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U.S. Department of State - Great Seal

U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

III. State Foreign Policy Objectives--Western Hemispheric Region


Foreign Military Training: Joint Report to Congress, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005
Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
April 2005
Report
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Antigua and Barbuda

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

18

$148,595

17

$195,047

INL

23

$28,800

0

$0

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

56

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

1

$5,700

3

$6,000

TOTAL

98

$183,095

20

$201,047

Antigua and Barbuda is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of Antigua and Barbuda to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities. U.S.-funded training assists in the development of a more professional and efficient security force. Participating in joint exercises and maritime training increases Antigua and Barbuda's ability to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic operations, search and rescue operations and other bilateral and multilateral operations. An 82-foot patrol boat, provided by the U.S. government and delivered in 1998, has been used extensively for coastal patrolling and maritime counternarcotic missions.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Antigua and Barbuda at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Antigua and Barbuda.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Antigua and Barbuda, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Argentina

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

ALP

2

$17,662

0

$0

CTFP

12

$63,139

23

$412,911

EIPC

2

$18,112

1

$9,155

FMS

32

$87,876

8

$4,240

IMET

598

$911,011

140

$909,098

IMET Multi-Year

1

$70,198

0

$0

PME Exchanges

4

$0

2

$0

Regional Centers

28

$89,140

25

$66,500

Section 1004

0

$0

0

$564,000

TOTAL

679

$1,257,138

199

$1,965,904

Argentina is a democratic nation and a close ally in the strategically important Southern Cone region. We have a close relationship with the Government of Argentina (GOA) and the Argentine military actively participates in international peacekeeping and other multilateral efforts. The President has also designated Argentina as a Major Non-NATO Ally. To promote interoperability and knowledge of U.S. operations, the Argentine military has participated in a number of joint exercises with U.S. forces in the region, including UNITAS (blue-water and amphibious) naval exercises, the SALITRE air force exercise in Chile, PANAMEX (defense of the Panama Canal), and a seven-month operational deployment of a destroyer to the Mediterranean with a U.S. Carrier Battle Group completed in December 2003. Exercises involving U.S. troops on Argentine soil are on hold pending approval by the Argentine Congress.

IMET-funded and other courses in international law, peacekeeping, civil-military operations, command and general staff and a variety of other courses provide officer and non-commissioned officer training that enhance efforts to modernize and professionalize its armed forces. They also help reinforce the concept of civilian control of the military and familiarize Argentine military with U.S. military doctrine and practices. Other training in helicopter maintenance and courses in logistics management also increase Argentina's ability to maintain U.S. equipment in its inventory, thus improving Argentine interoperability with U.S. forces in bilateral and multilateral activities. As South America's second largest contributor of troops to international peacekeeping operations, training in peacekeeping and humanitarian demining further encourages Argentina's participation in these activities. Argentina contributed over 600 troops to the UN multilateral peacekeeping force, MINUSTAH, and reports from Haiti have praised the troops' performance, especially in the northern city of Gonaives, which was severely hit by Hurricane Jeanne in September 2004, causing approximately 2000 deaths.

Argentina started to receive Counterterrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) funding in FY 2004. The Argentine Police are primarily responsible for an effective counterterrorism program in Argentina. They have a strong special operations group, skilled at real world hostage rescue and good marksmanship skills. CTFP funds will assist this group to train for more effective counterterrorism initiatives, and to strengthen the unit's ability to conduct small-to-medium scale operations. CTFP funds have also allowed Argentineans to participate in counterterrorism conferences, international crisis command and control courses, international maritime contingency, several in-residence courses at U.S. schools, and other courses geared to improving Argentina's ability to counter the threat of international terrorism.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomed Argentine participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which leads to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Argentina.

By its own terms, � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) does not prohibit the provision of military assistance to Argentina. Argentina is currently under Brooke Amendment sanctions for failure to pay a debt owed to the America's Fund, however, section 638 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, does allow for assistance for training.

Bahamas

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

Credit

0

$0

6

$19,486

CTFP

0

$0

3

$11,205

IMET

36

$164,399

33

$340,580

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

39

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

1

$5,700

22

$44,000

Section 1004

3

$24,948

0

$0

TOTAL

79

$195,047

64

$415,271

The Bahamas is a democratic nation that has very good bilateral relations with the United States. IMET courses in basic military officer and NCO training, and attendance at the Naval Staff College and a variety of maritime training courses assist The Bahamas in the development of a more professional and efficient security force.

The Bahamas is instrumental in assisting the U.S. in combating narcotics trafficking and illegal migration in the region. Training activities therefore include instruction in operational planning and exercises with U.S. forces. Training in ship management and boarding team operations greatly enhances The Bahamas' ability to perform law enforcement and security activities. Training on legal issues involving the military encourages continued Bahamian participation in many bilateral and multilateral activities. One result has been close cooperation with the U.S. Government on a combined law enforcement effort, Operation Bahamas and Turks and Caicos (OPBAT), which is critical for the interdiction of aliens, drugs and terrorist en route to the United States. In addition, this training has resulted in The Bahamas placing an increased emphasis on preventing money laundering and on asset forfeiture investigations and prosecution.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the United States welcomes participation from The Bahamas at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from The Bahamas.

As of the publication date of this report, The Bahamas is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Barbados

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

0

$0

16

$145,025

Regional Centers

2

$11,400

3

$6,000

TOTAL

2

$11,400

19

$151,025

Barbados is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. Planned training will assist Barbados in the development of a more professional and efficient security force. Training in marine safety and maritime search and rescue greatly enhances Barbados' ability to assist in counternarcotics efforts. Barbados has continued its leadership role in the Eastern Caribbean by passing domestic legislation that enables it to implement maritime law enforcement agreements. U.S. Government training and support has facilitated execution of cooperative bilateral law enforcement efforts in the region.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Barbados at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Barbados.

As of the publication date of this report, Barbados, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Belize

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

1

$8,477

1

$40,088

IMET

33

$262,204

26

$329,637

Regional Centers

0

$0

1

$2,000

TOTAL

34

$270,681

28

$371,725

Belize is a democratic nation that has a good bilateral relationship with the United States. We have encouraged the military of Belize to participate more actively in counternarcotic and other multilateral efforts. Because of its proximity to the United States, its long coastline dotted with many islands and inlets, and its position linking Central American and Caribbean states, Belize is an ideal transit point for illicit drugs headed for the United States. Easy access to the United States and Mexico makes Belize an attractive staging area for other international crimes as well. It is a market for vehicles stolen in the United States, a potential site for money laundering, and a point of origin for smuggled wildlife and artifacts.

