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U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

2008 Foreign Military Training: III. State Foreign Policy Objectives--East Asia and Pacific Region


Report
Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
January 31, 2008

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Brunei

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

FMS

4

3

4

$167,489

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

1

1

1

$7,343

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

59

59

10

$7,771

17

17

13

$13,350

Section 1004

30

30

1

$30,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Service Academies

1

1

1

$0.00

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

95

94

17

$212,603

17

17

13

$13,350

The Royal Bruneian Armed Forces (RBAF) consists of infantry, navy, and air combat units. A British Ghurka battalion is permanently stationed in Brunei near the center of the country’s oil industry contributes to Brunei's national security. Because of the country’s small size, Bruneians regard a continued U.S. presence in the region as critical to their long-term security and prosperity. Since the signing of a November 1994 Memorandum of Understanding on Defense Cooperation, the RBAF have engaged in joint exercises, training programs, and other military exchanges with the United States. Their continued participation in Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) courses and in training they purchase through Foreign Military Sales (FMS) enables the USG to help Brunei train future leaders for its armed forces. This training also increases Brunei’s awareness and understanding of U.S. policies and facilitates lasting relationships between Bruneian military leaders and their counterparts from the United States and the Asia-Pacific region.

We have steadily enhanced military cooperation since the Sultan of Brunei’s visit to the United States in 2002. The Joint Working Committee on Defense meets annually to plan and coordinate bilateral military-to-military activities, which have expanded to include joint special forces exercises, multilateral peacekeeping operations training, explosive ordinance disposal training, and maritime ship boarding and interdiction exercises, along with increased port calls by U.S. Navy vessels for training and community relations events. The Bruneian government has a cadet at West Point (class of 2009), with the cost of training underwritten by the GOB.

Burma

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

1

1

1

$0.00

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

1

1

1

$0.00

0

0

0

$0.00

The United States allowed the Royal Thai Government to pay for one mid-level Burmese police official to participate in a course at the Asia Pacific Center pertaining to cross-border crime and drug interdiction. The U.S. Embassy in Rangoon vetted the Burmese participant. The Royal Thai Government paid all costs associated with his participation.

Cambodia

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

CTFP

3

3

2

$12,564

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

43

43

3

$203,439

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-1

5

3

5

$82,145

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-SA, UC

0

0

0

$0.00

44

44

1

$260,000

Regional Centers

22

22

8

$70,882

21

21

10

$204,818

Section 1004

335

335

8

$869,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Service Academies

1

1

1

$71,033

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

409

407

27

$1,309,062

65

65

11

$464,818

The U.S. enjoys a nascent military relationship with Cambodia. In 2004, DOD and State developed a plan to take modest steps to enhance our limited military ties with Cambodia, with cooperation focusing on such areas as humanitarian concerns, re-integration of Cambodia into multilateral events, and enhancing Cambodia’s counterterrorism (CT) and counter-narcotics (CN) capabilities. In the future, the United States would like to respond to a long-standing Cambodian request to provide assistance to improve its military capability to interdict and deter a myriad of potent transnational threats across its porous borders. This growing cooperation follows the suspension of most military ties after the 1997 political violence in Cambodia. In addition, the lifting of the suspension of IMET and FMF accounts as a result of Cambodia’s change in anti-trafficking status from Tier 3 to Tier 2 Watch list in 2006 further contributed to strengthening military-to-military ties.

In its Congressional Budget Justification for FY 2007, the State Department proposed the use of IMET funds for training to help professionalize the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces. Funds were also requested to provide training and education to the Cambodian military in order to combat terrorism and to improve its border surveillance and control. These activities remain relevant to improving Cambodia’s counter-terrorism, counter-narcotics, and anti-piracy efforts. Expanded IMET (E-IMET) training in civil-military relations, human rights, the military justice system, and establishing democratic values in the military would assist in the professionalization of the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (RCAF). FY 2007 Foreign Military Financing (FMF) funds provided training and non-lethal military equipment. These funds helped modernize border and naval units to assist in deterring transnational and regional terrorist threats. In FY 2007, the Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI) funded, for the first time, peacekeeping operations training for the military, which included courses in pre-deployment, infantry, and staff training. The State Department also provided funding in support of demining (NADR-HD) and weapons destruction programs that included training components. In FY 2007, DoD provided over $12,000 in Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) funding to Cambodia.

In FY 2008, the State Department proposes using assistance through IMET, FMF, NADR, and GPOI to increase Cambodia’s counterterrorism efforts by providing training and military equipment to increase the operational capability of the RCAF’s counterterrorism units, border units, and naval units.

China, People's Republic Of

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

CTFP

1

1

1

$1,940

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

1

1

1

$724

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

5

5

3

$3,004

10

10

2

$1,682

Service Academies

0

0

0

$0.00

2

2

1

$0.00

Totals:

7

7

5

$5,668

12

12

3

$1,682

The United States seeks a strong, cooperative military-to-military relationship with China that contributes to peace in Asia and elsewhere. Our two countries share common interests in a number of areas, including the maintenance of stability in Asia permitting the continuation of that region's economic development; a peaceful, denuclearized Korean Peninsula; and nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The USG considers dialogue with the PRC essential to ensure a clear understanding of one another's regional security interests and concerns and to help promote a constructive role by the PRC in the international community. We have differences with China, but greater contact and communication allow us to work together on areas of common interest and to avoid misunderstandings.

