians for humanitarian demining. Since the beginning of operations in FY 1994, over 815 Lao personnel have been trained as demining technicians, medics, community (mine) awareness experts, team leaders and instructors. In FY 1999, over 250 Lao participants were trained in an effort to enable Laos to develop a self-sustaining training capacity. Since 1999, the United States has continued to support Lao's demining efforts by providing FMF NADR/HD funds.

Lao inclusion in military programs outside POW-MIA operations is decided on a case-by-case basis. Programs supporting our POW-MIA accounting and recovery missions will be given the highest priority. Since FY 2001, we have offered the GOL an IMET program to teach English in Laos to a small group of Lao military. The Lao have not accepted the offer. Representatives of the Lao government, however, did attend the executive course at the Asia Pacific Center for Security Studies in FY 2003 and will be invited to continue their participation in FY 2004.

The Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. They increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Laos.

As of the publication date of this report, Laos is not a State Party to the Rome Statute, therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Malaysia

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

CTFP

23

$387,455

20

$400,000

FMF

0

$0

3

$34,022

FMS

60

$277,253

15

$46,485

IMET

59

$1,353,221

104

$1,178,826

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

35

$49,832

46

$0

Non-SA, Combatant Command

40

$234,682

0

$0

PME Exchanges

4

$42,716

2

$23,250

Regional Centers

23

$277,257

16

$185,350

Section 1004

90

$282,080

60

$364,000

USAID

40

$125,000

0

$0

TOTAL

374

$3,029,496

266

$2,231,933


The U.S. has important security interests in Malaysia, a key member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and the current chair of the Organization of the Islamic Conference. A supporter of our forward-deployed presence in Asia and of our War on Terrorism since the September 11 attacks, Malaysia borders one of the world's most important maritime waterways. The U.S. military benefits from transit rights over Malaysian territory and access to Malaysian ports and airfields.

IMET contributes significantly to the strengthening of our military-to-military ties, and familiarizes the Malaysian military with U.S. doctrine, equipment and management techniques. IMET training also reinforces the Malaysian military's commitment to human rights and good civil-military relations, and helps expand our access to, and cooperation with, Malaysian military leaders. Malaysia is active in multinational peacekeeping operations, which necessitate training that promotes interoperability. It is also engaged in training that will improve the military's ability to combat narcotics trafficking and money laundering operations.

The Counter Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) is providing important training and education to assist Malaysia in integrating its interagency approach to combating terrorism. This program brings together counterparts from different countries and agencies across the counter terrorism (CT) spectrum and through this cross-fertilization process; it builds a more comprehensive approach to addressing regional concerns in combating terrorism.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by Malaysia in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Malaysia.

As of the publication date of this report, Malaysia is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Marshall Islands

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Regional Centers

4

$44,746

3

$36,088

TOTAL

4

$44,746

3

$36,088


As a means of strengthening ties with the Marshall Islands, the U.S. welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from the Marshall Islands.

The Marshall Islands is a State Party to the Rome Statute and an Article 98 agreement in force. However, because the Marshall Islands does not otherwise receive military assistance from the United States, the prohibition in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) has not been waived.

Micronesia

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Regional Centers

8

$91,280

5

$56,587

TOTAL

8

$91,280

5

$56,587


As a means of strengthening ties with Micronesia, the U.S. welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Micronesia.

As of the publication date of this report, Micronesia is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Mongolia

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

FMF

44

$132,899

0

$0

IMET

123

$932,363

179

$789,393

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

2

$0

0

$0

PME Exchanges

0

$0

11

$44,594

Regional Centers

31

$147,451

45

$77,086

TOTAL

200

$1,212,713

235

$911,073


Continued support of Mongolia's transformation into a secure, democratic and stable country greatly serves the U.S. national interest. This support facilitates Mongolia's contribution to the security and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific region, its participation in international peacekeeping and support for Operation Iraqi Freedom, as well as its participation in the Global War on Terrorism.

In FY 2002, Mongolia began participating in international peacekeeping operations with the deployment of military observers to the UN Mission in the Congo. With an Enhanced International Peacekeeping Capabilities (EIPC)-trained cadre and EIPC-provided training equipment, the Mongolian General Staff established a Department of Peacekeeping Operations that developed and trained the Mongolian peacekeeping battalion for participation in, and for the hosting of, multinational training events. Building on this experience, in FY 2003 Mongolia sent peacekeeping troops to Al-Hillah, Iraq to serve under the Polish Multinational Force. They also sent peacekeepers to Afghanistan.