IMET and other programs provide training and equipment to maintain a small but disciplined Belize Defense Force (BDF). BDF troops served with the CARICOM Battalion during peacekeeping operations in Haiti and participated in regional training exercises with U.S., British and Caribbean forces. IMET training in the areas of mid-level officers training and equipment maintenance, as well as the rule of law and discipline in military operations, greatly improves the professionalism and competence of the BDF. A number of activities were conducted to help make the BDF a more effective partner when operating with U.S. forces in joint exercises and operations, particularly in the counterdrug area.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Belize, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Bermuda

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

1

$7,753

0

$0

TOTAL

1

$7,753

0

$0

Bermuda is a non-sovereign territory of the United Kingdom in the Atlantic Ocean east of the United States. During FY 2004, they used their own national funds to send a student from their Department of Marine and Ports Services to the U.S. Coast Guard Training Center at Yorktown, VA to attend a variety of courses related to maritime maintenance, navigation and officer training. Since Bermuda is a frequent stop for U.S.-owned yachts and cruise ships with U.S. passengers, this training will help ensure the safety of U.S. travelers and vessels that may call at their port or transit their waters. This training will also enhance Bermuda's ability to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotics operations, search and rescue operations and other bilateral and multilateral operations.

As of the publication date of this report, Bermuda is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Bolivia

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

ALP

1

$10,368

0

$0

CTFP

3

$17,100

2

$83,656

EIPC

3

$21,699

0

$0

FMF

4

$53,015

0

$0

IMET

1813

$797,416

91

$1,127,703

INL

1

$73,960

0

$0

Regional Centers

7

$39,900

9

$48,050

Section 1004

143

$1,304,177

119

$1,056,709

TOTAL

1975

$2,317,635

221

$2,316,118

Bolivia is currently experiencing significant challenges to democratic rule by anti-government forces. It enjoys a strong bilateral relationship with the United States. Bolivia is heavily engaged in a major counternarcotics effort with significant support and partial funding from the United States. The Bolivian government implemented a five-year counternarcotics plan early in 1998. U.S. Government training and participation in joint exercises have enabled Bolivia to phase out individual compensation for eradication, substantially reduce the amount of coca under cultivation in the Chapare and increase the number of arrests and chemical seizures. This effort is hampered by resistance from those who have profited from the production and trafficking of narcotics, particularly cocaine. Special counternarcotic forces and certain select units of the military are active participants in the drug war. At times there have been violent confrontations between coca growers and government forces.

Bolivia has been certified as cooperating with U.S. counternarcotics policy. IMET and other training funds have provided professional military education (PME) and NCO training to enhance the professionalism of Bolivia's armed forces. Programs on civil-military relations, resource management and human rights instruction help reinforce principles of democracy and civilian control of the military. Prior-year FMF funds provided mid-level officer training and improved technical training for counternarcotic operations.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomed Bolivian participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Bolivia.

Bolivia did not receive CTFP funding in FY 2004. However they are expected to send students to regional training by the Center for Civil Military Relations (CCMR) conducted in Uruguay and Panama. Topics to be discussed at this seminar include: Terrorism in Transition, Democratic 'Toolkit', Media Issues and CT, Intelligence and CT, International Approaches, Interagency Decision-Making, Defense Restructuring and CT, Building a CT Strategy, Measures of Effectiveness, and 'Terrorism in Latin America'.

As of the publication date of this report, Bolivia, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Brazil

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

6

$72,279

29

$373,656

FMS

19

$4,512,008

18

$934,810

IMET

13

$117,892

67

$356,710

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

1

$103

0

$0

PME Exchanges

1

$70,198

0

$0

Regional Centers

26

$68,070

14

$72,200

TOTAL

66

$4,840,550

128

$1,737,376

As a result of its geographic size and economic power, Brazil has substantial influence over the entire South American continent and its military actively participates in international peacekeeping and other multilateral efforts. Our security relationship with this regional leader suffered a considerable decline in the late 1970s when Brazil was governed by a military regime that was displeased by the USG's foreign policy emphasis on human rights. This displeasure resulted in the cessation of the U.S.-Brazil Military Assistance Accord that had been in effect since WWII. Brazil's transition to civilian government in 1985 paved the way for a closer partnership and its creation of a civilian-led Ministry of Defense in 1999 greatly facilitated our bilateral defense relationship. Today, that relationship can be characterized as mature and continually improving.

IMET training courses for NCOs, mid-level and senior officers assist Brazil's efforts to modernize and professionalize its armed forces and help strengthen the principle of civilian control of the military. Other training in equipment maintenance and logistics also enhances Brazil's ability to maintain its inventory and further encourages Brazil's participation in international peacekeeping and humanitarian operations. Brazil's participation in joint exercises strengthens interoperability with U.S. forces.

Brazil received $94,000 in FY 2004 invitational courses, and is projected to receive $200,000 in country funding in FY 2005, in addition to other CTFP funded invitational courses. Students from Brazil attended the National Defense University's Counterterrorism Fellows Program and the Naval Post Graduate Schools Center For Civil Military Relations, Civilian-Military Response to Terrorism course. These courses are designed to support international understanding of the politico-military components of combating international terrorism and enhance the capabilities of coalition partners to develop effective short- and long-term programs to combat terrorism that are consistent with democratic principles. Brazil plans to increase their CTFP participation in 2005 by sending approximately 27 students to courses in the United States, some of which will provide attendees with a thorough understanding of terrorism in all its forms, with considerable emphasis on strategy formulation and international cooperation. Brazil sent a student to the U.S. Coast Guard International Crisis Command and Control course. Continued engagement with Brazil using the CTFP program will allow for increased security for the region and for the United States.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Brazil at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Brazil.

As of the publication date of this report, Brazil, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Chile

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

ALP

2

$16,927

0

$0

CTFP

9

$39,990

1

$2,240

Exchange Training

2

$10,000

2

$10,000

FMF

0

$0

0

$51,355

FMS

6

$183,281

77

$9,624,992

IMET

301

$772,628

178

$769,503

Non-SA, Combatant Command

2

$1,000

0

$0

PME Exchanges

0

$0

3

$28,346

Regional Centers

45

$261,029

34

$194,395

Section 1004

0

$0

0

$755,000

Service Academies

2

$0

2

$0

TOTAL

369

$1,284,855

297

$11,435,831

Chile is a key partner of the United States in the Western Hemisphere and beyond. Our military training activities help to advance U.S. interests in regional stability, interoperability with U.S. forces and the maintenance and protection of basic democratic values and human rights. As the Chilean armed forces have become more modern and professional, they have expanded their participation in U.S.-advocated activities such as international peacekeeping, with their participation in both the Multinational Interim Force and subsequent UN Mission (MINUSTAH) in Haiti serving as examples.