To this end, in FY 2007, China sent several participants to regional center events including a Working Group on Trilateral Confidence and a program on Energy Security Cooperation. Using GPOI funding, one Chinese official attended a Command Leadership Development Seminar in FY 2007 at the Center of Excellence for Stability Police Units (CoESPU). Two Chinese students are expected to attend the U.S. Military Academy during FY 2008 as part of the Foreign Academy Exchange Program.

Cook Islands

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

1

1

1

$14,149

5

5

4

$28,983

Totals:

1

1

1

$14,149

5

5

4

$28,983

The United States welcomes the continued participation of the Cook Islands in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. These courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from these islands.

Fiji

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

IMET-1

2

2

2

$33,512

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

1

1

1

$14,149

7

7

6

$53,554

Totals:

3

3

3

$47,661

7

7

6

$53,554

On December 5-6, 2006, the Fiji military overthrew the lawfully elected government of Fiji. The United States has called on the leader of the coup, Commodore Bainimarama, to abandon his extra-judicial activities, withdraw completely from politics, and restore Fiji’s legitimate democratically-elected government.

After the coup, the United States reviewed its assistance programs and policy options under section 508 of the Foreign Operations Appropriations Act and determined it appropriate to cease all applicable U.S. assistance directed to the Government of Fiji. This decision covers approximately $2.5 million in primarily military-related assistance, such as the Foreign Military Financing (FMF) and International Military Education and Training (IMET) programs. This action further precludes new economic assistance programs to the government of Fiji under the Foreign Operations Appropriations Act, including the Millennium Challenge Account. The United States has suspended all deliveries and sales of lethal military equipment to Fiji, official visits to the United States, and participation by senior Fiji military and government officials in U.S. sponsored events in third countries. The United States has also suspended the Fiji military’s participation in and planning for joint military exercises and U.S.-sponsored conferences and courses. Visa sanctions have been imposed on coup and interim government leaders. These measures will remain in place until the President or Secretary of State determines that a democratically-elected government has taken office. Other U.S. actions taken in response to the coup are subject to further review as circumstances in Fiji merit.

Hong Kong

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

0

0

0

$0.00

12

12

8

$31,537

Totals:

0

0

0

$0.00

12

12

8

$31,537

The United States is committed to strengthening the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region’s (HKSAR) autonomous structures. The HKSAR government police, maritime, and flying services are all highly professional organizations with little to no contact with their mainland counterparts. It is in the USG interest to see that these entities are capable of remaining independent from the mainland. Training of this nature helps to cement the already strong relationship in existence between the United States and Hong Kong government forces.

Indonesia

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

ALP

1

1

1

$5,764

0

0

0

$0.00

CTFP

115

112

20

$535,891

0

0

0

$0.00

FMS

1

1

1

$13,965

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

111

111

7

$525,781

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-1

91

73

57

$1,649,518

0

0

0

$0.00

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

60

60

1

$50,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-SA, UC

237

237

5

$1,710,147

104

104

5

$1,971,000

Regional Centers

17

17

10

$159,363

23

23

11

$206,968

Section 1004

625

625

17

$2,159,000

15

15

1

$100,000

Totals:

1258

1237

119

$6,809,430

142

142

17

$2,277,968

As the world’s fourth most populous nation, and the country with the largest Muslim population, Indonesia has considerable influence in Southeast Asia. Indonesia is undergoing an historic transition to democracy while attempting to foster economic recovery and reform; it is critical that military reform keep pace with broader democratic reform. Indonesia’s future political and economic path will have profound implications for U.S. strategic interests in the region such as combating terrorism, preserving regional stability in Southeast Asia, strengthening democracy and respect for human rights, and expanding access for U.S. exports and investment. Our IMET program and other engagement activities are designed to enhance military professionalism, improve interoperability (critical in disaster relief, peacekeeping, and other operations), and provide opportunities for Indonesian military and civilian personnel to attend courses in, and have other exposure to, our norms of civil-military relations, defense budget formulation, military reform, and respect for internationally recognized human rights.

The Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) is providing important training and education to assist Indonesia in combating terrorism. This program brings together counterparts from different countries and agencies across the counterterrorism (CT) spectrum. Through this cross-fertilization Indonesia is building a more comprehensive approach to addressing its particular concerns in combating terrorism; other countries in the region are gaining an understanding of the challenges, successes, and failures of CT efforts in Indonesia; and the United States is building Indonesia’s long-term CT capacity.

The United States welcomes the continued participation of Indonesia in the Asia-Pacific Center’s executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Indonesia.

Kiribati

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

0

0

0

$0.00

4

4

3

$27,903

Totals:

0

0

0

$0.00

4

4

3

$27,903

As a means of strengthening defense ties with Kiribati, the United States welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. These courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Kiribati.

