printable banner

U.S. Department of State - Great Seal

U.S. Department of State

Diplomacy in Action

2013 To Walk the Earth in Safety: Asia


Report
Bureau of Political-Military Affairs
August 1, 2013

Share

Date: 2012 Description: The Swiss Foundation for Mine Action (FSD) leads a munitions clearance and destruction project in Tajikistan.  © Photo courtesy of FSD
The Swiss Foundation for Mine Action (FSD) leads a munitions clearance and destruction project in Tajikistan.

Already the largest and most populous continent, Asia has the highest rate of population growth in the world. Asia also has experienced rapid economic growth and development in recent decades. However, the region has faced extreme natural disasters and internal challenges including poverty, corruption, and poor governance. Large gaps exist between the relative wealth of developed nations such as Japan and South Korea and that of developing nations, such as Cambodia and Sri Lanka. Persisting through decades of armed conflicts since World War II, explosive remnants of war affect the daily lives of people throughout Southeast Asia. The continent contains the country most heavily bombed per capita, Laos, and the world’s most heavily mined country, Afghanistan. U.S. conventional weapons destruction programs have provided more than $628 million to support mine clearance, small arms and light weapons and munitions control, and victim assistance programs throughout the region.

Afghanistan

After decades of conflict, Afghanistan has one of the world’s highest levels of contamination from landmines and explosive remnants of war (ERW). Contamination is mainly the result of the 1979 Soviet invasion, internal armed conflict from 1992 to 2001, and the U.S.-led Coalition’s intervention in late 2001, which added considerable quantities of unexploded ordnance (UXO). As of February 2013, the Mine Action Coordination Center of Afghanistan (MACCA) estimated the number of hazards at 4,734, affecting over 523 million square meters (202 square miles) and 1,717 communities. Although Afghanistan boasts one of the most established mine action programs in the world, the recent release of land from Taliban strongholds has resulted in the identification of 33 additional hazardous areas. This reemphasizes the need for donor funding and increased attention to the severity of the problem affecting the civilian population and the socioeconomic success of Afghanistan as a whole.

Date: 2012 Description: Two disabled men are fitted with prosthetics at an orthopedic center in Kabul, Afghanistan.  © Photo courtesy of Akmal Dawi/IRIN
Two disabled men are fitted with prosthetics at an orthopedic center in Kabul, Afghanistan.

Through FY2012 the United States has invested more than $271 million in conventional weapons destruction (CWD) programs in Afghanistan aimed at the clearance and safe disposal of landmines, UXO, and excess weapons and munitions. Directed through several Afghan and international partner organizations, this assistance has made significant progress toward restoring access to land and infrastructure, developing Afghan capacity to manage such programs independently, and protecting Afghan communities from potential risks.

In FY2012 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) provided $40,550,000 to Afghanistan for CWD programs that cleared landmines and UXO, provided mine risk education (MRE), delivered victim assistance, and enhanced host-nation capacity. More specifically, PM/WRA funded the following organizations and activities:

  • Afghan Technical Consultants continued mine action operations, with emphasis on landmine clearance in east, southeast, and central provinces. Clearance operations included 13 manual demining teams, two mechanical demining units, five mine detection dog (MDD) teams, and three explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) teams.


  • Clear Path International supported 10 subgrant recipients that expanded integrated victim assistance initiatives throughout the north, east, and south regions of Afghanistan. Victim assistance projects included rehabilitation services, programs to enhance access to public buildings and facilities, and vocational rehabilitation training for landmine survivors.


  • Danish Demining Group continued and expanded clearance operations in the Panjshir Valley, using two survey and impact monitoring teams and 10 manual clearance teams.


  • Demining Agency for Afghanistan (DAFA) core operations in Kabul, Kapisa, and Nangarhar provinces used the following assets: 16 demining teams, four mechanical demining units, two EOD teams, and five MDD teams. DAFA also oversaw three competitively bid community-based demining (CBD) projects in Panjwai and Zhari districts of Kandahar and the Kajaki district, Helmand.


  • DynCorp International completed six remaining operational months of current contractual agreements. These operations provided oversight of mine clearance projects, the mentoring of five national nongovernmental organizations (NGO), and the management of seven CWD EOD teams.