The IMET program has been an invaluable tool in the transition away from the Pinochet era. Technical training has supported Chile's efforts to modernize its forces, which, combined with Chile's participation in joint training exercises with American personnel, has enhanced effective interoperability with the United States. The provision of management training for non-commissioned, mid-level and senior officers has helped Chile to further professionalize its armed forces. Overall, contact between Chilean and U.S. military and civilian personnel through the IMET program has strengthened Chile's democracy and steadily eased the misperceptions that had arisen between our two countries.

EIPC-funded assistance Chile previously received enhanced their peacekeeping capability and supports U.S. interests by facilitating regional and international cooperation. Increased peacekeeping readiness encourages cooperation among the Chilean services, strengthens and further motivates Chile's rationale for defense modernization and promotes collaboration and exchanges with the U.S. and other regional militaries. Due in part to training programs such as these, today's Chilean military is more modern, professional and willing/able to support the U.S. than ever before.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the United States welcomes Chilean participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Chile.

As of the publication date of this report, Chile is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Colombia

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

542

$654,075

12

$488,005

FMF

58

$74,264

0

$0

FMS

45

$69,680

18

$72,550

IMET

704

$1,743,754

438

$2,024,332

INL

903

$3,815,064

581

$2,541,114

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

1

$0

0

$0

Non-SA, Combatant Command

3

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

71

$71,300

120

$144,550

Section 1004

6472

$27,032,332

185

$15,159,294

Service Academies

2

$100,165

3

$154,365

TOTAL

8801

$33,560,634

1357

$20,584,210

Colombia is Latin America's oldest formal democracy and a major ally of the United States in the fight against international narcotics trafficking and terrorism. As the source of most of the cocaine and much of the heroin consumed in the United States, Colombia is the focus of a significant share of the U.S. Government's international counterdrug effort. Prior to the passage of the FY 2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act, the largest part of the training provided to the Colombian military was in direct support of the U.S. counterdrug strategy. Since then, U.S. training has broadened to reflect U.S. support to assist the Colombian military in its unified campaign against narcotics traffickers and designated terrorist groups.

In FY 2005, section 1004 (National Defense Authorization Act for FY 1991) counterdrug training for Colombia will included aviation aircrew training, Colombian Marine riverine training and light infantry training of Colombian police and military. All section 1004 training is provided in support of drug eradication and interdiction efforts. Extensive sustainment training occurred as did increased support for training of aircraft mechanics, crew and pilots for the assets provided to the Government of Colombia (GOC) for counternarcotics and counterterrorism programs.

The FY 2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act provided DoD with expanded authority to use Colombia assistance funds to support the GOC in its unified campaign against narcotics trafficking and terrorist groups such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the National Liberation Army (ELN), and the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC), and to take actions to protect human health and welfare in emergency circumstances, including undertaking rescue operations. This authority has been renewed. As part of the FY 2002 Supplemental, Congress also approved $6M to enhance the Colombian military's ability to protect critical infrastructures, specifically the Cano Limon pipeline. In FY 2003, U.S. Special Operations Forces provided training and equipment as part of this initiative. An additional $43M in FY 2004 FMF funding was used for infrastructure security training assistance and needed equipment. For FY 2005, FMF funding will be used to continue to support Colombia's unified campaign against narcotics trafficking and terrorist organizations.

The IMET program adds to these training efforts, and funds a broad range of courses for the Colombian military at all levels that promote mutually beneficial mil-to-mil relations and increase understanding and defense cooperation between the U.S. and Colombia.

Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies and IMET courses include a strong emphasis on human rights, including courses on democratic sustainment. IMET also provides technical training for NCOs and field-grade officers, as well as training in maintenance, logistics and resource management. These courses assist the Colombian military by increasing its abilities to better care for and maintain U.S.-provided equipment, thus increasing Colombia's ability to pursue its counterdrug and counterterrorist efforts, as well as its efforts to reestablish security throughout Colombia.

The Urban Antiterrorism Special Forces Group, a joint unit comprised of personnel and equipment from all of their military services, formally manages Colombia's counterterrorism program. This unit has real world combat experience and excellent planning skills, and Counterterrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) funding is geared toward giving them the counterterrorism training to supplement this experience. CTFP funds have already allowed Colombians to attend courses designed to assist them to combat terrorism, manage resources, understand better the dynamics of international terrorism, and develop international and U.S. ties through senior leader attendance at U.S. senior military schools. These courses will allow Colombia's elite counterterrorism unit a greater understanding of the international threat of terrorism and an increased ability to counter it.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes Colombian participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Chile.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Colombia, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Costa Rica

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

3

$11,400

1

$3,972

IMET

6

$46,426

53

$449,942

INL

1

$8,077

0

$0

MAP

0

$0

1

$3,972

Regional Centers

4

$22,800

8

$39,000

Section 1004

5

$22,587

3

$7,827

Service Academies

2

$100,170

2

$100,170

TOTAL

21

$211,460

68

$604,883

Costa Rica is a democratic nation, a major ally in Central America and was the first Central American nation to sign and ratify a Maritime Counternarcotics Agreement with the United States. Costa Rica actively participates in efforts to reduce illegal migration, drug trafficking and poaching of marine fisheries in the region, and has become a staunch U.S. partner in the fight against international crime, greatly expanding and complementing our law enforcement efforts in the region.

Costa Rica is one of three countries in Latin America that does not have a military, relying on its Public Security Forces for defense. IMET training serves to professionalize the Coast Guard and law enforcement services through courses such as counterdrug operations, rule of law and discipline in military operations and technical training. Likewise, as the GOCR assumes an increasingly sophisticated counternarcotics role, other training provides access to modern, state-of-the-art law enforcement methods, as well as assistance in equipment maintenance, logistics and resource management. Counternarcotics training focuses on operational skills, as well as on joint exercises to improve interoperability with U.S. forces.

As a means of strengthening security ties, the U.S. welcomes participation by Costa Rica at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Costa Rica.