Korea, Republic of

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Exchange

16

11

14

$0.00

0

0

0

$0.00

FMS

1083

689

536

$4,084,871

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

12

12

2

$56,027

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-SA, UC

440

440

3

$301,277

634

634

5

$1,039,000

PME

3

3

3

$64,786

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

11

11

8

$13,522

56

56

11

$14,515

Service Academies

4

4

4

$71,033

2

2

1

$0.00

Totals:

1569

1170

570

$4,591,516

692

692

17

$1,053,515

Since the Korean War, the Republic of Korea (ROK) has proven a strategically important and reliable defense treaty ally. While efforts to reduce tensions on the Korean Peninsula are underway, the United States and the ROK continue to maintain and strengthen the three major elements of our security alliance: the 1953 Mutual Defense Treaty, strong bilateral ties, and combined military forces. U.S. and ROK forces unified under the Combined Forces Command continue to enhance their capabilities to deter and, if necessary, defeat aggression. To sharpen readiness, the Command is continually refining its vigorous program of training and exercises.

A key objective of U.S. training is maintaining the strong sense of shared values and purposes that underlies the U.S.-ROK alliance. Toward that end, the United States and the ROK signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for professional military education (PME). The PME Reciprocal Exchange Program is comprised of an annual exchange with the Army Command and General Staff College (CGSC) and United States Marine Corps (USMC) Command and Staff College and a bi-annual exchange with the Air Command and Staff College. In addition to these programs, the ROKAF receives an additional annual slot at the Joint Forces Staff College. The ROK services receive one National Defense University slot each year and the ROKA and the ROKAF each receive an annual U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Senior Service College slot. The ROKN receives one Naval Command College and one Naval Staff College slot per year.

The United States welcomes the continued participation by ROK in the Asia-Pacific Center’s executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from the ROK.

Laos

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

GPOI

1

1

1

$7,343

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-1

4

4

2

$22,514

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

9

9

4

$48,033

13

13

8

$136,709

Section 1004

40

40

1

$100,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

54

54

8

$177,890

13

13

8

$136,709

Since FY 2001, the United States has offered the Government of Laos an IMET program to teach English in Laos to a limited number of Lao military personnel. The Lao accepted the offer in principle in January 2007, and in June 2007 the USG used IMET funds to pay for a three-member Lao delegation to visit English-language and medical training facilities in the U.S. The United States anticipates that English-language training will begin in FY 2008, when two Lao military students attend the Defense Language Institute. The graduates would either serve as defense attaches at the Lao Embassy in Washington, DC, or as the nucleus of an English-language laboratory in Laos itself. Medical training would strengthen Laos’s own capacity to deal with public health threats such as avian influenza and HIV/AIDS. Both of these activities reinforce efforts to undertake modest yet direct engagement with the Lao military—an institution that historically has been averse to contact with the U.S.

In FY 2007, visiting U.S. military physicians and health specialists conducted two “expert exchanges” with Lao officials, on avian influenza (involving 135 Lao attendees, half military) and on emergency medical response / nursing care / cleft lip surgery (involving one senior Lao military officer and 12 officials from a military hospital). In FY 2008 the United States intends to hold additional “expert exchanges” aimed at strengthening Laos’s capacity to deal with public health threats. The United States also plans to conduct an exchange on unexploded ordnance (UXO) removal, to enhance Laos’s capacity to clear land of cluster munitions—which directly reinforces existing U.S. funded programs aimed at strengthening Laos’s UXO-clearance capacity.

Representatives of the Lao government attended the executive course at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in FY 2007 and will be invited to continue their participation in FY 2008. The Asia-Pacific Center’s executive courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. They increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Laos.

Malaysia

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

CTFP

113

112

13

$368,606

0

0

0

$0.00

FMF

2

2

2

$21,147

0

0

0

$0.00

FMS

61

52

17

$337,526

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

20

20

3

$136,675

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-1

80

55

69

$1,182,160

0

0

0

$0.00

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

110

110

1

$120,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-SA, UC

210

210

6

$1,205,223

290

290

7

$1,924,000

Regional Centers

15

15

8

$144,921

34

34

10

$254,893

Section 1004

380

380

11

$2,214,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Service Academies

3

3

2

$71,033

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

994

959

131

$5,801,290

324

324

17

$2,178,893

The United States has important security interests in Malaysia, which is currently chair of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC). A key counterterrorist partner, Malaysia borders and helps to safeguard one of the world’s most important maritime waterways. U.S. military response to the Aceh tsunami crisis benefited from transit rights over Malaysian territory and access to Malaysian airfields.

IMET has contributed significantly to the strengthening of our military-to-military ties and familiarizes the Malaysian military with U.S. doctrine, equipment, and management techniques. IMET training also reinforces the Malaysian military’s commitment to human rights and good civil-military relations and helps expand our access to, and cooperation with, Malaysian military leaders. Malaysia participates actively in, and provides other nations training for, multinational peacekeeping operations, which necessitates U.S.-funded training that promotes interoperability. It is also engaged in training that will improve the military’s ability to combat narcotics trafficking and money laundering operations.

The Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) has provided important training and education to assist Malaysia in integrating its interagency approach to combating terrorism, with a focus on enhancing maritime security. This program brings together counterparts from different countries and agencies across the counterterrorism spectrum and, through this cross-fertilization process, builds a more comprehensive approach to addressing regional concerns in combating terrorism.

The United States welcomes the continued participation by Malaysia in the Asia-Pacific Center’s executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Malaysia.

