The Bureau of International Narcotics Matters (INM) was created in 1978 to reduce drug trafficking into the United States from Latin America.  INM’s mission soon expanded beyond combating drugs to supporting stabilization efforts in the Balkans, and to fighting corruption and transnational crime around the world.  To reflect its expanded mission, INM was re-established as the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) in 1995.

Today, INL uses a wide range of tools to counter crime, illegal drugs, and instability abroad, including foreign assistance, bilateral diplomacy, multilateral engagement, and reporting, sanctions, and rewards.  INL has two complementary core competencies: helping partner governments assess, build, reform, and sustain competent and legitimate criminal justice systems, and developing and implementing the architecture necessary for international drug control and cross-border law enforcement cooperation.  INL works with partner nations, international and regional organizations, non-governmental organizations, U.S. federal, state, and local criminal justice entities to achieve our mission. 

Offices

INL Front Office:

  • Strategy, Communications, and Outreach Unit (INL/FO/SCO)

Regional Offices:

  • Office of Afghanistan and Pakistan (INL/AP)
  • Office of Africa and the Middle East Programs (INL/AME)
  • Office of Europe and Asia Programs (INL/EA)
  • Office of Western Hemisphere Programs (INL/WHP)

Functional Offices:

  • Office of Global Programs and Policy (INL/GPP)
  • Office of Knowledge Management (INL/KM)
  • Office of Aviation (INL/A)
  • Office of Executive Management (INL/EX)

For press and outreach inquiries, please contact INL-PAPD@state.gov and follow the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs on Twitter and Facebook at @StateINL.

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