As of the publication date of this report, Costa Rica, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Dominica

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

7

$85,580

16

$172,372

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

32

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

1

$5,700

1

$2,000

TOTAL

40

$91,280

17

$174,372

Dominica is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of Dominica to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities. The planned training will assist Dominica in the development of a more professional and efficient security force and will enable Dominica to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic activities, search and rescue operations, international peacekeeping efforts and other bilateral and multilateral operations.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Dominica at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Dominica.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Dominica, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Dominican Republic

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

3

$20,043

24

$110,945

FMF

108

$130,947

7

$173,916

FMS

6

$68,723

0

$0

IMET

45

$1,031,994

119

$1,472,792

INL

12

$22,600

0

$0

Regional Centers

8

$34,300

10

$33,150

Section 1004

4

$13,196

7

$14,615

TOTAL

186

$1,321,803

167

$1,805,418

The Dominican Republic is a democratic nation and a close ally of the United States. We have encouraged the Dominican Republic military to participate more actively in counternarcotic operations and other multilateral efforts. The Dominican Republic is a member of the Coalition of the Willing. In 2002, the Dominican Republic was the first country in the Western Hemisphere to sign an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

IMET-funded and other training in areas such as civil-military operations and democratic sustainment will contribute to the Dominican Republic's support for the principles of human rights, democracy and civilian control of the military. Professional training and education at all levels (including NCO training and command and staff colleges) improves the professionalism of the Dominican Republic armed forces. Other training included technical and counternarcotics training to increase the Dominican Republic's ability to operate with U.S. forces, and joint exercises that promoted team building and provided baseline knowledge of U.S. operations.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from the Dominican Republic at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from the Dominican Republic.

As of the publication date of this report, the Dominican Republic is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Ecuador

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

ALP

5

$31,486

2

$880

CTFP

14

$187,454

12

$88,814

FMF

0

$107,907

0

$0

FMS

36

$522,551

2

$600,000

IMET

10

$272,399

36

$755,048

Regional Centers

12

$45,750

25

$54,800

Section 1004

106

$704,087

161

$1,140,305

Service Academies

3

$150,245

4

$206,505

TOTAL

186

$2,021,879

242

$2,846,352

The United States has strong and friendly bilateral relations with Ecuador. Ecuador's democracy has been struggling in recent years under various pressures, including a severe financial crisis, rivalries between domestic regions, high-profile corruption and lack of support for the President. Ecuador's military has a great deal of independence and political influence, and they have some funding sources of their own which reduce their dependence on the budget process. The Ecuadorian military played a controversial role in the January 2000 political crisis, but has reaffirmed its commitment to civilian control.

Training in civil-military relations, the rule of law and discipline in military operations and as human rights instructors, as well as participation at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) help reinforce the principles of civilian control of the military and strengthen the principles of human rights. Ecuador is designated as a major drug-transiting country, and many of the activities such as counternarcotic operations, officer training, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance provide training needed to professionalize and modernize Ecuador's military. Significant training efforts in counterdrug operations have also been conducted. Joint exercises with U.S. forces contributed to continued cooperation with U.S. counternarcotic efforts. In November 1999, Ecuador and the United States concluded a ten-year agreement for the access and use of Manta Air Force Base, Ecuador, as a Forward Operating Location for U.S. aircraft monitoring drug trafficking flights through the region.

Ecuador began its association with the CTFP program in FY 2004, receiving $175,944 in CTFP invitational courses. It is projected to receive $200,000 in discretionary funding in FY 2005 as well as other CTFP funded invitational courses. In FY 2004, Ecuador sent a number of students to the CCMR regional Seminar in Paraguay, a student to the Naval Post Graduate School CT MS degree program, and the National Defense University's Counterterrorism Fellows Program. The NDU program assigns selected foreign officials to graduate accredited courses offered by NDU's School for Senior National Security Executive Education (SNSEE). CT Fellows participate in these seminars and also attend elective courses alongside American counterparts from the military services, DoD, other Executive Branch agencies, and relevant congressional staffs. SNSEE brings a broad strategic perspective to these interservice, interagency, and international deliberations. Attendance at these and similar courses will allow Ecuadorians to analyze global threats and its various manifestations, recognize global terrorism mechanisms, including the modes, means, roots and psychology of transnational terrorism, and evaluate the means to counter this threat within and outside Ecuador.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Ecuador at the CHDS executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to
increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Ecuador.

As of the publication date of this report, Ecuador, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

El Salvador

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

ALP

1

$9,004

0

$0

CTFP

5

$21,090

2

$2,379

FMF

0

$0

3

$1,408

IMET

396

$1,568,468

182

$1,940,477

Non-SA, Combatant Command

2

$2,000

0

$0

Regional Centers

5

$19,307

6

$21,050

Section 1004

4

$20,056

2

$9,178

Service Academies

2

$100,170

2

$100,170

TOTAL

415

$1,740,095

197

$2,074,662

El Salvador is a democratic country with a historically close relationship with the United States. Bilateral military assistance has been dramatically reduced since the end of the civil war in 1992, and overall relations have flourished with the civilian government. The principal U.S. interests in El Salvador are supporting democracy, fighting international crime and illegal drugs, encouraging economic development, deterring illegal immigration to the U.S. and promoting U.S. exports.

Assistance is geared towards professional training programs that will sustain the dramatic improvement in civil-military relations and consequent improvement in the democratic climate and regional stability seen in recent years. Officer training at all levels, including command and staff colleges and courses in civil-military relations and democratic sustainment help reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and reinforce the principles of human rights. El Salvador has strongly supported the Global War on Terror and sent Special Forces troops to Iraq. Training in international peacekeeping will allow the Salvadoran Armed forces to develop expertise and participate in future peace support operations.

In March 2000, the USG opened one of three Forward Operating Locations (FOL) which support counterdrug operations in the Pacific corridor. The Government of El Salvador (GOES) granted the concession to base our operations in their country at great political expense, and our continued close relations with their military through IMET is vital to the longevity of this operation. Training, through IMET and FMF funds, in counternarcotic operations, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance provides assistance needed to professionalize and modernize the Salvadoran military and encourage its continued cooperation with U.S. counternarcotic efforts. Joint training exercises with U.S. forces contribute to team building and give the armed forces exposure to U.S. counterdrug operations. El Salvador is also a transit point for illegal immigration and drugs to the U.S., and IMET assists the GOES to better patrol its borders. Since the earthquakes of January/February 2001, emphasis has been given to helping the Salvadoran military carry out its disaster relief and reconstruction mission, as well as to building its disaster preparedness capabilities. The new roles of patrolling borders and disaster relief have created a needed and positive role for the military, helping to erase years of distrust by the population of the armed forces.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from El Salvador at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from El Salvador.

As of the publication date of this report, El Salvador is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Grenada

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

11

$95,045

16

$248,913

TOTAL

11

$95,045

16

$248,913

Grenada is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of Grenada to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities. The planned training will assist in the development of a more professional and efficient security force that will be able to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic operations, search and rescue operations and other bilateral and multilateral operations. Joint training and exercises with U.S. forces will contribute to greater interoperability and baseline understanding of U.S. counterdrug operations.