Marshall Islands

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

2

2

2

$28,298

9

9

8

$75,769

Section 1004

15

15

1

$100,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

17

17

3

$128,298

9

9

8

$75,769

As a means of strengthening ties with the Marshall Islands, the U.S. welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from the Marshall Islands.

Micronesia

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

3

3

2

$42,447

9

9

8

$75,769

Section 1004

30

30

1

$20,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Service Academies

3

3

2

$6,711

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

36

36

5

$69,158

9

9

8

$75,769

As a means of strengthening ties with Micronesia, the United States welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Micronesia.

Mongolia

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

CTFP

1

1

1

$1,940

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

240

240

4

$1,122,316

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-1

128

108

48

$1,240,353

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

42

42

19

$258,141

50

50

10

$203,436

Totals:

411

391

72

$2,622,750

50

50

10

$203,436

Continued support of Mongolia’s transformation into a secure, democratic, and stable country greatly serves the U.S. national interest. This support facilitates Mongolia’s contribution to the security and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific region, its participation in international peacekeeping, and support for Operations Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Enduring Freedom (OEF), as well as its participation in the War on Terror. For a modest investment Mongolia has become a reliable Coalition Partner.

With a trained cadre and training equipment provided from the now defunct Enhanced International Peacekeeping Capabilities (EIPC) program, the Mongolian General Staff established a Department of Peacekeeping Operations that developed and trained a Mongolian peacekeeping battalion for participation in international peacekeeping deployments and multinational training events. Building on this experience, Mongolia has deployed peacekeeping forces to Iraq, Afghanistan, Sierra Leone, and Kosovo, and has contributed military observers to UN peacekeeping missions in other countries. With Global Peace Support Operations Initiative (GPOI) funding, Mongolia improved its Five Hills peacekeeping training facility and hosted the regional capstone peacekeeping training exercise in August 2007. Funds from the Coalition Solidarity Fund are being used to purchase equipment that will increase the deployment capabilities of the current peacekeeping battalion and lay the groundwork for the planned standup of a second battalion.

IMET training for Mongolia promotes civilian control of the military, military justice and law, and respect for international human rights standards. IMET funded language and professional military training not only strengthen U.S.-Mongolian military ties but continue to build a cadre of pro-U.S. reformers in the most critical leadership positions in the armed forces. IMET programs have been largely responsible for the English language skills of the Mongolian officers and NCOs deployed in Iraq. The commanders of all the rotations to Iraq have been IMET graduates. IMET-funded coursework included training in infantry, engineer, health care specialists, quartermaster, defense management, ranger, civil military relations, and senior service education. The State Partnership Program between Mongolia and Alaska also contributed to Mongolia’s training, including through Medical Readiness exercises.

The United States welcomes the continued participation by Mongolia in both the Asia-Pacific Center and the Marshall Center’s regular and executive courses that focus on the peacetime aspects of security and international relations. These executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Mongolia.

Nauru

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

0

0

0

$0.00

3

3

2

$15,027

Totals:

0

0

0

$0.00

3

3

2

$15,027

As a means of strengthening ties with Nauru, the United States welcomes its participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Nauru.

Niue

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

0

0

0

$0.00

2

2

1

$2,150

Totals:

0

0

0

$0.00

2

2

1

$2,150

As a means of strengthening ties with Niue, the United States welcomes its participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Niue.

Palau

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

2

2

2

$28,298

5

5

4

$40,780

Service Academies

1

1

1

$71,033

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

3

3

3

$99,331

5

5

4

$40,780

As a means of strengthening ties with Palau, the United States welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Palau.

Papua New Guinea

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

IMET-1

52

43

14

$260,744

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

2

2

2

$22,088

8

8

8

$79,403

Totals:

54

45

16

$282,832

8

8

8

$79,403

U.S. national interests in Papua New Guinea (PNG) derive from our overarching interest in regional stability and from PNG’s status as home to one of the world’s greatest remaining tropical rain forests and biodiversity reservoirs. PNG is the largest and most populous island nation in the South Pacific and neighbor to the troubled Indonesian province of Irian Jaya. U.S. interests include strengthening democratic institutions, assisting with development of disaster relief capabilities, supporting peaceful transition from civil strife to rule of law in Bougainville, supporting the nation’s pursuit of free enterprise, and fostering stewardship of diverse natural resources. The benefits of a stable, lawful, and prosperous PNG include reduced prospects of human rights violations, environmental degradation, and international organized crime.

Normalized military-to-military relations were resumed in November 2003, and U.S. Embassy Port Moresby was instructed to dampen any expectations that this meant significantly increased U.S. activity, funding, or military presence in PNG. Each proposed military-to-military activity will be reviewed on its merits by the appropriate U.S. government departments.

FY 2007 IMET funded activities continued to focus on professional military education (PME) for the PNG Defense Force (PNGDF), contributing to better discipline, and increasing PNG’s ability to engage in cooperative international military-related efforts, including peacekeeping. FY 2008 IMET will focus on training non-commissioned officers for the PNGDF.

The United States welcomes the continued participation of Papua New Guinea in the Asia-Pacific Center’s executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Papua New Guinea.