IMET training for Mongolia in FY 2003 promoted civilian control of the military, military justice and law and respect for international human rights standards. In FY 2003, IMET-funded language and professional military training not only strengthened U.S.-Mongolian military ties but also built a cadre of pro-U.S. reformers in the most critical leadership positions in the armed forces. Their coursework included training in infantry, engineer, civil affairs, military medicine, intelligence, defense and resource management, ranger and senior service education. FY 2004 IMET programs will continue this highly successful program, which was largely responsible for the English language skills of the officers in Iraq and build on the knowledge and experiences of previous students.

In FY 2003, non-security assistance programs were initiated at the Mongolian Armed Forces Training Center, including training for special forces, peacekeeping, medical and civil affairs units. This training is expected to be enhanced in FY 2004 with the greater involvement of U.S. forces from the Pacific Command.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by Mongolia in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Mongolia.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Mongolia, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Nauru

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Regional Centers

1

$16,216

1

$15,589

TOTAL

1

$16,216

1

$15,589


The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of Nauru in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from these islands. These courses are an excellent complement to the efforts other nations in the region are making to help Nauru achieve political and economic security.

Nauru is a State Party to the Rome Statute and has concluded an Article 98 agreement. However, because Nauru does not otherwise receive military assistance from the United States, the prohibition in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) has not been waived.

Niue

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Regional Centers

2

$29,151

1

$15,589

TOTAL

2

$29,151

1

$15,589


Niue is a self-governing territory in free association with New Zealand, which has responsibility for Niue's defense. Niue has a population of approximately 2000 and a police force last reported numbering seventeen officers. The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of Niue in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from these islands.

Palau

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Regional Centers

3

$33,870

2

$20,499

TOTAL

3

$33,870

2

$20,499


The U.S. welcomes continued participation by Palau in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence.

As of the publication date of this report, Palau is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Papua New Guinea

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

53

$148,831

88

$370,792

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

1

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

10

$129,461

7

$77,086

TOTAL

64

$278,292

95

$447,878


U.S. national interests in Papua New Guinea (PNG) derive from our overarching interest in regional stability and from PNG's status as home to one of the world's greatest remaining tropical rain forests and biodiversity reservoirs. PNG is the largest and most populous island nation in the South Pacific and neighbor to the troubled Indonesian province of Irian Jaya. U.S. interests include strengthening democratic institutions, assisting with development of disaster relief capabilities, supporting peaceful transition from civil strife to rule of law in Bougainville, supporting the nation's pursuit of a free enterprise tradition and fostering stewardship of diverse natural resources. The benefits of a stable, lawful and prosperous PNG include reduced prospects of human rights violations, environmental degradation and international organized crime.

FY 2003 IMET-funded activities continued to focus on professional military education (PME) for the PNG Defense Force (PNGDF), contributing to better-discipline and increasing PNG's ability to engage in cooperative international military-related efforts, including peacekeeping. English language training contributes to the latter goal and offers increased ability and opportunities for fruitful interaction with the U.S. military. FY 2004 IMET will continue to focus on PME for the PNGDF.

Normalized military-to-military relations were resumed in November 2003, and U.S. Embassy Port Moresby was instructed to dampen any expectations that this means significantly increased U.S. activity, funding or military presence in PNG. Each proposed military-to-military activity for 2004 would be reviewed on its merits by the appropriate U.S. government departments.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of Papua New Guinea in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Papua New Guinea.

As of the publication date of this report, Papua New Guinea is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by� 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Philippines

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

CTFP

36

$853,039

25

$500,000

FMF

45

$2,069,805

19

$117,919

FMS

2051

$3,784,831

29

$150,567

IMET

187

$3,031,600

194

$3,531,902

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

292

$140,900

40

$0

Non-SA, Combatant Command

329

$1,039,816

0

$0

PME Exchanges

7

$64,180

2

$30,752

Regional Centers

24

$284,106

16

$185,350

Section 1004

0

$0

52

$472,000

Service Academies

5

$225,383

0

$0

TOTAL

2976

$11,493,660

377

$4,988,490


The Government of the Philippines is a key player in the War on Terrorism and has consistently supported USG policy in this area. Various terrorist groups including the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) and the Communist Party of the Philippines/New People's Army (CPP/NPA) are based in the Philippines and have targeted Philippine facilities, killing both Philippine and U.S. citizens. In October 2002, the United States Government designated the Jemaah Islamiya (JI) organization a Foreign Terrorist Organization. JI is an extremist group with cells operating throughout Southeast Asia, including the Philippines. JI members recently arrested in the region have revealed links with al-Qaeda, other regional terrorist groups and previous terrorist attacks in the region. The Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), which is active in the southern islands, is believed to have some ties to ASG and JI, but is currently observing a cease-fire during informal meetings with the Philippine Government aimed at the opening of more formal negotiations.