  • The HALO Trust (HALO) continued ongoing demining operations, using 24 manual demining teams, six manual clearance units, 12 mechanical clearance teams, two battle area clearance teams, one EOD team, and two survey teams. Funding also continued to support and expand the weapons and ammunition disposal program in Afghanistan with three disposal teams, three survey teams, and one Ministry of Defense support team.


  • Mine Clearance Planning Agency continued mine clearance operations in Khost, Logar, Nangarhar, Paktiya, and Parwan provinces of Afghanistan, using 18 demining teams, five MDD teams, two EOD teams, four mechanical demining units, and five CBD teams.


  • Mine Detection Center (MDC) deployed four MDD teams, two demining teams, one EOD team, 24 CBD teams, and one community-based EOD team. MDC also continued its CBD project in Now Zad district, Helmand.


  • Organization for Mine Clearance and Afghan Reconstruction deployed 15 demining teams, eight MDD teams, and one mechanical demining unit in Kabul, Logar, Nangarhar, and Parwan. Funding also supported an MRE program at the East River Firing Range in Bagram, Parwan.


  • Sterling International (now Sterling Global) provided oversight of mine clearance projects, mentored five NGOs, and managed seven CWD EOD teams.


  • United Nations Mine Action Service supported the Mine Action Program for Afghanistan with particular emphasis on developing host-nation capacity through the Department of Mine Clearance.

In FY2012, the U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, in partnership with HALO, continued evaluations of equipment valued at $1 million. The technologies continue to clear mines and perform technical surveys in villages and agricultural areas throughout Afghanistan. The equipment includes the Orbit Screen, which sifts mine-contaminated soil; several sifting excavator attachments; the Mantis, an armored area-preparation and mine-clearance tractor; and the Raptor, an armored tractor with the Rotary Mine Comb anti-tank mine clearance attachment. These systems have cleared more than 2,500,000 square meters (618 acres) of land and found more than 28,000 mines and items of UXO to date.

Burma

Burma suffers from extensive landmine contamination resulting from decades of internal conflict. The central government and some ethnic minority forces laid mines, and they now share the view that mines are impediments to peace and development. Reports indicate a reduction in new mine placement, though mines are still deployed in conflict areas. No complete estimate of the extent of contamination exists, although suspected hazardous areas have been identified by the Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor. Mines are believed to be concentrated on Burma’s borders with Bangladesh and Thailand. Explosive remnants of war (ERW) contamination dating back to World War II also affects the country. From 1999 to 2011 the Landmine and Cluster Munition Monitor identified 3,242 casualties from landmine and ERW incidents in Burma, but total casualty numbers are unknown.

Burma is currently developing mine action standards; however, the government of Burma has not legally approved survey and clearance activities in the country at this time. The government of Burma has taken steps to permit humanitarian mine action activities and has established the Myanmar Mine Action Centre. The Ministry of Health does not distinguish mine and ERW incidents from trauma incidents, and a lack of suitable healthcare infrastructure leaves many victims without access to treatment. However, some survivors have received assistance through rehabilitation centers in Burma and near the border in Thailand.

In FY2011 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) invested $90,000 in a pilot program in Burma aimed at improving the lives of mine and ERW survivors and mitigating the negative impact of the country’s contamination by conducting mine risk education (MRE).

In FY2012 PM/WRA granted $828,286 in assistance to Burma for programs that provided MRE and victim assistance as follows:

  • DanChurchAid continues to conduct MRE and victim assistance activities.


  • Humpty Dumpty Institute continued its MRE and victim assistance programs that began in FY2011.


  • World Education, Inc. improved the capacity of a prosthetics workshop in Kayah state.
     

Cambodia

Nearly three decades of armed conflict left Cambodia severely contaminated by landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO). During the various Indochina wars, the Khmer Rouge, the Royal Cambodian Armed Forces (RCAF), the Vietnamese military, and to a lesser extent the Thai army, were responsible for laying extensive minefields. These minefields are especially concentrated in the western part of the country, most notably in the dense K-5 mine belt along Cambodia’s border with Thailand. The eastern and northeastern areas of Cambodia are heavily contaminated with UXO, mostly from U.S. air and artillery strikes during the Vietnam War and also from numerous land battles fought along the border with Vietnam. International donors fund more than 90 percent of mine and UXO clearance in Cambodia.

Date: 2012 Description: A Golden West Humanitarian Foundation team in Cambodia moves a 2,000 pound bomb, which was later destroyed.  © Photo courtesy of Golden West Humanitarian Foundation
A Golden West Humanitarian Foundation team in Cambodia moves a 2,000 pound bomb, which was later destroyed.