Philippines

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

ALP

1

1

1

$5,459

0

0

0

$0.00

CTFP

17

17

10

$520,332

0

0

0

$0.00

FMF

72

68

14

$752,937

0

0

0

$0.00

FMS

2

2

2

$26,296

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

3

3

1

$14,007

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-1

318

227

225

$3,873,013

0

0

0

$0.00

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

60

60

1

$50,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-SA, UC

900

900

7

$6,129,677

700

700

8

$3,109,000

Regional Centers

25

25

13

$204,746

47

47

11

$218,799

Section 1004

780

780

18

$2,817,000

120

120

2

$511,000

Service Academies

8

8

3

$345,808

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

2186

2091

295

$14,739,275

867

867

21

$3,838,799

The Government of the Philippines is a key player in the War on Terror. In her September 14, 2005 address to the UN Security Council, Philippine President Arroyo said the United States had helped the Philippines combat terrorism. Various terrorist groups including the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) and the Communist Party of the Philippines/New People’s Army (CPP/NPA) are based in the Philippines and have targeted Philippine facilities, killing both Philippine and U.S. citizens. In October 2002, the United States government designated the Jemaah Islamiyah (JI) organization a Foreign Terrorist Organization. JI is an extremist group with cells operating throughout Southeast Asia, including the Philippines. JI members recently arrested in the region have revealed links with al-Qaeda, other regional terrorist groups, and previous terrorist attacks in the region. The Moro Islamic Liberation Front, which is active in the southern islands, is believed to have some ties to ASG and JI, but is currently observing a cease-fire during peace negotiations with the Philippine government. Since August 2006, the AFP has been engaged in a major counterterrorism (CT) offensive against Al Qaeda-linked ASG and JI terrorists on the southern island of Jolo. This offensive has achieved some remarkable successes, including the neutralization of ASG leaders Khadafy Janjanjani and Abu Solaimna, both of whom are responsible for the deaths of American citizens.

Building on longstanding bilateral counterterrorism cooperation and stemming from commitments made during President Arroyo’s visits to the United States and President Bush’s October 2003 visit to Manila, the United States and the Philippines have embarked on a comprehensive military-to-military program to enhance the Armed Forces of the Philippines’ (AFP) capability to combat terrorism. As U.S. military cooperation under this counterterrorism program grows, IMET funds have become an even more important part of the effort to maintain and enhance the professionalization of the AFP.

The Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) is providing important training and education to assist the Philippines in combating terrorism. This program brings together counterparts from different countries and agencies across the CT spectrum. Through this cross-fertilization, the Philippines is building a more comprehensive approach to addressing its particular concerns in combating terrorism; other countries in the region are gaining an understanding of the challenges, successes, and failures of CT efforts in the Philippines; and the United States is building the Philippines’ long-term CT capacity.

In addition to our counterterrorism cooperation with the Philippines, the United States has important security, commercial, and political interests in the Philippines, a treaty ally that straddles important air and sea-lanes. As a nation-state committed to democratic political principles and a regional leader, a stable Philippines is an important force for stability in Southeast Asia. The Philippines is committed to close relations with the United States in support of regional peace and security in Southeast Asia. It seeks to promote regional, economic, and political cooperation through the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the ASEAN Regional Forum, and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

IMET funds have contributed to overall regional stability and positively influenced the Philippine military’s professionalism and discipline. IMET training also has helped further strengthen civilian control over the military, contributing to a decline in the number of reported incidents of human rights abuses. The steady advancement of IMET graduates helps ensure the continued understanding and cooperation of the Government of the Philippines on U.S. views toward regional issues. IMET graduates who populate the top ranks of the AFP contribute to building the close professional military-to-military relations that exist between the U.S. military and the AFP. With the Visiting Forces Agreement (VFA) in force, the U.S. military is actively engaged in ship visits and joint training exercises with the AFP.

These cooperative bilateral military activities constitute important steps toward normalizing our military-to-military ties and increasing interoperability and standardization with the AFP. It also enables the AFP to defend the national borders against external aggression, counter Communist and Muslim separatist insurgencies, participate in regional peacekeeping operations, and combat terrorism. In support of these goals, and in keeping with our treaty ally relationship, Philippine officers have participated in a range of operational, officer training, and leadership courses. These include courses related to aviation, aircraft maintenance, field artillery, expeditionary warfare training, psychological operations, ranger operations, signals, supply, service and maintenance, the Medical Strategic Leadership Program, and other similar courses.

Officer professionalization and leadership development are the aims of Command & Staff College and military law courses. Such training increases Philippine military exposure to the U.S. system of civil-military relations and respect for human rights. Staff officer and related courses are aimed at increasing Philippine officers’ ability to participate effectively with the United States in international peacekeeping and related operations. A Joint Defense Assessment (JDA) conducted by the U.S. and Philippine militaries of the AFP’s status and capabilities was accepted in September 2003 by President Arroyo as the basis for a further expansion of military cooperation through the jointly-funded Philippine Defense Reform (PDR) program. The Department of National Defense in November 2004 deposited $17.45 million in a Foreign Military Sales account as its initial contribution to PDR.

DoD has also funded Philippine participation in joint exercise training and a military training team assessment of defense needs and requirements. These also increase interoperability and provide the Philippines with a realistic assessment of how to shape their defense strategy.