Building on already longstanding bilateral counter-terrorism cooperation and stemming from commitments made during Philippine President Arroyo's recent visits to the U.S. and President Bush's October 2003 visit to Manila, the U.S. and the Philippines have embarked on a comprehensive military-to-military program to enhance the Armed Forces of the Philippines' (AFP) capability to combat terrorism. As U.S. military cooperation under this counter terrorism program grows, IMET funds have become an even more important part of our effort to maintain and enhance the professionalization of the AFP.

The Counter Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) is providing important training and education to assist Philippines in integrating its interagency approach to combating terrorism. This program brings together counterparts from different countries and agencies across the counter terrorism (CT) spectrum. Through this cross-fertilization Philippines is building a more comprehensive approach to addressing its particular concerns in combating terrorism; other countries in the region are gaining an understanding of the challenges, successes and failures of CT efforts in Philippines; and the United States is building the Philippines's long-term CT capacity.

In addition to our counter-terrorism cooperation with the Philippines, the United States has important security, commercial and political interests in the Philippines, a treaty ally that straddles important air and sea-lanes. As a nation-state committed to democratic political principles and confident in its exercise of regional leadership, a stable Philippines is an important force for stability in Southeast Asia. The Philippines is committed to close relations with the U.S. in support of regional peace and security in Southeast Asia. It seeks to promote regional economic and political cooperation through the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the ASEAN Regional Forum and APEC.

IMET funds have contributed to overall regional stability and focuses on positively influencing the Philippine military's professionalism and discipline. IMET training also helped further strengthen civilian control over the military, contributing to a decline in the number of reported incidents of human rights abuses. The steady advancement of IMET graduates helps ensure the continued understanding and cooperation of the Government of the Philippines on U.S. views toward regional issues. IMET graduates who populate the top ranks of the AFP contributed to building the close professional military-to-military relations that exist between the U.S. military and the AFP. Now that the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) has entered into force, the U.S. military is actively engaged in ship visits and joint training exercises with the AFP.

These cooperative bilateral military activities constitute important steps toward normalizing our military-to-military ties and increasing inter-operability and standardization with the AFP. It also enables the AFP to defend the national borders against external aggression, counter the Communist and Muslim separatist insurgencies, participate in international and regional peacekeeping operations and combat terrorism. In support of these goals, and in keeping with our treaty ally relationship, Philippine officers have participated in a range of operational, officer training and leadership courses. These include courses related to military medicine, aviation, aircraft maintenance, amphibious training, engineering and electrical training, field artillery, maritime and coast guard training, psychological operations, radio communications, ranger operations, signals, supply, service and maintenance and related courses.

Officer professionalization and leadership development are the aims of Command & Staff College and military law courses. Such training increases Philippine military exposure to the U.S. system of civil-military relations and respect for human rights. International staff officer and related courses are aimed at increasing Philippine officers' ability to participate effectively with the U.S. in international peacekeeping and related operations. A Joint Defense Analysis (JDA) conducted by the U.S. and Philippine militaries of the AFP's status and capabilities was accepted in September 2003 by President Arroyo as the basis for a further expansion of military cooperation.

DoD has also funded Philippines participation in training related to joint exercises and a military training team assessment of defense needs and requirements. These also increase interoperability and provide the Philippines with a realistic assessment of how to shape their defense strategy.

As another means of strengthening our defense cooperation with the Philippines, the U.S. welcomes continued Philippine participation in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from the Philippines.

By its own terms, � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) does not prohibit the provision of military assistance to the Philippines.