From FY1993 to FY2012 the United States invested more than $85 million in Cambodia for clearance and safe disposal of mines and UXO, as well as to improve the lives of mine/UXO survivors and increase access to land and infrastructure.

During FY2012 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s (DOS) Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) provided $5,493,899 to Cambodia for conventional weapons destruction (CWD) programs to clear mines and UXO and provide mine risk education (MRE) and victim assistance as follows:

  • Clear Path International implemented projects that improved the socioeconomic status of survivors with disabilities from UXO incidents by providing professional skills training and infrastructure development.


  • Golden West Humanitarian Foundation (GWHF) operated its Explosive Harvesting System (EHS), supported PM/WRA regional initiatives related to CWD, and provided underwater demining training to representatives of the Cambodia Mine Action Authority.


  • The HALO Trust (HALO) conducted clearance activities in mine-affected districts in Cambodia.


  • Landmine Relief Fund administered a subgrant to maintain a clearance team operated by Cambodia Self-Help Demining, an indigenous organization that operates in villages overlooked by larger, multi-national, nongovernmental, clearance organizations.


  • MAG (Mines Advisory Group) conducted clearance and community liaison activities in rural communities in northwest Cambodia.


  • Spirit of Soccer delivered MRE messages to children living in high-risk regions of western Cambodia by providing soccer training in conjunction with MRE.


  • Sterling International (now Sterling Global) provided technical advisors to consult, manage, and disburse funds to the Cambodia Mine Action Center and provide explosive ordnance disposal support to RCAF.


  • U.S. Embassy Phnom Penh administered a fund to assist in destroying man-portable air-defense systems (MANPADS) discovered in RCAF stocks.

In FY2012 U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) deployed four subject-matter experts to Cambodia to conduct a program development visit to analyze and develop future humanitarian mine action (HMA) train-the-trainer events. In support of this mission, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) Humanitarian Demining Training Center (HDTC) also deployed two subject-matter experts to Cambodia.

In addition, USPACOM conducted two HMA blast-injury training missions in Cambodia during FY2012. During the two missions, 44 Cambodian medics were trained. USPACOM funding for the program development visit and blast-injury training missions totaled $235,000. Overseas Humanitarian Disaster Assistance and Civic Aid funded HDTC travel costs, totaling $21,945.

With funding and support of both the DOS and the DOD Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, HALO and MAG continued their operations with and evaluations of the dual-sensor Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System (HSTAMIDS) in manual mine-clearance of densely cluttered minefields. During evaluations in partnership with the HD R&D Program, HSTAMIDS cleared 4.6 million square meters (1.8 square miles) of land and detected 23,000 anti-personnel mines. HSTAMIDS accurately discriminated 9.8 million detections as metallic clutter, saving 10–15 minutes of excavation for each. The HD R&D Program advanced the rapid investigation of clutter, currently performed with long-handled tools, by beginning an evaluation of the Wolverine Mine Tiller with MAG in late FY2012. The remote-controlled Wolverine is equipped with a power harrow attachment for engaging the ground and providing rapid quality assurance. The long-handled tools and Wolverine Mine Tiller follow HSTAMIDS clearance in minefields with high metallic clutter concentrations, where cleared minefields are not metal-free and require a secondary mechanical process for quality assurance and quality control.

The HD R&D Program initiated several new detection technology evaluations in Cambodia in FY2012. In mid-FY2012, HALO began an evaluation of the Minehound, a dual-sensor handheld detector that uses ground-penetrating radar and metal detection technology to locate mines and UXO. To date, the Minehound has cleared more than 130,000 square meters (32 acres) of land and found 197 mines. Also in FY2012, GWHF began intensive in-country testing and evaluation of the Luxor and Scorpion UXO detection systems. Luxor integrates UPEX large loop coils with real-time kinematic global positioning system geo-referenced mapping capability on a remote-controlled all-terrain vehicle. The system is designed to provide a quick survey of a suspected hazardous area to identify and locate buried UXO. The Scorpion is a lightweight man-portable system that complements the Luxor with its ability to operate in either the same area or in areas too small for the Luxor to operate. HD R&D will continue evaluations of the Luxor and Scorpion in Cambodia with MAG in FY2013.