As of the publication date of this report, Grenada is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Guatemala

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

ALP

4

$37,162

0

$0

CTFP

4

$17,490

0

$0

IMET

175

$398,173

25

$371,412

Regional Centers

7

$28,600

9

$33,100

Section 1004

0

$0

6

$37,589

TOTAL

190

$481,425

40

$442,101

Guatemala is an evolving democracy with a traditionally cooperative relationship with the United States. The principal U.S. interests in Guatemala include strengthening Guatemala's democracy and rule of law, fighting transnational crime and drug trafficking, and encouraging the growth of a stable market economy. In July 2004, the Guatemalan military was reduced to 15,500 personnel, the latest in a series of reductions that has cut the size of the Guatemalan Armed Forces by 66 percent between 1997 and 2004. The Guatemalan military has also carried out an extensive revision of its doctrine, training, and education that have eliminated internal security as a military role, and that includes a strong emphasis on human rights training. Efforts to modernize the military to reflect its new role in a democratic society have been stymied by budget constraints and the Government of Guatemala is seeking foreign assistance to help fund military modernization. Because of continuing concerns regarding past human rights cases, as well as issues regarding implementation of various aspects of the Peace Accords, Guatemala is Congressionally restricted to receiving Expanded IMET (E-IMET).

Participation in Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies activities, and training in civil-military relations, rule of law and discipline in military operations and democratic sustainment help reinforce the goal of civilian control of the military and human rights principles. Other training activities help Guatemalan forces strengthen their drug enforcement capabilities, conduct interdiction and eradication activities and improve their ability to integrate their planning and execution with U.S. entities in regional counter-narcotic, disaster relief, peacekeeping, and humanitarian operations.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Guatemala at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Guatemala.

As of the publication date of this report, Guatemala is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Guyana

  

FY 2004

FY 2005 

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained 

Dollar
Value 

Number of
Projected
Students

Dollar
Value 

IMET

28

$386,295

29

$527,578

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

17

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

5

$28,500

5

$10,000

TOTAL

50

$414,795

34

$537,578

The United States has friendly relations with Guyana, a small, poor and heavily indebted country with a wealth of natural resources. Guyana is making a slow transition to a free-market system and has held several free and fair elections over the past twelve years. Guyana has an unresolved border dispute with neighboring Suriname. Venezuela also has an outstanding claim to approximately two-thirds of Guyana's territory. Neither border controversy is likely to lead to armed conflict in the immediate future.

Although Guyana has not been identified as a major drug-transit or producing country, narcotics trafficking is increasingly a concern. The USG has been encouraging the Government of Guyana (GOG) to participate more actively in counternarcotic and other multilateral security activities. IMET-funded and other training in professional military education (PME), a variety of maritime-related courses and those which support counternarcotic efforts, as well as participation in the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies, assist in the development of a more professional and efficient security force. Participating in joint exercises and training in maritime search and rescue increases Guyana's ability to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotics and other bilateral and multilateral operations. A Maritime Law Enforcement Agreement giving shipriders law enforcement authority was enacted in 2003.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Guyana at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Guyana.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Guyana, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Haiti

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

57

$141,685

7

$82,545

Regional Centers

0

$0

1

$2,000

TOTAL

57

$141,685

8

$84,545

The Haitian Coast Guard performed admirably during the period of instability leading up to former President Aristide's departure in March 2004. The chance of building on these and other achievements by the Coast Guard argues for continued targeted support to the Haitian Coast Guard in FY 2005. Continued engagement with the Haitian Coast Guard will increase its professionalism and interdiction capacity and reinforce the rule of law in Haiti's ports and territorial waters. USG training and support will enable Haiti to cooperate more fully with the U.S. Coast Guard and other U.S. law enforcement agencies working to control narcotics trafficking, illegal migration and alien smuggling. Additional resources will allow the Haitian Coast Guard to expand its presence on the north and south coasts of the country and to demonstrate independent initiative in areas of concern.

As of the publication date of this report, Haiti is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Honduras

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

ALP

3

$22,219

0

$0

CTFP

3

$14,510

17

$64,310

IMET

258

$1,177,684

229

$1,937,013

Regional Centers

4

$11,450

7

$27,050

Section 1004

9

$30,968

5

$14,345

Service Academies

5

$258,645

1

$52,140

TOTAL

282

$1,515,476

259

$2,094,858

Honduras is a democratic country and a close ally in the Central American region. Although Honduras is not designated as a major drug-transiting country, narcotics' trafficking is a growing concern. Because of its geographic location, Honduras has become a transshipment point for narcotics entering the United States.

IMET-funded training is geared towards professional military education (PME) courses that encourage the continued dramatic improvement in civil-military relations, as well as improvement in the democratic climate and regional integration/stability. Training at all levels, from NCO training up to command and staff colleges, and courses in civil-military relations and democratic sustainment, help reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and promote the principles of human rights. Honduras, who deployed a task force to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, remains a strong supporter of the Global War on Terror. Training in international peacekeeping will allow the Honduran armed forces to more fully develop expertise in this area and to participate in future PKO. Training in counternarcotic operations, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance and participation in exercises with U.S. forces provide opportunities needed to professionalize and modernize the Honduran military and encourage its continued cooperation with U.S. counternarcotic efforts.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Honduras at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Honduras.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Honduras, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement.

Jamaica

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

3

$127,171

5

$176,692

IMET

76

$667,822

112

$1,128,985

Regional Centers

1

$5,700

10

$20,000

Section 1004

7

$27,948

8

$46,660

Service Academies

2

$104,280

1

$52,140

TOTAL

89

$932,921

136

$1,424,477

Jamaica is a stable democracy and the Government of Jamaica (GOJ) cooperates with the U.S. on a variety of international and regional issues. Although Jamaica is a major transit country for cocaine and the largest Caribbean producer and exporter of marijuana, the GOJ's cooperation with U.S. counternarcotic goals has been fully certified. Jamaica has no serious external threats to its security and maintains a very small military.

Training in the rules of law and discipline in military operations and junior- to mid-level officer professional development help maintain a professional military force subject to civilian control. Additionally, training in aircraft repairs, information systems, logistics and maritime operations assists in maintaining the technical proficiencies of the Jamaican military, while continued U.S. counternarcotics training enhances Jamaica's ability to combat narcotics traffickers. U.S. Government training and exercises have enabled Jamaica to improve its participation in bilateral counterdrug initiatives, strengthen its drug enforcement, money laundering and anti-corruption laws and improve its counternarcotic enforcement capabilities.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Jamaica at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Jamaica.