Samoa

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

34

$75,955

0

$0

Regional Centers

1

$12,449

1

$15,589

TOTAL

35

$88,404

1

$15,589


U.S. interests in Samoa grow out of our national security interest in regional stability. The U.S. strives to maintain close ties with Samoa, which is a consistent supporter of U.S. positions internationally. Samoa is also a close neighbor of the U.S. territory of American Samoa, with which it has long-standing family and cultural ties. Other interests include encouraging broad-based economic growth, supporting improved capacity to protect the island's environment and natural resources and educating the public on health issues.

The most important use of IMET has been to support the U.S. objective of helping Samoa develop an effective maritime law enforcement and surveillance capability. Training in basic coastal surveillance and seaborne law enforcement skills is carried out in accordance with U.S. leadership doctrines, emphasizing civilian control. DoD/Coast Guard resources contribute to broad-based economic growth in Samoa by assisting Samoa's maritime police patrol to strengthen enforcement of their exclusive economic zone (EEZ) and to improve safety in Samoa's fishing fleet. Regrettably, Samoa has been unwilling to conclude an Article 98 agreement with the U.S., threatening the continuation of IMET assistance to Samoa during FY 2004.

Two dozen Samoan police officers have helped to maintain order in East Timor since March 2000 as part of a UN peacekeeping force. This is the first time that Samoa has made a contribution to a peacekeeping force. There is no doubt that the training provided under IMET helped contribute to Samoa's readiness to take on a peacekeeping role in such a difficult environment.

Samoa has participated in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses have also allowed U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Samoa.

As of the publication date of this report, Samoa, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Singapore

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

FMS

1227

$61,156,834

588

$40,747,343

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

2

$17,952

20

$0

Regional Centers

2

$2,934

0

$0

Service Academies

11

$100,170

0

$0

TOTAL

1242

$61,277,890

608

$40,747,343


Singapore's prosperous economy and extensive cooperation on a broad range of issues have made it an important U.S. security partner and an important force for stability and economic progress in Southeast Asia. The visit by President Bush in October 2003 elevated bilateral relations to a new high. The President and Prime Minister issued a joint statement on October 21 wherein they called for closer cooperation between the two countries, including the negotiation of a framework agreement to expand the scope of bilateral cooperation on defense and security. Singapore has supported efforts to bring stability and security to Iraq. In late October the Singapore government announced that it will deploy a C-130 transport plane and a Landing Ship Tank to provide logistics support for the multinational Iraq stabilization effort.

Singapore has been unfailing in its support for continued U.S. forward deployment in the region, including the provision of ready access to its military facilities following closure of U.S. bases in the Philippines. In March 2001, Singapore inaugurated a pier at its new Changi Naval Base, which was augmented at Singapore's expense to accommodate U.S. aircraft carriers. Singapore has provided staunch military support for the Global War on Terrorism since the September 11, 2001 attacks, including blanket overflight clearance and tanker fueling to form an air bridge in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Approximately 150 U.S. logistics personnel stationed in Singapore support regular combined air exercises and up to 100 U.S. ship visits in a typical year (however, naval and air transits surged after 9/11, and still run above previous rates). Singapore turns to the U.S. for approximately 85 percent of its total imports of military equipment. Strengthening our defense ties with Singapore in FY 2003 and earlier has included FMS training, participation at U.S. Service Academies and improved interoperability through combined exercises with U.S. forces. The U.S. proposes further strengthening of our ties with Singapore in all these areas in FY 2004.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by Singapore in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Singapore.

As of the publication date of this report, Singapore is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance. Singapore signed an Article 98 non-surrender agreement with the United States in October 2003.

Solomon Islands

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

9

$128,918

34

$69,002

Regional Centers

1

$12,976

0

$0

TOTAL

10

$141,894

34

$69,002


U.S. national interests in the Solomon Islands emphasize strengthening the nation's capabilities to secure its maritime borders, encouraging its democratic institutions and preserving its biodiversity. Though the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) has restored law and order to the country and is deemed by many to be a stunning success, our continued engagement in the Solomons is all the more important as it works with its Pacific Island neighbors to revitalize its security capabilities and rebuild systems of governance.

Continued IMET training will ensure meaningful U.S. participation in the international effort to bring the Solomon Islands back from the brink of complete collapse. It also increases the country's ability to maintain control of its own fishery resources. To these ends, MET courses have focused mainly on maritime issues, port safety, information systems and engine maintenance as well as psychological operations and civil affairs.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of the Solomon Islands in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from these islands.