In primary mechanical mine and vegetation clearance, the HD R&D Program continued operational field evaluations with HALO and MAG of the Badger tracked excavator, the Storm steep-slope excavator, the Nemesis remote-controlled skid-steer, and the Rex small remote-controlled tracked excavator. Together these technologies have cleared 561,000 square meters (139 acres) of vegetation and suspect soil, finding 869 mines and items of UXO.

The HD R&D Program, in partnership with GWHF, continued support of the innovative EHS in Cambodia. The EHS and Mobile Cutting System (MCS) process large projectiles and mines, and recast the explosive into small disposal charges for in situ mine/UXO neutralization. The MCS renders UXO safe in the field, enabling the explosive to be recovered. Together the systems have processed 14,056 items of ordnance, recovering 33,000 kilograms (72,753 pounds) of explosives for a total of 280,000 disposal charges. The effort has also recovered 89,000 kilograms (196,211 pounds) of metal for safe recycling. Total HD R&D assistance in Cambodia is valued at $4 million.

Kyrgyzstan

In addition to landmine contamination along its border with Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan faces risks from unsecured and deteriorating weapons and munitions stockpiles remaining from the dissolution of the Soviet Union. In March 2011 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA), the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), and the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) conducted a joint survey and assessment of ammunition storage facilities in Kyrgyzstan to determine the current condition of small arms and light weapons (SA/LW), conventional ammunition, and man-portable air-defense systems (MANPADS). While the overall physical security is of serious concern, degraded and deteriorating ammunition poses immediate danger to civilians because storage sites are located close to populated areas. In all cases, storage facilities were in such poor condition that they provided only minimum protection from adverse weather. This, in turn, adds to the risk of explosive residue from decaying ammunition contaminating soil and water tables around storage sites. Professional training and financial assistance can mitigate the imminent threat of a depot explosion.

In February 2012 the United States expressed its pledge to provide funding to OSCE-Bishkek to support a Kyrgyzstani physical security and stockpile management (PSSM) program. In FY2012 the United States provided OSCE-Bishkek with $500,000 in support of this program. To date, this funding has been utilized for renovation of and upgrades to explosive storage facilities, destruction of excess and unserviceable munitions, and training programs in support of PSSM initiatives. The European Union, Finland, Kazakhstan, and the United Kingdom have also provided funds in support of ongoing projects. This combined assistance will develop a national regulatory framework for the management of SA/LW and conventional ammunition stockpiles that meets and adheres to OSCE and U.N. best practices; mitigates the threat to civilians from unplanned depot explosions with infrastructure development and facility modernization; trains and educates the Kyrgystani military to adhere to weapons and ammunition storage procedures based on explosive classification and compatibility standards; and facilitates destruction of excess, unserviceable, or unsafe weapons and weapon systems.

At the request of OSCE, the DTRA SA/LW Program conducted three PSSM seminars in Bishkek and Osh in February and March 2012. The seminars were sponsored by OSCE-Bishkek, and the team provided international PSSM best practices and procedures training to more than 60 members of the Ministry of Defense of Kyrgyzstan. DTRA instructors were assisted by a subject-matter expert from the Swedish EOD and Demining Centre. The goal of the seminars was to improve Kyrgyzstan’s PSSM procedures by providing a forum for international best practices on safe storage and stockpile management of arms, ammunition, and explosives (AA&E). These seminars were part of an OSCE Comprehensive Project on SA/LW and Conventional Ammunition in Kyrgyzstan. The DTRA SA/LW Program and the Swedish Arms Control Agency have collaborated and coordinated AA&E assistance activities through the Multinational Small Arms and Ammunition Group for several years.

Laos

Date: 2012 Description: Farmers in Khammouan province, Laos, harvest crops from cleared land.  © Photo courtesy of MAG
Farmers in Khammouan province, Laos, harvest crops from cleared land.

Laos is the most heavily bombed country per capita in the world, a result of the Indochina Wars of the 1960s and 1970s. While landmines were laid in Laos during this period, unexploded ordnance (UXO), such as cluster munitions, called “bombies,” represent a far greater threat to the population. Most of the country’s 17 provinces are contaminated by UXO, and population growth in rural areas and other socioeconomic factors intensify demands to put UXO-contaminated land into production, which in turn leads to increased risk of death and injury.