As another means of strengthening our defense cooperation with the Philippines, the United States welcomes continued Philippine participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from the Philippines.

Samoa

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

IMET-1

41

41

1

$35,537

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

1

1

1

$14,149

4

4

3

$23,183

Totals:

42

42

2

$49,686

4

4

3

$23,183

The U.S. national interests in Samoa are related to the U.S. government’s national security interests in regional stability. Samoa is a close neighbor of American Samoa, with which it has long-standing ties. In FY 2007, IMET funded a Disaster Planning Mobile Education Team for participants from various Samoan ministries.

As a means of strengthening ties with Samoa, the United States welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Samoa.

Singapore

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

CTFP

2

2

1

$3,880

0

0

0

$0.00

DOHS/USCG

1

1

1

$8,295

0

0

0

$0.00

FMS

714

641

298

$45,918,957

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

3

3

1

$14,007

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-SA, UC

120

120

1

$284,829

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

10

10

6

$7,921

13

13

9

$16,143

Service Academies

8

8

4

$274,775

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

858

785

312

$46,512,663

13

13

9

$16,143

Singapore’s prosperous economy and extensive cooperation on a broad range of issues have made it an important U.S. security partner and an important force for stability and economic progress in Southeast Asia. In 2005, President Bush and Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong signed the “Strategic Framework Agreement” (SFA), which formalizes and enhances an already robust security relationship. The SFA serves as a statement of principles to guide our bilateral security relationship and reflects the convergence of strategic views between our two countries. The value of the familiarity, interoperability, and access afforded by our close military relationship was apparent during the rapid and successful mobilization of U.S. forces for the Indian Ocean tsunami relief operation in 2005. Singapore has supported efforts to bring stability and security to Iraq. The Singaporean government has deployed a C-130 transport plane and continues to rotate Landing Ship Tanks and KC-135s to provide logistics support for the multinational Iraq stabilization effort. Singapore deployed a dental team and bridge construction team to Afghanistan in support of a Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT) in 2007. In 2009, Singapore will open a regional Command and Control (C2) center that will facilitate effective C2 for exercises, contingency ops and Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief efforts.

Singapore has been unfailing in its support for continued U.S. forward deployment in the region, including the provision of ready access to its military facilities following closure of U.S. bases in the Philippines. Singapore augmented at its own expense its pier at the Changi Naval Base to accommodate U.S. aircraft carriers. Singapore has provided staunch military support for the War on Terror since the September 11 attacks, including blanket overflight clearance and tanker fueling to form an air bridge in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Approximately 150 U.S. logistics personnel stationed in Singapore support regular combined air exercises and more than 100 U.S. ship visits in a typical year. Singapore turns to the United States for approximately 85 percent of its total imports of military equipment. Our robust collaborative partnership stretches across all services and into the respective national labs in pursuit of mutually beneficial technologies.

Strengthening our defense ties with Singapore has included FMS training, participation at U.S. Service Academies, and improved interoperability through combined exercises with U.S. forces. The United States proposes further strengthening of our ties with Singapore in all these areas in FY 2008.

Singapore is a major FMS training customer and has training detachments in the continental United States. It has 48 open FMS training cases supporting 1,000 students a year. Singapore’s new F-15SG detachment should be in place in FY08. The US Navy will provide qualification training for Singapore to use its new S70s as well as helicopter-ship integration training between the S70s and Singapore’s newly acquired French Frigates. Singapore’s HIMARs purchase is also likely to involve on-the-job training / familiarization training to improve interoperability with U.S. forces.

The United States welcomes the continued participation by Singapore in the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies (APCSS) executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Singapore.

Solomon Islands

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

IMET-1

7

5

4

$57,634

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

0

0

0

$0.00

5

5

4

$40,780

Totals:

7

5

4

$57,634

5

5

4

$40,780

U.S. national interests in the Solomon Islands emphasize strengthening the nation’s capabilities to secure its maritime borders, encouraging its democratic institutions, and preserving its biodiversity. Though the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI) has restored law and order to the country and is deemed by many to be a stunning success, the continued U.S. engagement in the Solomons is all the more important as it works with its Pacific Island neighbors to revitalize its security capabilities and rebuild systems of governance.

Continued IMET training will ensure meaningful U.S. participation in the international effort to bring the Solomon Islands back from the brink of complete collapse. It also increases the country’s ability to maintain control of its own fishery resources. To these ends, IMET-funded courses have focused on maritime and aviation issues.

The United States welcomes the continued participation of the Solomon Islands in the Asia-Pacific Center’s executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from these islands.

Taiwan

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

FMS

510

367

242

$7,622,890

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

4

4

3

$7,771

3

3

2

$5,784

Service Academies

14

14

6

$274,775

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

528

385

251

$7,905,436

3

3

2

$5,784

Consistent with the Taiwan Relations Act of 1979, it has been long-standing U.S. policy to make available to Taiwan defense articles and services to enable Taiwan to maintain a sufficient self-defense capability. This policy also seeks to reinforce regional stability. Training of Taiwan armed forces personnel can play a major role in the enhancement of Taiwan’s security. For senior professional military education, Taiwan has been approved in principle for slots at the Naval Command College, Army War College, and Air War College; one slot each at the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps Command and General Staff Colleges; and one NDU International Fellow. During FY 2007, Taiwan officers completed courses at the National Defense University, Army War College, and Air War College. Additional officers completed courses at the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps Command and Staff Colleges. These programs increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency and confidence.