As of the publication date of this report, the Solomon Islands is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Taiwan

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

FMS

577

$10,133,569

815

$32,828,674

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

30

$0

30

$0

Regional Centers

10

$8,824

4

$5,912

Service Academies

8

$50,085

0

$0

TOTAL

625

$10,192,478

849

$32,834,586


Consistent with the Taiwan Relations Act of 1979, it has been long-standing U.S. policy to make available to Taiwan defense articles and services to enable Taiwan to maintain a sufficient self-defense capability. This policy also seeks to reinforce regional stability. Training of Taiwan armed forces personnel can play a major role in the enhancement of Taiwan's security.

Taiwan participated in FY 2003 executive courses at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Honolulu, Hawaii and it is desired that Taiwan continue to participate during FY2004. These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence.

By its own terms, � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) does not prohibit the provision of military assistance to Taiwan.

Thailand

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

ALP

2

$20,022

0

$0

CTFP

6

$214,364

15

$300,000

FMF

60

$172,504

16

$3,441,740

FMS

155

$748,135

107

$1,978,411

IMET

132

$1,640,062

167

$2,861,470

INL

30

$0

0

$0

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

186

$67,000

0

$0

Non-SA, Combatant Command

383

$1,370,970

81

$209,774

PME Exchanges

30

$0

3

$29,529

Regional Centers

25

$293,425

16

$185,350

Section 1004

705

$1,379,272

375

$1,943,000

Service Academies

9

$422,845

0

$0

USAID

35

$51,606

0

$0

TOTAL

1758

$6,380,205

780

$10,949,274


One of five treaty allies in Asia and a major trading partner, Thailand hosts our largest joint military exercise in Asia (Cobra Gold), provides crucial access to Thai facilities when needed, such as during Operation Enduring Freedom, and has become an active troop contributor to US-led coalition operations, including OEF in Afghanistan and OIF in Iraq, both in the stability operations phase. It has made critical contributions in the Global War on Terrorism, including the capture of the leading Jemaah Islamiah link to Al Qaeda, Hambali. During his state visit to Thailand in October 2003, President Bush acknowledged the depth of our bilateral relationship by announcing that Thailand has been designated a Major Non-NATO Ally; and that the U.S. plans to begin free trade negotiations with Thailand in 2004. Thirty years of effective counternarcotics cooperation has led to the establishment (in Bangkok) of our second International Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) in 1998.

Thailand plays a significant role in fostering regional stability in Southeast Asia and beyond. Continuing joint exercises and IMET help develop and maintain a professional Thai military committed to respecting and fostering democratic principles and capable of participating in international peacekeeping operations. Thailand has put these exercises and IMET courses to work in East Timor, where two U.S. educated and trained Thai Generals served as UNTAET force commanders. Thailand sent military observers and the observer force commander to the Indonesian province of Aceh in early 2003 in an attempt to resolve the Indonesian-Achenese conflict peacefully. Thailand sent military engineers to support reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan and has deployed troops to serve in the Polish-led multinational division in Iraq. Courses which contribute to these goals include training at command and general staff and service colleges, civil affairs, defense management, manpower management, information management, English language and instructor training, accounting, financial and personnel officer training. IMET graduates dominate the top levels of the Thai military, including the majority of top positions at the Defense Ministry, Supreme Command headquarters and all of the services.

U.S. training for Thailand's military also concentrates on developing operational interoperability and officer leadership in specific disciplines. These courses include tactics, airborne, aviation and aircraft maintenance, engineering, field artillery courses, medical courses, intelligence, ranger, sergeant major, munitions and Marine Corps courses.

The Counter Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) is providing important training and education to assist Thailand in integrating its interagency approach to combating terrorism. This program brings together counterparts from different countries and agencies across the counter terrorism (CT) spectrum. Through this cross-fertilization, Thailand is building a more comprehensive approach to addressing its particular concerns in combating terrorism; other countries in the region are gaining an understanding of the challenges, successes and failures of CT efforts in Thailand; and the US is building Thailand's long-term CT capacity.

Our mine action program was launched in Thailand in FY 1999 with the establishment of the Thai Demining Action Center (TMAC). NADR funds provided equipment and DoD's ODHACA funds provided the initial trainers. FY 2002 funds will complete the effort to fully train the Thai demining trainers and fill out the canine units, setting the stage for mutual cooperation within the Asian demining community. In addition, DoD has funded training to enhance Thailand's participation in our joint exercise program. Several Thai officers also attend U.S. service academies, which provide an invaluable means to foster long-standing ties with the Thai military and to provide in-depth exposure to the U.S. system of civil-military relations, military law and related issues.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation by Thailand in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Thailand.