Since 1993, the United States has invested $62,061,333 in conventional weapons destruction (CWD) programs in Laos for clearance and safe disposal of mines and UXO as well as survivor assistance and risk education. Directed through several international partner organizations and UXO Lao, a national clearance operator, CWD programs have made significant progress toward restoring access to land and infrastructure, increasing national capacity to manage such programs independently, providing invaluable support to UXO survivors, and protecting Laotian communities from potential risks.

Date: 07/2012 Description: Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visits with Phongsavath Souliyalat at COPE Center in Vientiane, Laos, during her July 2012 visit.  - State Dept Image
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton visits with Phongsavath Souliyalat at COPE Center in Vientiane, Laos, during her July 2012 visit.

In FY2012 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) provided $9,233,333 to Laos for CWD programs that cleared mines and UXO and provided mine risk education (MRE) and victim assistance as follows:

  • Catholic Relief Services trained village first responders and disseminated MRE materials in two provinces.


  • Clear Path International implemented its integrated mine action and victim assistance programs, which support and advance the development, inclusion, and integration of persons with disabilities through education, training, and income generation.


  • The HALO Trust conducted UXO clearance in Savannakhet province.


  • Health Leadership International provided portable ultrasound machines and trained Laotian health workers on ultrasound procedures in mine-affected districts.


  • MAG (Mines Advisory Group) continued work begun in FY2011, conducting survey and clearance operations in Xiengkhouang and Khammouane provinces, and contributed to a European Union-funded UXO contamination survey called the District Focused Approach.


  • Norwegian People’s Aid conducted survey and clearance operations in approximately 30 villages deemed high-impact in Xekong province.


  • Spirit of Soccer conducted a sports-centered MRE program aimed at children in high-impact areas.


  • Sterling International (now Sterling Global) supported the oversight and management of UXO Lao clearance teams as well as technical capacity development of UXO Lao and the National Regulatory Authority.


  • World Education worked to improve the ability of the Xiengkhouang first responder and trauma care systems to care for UXO accident victims and other patients. World Education also issued a subgrant to the nongovernmental organization Legacies of War to conduct a UXO awareness-raising speakers tour throughout the United States.

In FY2012, U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) deployed four subject-matter experts to Laos to conduct a program development visit to analyze and develop future humanitarian mine action train-the-trainer events. Funding for travel related costs totaled $32,645.

The U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Training Center (HDTC) also deployed two subject-matter experts to Laos in support of USPACOM’s program development visit. Overseas Humanitarian Disaster Assistance and Civic Aid funded the HDTC travel costs, totaling $21,945.

Palau

The Republic of Palau is contaminated with unexploded ordnance (UXO) dating back to World War II. The majority of the contamination is on the island of Peleliu, which saw fierce combat between American and Japanese forces in late 1944. UXO contamination exists elsewhere in the island nation where U.S. forces bombarded Japanese bases.

The Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) began conventional weapons destruction assistance to Palau with an $85,000 grant in FY2009 to the United Kingdom-based nonprofit Cleared Ground Demining (CGD). In FY2012 PM/WRA provided $150,000 to CGD to conduct battle area clearance on sites along Bloody Nose Ridge on Peleliu and to conduct UXO spot task removal throughout the country.

Solomon Islands


Date: 2012 Description: Members of the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force are trained in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) by Golden West Humanitarian Foundation. Here, two of the EOD team members cut a World War II-era projectile at the team's EOD facility at Hell's Point on Guadalcanal.  Photo courtesy of Dave Hardison, PM/WRA, U.S. Dept. of State.
Members of the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force are trained in explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) by Golden West Humanitarian Foundation. Here, two of the EOD team members cut a World War II-era projectile at the team’s EOD facility at Hell’s Point on Guadalcanal. Photo courtesy of Dave Hardison, PM/WRA, U.S. Dept. of State.

The Solomon Islands are contaminated by unexploded ordnance (UXO) remaining from World War II. In FY2012 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) granted $566,667 to Golden West Humanitarian Foundation (GWHF) to continue providing International Mine Action Standards Level 2 Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) training and technical oversight to the Royal Solomon Islands Police Force’s EOD team.

In 2012 the U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program began an operational field evaluation of the Badger armored excavator with GWHF. The evaluation took place in the Solomon Islands on Guadalcanal where U.S. and Japanese forces fought during World War II. With a suite of attachments for removing thick, mature tropical vegetation, deeply buried UXO, and abandoned explosive ordnance (AXO), the Badger began operations in mid-FY2012 to provide access to EOD teams to locate and clear UXO and AXO at Hells Point. This UXO and AXO contamination has long been a source of “fish bomb” material that endangers local populations and destroys fishing grounds. Valued at $325,000, the Badger cleared 305,000 square meters (75 acres) of extremely dense jungle vegetation in difficult terrain and found 602 items of UXO and AXO in FY2012.

Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka is contaminated by landmines and explosive remnants of war (ERW) remaining from more than three decades of armed conflict between the government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), which sought a separate homeland in the north and east. After the war ended in 2009, demining activities immediately commenced; however, mine and ERW contamination remains a critical impediment to the resettlement of internally displaced persons (IDP) and development initiatives. According to the U.S. Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration, approximately 116,000 IDPs remain in the country. The vast majority of IDPs live with host families while others live in welfare centers and transit camps. The widespread presence of mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) presents an ongoing threat to the safety of returnees and the long-term security of Sri Lanka.

Date: 2012 Description: Morning safety briefing for Mine Action Team 10, an all-female demining team funded by PM/WRA in Mullativu district, Sri Lanka. Of the 360,000 IDPs all but 6,000 have been able to return home and safely rebuild their lives thanks to the work achieved by MAG, other NGOs, and Sri Lankan military clearance teams.  © Photo courtesy of Sean Sutton/MAG
Morning safety briefing for Mine Action Team 10, an all-female demining team funded by PM/WRA in Mullativu district, Sri Lanka. Of the 360,000 IDPs all but 6,000 have been able to return home and safely rebuild their lives thanks to the work achieved by MAG, other NGOs, and Sri Lankan military clearance teams.

From FY2002 through FY2012 the United States invested more than $35 million in conventional weapons destruction (CWD) programs in Sri Lanka to clear and safely dispose of mines, UXO, and excess weapons and munitions. Directed through several international partner organizations, this assistance has made significant progress toward restoring access to land and infrastructure, developing national capacity to manage CWD programs independently, and protecting communities from potential risks.

In FY2012 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) provided $4.8 million to Sri Lanka for CWD programs that cleared landmines and UXO and provided mine risk education (MRE) as follows:

  • Danish Demining Group deployed seven manual demining teams, one survey team, and three mechanical ground preparation teams to clear land in the northern and eastern provinces for emergency resettlement.


  • The HALO Trust returned more than 500,000 square meters (124 acres) of land to communities for emergency resettlement in northern and eastern Sri Lanka.


  • MAG (Mines Advisory Group) returned more than one million square meters (247 acres) of land to communities for emergency resettlement in northern and eastern Sri Lanka.


  • Marshall Legacy Institute provided training and mentoring to the Sri Lanka Army’s Humanitarian Demining Unit mine detection dog program.


  • Fondation Suisse de Déminage (Swiss Foundation for Mine Action) returned more than 700,000 square meters (173 acres) of land to communities for emergency resettlement in northern and eastern Sri Lanka.


  • UNICEF provided MRE to resettling communities.

In FY2012 U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) deployed four subject-matter experts to Sri Lanka to conduct a program development visit to analyze and develop future humanitarian mine action train-the-trainer events. Funding for travel-related costs totaled $42,047. The U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Training Center (HDTC) deployed two experts to Sri Lanka in direct support of USPACOM’s program development visit. Overseas Humanitarian Disaster Assistance and Civic Aid funded the HDTC travel costs, totaling $9,229.

Also in FY2012 the U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, in partnership with MAG, continued an evaluation of the Improved Backhoe system. The equipment, valued at $220,000, provides area preparation, area reduction, and mine clearance capabilities to release villages and agricultural land to returning IDPs. The Improved Backhoe has cleared vegetation from 68,000 cubic meters (88,941 cubic yards) of land and sifted 40,000 cubic meters (52,318 cubic yards) of soil, uncovering 1,600 mines.

Tajikistan

Date: 2012 Description: FSD staff in Tajikistan place shells in an incinerator to be destroyed.  © Photo courtesy of FSD
FSD staff in Tajikistan place shells in an incinerator to be destroyed.

Landmine contamination in Tajikistan remains along the Tajikistan-Afghanistan border from the Soviet Army’s border defense operations during its 1979–1989 occupation of Afghanistan and in central areas of Tajikistan from the 1992–1997 civil war. Uzbekistan also continues to mine the Tajikistan-Uzbekistan border piecemeal, with new minefields created as recently as 2012. As a result of years of conflict, as well as the porous border with Afghanistan, a large quantity of ammunition and weapons in Tajikistan are poorly secured, hindering national and regional security.