Thailand

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

CTFP

85

83

15

$627,941

0

0

0

$0.00

FMS

1

1

1

$55,940

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-1

57

41

50

$994,131

0

0

0

$0.00

Misc DOD/DOS Non-SA

3

3

1

$6,746

0

0

0

$0.00

Non-SA, UC

239

239

4

$1,072,134

535

535

6

$2,125,000

Regional Centers

25

25

11

$176,044

31

31

12

$274,500

Section 1004

1075

1075

25

$3,811,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Service Academies

7

7

4

$345,808

2

2

1

$0.00

Totals:

1492

1474

111

$7,089,744

568

568

19

$2,399,500

The United States has significant commercial, political and security interests in Thailand. One of five treaty allies in Asia, Thailand hosts over 40 joint military exercises, provides crucial access to Thai facilities, and has contributed troops to United Nations peacekeeping and U.S.-led coalition operations. Thailand hosts Cobra Gold, our largest multi-national exercise in Asia, and, by so doing, allows us to engage not only with the Thai military, but also the militaries of Singapore, Japan, Indonesia, and others. Thailand has made critical contributions to the War on Terror, including allowing access to its airspace and bases for Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom as well as deploying military engineers and medical personnel to Iraq. In December 2003, Thailand was designated a Major Non-NATO Ally. Thailand permitted the United States to use Utapao Naval Air Station as the hub for relief operations in response to the December 26, 2004, tsunami that devastated the Indian Ocean region in Operation Unified Assistance.

Thailand has traditionally been one of the top recipients of IMET funds. Following the military coup d’etat of September 19, 2006, Thailand’s IMET program was suspended, as required by section 508 of the Foreign Operations Authorization Act. IMET funding for Thailand can resume once the Secretary of State certifies that Thailand is again led by a democratically elected government. IMET graduates dominate the top levels of Thailand’s Defense Ministry, Supreme Command headquarters, and all of the services. IMET assistance has helped to develop and maintain a professional Thai military that is capable of participating in international peacekeeping operations. Two U.S. educated and trained Thai Generals served as United Nations Transitional Administration in East Timor (UNTAET) force commanders. The Thai General who served as Deputy Chief of the EU-ASEAN Interim Monitoring Mission in Aceh was an IMET graduate.

The Regional Defense Combating Terrorism Fellowship Program (CTFP) provides important training and education to assist Thailand in integrating its approach to combating terrorism. This program brings together counterparts from different countries and agencies across the counterterrorism (CT) spectrum. CTFP resources are used to engage the Royal Thai Government at the highest levels (such as the Director of the National Security Council) as well as at the decision-maker and action officer level. Efforts are focused on niches perceived to be weak points, including interagency cooperation, information sharing, and institutional knowledge bases in specific areas related to countering terrorism. Every effort is made to ensure that CTFP resources are not duplicative with other USG programs and resources, and instead is synergistic, focusing on areas not otherwise addressed. As a result, CT cooperation with Thailand is consistently rated by USG officials as excellent and, with continued CTFP assistance, the RTG capacity to support greater cooperation with more skilled personnel with increased interagency coordination can be improved even more.

Thai officers have traditionally attended U.S. service academies. Although funding for new enrollment has been suspended since the coup, service academy attendance has traditionally provided an invaluable means to foster long-standing ties with the Thai military and to provide in-depth exposure to the U.S. system of civil-military relations, military law, and related issues. The Thai military has expressed interest in participating in the OSD-sponsored Defense Resource Management Study (DRMS). This program’s intent is to work with the host-nation military to design a multi-year resource management model tailored to the specific requirements and unique aspects of that country. OSD is considering this request.

The United States welcomes the continued participation by Thailand in the Asia-Pacific Center for Strategic Studies’ (APCSS) senior executive, junior executive, and comprehensive security responses to terrorism (CSRT) courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Thailand as well as bridge differences among civil and military leaders from participating countries.

Timor-Leste

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

IMET-1

36

31

11

$226,650

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

0

0

0

$0.00

5

5

3

$50,229

Totals:

36

31

11

$226,650

5

5

3

$50,229

Timor-Leste has established a modest defense force (F-FDTL) comprised of about 730 active duty personnel. Although Timor-Leste’s security will ultimately depend in large measure on good relations with neighboring countries, the country requires armed forces with a defined mission and basic equipment for defense, support, communication, disaster management, humanitarian relief, and transportation. As the military is less than five years old and is rebuilding after the security crisis of April-May 2006, the F-FDTL needs training for its new officers. International Military Education and Training (IMET) and Enhanced International Military Education and Training (E-IMET) funds will provide opportunities for civilian and F-FDTL attendance at courses that discuss transparent, efficient, and effective budgeting, logistics, acquisition, and resource management processes. It will also provide opportunities for civilian and F-FDTL attendance at courses that emphasize the principles of a civilian-led military, respect for human rights, and the law of war. This training will help institutionalize these concepts in the Ministry of Defense and the military, and assist the Government of Timor Leste in establishing effective and sustainable defense management systems. In FY 2007, the IMET-funded training Timor-Leste received focused on English language training, engineer training, shipyard management and port security.