By its own terms, � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) does not prohibit the provision of military assistance to Thailand.

Tonga

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

5

$98,373

12

$269,875

Regional Centers

5

$62,016

2

$20,499

TOTAL

10

$160,389

14

$290,374


The Kingdom of Tonga, a highly traditional society where the King and nobles dominate political life, interacts with the U.S. mainly in such Pacific organizations as the Pacific Community, the Forum Fisheries Agency and the South Pacific Regional Environment Program. U.S. interests in Tonga include encouraging democratic institutions and assisting in environmental protection efforts. IMET is an important vehicle for pursuing U.S. interests.

Tonga joined other regional nations in 1999 (New Zealand, Australia, Vanuatu and Fiji) in providing unarmed peace monitors once a truce was achieved in Papua New Guinea's Bougainville. They have also discussed sending a peacekeeping unit to Iraq. IMET provides professional military education (PME) and training to Tonga's Defense Force with emphasis on respect for human rights, civilian control over the military and military justice. Courses on officer and NCO development, command and general staff officer training and defense management contribute to this goal. IMET also helps to support Tonga's ability to contribute to regional peacekeeping endeavors and contributes to Tonga's development of an effective maritime law and surveillance capability through training in international maritime search and rescue and information systems. FY 2004 IMET will continue to focus on PME training for its defense forces.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of Tonga in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Tonga.

As of the publication date of this report, Tonga is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Tuvalu

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

Regional Centers

5

$63,032

1

$15,589

TOTAL

5

$63,032

1

$15,589


As is true for many other Pacific countries, Tuvalu interacts with the U.S. mainly in such Pacific organizations as the Pacific Community, the Forum Fisheries Agency and the South Pacific Regional Environment Program. Environmental protection efforts are especially critical in Tuvalu, which is vulnerable to rising sea levels due to very low elevations throughout the country.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of Tuvalu in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Tuvalu.

As of the publication date of this report, Tuvalu is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Vanuatu

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

3

$20,700

84

$175,415

Regional Centers

2

$34,134

2

$31,178

TOTAL

5

$54,834

86

$206,593


U.S. national interests in Vanuatu center on strengthening the nation's democratic institutions. Other interests include building Vanuatu's capacity to secure its maritime borders and encouraging programs that protect the island's environment and fragile natural resources.

The small Vanuatu Mobile Force (VMF) must patrol a vast area of ocean. U.S. Coast Guard training in maritime law-enforcement supplements Australian and New Zealand programs and upgrades VMF capabilities. Continued IMET funding for civil affairs, intelligence, combating terrorism and maritime officer training also help improve force discipline and enhance its effectiveness in regional peacekeeping and disaster relief efforts.

The U.S. welcomes the continued participation of Vanuatu in the Asia-Pacific Center's executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Vanuatu.

As of the publication date of this report, Vanuatu is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Vietnam

  

FY 2003

FY 2004

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value

IMET

0

$0

15

$86,197

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

4

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

8

$104,185

7

$77,086

TOTAL

12

$104,185

22

$163,283


U.S. national security will be served by a stable, fully integrated Vietnam with increasing economic prosperity and trade relations with the United States. The U.S. seeks to enhance Vietnam's ability to be a constructive regional player by encouraging Hanoi's active participation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and the ASEAN Regional Forum and in other strategic dialogues and cooperation. The U.S. can also improve trust through incremental expansion of military-to-military contacts. The Vietnamese military has been increasingly interested in attending conferences and confidence building meetings hosted by the Commander, Pacific Command.

The United States and Vietnam signed a bilateral Letter of Agreement on Counternarcotics Cooperation on December 11, 2003. The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) has identified Vietnamese counternarcotic requirements that could be addressed by USCG training courses. Vietnam's FY 2002 and 2003 IMET funding was reprogrammed into other country accounts due to the Vietnamese government's failure to conclude a FAA Section 505 agreement on end-user assurances.

The Asia-Pacific Center will continue to invite representatives from Vietnam to reinforce our defense cooperation and foster links with other regional partners and neighbors. The executive courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Vietnam.

As of the publication date of this report, Vietnam is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.




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