Through FY2012 the United States has invested more than $6.8 million in conventional weapons destruction (CWD) programs in Tajikistan for clearance and the safe disposal of landmines, unexploded ordnance (UXO), and excess weapons and munitions.

In FY2012 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) provided $1,691,120 to Tajikistan for CWD programs that cleared landmines and UXO, developed host-nation capacity, and provided victim assistance as follows:

  • Fondation Suisse de Déminage (Swiss Foundation for Mine Action or FSD) continued CWD activities, including land survey and explosive remnants of war clearance, through the deployment of one multi-purpose demining team. FSD continued the deployment of two weapons and ammunition disposal (WAD) teams to conduct operations in coordination with the government of Tajikistan. To date, Tajikistan’s Ministry of Defense (MOD) has given FSD approximately 100 tons of ammunition for destruction and is promising another 100 tons in the near future. FSD also contributed to the development of victim assistance programs and information management within the Tajikistan Mine Action Centre (TMAC).


  • Norwegian People’s Aid expanded manual mine clearance capacities and technical survey operations along the Tajikistan-Afghanistan border.


  • Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) strengthened national humanitarian demining capacities and their operational deployment along the Tajikistan-Afghanistan border.

Also in FY2012, the U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, in partnership with Tajikistan’s MOD, TMAC, the U.S. Embassy’s Office of Military Cooperation, and OSCE, completed a field-trial evaluation of the Mini MineWolf, a remote-controlled, earth-tilling system capable of clearing anti-personnel and anti-tank landmines. With the help of the Mini MineWolf, the demining team surveyed and cleared 532,000 square meters (132 acres) of land and found or destroyed 793 mines and items of UXO along the Tajikistan-Afghanistan border.

Using Foreign Military Financing (FMF), Tajikistan’s MOD procured its own Mini MineWolf, delivered in 2011. In 2012 the MOD requested to include an additional year of field service support, a remote camera, and a mobile maintenance workshop, expected for delivery in late spring 2013. This FMF grant assistance totals $1.2 million. In coordination with OSCE, the U.S. Embassy is also requesting $100,000 in extra budgetary funding for additional parts and spares, and is exploring long-term parts assistance and the eventual incorporation of the mechanical and manual demining groups into MOD’s peacekeeping unit as a deployable U.N. niche capability.

Additionally, the Leahy War Victims Fund of the U.S. Agency for International Development provided $1.5 million to Tajikistan in FY2012 to strengthen the country’s rehabilitation services.

Thailand

Threatening national and regional security, Thailand’s borders with Burma, Cambodia, Laos, and Malaysia are contaminated with landmines and explosive remnants of war. The 700 kilometer (435 mile) Thai-Cambodian border still contains extensive contamination—including ammunition and grenade caches, mortar shells, and unexploded ordnance—left behind by Cambodian non-state actors in the 1980s and 1990s.

In FY2012 the U.S. Department of Defense Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program partnered with the Thailand Mine Action Center to continue operational field evaluations of several mechanical technologies in Thailand. The technologies that concluded evaluations, including the remote-controlled Tempest, Survivable Demining Tractors, and Uni-Disk Excavator, have cleared 6.4 million square meters (2.5 square miles) of suspected hazardous areas over the last decade. Evaluations of the small remote-controlled Wolverine Vegetation Cutter and Beaver Mini-excavator continued, clearing vegetation from 460,000 square meters (114 acres) to date. Total assistance is valued at $1.5 million.

Vietnam

As a result of 30 years of conflict, extending from World War II through the Vietnam War, virtually all of Vietnam is contaminated to some extent by explosive remnants of war (ERW). The most heavily contaminated provinces are Quang Tri and Quang Binh, along the former Demilitarized Zone, and Ha Tinh, north of Quang Binh. Mined areas also remain in some parts of southern Vietnam, as well as along its border with China. A 2008 report by Vietnam’s Ministry of Labor, Invalids, and Social Affairs (MoLISA) claimed that ERW and landmines killed 38,849 and injured 65,852 people from 1975 to 2007. The Vietnamese government is demonstrating a gradual openness to greater activity in the mine action sector, evidenced by the opening of Quang Nam province to mine action activities in 2012.