As of the publication date of this report, Jamaica is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Mexico

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

236

$479,699

19

$340,420

FMS

16

$304,803

2

$11,768

IMET

484

$1,211,942

121

$1,225,346

INL

99

$190,945

26

$42,185

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

1

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

11

$34,450

13

$24,350

Section 1004

45

$1,174,206

62

$1,467,739

TOTAL

892

$3,396,045

243

$3,111,808

Mexico, our second largest trading partner, shares a border with the United States of more than 2,000 miles. The U.S. and Mexican governments have significantly improved cooperation across a range of common interests and concerns, including counterterrorism, counternarcotics, and the fight against corruption. The Mexican military focuses primarily on internal security, but also plays a significant role in infrastructure protection, border and airport security, and counternarcotics activities. Given our extensive border and close cultural and commercial ties, both governments recognize the fundamental importance of effective coordination of counterterrorism efforts. The Mexican military also plays a central role in the government's counternarcotics efforts, including interdiction and the deployment of some 20,000 troops at any one time to manually eradicate marijuana and opium poppy fields. Mexico nonetheless remains an important source of marijuana and opium poppy. Additionally, as much as 70 percent of the cocaine entering the United States from South America passes through Mexico or its surrounding waters off both coasts. The U.S. and Mexican governments coordinate counternarcotics cooperation through various mechanisms, including the Binational Commission (BNC), the Senior Law Enforcement Plenary (SLEP), and the Bilateral Interdiction Working Group (BIWG). The administration of President Vicente Fox has taken a courageous stand against transnational crime and corruption, viewing both as fundamental threats to Mexican national security. As a result, levels of coordination and bilateral counternarcotics cooperation have reached unprecedented levels. Mexican efforts to clean house and attack internal corruption have also been dramatic and include the disbanding of an entire battalion in Sinaloa and the arrest of several senior officers for suspected ties to narcotraffickers.

IMET-funded training in the areas of rule of law and discipline in military operations support the Fox Administration's efforts to strengthen the rule of law and respect for human rights in Mexico's law enforcement agencies and in its armed forces. Mid-to-senior level officer training helps maintain the professionalism of the Mexican military. The U.S. conducts extensive counterterrorism and counternarcotics training, focusing its efforts on helping Mexico improve its air and sea reconnaissance capabilities to enhance their ability to detect and thwart illicit activity. Technical assistance covering a broad range of counterterrorism and counternarcotics capabilities and assets also enhances Mexico's ability to cooperate more effectively with U.S. counterterrorism and counternarcotics efforts.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Mexico at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their Mexican counterparts.

As of the publication date of this report, Mexico is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Netherlands Antilles

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

2

$11,114

0

$0

Section 1004

0

$0

0

$365,000

TOTAL

2

$11,114

0

$365,000

Curacao is the capital of the Netherlands Antilles and maintains active, bilateral relations with the United States. With the close cooperation of the Netherlands Antilles Government an active Forward Operating Location is located in Curacao taking advantage of its strategic position in counter-narcotics efforts. The Netherlands Antilles and the Dutch military collaborate closely with the U.S. Joint Inter-Agency Task Force (JIATF) South in Key West as well as in the full range of law enforcement counter-narcotics efforts. There is ample evidence to confirm the strong support of the Netherlands Antilles in working closely with the U.S. in counter narcotics and other multilateral security activities. The planned training will assist in the development of a more professional and efficient security force that will be able to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic operations, search and rescue operations and other bilateral and multilateral operations. Joint training and exercises with U.S. forces will contribute to greater interoperability and baseline understanding of U.S. counterdrug operations.

As a member of the Kingdom of the Netherlands, foreign and defense affairs for the Netherlands Antilles are managed by the Government of the Netherlands in The Hague. By its own terms, � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) does not prohibit the provision of military assistance to the Netherlands.

Nicaragua

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

1

$5,700

1

$40,088

IMET

92

$770,122

71

$1,023,303

Regional Centers

1

$5,700

4

$15,000

Section 1004

17

$14,925

4

$12,176

TOTAL

111

$796,447

80

$1,090,567

The primary national interests of the United States in Nicaragua are to support and strengthen democratic institutions, foster regional security, interdict international crime and to promote broad-based economic growth. Since the return of a democratically elected government in 1990, Nicaragua has made great strides in opening its economy and in establishing legitimate, responsive democratic institutions. In particular, the Nicaraguan National Army (EN), once the political tool of the Sandinistas (FSLN), has undergone a dramatic transformation and has become a respected democratic institution. Continued engagement will further contribute to this process. Training activities promote regional security and strengthen democratic institutions. Nicaragua has strongly supported the Global War on Terrorism and contributed troops to stabilization efforts in Iraq. Training in international peacekeeping will allow the Nicaraguan Armed forces to develop expertise and participate in future PKO.

Indicative of the EN's evolution from merely an armed instrument of the FSLN Party to a professional, apolitical institution was the complete support offered by the Commander of the Nicaraguan Army for passage of the Nicaraguan Counterdrug Maritime Agreement, enacted in November 2001. The Counterdrug Maritime Agreement allows Coast Guard/law enforcement elements to conduct joint interdiction operations against narcotraffickers in Nicaraguan waters. Embassy Managua has made a concerted effort to cross-train elements of the Nicaraguan Military and Nicaraguan National Police in ship boarding, interdiction techniques and drug enforcement operations.

The GON's first-ever white paper was presented to President Bolanos September 2, 2004. This paper is an important step in defining the role of the military under a civilian Minister of Defense. The white paper examines once taboo topics such as civilian formulation of the military budget, structure and size of the armed forces, national and regional emerging threats, force modernization requirements, and senior officer promotions. It is currently awaiting approval by the National Assembly.

IMET-funded training, such as civil-military relations and leadership training, have helped the EN make great progress in professionalizing its officer corps and supporting the leadership of a civilian president and a civilian Minister of Defense. The IMET program contains a significant English language component, as well as resource management, maritime operations, and for the first time professional military education courses such as command and general staff and war college equivalent.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Nicaragua at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Nicaragua.

As of the publication date of this report, Nicaragua is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Panama

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

3

$50,412

1

$40,088

FMS

1

$4,959

3

$14,943

IMET

35

$429,267

64

$830,690

INL

91

$63,745

0

$0

Regional Centers

3

$17,100

7

$33,000

Section 1004

84

$305,375

6

$36,044

TOTAL

217

$870,858

81

$954,765

Panama remains important to U.S. national interests following the transfer of the Panama Canal. Approximately two-thirds of Canal traffic originates in, or is destined for, the United States. Panama's strategic location between South and North America makes it a crossroads for international commerce, and also a center for illegal activity such as drug trafficking, money laundering, arms smuggling and illegal immigration. U.S. security engagement with Panama will become more crucial as Panama deals with any spillover from the Colombian conflict along its porous border.