Tonga

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

FMS

55

55

2

$939,290

0

0

0

$0.00

GPOI

39

39

2

$182,088

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-1

14

9

13

$128,362

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

3

3

3

$32,183

5

5

5

$57,306

Service Academies

2

2

2

$142,066

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

113

108

22

$1,423,989

5

5

5

$57,306

The Kingdom of Tonga, a highly traditional society where the King and nobles dominate political life, interacts with the United States mainly in such Pacific organizations as the Pacific Community, the Forum Fisheries Agency, and the South Pacific Regional Environment Program. U.S. interests in Tonga include encouraging democratic institutions and assisting in environmental protection efforts. IMET is an important vehicle for pursuing U.S. interests.

Tonga joined other regional nations (New Zealand, Australia, Vanuatu, and Fiji) in 1999 in providing unarmed peace monitors once a truce was achieved in Papua New Guinea’s Bougainville. Tonga sent troops to Solomon Islands as part of the Regional Assistance Mission. In June 2004, they sent a unit of 45 troops to Iraq for peacekeeping duties. IMET provides professional military education (PME) and training to Tonga’s Defense Force with emphasis on respect for human rights, civilian control over the military and military justice. IMET also helps to support Tonga’s ability to contribute to regional peacekeeping endeavors and contributes to Tonga’s development of an effective maritime law and surveillance capability through training in peacekeeping operations and international maritime search operations. FY 2007 IMET continued to focus on PME training for its defense forces.

The United States welcomes the continued participation of Tonga in the Asia-Pacific Center’s executive courses, which are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Tonga.

Tuvalu

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Regional Centers

1

1

1

$14,149

8

8

7

$66,431

Totals:

1

1

1

$14,149

8

8

7

$66,431

As a means of strengthening ties with Tuvalu, the United States welcomes its continued participation in the Asia-Pacific Center’s courses, designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations. The executive courses increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with officials from Tuvalu.

Vanuatu

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

IMET-1

7

5

6

$48,852

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

1

1

1

$14,149

6

6

5

$50,118

Totals:

8

6

7

$63,001

6

6

5

$50,118

U.S. national interests in Vanuatu center on strengthening the nation’s democratic institutions. Other interests include building Vanuatu’s capacity to secure its maritime borders and encouraging programs that protect the island’s environment and fragile natural resources.

The small Vanuatu Mobile Force (VMF) must patrol a vast area of ocean. U.S. Coast Guard training supplements Australian and New Zealand programs and upgrades VMF capabilities. Continued IMET funding for maritime officer training also helps improve force discipline and enhance its effectiveness in regional peacekeeping and disaster relief efforts.

Vietnam

FY 2007

FY 2008

Program

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

Training

Sessions

Individual

Students

Course

Count

Dollar

Value

IMET-1

2

1

2

$30,138

0

0

0

$0.00

IMET-X

2

1

2

$30,063

0

0

0

$0.00

Regional Centers

7

7

7

$48,271

56

56

12

$145,075

Section 1004

160

160

2

$290,000

0

0

0

$0.00

Totals:

171

169

11

$398,472

56

56

12

$145,075

U.S. national security will be served by a stable, fully integrated Vietnam with increasing economic prosperity and trade relations with the United States. The United States seeks to enhance Vietnam’s ability to be a constructive regional player by encouraging Hanoi’s active participation in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), the ASEAN Regional Forum, the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) group, in its expected term on the UN Security Council in 2008-9, in regional search and rescue (SAR) and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HA/DR) activities, and other strategic dialogues and cooperation. Vietnam chaired APEC in 2006.

The United States can also improve trust through steady expansion of military-to-military contacts, involvement of Vietnam in peacekeeper training through the Global Peace Operations Initiative (GPOI), exchanges of senior military officials, and additional U.S. Navy ship visits (Vietnam hosted four U.S. Navy ship visits in 2007).

In June 2005, the United States and Vietnam concluded a section 505 agreement on end-use assurances under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, which permitted IMET funds for Vietnam to be spent for the first time. IMET support focused on English language instruction. The U.S. provided $86,000 in IMET funding in FY 2006 and $282,000 in FY 2007. In June 2005, Prime Minister Phan Van Khai and Former Defense Secretary Rumsfeld agreed to explore broader military-military cooperation; Defense Secretary Rumsfeld, in his June 2006 trip to Vietnam, reaffirmed the U.S. commitment to exploring broader military-military cooperation. In August 2007, the Joint Interagency Taskforce West (JIATF-W) participated in joint counternarcotics training with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. JIATF-W provided instruction in emergency medical procedures. Vietnamese participants included officers involved in counternarcotics enforcement activities from Customs, Border Army, Maritime Police and Ministry of Public Security.

The Asia-Pacific Center will continue to invite representatives from Vietnam to reinforce our defense cooperation and foster links with other regional partners and neighbors. The executive courses are designed to focus on the non-warfighting aspects of security and international relations and increase awareness and understanding of U.S. policies, leading to increased trust, transparency, and confidence. The courses also allow U.S. officers to build lasting relationships with their counterparts from Vietnam.



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