From FY1993 through FY2012 the United States invested almost $65.5 million in Vietnam to clear and dispose of landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO), assist landmine and UXO survivors, improve access to land and infrastructure, and support the development of national capacity for conventional weapons destruction (CWD). In FY2012 the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Political-Military Affairs (PM/WRA) provided $4,032,296 to Vietnam for CWD programs as follows:

  • Catholic Relief Services continued mine risk education (MRE) and victim assistance in Quang Tri and Quang Binh.


  • Clear Path International implemented integrated victim assistance projects in 19 provinces.


  • Golden West Humanitarian Foundation (GWHF) provided expert consulting to the Center for Bomb and Mine Disposal Technology (BOMICEN) and the Vietnam Bomb and Mine Clearance Action Center (VBMAC). GWHF also supported the deployment of technology funded by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD).


  • International Center of the Vietnam Veterans of America Foundation continued to provide technical advice and support to BOMICEN and VBMAC.


  • Humpty Dumpty Institute supported “Mushrooms with a Mission,” a microcredit program aimed at the socioeconomic reintegration of survivors.


  • MAG (Mines Advisory Group) continued mobile ERW clearance in Quang Binh and expanded its mobile ERW clearance into Quang Nam.


  • Norwegian People’s Aid (NPA) managed a provincial mine action database in Quang Tri.


  • PeaceTrees Vietnam maintained two mobile explosive ordnance disposal team operations in Quang Tri.


  • Vietnam Assistance Program arranged integrated risk education.

In FY2012 the U.S. DOD Humanitarian Demining Research and Development (HD R&D) Program, in partnership with MAG, continued an operational field evaluation of Vegetation Cutters, cutting 139,000 square meters (34 acres) of vegetation. The Vegetation Cutters provide critical access to manual clearance teams in densely vegetated areas. NPA, in partnership with the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund’s Project RENEW, evaluated an Armored Excavator in area-preparation and clearance roles. Total assistance is valued at $300,000.

More Support in Asia

Date: 2012 Description: White oyster mushrooms are being grown inside the Communal Grow House located in the Mushroom Center in Cam Lo district, Vietnam, as part of the Mushrooms with a Mission microcredit program. The communal growing house is intended to offer UXO-affected, poor families a unique and pleasant social environment in which to work and to earn good incomes.  © Photo courtesy of Project Renew
White oyster mushrooms are being grown inside the Communal Grow House located in the Mushroom Center in Cam Lo district, Vietnam, as part of the “Mushrooms with a Mission” microcredit program. The communal growing house is intended to offer UXO-affected, poor families a unique and pleasant social environment in which to work and to earn good incomes.

The U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) provided additional support in FY2012 in Asian countries that did not receive funding from other U.S. conventional weapons destruction programs.

In FY2012 DTRA provided the following support in Bangladesh and Turkmenistan:

  • Bangladesh: In March 2012, at the request of the U.S. Office of Defense Cooperation in Dhaka, the DTRA Small Arms and Light Weapons (SA/LW) Program conducted a physical security and stockpile management (PSSM) executive seminar in Bangladesh. The seminar oriented 25 senior decision-makers to international PSSM best practices and assisted them with improving the security, safety, and management of their SA/LW stockpiles.


  • Turkmenistan: At the request of the Organization for Security Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), the DTRA SA/LW Program led two multinational teams to Ashgabat, Turkmenistan, to conduct executive and technical level PSSM seminars. The seminars were sponsored by the OSCE Office in Ashgabat, and the teams trained more than 50 members from the Turkmenistan Ministry of Defense in best practices and procedures for arms, ammunition, and explosives storage safety and security. Instructors were coordinated through the Multinational Small Arms and Ammunition Group and included PSSM experts from DTRA, Canada, Germany, and Switzerland.

The USAID Leahy War Victims Fund also funded the following rehabilitation efforts in Asia:

  • Nepal received $1 million to improve the quality of rehabilitation treatment services through training and capacity building and to support treatment and community-based rehabilitation services for people with disabilities.


  • India was granted $300,000 to provide rehabilitative services and to build the capacity of approximately 1,000 rehabilitation professionals in eight conflict-affected north and northeastern states.



Back to Top
Sign-in

Do you already have an account on one of these sites? Click the logo to sign in and create your own customized State Department page. Want to learn more? Check out our FAQ!

OpenID is a service that allows you to sign in to many different websites using a single identity. Find out more about OpenID and how to get an OpenID-enabled account.