As Panama is one of three Latin American nations without a standing military, the U.S. needs to continue cooperative efforts with Panamanian security elements of the Public Force (law enforcement authorities) to counter transnational crime, increase border security and address other threats. U.S. assistance supports all four services of Panama's Public Force (PPF): National Police, National Air Service, National Maritime Service and Institutional Protection Service. IMET-funded and other training programs provided to the PPF are used for technical and operational courses focused on security, counternarcotics and counterterrorism.

Currently, the U.S. has a case-by-case agreement in place to provide legal coverage to members of the U.S. Armed Forces temporarily in Panama providing training or other assistance to the Government of Panama.

As a means of strengthening security ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Panama at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Panama.

The President has waived the prohibition, in � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.), of the provision of military assistance to Panama, a State Party to the Rome Statute, for as long as it is party to an Article 98 agreement with the United States.

Paraguay

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

ALP

6

$36,889

3

$1,408

CTFP

94

$242,458

60

$489,287

EIPC

7

$102,286

10

$68,390

IMET

1

$16,819

24

$220,409

Regional Centers

89

$113,640

12

$78,050

Section 1004

40

$449,000

0

$0

TOTAL

237

$961,092

109

$857,544

Fifteen years after the overthrow of the Alfredo Stroessner dictatorship, the consolidation of a democratic society and state continues. Bilateral relations between the U.S. and Paraguay are strong, with Paraguay providing excellent cooperation in the fight against terrorism. There is no external threat to Paraguay's security, and the Paraguayan military is struggling to define its modern mission.

The Counterterrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) and the remaining Enhanced International Peacekeeping Capability (EIPC) program funds strengthen counterterrorism and peacekeeping capabilities within the Paraguayan military. Courses at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) and participation in Unified Command seminars and military exercises advance the concept of civilian control of the military, support human rights principles, and maintain the rule of law and discipline in military operations. They also contribute to Paraguay's making proportionally significant contributions to international peace and regional security. Peacekeeping observers have served in Africa under United Nations deployment since 2001. The U.S. will be holding military exercises as well as offering seminars on counterterrorism, peacekeeping and senior leadership in the coming year to continue advancing these objectives.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Paraguay at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). CDHS courses are designed to focus on the non-combat aspects of security and international relations, and increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Paraguay. In September 2004, Paraguay hosted a weeklong CHDS seminar (the first such seminar held outside the United States) on Defense Transformation and Policy Formulation for civilian and military defense experts from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay.

Paraguay's counterterrorism program is formally managed by their Police Special Operations Force, a branch of the Paraguayan National Police, a highly motivated unit that is able to tap into other police units for support. CTFP funds allow this unit to train more effectively and improve their operational skills. CTFP provided funds for Paraguayans to attend courses on the dynamics of international terrorism, and the importance and application of intelligence in combating terrorism. These courses will move Paraguay's elite counterterrorism unit toward a greater ability to counter the international threat of terrorism. In FY 2005 Paraguay will focus on taking better advantage of CTFP funding, increasing the number of its students to 48 by taking advantage of in-country military training and education teams and attending regional seminars. Some of the courses planned in 2005 include civil-military response to terrorism, a number of professional military education distance learning programs, and a special reaction/antiterrorism course.

As of the publication date of this report, Paraguay, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Peru

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

119

$362,413

13

$142,623

IMET

4

$163,635

4

$377,552

INL

115

$755,872

78

$416,585

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

1

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

23

$80,204

19

$62,175

Section 1004

137

$1,834,642

65

$1,087,140

Service Academies

3

$152,300

3

$156,420

TOTAL

402

$3,349,066

182

$2,242,495

Peru is one of the largest countries in South America and has a strong bilateral relationship with the United States. The U.S. seeks to strengthen democratic institutions in Peru and to strengthen the Government of Peru's (GOP) ability to interdict and disrupt narcotics production and distribution. The U.S. has enjoyed excellent cooperation from the GOP in counternarcotic activities.

Training in human rights and the rule of law, and discipline in military operations helps reinforce the notion of civilian control of the military and reinforces support for the principles of human rights. Training in counternarcotic operations, professional military education, resource management, logistics and equipment maintenance provide training needed to professionalize and modernize Peru's military and enhance its capabilities in air operations, search and rescue and demining operations. This training is particularly important to the demining efforts along Peru's border with Ecuador in support of the 1998 peace settlement. Finally, significant training efforts in the area of counterdrug operations are underway. These activities include training to improve helicopter and other aircraft capabilities, as well as participation in training exercises with U.S. forces to improve interoperability. The Peruvian military continues to conduct operations against insurgents and narco-terrorists. Professionalization of the Peruvian military will help make these operations more efficient while training the military to avoid the excesses of counterinsurgency efforts of past decades as recently reported by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Acting on the Commission's recommendations, which include reforming the military as an institution, will be important for Peruvian society to continue developing continuing counternarcotics and counterterrorist operations while respecting the rule of law and human rights.

The Emergency Tactical Actions Group, a branch of the Peruvian National Police formally manages Peru's counterterrorism program. Counterterrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) funds will allow this unit to train more effectively and improve its skills in planning initiatives against complex targets and local threats imposed by terrorist organizations in Peru. CTFP funds have already allowed Peruvians to attend courses designed to help them better understand international counterterrorism defense and the dynamics of international terrorism. These funds have also allowed for participation in counterterrorism military education team training, as well as courses in intelligence in combating terrorism - all geared to improving Peru's ability to counter the international threat of terrorism.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Peru at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Peru.

As of the publication date of this report, Peru, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

St. Kitts and Nevis

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

12

$106,297

15

$151,287

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

17

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

1

$5,700

0

$0

TOTAL

30

$111,997

15

$151,287

St. Kitts and Nevis is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of St. Kitts and Nevis to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities. IMET-funded and other training assists St. Kitts and Nevis in the development of a more professional and efficient security force, which will be able to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic operations, search and rescue operations and other bilateral and multilateral operations. Participation in training exercises with U.S. forces augments counterdrug capabilities and enhances interoperability.

As of the publication date of this report, St Kitts and Nevis is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

St. Lucia

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

13

$122,720

12

$115,426

Regional Centers

0

$0

1

$2,000

Service Academies

3

$154,365

1

$50,085

TOTAL

16

$277,085

14

$167,511

St. Lucia is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of St. Lucia to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities. IMET-funded and other training assists in the development of a more professional and efficient security force that will be able to work with U.S. entities in counternarcotic operations, search and rescue operations and other bilateral and multilateral operations. Joint training exercises with U.S. forces improve counterdrug capabilities and enhance interoperability.

As of the publication date of this report, St Lucia is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

St. Vincent and Grenadines

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

0

$0

11

$120,854

TOTAL

0

$0

11

$120,854

St. Vincent and the Grenadines is a democratic nation that has good bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities.

As of the publication date of this report, St Vincent and the Grenadines, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by � 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Suriname

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

IMET

15

$178,728

13

$165,430

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

35

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

0

$0

2

$4,000

Service Academies

0

$0

1

$52,140

TOTAL

50

$178,728

16

$221,570

United States military security assistance objectives in Suriname are achieved through IMET, the Humanitarian Assistance Program and USSOUTHCOM's Traditional Activities program which assist the Surinamese Armed Forces (Nationale Leger) in becoming a more professional, apolitical service, providing external and internal security for the country, under democratic civilian-control. The U.S. military will continue to assist the Surinamese Armed Forces with the development of counter-drug and counterterrorism capabilities. Particular emphasis will be devoted to encouraging the armed forces to better utilize their IMET budget, to commit national funds to future FMS purchases and to setting up an effective Excess Defense Articles (EDA) program.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, in FY 2005 the U.S. will once again welcome participation from Suriname at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Suriname.

As of the publication date of this report, Suriname is not a State Party to the Rome Statute; therefore, it is not prohibited by 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Trinidad and Tobago

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

5

$146,825

1

$40,088

FMF

1

$25,310

0

$0

FMS

1

$36,007

1

$32,739

IMET

0

$0

10

$246,581

INL

16

$42,200

1

$22,977

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

79

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

4

$22,800

6

$10,050

Section 1004

0

$0

0

$140,000

TOTAL

106

$273,142

19

$492,435

Trinidad and Tobago is a democratic nation that enjoys strong bilateral relations with the United States. We have been encouraging the Government of Trinidad and Tobago (GOTT) to participate more actively in counternarcotic efforts and other multilateral security activities. Officer training assists in professionalizing the military, while training in medicine, electronics and defense resource management help maintain the technical proficiencies of the armed forces of Trinidad and Tobago. Training in communication and maritime operations helps strengthen Trinidad and Tobago's counternarcotic efforts.

Trinidad and Tobago continues to support its interagency coordination center that gathers narcotics related information from multiple sources and disseminates it to military and enforcement agencies involved in drug interdiction operations. U.S. government training and support have enabled Trinidad and Tobago to improve its ability to interdict illegal drug shipments, strengthen anti-drug trafficking laws and participate in bilateral maritime exercises.

As a means of strengthening defense ties, the U.S. welcomes participation from Trinidad and Tobago at the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) executive courses at the National Defense University (NDU). These courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and they increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, which lead to increased trust, transparency and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Trinidad-Tobago.

As of the publication date of this report, Trinidad and Tobago, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Uruguay

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

39

$158,916

34

$145,136

IMET

20

$130,087

116

$724,825

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

2

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

5

$17,200

15

$54,150

TOTAL

66

$306,203

165

$924,111

Though often overlooked due to its small size, Uruguay is a model of stability and democracy in Latin America. The U.S. maintains strong bilateral relations with the Government of Uruguay, especially under current President Jorge Batlle who has publicly pushed for closer economic and political cooperation. The military is unequivocally subordinate to the control of the civilian political leadership. Uruguay's relations with neighbors Brazil and Argentina are excellent. The armed forces conduct a robust program of confidence and security building exercises and professional exchanges with the Brazilian and Argentine militaries that make the Southern Cone one of the least conflictive regions of the world. Among Latin American nations, the Uruguayan armed forces has been the largest per capita contributor of personnel for international peacekeeping missions, having deployed over 12,000 troops over the past decade. As of September 2004, Uruguay had 2,563 soldiers deployed on 11 peacekeeping missions. The Uruguayan government also has been a consistent contributor of humanitarian assistance to other Latin American countries during natural disasters. The Uruguayan Air Force has flown water purification equipment, medicine and other emergency supplies to Colombia, Venezuela and Central America over the past six years. The armed forces also provide all logistical and operational support for the Uruguayan scientific research base in Antarctica that is performing valuable research on depletion of the ozone layer.

Prior to the restrictions of the American Servicemembers Protection Act taking effect, civilians and military officers attending the Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies (CHDS) and participating in IMET-funded training had helped improve civil-military relations, rationalize the defense policy planning process thus making the process increasingly transparent, build civilian expertise in defense matters and inculcate the principals of human rights in future leaders. Mid- to senior-grade officers attending professional development courses had facilitated the modernization and professionalization of the armed forces. Technical, resource management and logistics training would help Uruguay maintain and manage its defense resources, improving the Uruguayans' ability to operate with U.S. and international forces in peacekeeping operations, disaster relief missions and other joint operations.

As of the publication date of this report, Uruguay, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.

Venezuela

   

FY 2004  

FY 2005  

Type of Activity

Number of
Students
Trained

Dollar
Value

Number of
Projected
Students 

Dollar
Value

CTFP

2

$8,810

0

$2,136

FMS

49

$471,423

2

$27,699

IMET

20

$187,681

190

$889,877

PME Exchanges

1

$0

0

$0

Regional Centers

13

$34,550

16

$36,450

TOTAL

85

$702,464

208

$956,162

President Hugo Chavez's administration, in which many military officers occupy ministerial and other senior positions, has increasingly used the Venezuelan Armed Forces for political means. Meanwhile, U.S.-Venezuelan military relations have suffered, culminating in the expulsion of the U.S. military liaison group from Venezuelan military headquarters in May 2004. The military liaison group has relocated to the Embassy compound and retains limited contact with the Venezuelan Armed Forces. Since President Chavez personally disapproved two counterdrug training support missions for military personnel in October 2003, the armed forces have received no U.S. training.

Any U.S. military training accepted by the Venezuelan Government, especially in the areas of civil-military affairs and human rights, would help reinforce the military's responsibility to maintain democratic and constitutional order. Many Venezuelan NCOs and officers have previously benefited from U.S. training.

In FY 2004, Venezuela used Counter-terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) funds to send students to the CCMR regional Seminar in Paraguay and it is anticipated they will do so again in FY 2005 to attend the seminar in Uruguay.

As of the publication date of this report, Venezuela, a State Party to the Rome Statute, is prohibited by 2007 of the American Servicemembers' Protection Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7421 et seq.) from receiving military assistance.



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